Action This Day

Eagle Day to Bombing of the Reich is a improved and enhanced edition of Talonsoft's older Battle of Britain and Bombing the Reich. This updated version represents the best simulation of the air war over Britain and the strategic bombing campaign over Europe that has ever been made.

Moderators: Joel Billings, harley, warshipbuilder, simovitch

User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

7-7-44
467 Sqn RAAF (Waddington – Lancaster I/III)

Operating, on a similar programme as was to have been on yesterday - 18 taking part. All away. The target was St. LEU D’ESSERENT once again, as the effort on July 4/5th was not entirely satisfactory. It is hoped this time to put it completely out of action.

AUS404713 P/O AB BOYLE arrived today to commence his second tour.

During the day 2 flights, totaling 5 hours, were made.

ADDENDUM – Lancaster I LM219 PO-G. Crew: F/L RW Reynolds KIA, JD O’Driscoll RNZAF KIA, Sgt RJ Taylor KIA, F/S LJG Walsh RAAF EVD, F/S S Adams RAAF EVD, F/S HA Cummins RAAF KIA, Sgt GT Tipping KIA, F/S GG Podosky RAAF KIA. T/o 2221 Waddington. Shot down by any one of 4 LW pilots. Those who died rest in Marissel French National Cemetery.

ADDENDUM – Lancaster III LM338 PO-U. Crew: F/O PW Ryan RAAF KIA, Sgt GA Hayes KIA, W/O CC Jones RAAF KIA, F/S VE Cockcroft RAAF KIA, F/S LH Porritt RAAF KIA, F/S WDD Killworth RAAF KIA, F/S JP Steffan RAAF KIA. T/o 2222 Waddington. Shot sown by any one of 3 LW pilots, crashed at Courgent, 12 KM SSW from Mantes-la-Jolie. All lie in Courgent General Cemetery.

BOMBER COMMAND
NORMANDY BATTLE AREA


467 aircraft – 283 Lancasters, 164 Halifaxes, 20 Mosquitoes – of 1, 4, 6 and 8 Groups in a major effort to assist in the Normany land battle.

The Canadian 1st and British 2nd Armies were held up by a series of fortified village strongpoints north of Caen. The first plan was for Bomber Command to bomb these villages but, because of the proximity of friendly troops and the possibility of bombing error, the bombing area was moved back nearer to Caen, covering a stretch of open ground and the northern edge of the city. The weather was clear for the raid, which took place in the evening, and two aiming points were well marked by Oboe Mosquitoes and other Pathfinder aircraft. The Master Bomber, Wing Commander S. P. (Pat) Daniels of 35 Squadron, then controlled a very accurate raid. Dust and smoke soon obscured the markers but the bombing always remained concentrated. 2,276 tons of bombs were dropped.

It was afterwards judged that the bombing should have been aimed at the original targets. Few Germans were killed in the area actually bombed, although units near by were considerably shaken. The northern suburbs of Caen were ruined. No German fighters appeared and only 1 Lancaster, of 166 Squadron, was shot down by Flak. 2 further Lancasters and 1 Mosquito crashed behind the Allied lines in France. (For statistical purposes, Bomber Command aircraft which were recorded as having crashed in France, and later in other reoccupied countries in Europe, will be considered as ‘lost’, as it was unlikely that the aircraft would be salvaged for later use, although the crews often returned safely to England.)

7/8 July 1944
ST-LEU-D’ESSERENT

208 Lancasters and 13 Mosquitoes, mainly from 5 Group but with some Pathfinder aircraft, attacked a flying-bomb storage dump in a group of tunnels (formerly used for growing mushrooms). The bombing was accurately directed on to the mouths of the tunnels and on to the approach roads, thus blocking access to the flying bombs stored there.

German night fighters intercepted the bombing force and 29 Lancasters and 2 Mosquitoes were lost, 14.0 percent of the force. 106 Squadron, from Metheringham, lost 5 of its 16 Lancasters on the raid and 630 Squadron, from East Kirkby, lost its commanding officer, Wing Commander W. I. Deas, who was flying his 69th operation. Wing Commander Deas was killed and is buried in a small cemetery at Omer-ville, north-west of Versailles.

