**Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Adanac's Strategic level World War I grand campaign game designed by Frank Hunter

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Snowbart1943
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**Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Snowbart1943 »

Ok, here it is! Since GoA is such an intriguing strategy game, this thread has been created as an ersatz strategy manual! Knowledgeable players, please post those tips that you had to learn the hard way...........



I'll start it off, from a very recent post:

One production point for a Major power equals 3 for a Minor country(ie, you will need 9 production points to refit that Bulgarian HQ).
boogada
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by boogada »

- If you are playing the Central Powers and start with an France first strategy: Don't forget to declare war upon Luxemburg.
ILCK
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by ILCK »

You aren't confused...there is nothing to do on the National Orders screen on the first turn. I stared at that thing a long time before realizing there was nothing to do.

You can allocate unused airpower during each activation phase. You do not need to use all your points during the first phase despite the dialog making it seem like you do.

FrankHunter
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by FrankHunter »

Rail : On the first turn you don't have any because the mobilization phase is considered to have used it all.

If you're wondering why units you ordered to a hex didn't arrive and meanwhile that hex fell to the enemy, its because rail movement is resolved last and you can't rail units into an enemy hex.

Transferring raw materials and food between countries costs rail points.

British units in France use the French rail capacity when moving by rail.
Mike Dubost
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Mike Dubost »

Retyped from the earlier thread that inspired this one:

Use your arms points to provide replacements for existing units. Keeping them alive is better than replacing them as the new units will have lower quality.
Harrybanana
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Harrybanana »

To succeed against real players you need to learn and understand how land movement works. At the beginning of each impulse each land unit is individually checked for it's "movement rating" for that impulse. The factors involved in determining a unit's movement rating are:

1. Whether or not the unit is activated,
2. The units quality,
3. The units organization,
4. The units type (cavalry have the advantage here),
5. Whether or not the unit was ordered to witdraw (a withdraw order is slightly less effective than being activated),
6. The terrain in the unit's hex, and
7. The terrain in the hex the unit is ordered to move to.

Units are then moved in order from highest movement rating down to lowest.

If an enemy unit moves into a hex occupied by any of your units it freezes all unmoved units in place.

A unit will not move into a hex if doing so will cause the hex to be overstacked. (What I'm not sure of is if you order unit #1 to move into hex A which already has maximum stacking, while also ordering unit #2 to move from hex A to hex B, what happens if unit #1 has the higher movement rating. When it's turn to move comes it will not move into hex A as it would be overstacked, does it then get a second chance to move after unit #2 moves out?)

Understanding these rules suggests a few things such as:

1. If you have a stack of units that you fear are going to be attacked at disadvantageous (to you) odds you are probably generally better off just moving them rather than "withdrawing." The reason for this is that it is very unlikely that you will be able to "Withdraw" all of these units before an activated enemy unit enters the hex feezing in place the remaining units that have not yet moved. Since a withdrawal order lowers unit readiness it means your remaining units in the hex (perhaps even all of them if none sucessfully withdrew) are now going to be attacked at even worse odds. By just "moving" your units you are virtually guarenteed that either all of your units will defend in the hex together with no loss of organization or else (if the enemy does not in fact attack the hex) all your units will move together again without loss of organization.

2. Even if you only have 1 unit in a hex which you fear is going to be attacked by a stack of enemy units you are taking a big chance "withdrawing" the unit rather than just moving it. The reason for this is that if you have 1 unit to move out of a hex and the enemy is moving in 3 units, your odds of having a higher movement rating than all 3 enemy units, all things being equal, is only 25%.

3. Probably the only times it is worthwhile to give a "withdraw" order to a unit is if you believe that because of the unit's type, quality, organization, or terrain it is more likely to have a higher movement rating than the opposing units.

4. If you are attacking a weak enemy hex that you fear your enemy will be reinforcing from adjacent hexes, sometimes it is a good idea to attack these other hexes as well in an attempt to freeze the enemy units there so they can't reinforce the weak hex.

5. As a counterpoint to 4 above, it is often a good idea to have reserve units behind your lines that you can move into crucial areas of the front without the risk of being frozen in place by enemy attacks.
Robert Harris
ILCK
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by ILCK »

Play with the resource hexes on.

It is very easy to spend a lot of activation points, especially on the Eastern Front, and occupy a lot of empty space that does not do a lot to help you win the war. The hexes give you targets for offensives and also help you plan your defenses.
EdinHouston
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by EdinHouston »

If you are trying to force a nation to surrender, taking cities will hurt their morale far more than inflicting casualties. You can virtually wipe out a nation's army before it starts to impact morale significantly... whereas you take cities and they will surrender pretty quickly, regardless of the status of their army.

