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WEGO World War II: Stalingrad

WEGO World War II: Stalingrad is the flagship of Brian Kelly's operational level, ground-centric, WEGOWW2 game system. Built on the framework of Desert War 1940-42, this hex-based wargame captures the drama of the epic German offensive to capture the industrial city of Stalingrad in the Summer of '42. It consists of a series of historical scenarios and campaigns that allow the players to explore the ebb and flow of the actual combat operations. It’s playable by both sides using hotseat, versus the AI, or Play By Email.

Recent NEWS

WEGO World War II: Stalingrad is coming soon

Aug. 10, 2021 - Brian Kelly's new operational level, ground-centric, WEGOWW2 game captures the drama of the epic…

Game SPECS

Brian Kelly
English
Operational
World War II
Eastern Europe
Advanced
Turn-Based WEGO
1-2
Present
PBEM
Operational

WEGO World War II: Stalingrad is the flagship of Brian Kelly's operational level, ground-centric, WEGOWW2 game system. Built on the framework of Desert War 1940-42, this hex-based wargame captures the drama of the epic German offensive to capture the industrial city of Stalingrad in the Summer of '42. It consists of a series of historical scenarios and campaigns that allow the players to explore the ebb and flow of the actual combat operations. It’s playable by both sides using hotseat, versus the AI, or Play By Email.
 

WEGOWW2: In many board and computer wargames, one side will move its units and resolve combat, followed by the other side repeating the process.  This game mechanic is known as IGOUGO ("I GO YOU GO"). WEGOWW2 is different.  WEGO by its nature is about the player's ability to plan for and manage chaos; to find solutions to perceived challenges and accomplish the mission with the tools at hand.  Despite the fog of war...against a thinking opponent who must problem-solve and plan under the same conditions-- Every decision you make must be carefully considered. Learn to think three moves ahead to outsmart your opponent!

WEGO World War II: Stalingrad 1942 comes with three campaigns. Each campaign consists of three to six linked scenarios. The game uses stylized maps of the Russian steppes over which a hexagonal grid system has been superimposed. This grid is employed to help regulate land unit placement, movement, and combat. Air, Naval, and Ground Assets are off-map capabilities that can be brought into play when the owning player sees fit.

Ground units range in size from company to regiment/brigade level and are represented on the game map using counters with stylized or NATO icons to display unit types.

Air assets represent air groups that can conduct counter-air, interdiction, air re-supply, bombardment, and ground support missions.  Air reconnaissance assets can collect information about enemy location, unit types and strengths.

Naval Assets represent the Soviet Volga River Flotilla.  These assets can conduct bombardment and ground support missions.

Ground Assets provide additional capabilities that can influence the outcome of on-map battles. Ground Assets include electronic warfare assets, command and control (C2) activities, and Special Forces.

Logistics Assets provide additional resources that can enhance the movement, combat, or  replacements priority to player selected units or organizations.

Ground Scales: There are two ground scales in the game. The operational maps use 2500 meters (~1.5 miles) per hex. The tactical level city maps of Stalingrad use 500 meters per hex.

Time Scales. The number of turns per day depends on the ground scale of the scenario. Scenarios that have a ground scale of 2500 meters per hex have five game turns per day. For example, game turns 1 through 4 are considered day turns (each ~five hours long); game turn 5 is a night turn (~four hours long). Scenarios that have a ground scale of 500 meters per hex have two turns per day (one day and one night).