VAIRES
123 Lancasters and 5 Mosquitoes of 1 and 8 Groups carried out an accurate raid on the railway yards without the loss of any aircraft.

SUPPORT AND MINOR OPERATIONS
106 aircraft of 1, 3, 5 and 93 Groups on a diversionary sweep almost to the coast of Holland, 7 Mosquitoes of 5 Group dropping ‘spoof’ markers in support of the St-Leu-d’Esserent raid, 32 Mosquitoes to Berlin and 9 to Scholven/Buer, 48 aircraft on R.C.M. sorties or Resistance operations (no breakdown available), 83 Mosquito patrols. 2 Mosquitoes were lost from the Berlin raid and 1 aircraft (type not recorded) was lost from a Resistance flight.

Total effort for the night: 634 sorties, 34 aircraft (5.3 percent) lost.
Screenshot (74).png
Screenshot (74).png (99.54 KiB) Viewed 88 times
2
Screenshot (75).png
Screenshot (75).png (134.44 KiB) Viewed 88 times
3
Screenshot (76).png
Screenshot (76).png (128.17 KiB) Viewed 88 times
4
Screenshot (77)A.png
Screenshot (77)A.png (81.54 KiB) Viewed 88 times
5
Screenshot (77)B.png
Screenshot (77)B.png (67.48 KiB) Viewed 88 times
2nd TAF
The next day proved to be another of fierce engagements right across the Invasion area. The daybegan for 2nd TAF when Spitfires of 412 Squadron flew an armed reconnaissance over Bernay, L'Aigle and Argentan, starting off at 0630. German fighters engaged in combat with Mustangs and the Canadians waded in, a Focke-Wulf and a Messerschmitt claimed shot down north-east of Bernay at 0710.

Patrols were launched throughout the morning, Spitfires from 401 Squadron encountering some 12 or so Bf 109s near Cabourg soon after 1100, Flt Lt W.R.McRae claiming one shot down. Four more of the unit's aircraft followed, encountering four Bf 109s near Lisieux, accompanied by 20 Fw 190s. Flt Lt A.L.Sinclair claimed a Focke-Wulf and then a Messerschmitt, which he thought dived into the ground before his fire had actually hit it.

Another patrol from 132 Squadron also spotted eight Fw 190s, one being claimed by Plt Off N.V.Chevers. During one of these late morning encounters, a Spitfire was claimed shot down by Lt Prager of II./JG 26; no loss was actually suffered. However at 1230 a 602 Squadron Spitfire was hit by Flak near Aunay whilst attacking railway targets, with Plt Off L.D.Kidd, RCAF killed.

It was then the turn of 412 Squadron again; another patrol which had taken off at 1420 over the same area as the unit had covered earlier, again met hostiles, Flt Lt R.I.A.Smith, a veteran of Malta, claiming one Fw 190 and Flg Off G.T.Schwalm a second, whilst a third was claimed damaged. However Flt Lt W.B.Needham's aircraft was hit by Flak south-west of Falaise, and was shot down; once more, the pilot was able to evade capture and return.

At 1616 132 Squadron took off in squadron strength, the unit's 12 Spitfires engaging 15 fighters in a very one-sided fight at about 1645. Four Bf 109s and three Fw 190s were claimed shot down, one of each by Flg Off Francis Campbell, who also claimed damage to a second Focke-Wulf, whilst other pilots claimed a probable and four more damaged, all in the Lisieux area. This was all achieved without loss, despite Lt Dieter Zink and Uffz Lederer of III./JG 3 each claiming a Spitfire during this engagement.

Close behind 132 Squadron more Spitfires from 411 Squadron had commenced an armed reconnaissance at 1630, eight to ten Fw 190s being seen east of Caen at 1710, where Flt Lt G.W.Johnson claimed one shot down and Flt Lt H.J.Nixon one damaged. Finally, during a late evening patrol at around 2100, 401 Squadron pilots reported at least eight Bf 109s in the same area, again one destroyed and one damaged being claimed.

On this date II. Jagdkorps lost 19 fighters, including seven Fw 190s and 11 Bf 109s. 2nd TAF fighters claimed seven Fw 190s, but so did their US counterparts; claims for Bf 109s were seven and two respectively.