If you take a nation's capital, they seem to lose all production, both food and production points. This can be crippling, over and above the huge loss in morale associated with losing the city. This doesnt seem to apply to neutrals but it does apply to France, Austria and perhaps others.

Each cruiser on patrol increases the chances that you will intercept the enemy's fleet.

Combat units of different nationalities in the same hex (either attacking or defending) will reduce firepower by 25%.

EdinHouston
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by EdinHouston »

ORIGINAL: Harrybanana
...
A unit will not move into a hex if doing so will cause the hex to be overstacked. (What I'm not sure of is if you order unit #1 to move into hex A which already has maximum stacking, while also ordering unit #2 to move from hex A to hex B, what happens if unit #1 has the higher movement rating. When it's turn to move comes it will not move into hex A as it would be overstacked, does it then get a second chance to move after unit #2 moves out?)

if neither hex is attacked, my experience is that you can swap units between fully stacked hexes and they will move as desired. But as you point out above, if a hex is attacked, those units are locked in place, and so nothing can leave and additional units can not enter if the hex is fully stacked. Now if your units are higher quality and higher readiness than the enemy's, you may be able to move the units before your enemy's units move into your hex. But that is not normally the case, because attacking units tend to move first.

1. If you have a stack of units that you fear are going to be attacked at disadvantageous (to you) odds you are probably generally better off just moving them rather than "withdrawing." The reason for this is that it is very unlikely that you will be able to "Withdraw" all of these units before an activated enemy unit enters the hex feezing in place the remaining units that have not yet moved. Since a withdrawal order lowers unit readiness it means your remaining units in the hex (perhaps even all of them if none sucessfully withdrew) are now going to be attacked at even worse odds. By just "moving" your units you are virtually guarenteed that either all of your units will defend in the hex together with no loss of organization or else (if the enemy does not in fact attack the hex) all your units will move together again without loss of organization.

2. Even if you only have 1 unit in a hex which you fear is going to be attacked by a stack of enemy units you are taking a big chance "withdrawing" the unit rather than just moving it. The reason for this is that if you have 1 unit to move out of a hex and the enemy is moving in 3 units, your odds of having a higher movement rating than all 3 enemy units, all things being equal, is only 25%.

3. Probably the only times it is worthwhile to give a "withdraw" order to a unit is if you believe that because of the unit's type, quality, organization, or terrain it is more likely to have a higher movement rating than the opposing units.

4. If you are attacking a weak enemy hex that you fear your enemy will be reinforcing from adjacent hexes, sometimes it is a good idea to attack these other hexes as well in an attempt to freeze the enemy units there so they can't reinforce the weak hex.

5. As a counterpoint to 4 above, it is often a good idea to have reserve units behind your lines that you can move into crucial areas of the front without the risk of being frozen in place by enemy attacks.

Those are all good points. I usually only withdraw units when the odds combat is so uneven that you would likely lose the unit(s) anyway if you cant get away. And sometimes its worth using a Withdraw command simply because its imperative to move a unit into or out of a hex, for tactical or strategic reasons. Because of their generally higher quality, its easier for the Germans to withdraw than it is for nations with lower quality troops.
Snowbart1943
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Snowbart1943 »

Sometimes it is a good idea to 'give up the good ground' to your opponent.  You may for instance want to give up a mountain hex, as your opponent will be limited in further attacks from that hex. 
 
Keep DD's with your DN's as they will protect them from sub attacks.
 
Defend behind rivers if possible.  The enemies effectiveness will be impared if attacking you. 
 
Great thread, thanks to all and keep it up![:)] 
ILCK
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by ILCK »

ORIGINAL: Snowbart1943

Sometimes it is a good idea to 'give up the good ground' to your opponent.  You may for instance want to give up a mountain hex, as your opponent will be limited in further attacks from that hex. 

Along those lines, it costs the same activation points to "attack" an empty hex as an occupied hex. You can burn an opponents activation points without losing many men in this way. For example, in the Bukovina the Austrians can defend as far back as the Carpathians and force any Russians trying to advance in that region to burn 3 of their rare AP's just to reach the AH resistance.

On the flip side, cavalry is mostly useless but stacked with infantry you can let your cavalry lead you across large open tracts of land like on the eastern or Ottoman fronts and save you AP's for attacking cities or actual enemy units.
andyinkuwait
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by andyinkuwait »

ORIGINAL: ILCK

ORIGINAL: Snowbart1943

Sometimes it is a good idea to 'give up the good ground' to your opponent.  You may for instance want to give up a mountain hex, as your opponent will be limited in further attacks from that hex. 

Along those lines, it costs the same activation points to "attack" an empty hex as an occupied hex. You can burn an opponents activation points without losing many men in this way. For example, in the Bukovina the Austrians can defend as far back as the Carpathians and force any Russians trying to advance in that region to burn 3 of their rare AP's just to reach the AH resistance.

On the flip side, cavalry is mostly useless but stacked with infantry you can let your cavalry lead you across large open tracts of land like on the eastern or Ottoman fronts and save you AP's for attacking cities or actual enemy units.
I don't quite understand this strategy. If you are roaming your cav across the plains you are roaming with an inf unit that will need to be activated to move. Cav can only move into friendly hexes if stacked with inf but the inf will need to keep up with the cav and therefore will need to be activated to move. It doesn't seem to be saving any HQ points to use cav in this way or am I missing something?
EdinHouston
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by EdinHouston »

ORIGINAL: andyinkuwait

I don't quite understand this strategy. If you are roaming your cav across the plains you are roaming with an inf unit that will need to be activated to move. Cav can only move into friendly hexes if stacked with inf but the inf will need to keep up with the cav and therefore will need to be activated to move. It doesn't seem to be saving any HQ points to use cav in this way or am I missing something?

he means that you start with an inf/cav stack, advance the cavalry into an enemy hex, then the next impulse the infantry follows. Then the next impulse the cavalry moves again, and so on. It takes twice as long as using offensives, but its very effective way to take unoccupied ground without using offensives. You see a lot of this on the eastern front where large areas are not defended. The Russians in particular can do this because they have lots of cavalry, and because they dont have many HQs so they need to use them sparingly. (edit: actually the Russians have plenty of HQs, but they are only at strengths 1 and 2, and the weak Russian economy makes them very very hard to replace.)
hjaco
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by hjaco »

Included some hints I could remember:

1) In a France first remember to ship British IP to France to buy additional arms until their manpower pool is down. I think they get 50 or 60 manpower a turn the first years time. Otherwise France can quickly be attritioned out of the game.

2) In a France first Germany should go for killing the French Corps in turn one and two. Replenishing existing corps puts French manpower and arms directly in the front line where as a new built Corps takes time to arrive.

3) In a France first Germany should in any case strive to cause a French Exhaustion level alone for the 20 morale loss effect. If Germany goes for a limited offensive use artillery to help achieving this.

4) 2 and 3 combined means France will largely have to attack with C Corps at the best. Those attacks are easier to break up and any lost hex is easily recaptured especially if you have artillery reserves nearby.

5) Its better to reinforce existing corps than buying new corps with miserabel quality and taking time to build. Where possible reinforce Quality and perhaps most importantly units with high endurance. This instantly gives you most value for your reinforcements.

6) A flanking maneuver around Liege through Netherlands in a France first gives CP an additional food and bypasses Liege freeing up the siege artillery for Verdun. The Austrian should set up in the alps moving into position to begin reducing the French border forts from south. Liege looses its fortress status when the rest of the cities in Belgium have been taking (perhaps Bruxelles is enough?).

7) Try no to occupy food resources in an unconquered country during the strategy phase. Otherwise you are certain to loose that resource fast. After conquering that country you can always take control of the hex afterwards.

8) If you are nearing an exhaustion level try not to have too many activation points in your HQ. Each HQ looses one activation point when you suffer one exhaustion level.

9) Send French cavalry into the middle east in order to gobble up empty hexes. Serbia is another great place for that.

10) Cavalry are great to block free enemy cavalry advancement. This forces your opponent to pay for each hex with activation points.

11) An Entente strategy to hold onto Serbia using diplomacy on Romania is good in a CP Russian first strategy. Just one turns open connection from Scutari to Russia can keep Russia with enough food for several years time.

12) Remember to change base judiciously. IT greatly improves your naval units efficiency.

13) Newly build British transports will in any case have to cross the North Sea in order to reach the Atlantic. CP raiding cruisers or SUBS in the North Sea can be devastating in this case.

14) Italy looses double morale for lost cities. So loosing Milan, Mantua and Venice costs Italy 45 * 2 = 90 morale.

15) Russia only looses half morale for lost cities (halved down). This makes the Russian food hexes even more important.

16) The country liberating a city gains morale regardless who originally owned it i.e. the original owner gains nothing.

17) Gobbling up as many minors as possible is a good strategy for CP if you go for victory but it may hurt entry for America. Why? Each Entente major power suffers a random morale loss for each conquered minor (1 to 10 ?).
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Harrybanana
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Harrybanana »

ORIGINAL: hjaco

12) Remember to change base judiciously. IT greatly improves your naval units efficiency.


Could you elaborate on this Hjaco.
Robert Harris
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by hjaco »

Certainly.

Naval action is carried out at the very end of the strategy phase i.e. before the next turn begins. In each strategy phase there is 3 rounds of naval actions. Think of them as separate naval impulses.

Naval units going to/from their base spends one naval impulse to enter a new sea area. It is "free of charge" to enter/leave ports so naval Squadrons are considered to be in the sea area where their port is located in.

So a British DN in Scapa Flow with patrol orders for the North Sea to intercept German ships will automatically enter the North Sea immediately conducting search in the first naval impulse and each naval impulse thereafter.

Imagine the same British DN being ordered to patrol the Eastern Mediterranean to say hunt the Austrian fleet. Entering the North Sea will happen automatic and the 3 naval impulses in the same turn will be spent entering the Atlantic, Western Mediterranean and Eastern Mediterranean (3 sea zones = 3 naval impulses). In this example no naval impulse remains to execute the patrol mission i.e. searching for the Austrian fleet. So you have to wait until next turn in order to get that DN to search for the Austrian ships (if still there at that time [;)] )

So if that DN was based in Alexandria it would be able to search for full 3 impulses instead of using those impulses to travel that long distance.

Bottomline is base the necessary naval units next to where you need them. Say you concentrate on protecting the Atlantic as the Entente thereby abandoning any shipping attempts in the mediterranean and you can base all 12 French/British ships in Atlantic ports giving you far better chances to find those pesky SUBS. 12 DD times 3 impulses - even at low odds you stand a reasonable chance finding something. Whether you actually can sink something is another matter though.

It is equally important for the British to base your main fleet in an Atlantic port if you dismiss patrolling the North Sea. Each search attempt is crucial.

Hope this makes sense.
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lordhoff
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by lordhoff »

RE: Capitals lost = no production

Just wondering for Austria - do both capitals (Vienna and Buda-Pest) have to fall or just the German capital?
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Lascar
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Lascar »

ORIGINAL: lordhoff

RE: Capitals lost = no production

Just wondering for Austria - do both capitals (Vienna and Buda-Pest) have to fall or just the German capital?
Just Vienna needs to fall.
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lordhoff
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by lordhoff »

Just Vienna needs to fall.

Thanks.
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RE: **Unofficial GoA Hints and Tips thread**

Post by Harrybanana »

ORIGINAL: hjaco

Certainly.

Naval action is carried out at the very end of the strategy phase i.e. before the next turn begins. In each strategy phase there is 3 rounds of naval actions. Think of them as separate naval impulses.

Naval units going to/from their base spends one naval impulse to enter a new sea area. It is "free of charge" to enter/leave ports so naval Squadrons are considered to be in the sea area where their port is located in.

So a British DN in Scapa Flow with patrol orders for the North Sea to intercept German ships will automatically enter the North Sea immediately conducting search in the first naval impulse and each naval impulse thereafter.

Imagine the same British DN being ordered to patrol the Eastern Mediterranean to say hunt the Austrian fleet. Entering the North Sea will happen automatic and the 3 naval impulses in the same turn will be spent entering the Atlantic, Western Mediterranean and Eastern Mediterranean (3 sea zones = 3 naval impulses). In this example no naval impulse remains to execute the patrol mission i.e. searching for the Austrian fleet. So you have to wait until next turn in order to get that DN to search for the Austrian ships (if still there at that time [;)] )

So if that DN was based in Alexandria it would be able to search for full 3 impulses instead of using those impulses to travel that long distance.

Bottomline is base the necessary naval units next to where you need them. Say you concentrate on protecting the Atlantic as the Entente thereby abandoning any shipping attempts in the mediterranean and you can base all 12 French/British ships in Atlantic ports giving you far better chances to find those pesky SUBS. 12 DD times 3 impulses - even at low odds you stand a reasonable chance finding something. Whether you actually can sink something is another matter though.

It is equally important for the British to base your main fleet in an Atlantic port if you dismiss patrolling the North Sea. Each search attempt is crucial.

Hope this makes sense.

It does make sense Hjaco; but I assume this is only for the first turn you move the fleets to the sea area. Since fleets can stay at sea for a few turns I assume that during the subsequent strategic phases your fleets will get 3 full searches. Is my assumption correct?
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