The day was also marked by the posting of Sqn Ldr B.D.Russel from 442 Squadron to replace Wg Cdr George Keefer (tour expired) as Wing Leader, 126 Wing. It was his second posting as Wg Cdr Flying, as he had led the Wing during the previous year. Following his rest tour, he had dropped rank to Sqn Ldr in order to get back on operations; his position in his old unit was taken by Flt Lt H.J.Dowding.

USAAF
CZECHOSLOVAKIA:
Fifteenth Air Force B-24s attack an armaments factory at Dubnica.

FRANCE: More than 100 IX Bomber Command B-26s and A-20s attack rail bridges near Tours and targets of opportunity around Beauzeville and Lisieux. More than 500 Ninth Air Force fighters and fighter- bombers patrol the beachhead area and bomb and strafe a broad variety of tactical and communications targets in western France.

IX TAC fighter pilots down eight GAF fighters over France between 0930 and 2025 hours. Capt Felix M. Rogers, a P-51 pilot with the 354th Fighter Group’s 353d Fighter Squadron, achieves ace status when he downs two FW-190s over Perdreauville at 2025 hours.

During the night of July 7–8, to help alleviate V-1 terror attacks on targets in England, 32 B-26s from the IX Bomber Command’s 322d Medium Bombardment Group are dispatched to attack the V- weapons headquarters at Chateau de Ribeaucourt. Alerted by radar, GAF night-fighters, some using flares, down nine B-26s. Bomber gunners down a single- engine night-fighter and a Ju-88.

GERMANY: Nine hundred thirty-nine Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s, escorted by 656 VIII Fighter Command fighters, attack three synthetic-oil plants, eight aircraft-assembly plants, marshalling yards at two locations, an equipment depot, railway repair shops, a railroad station, and two airdromes in central Germany. Thirty-seven heavy bombers are lost and 390 are damaged. Also, 166 escort fighters strafe airfields and rail targets.

Six escort fighters and their pilots are lost. Capt James M. Morris, a P-38 ace with the 20th Fighter Group’s 77th Fighter Squadron, brings his victory tally to 7.333 when he downs an Me-410 near Halle at 0935 hours, but Morris is then downed by another Me-410 and taken prisoner; and Col Glenn E. Duncan, the commanding officer of the 353d Fighter Group and a 19.5- victory P-47 ace, is downed by flak. Duncan (who is the third 353d group commander in a row to be shot down) evades capture and will continue to do so until April 22, 1945, when he returns to Allied hands.

VIII Fighter Command escort pilots down 77 GAF aircraft over Germany between 0830 and 1045 hours. LtCol Claiborne H. Kinnard, Jr., the 355th Fighter Group executive officer, in a P-51, achieves ace status when he downs two Me-410s and a Bf-109 near Lingen at about 0830 hours; Capt Frederick J. Christensen, Jr., a P-47 ace with the 56th Fighter Group’s 62d Fighter Squadron, brings his final personal tally to 21.5 confirmed victories when he downs six Ju-52s near Gardlegen Airdrome at about 1045 hours; and 2dLt Billy G. Edens, a P-47 pilot with the 56th Fighter Group’s 62d Fighter Squadron, achieves ace status when he downs three Ju-52s in the same engagement.

Fifteenth Air Force B-17s and B-24s attack two synthetic-fuel plants at Blechhammer, and B-24s also attack a synthetic-fuel plant and a coke plant at Odertal. Escort pilots from the 52d, 82d, and 325th Fighter groups down 13 Axis fighters along the bomber routes between 0950 and 1240 hours. Overall, 18 Fifteenth Air Force aircraft are lost on the day’s various missions.

ITALY: Twelfth Air Force B-25s and B-26s attack rail bridges and a fuel dump; XII TAC A-20s attack several fuel dumps; and XII TAC fighter-bombers attack Ferrara Airdrome, a town, ammunition dumps, and various tactical and communications targets.

During the night of July 7–8, XII TAC A-20s attack several defended towns.

YUGOSLAVIA: Fifteenth Air Force B-24s attack the airdrome and marshalling yards at Zagreb.

FIRST AND LAST OPERATIONAL MISSIONS
88 Sqn (Hartforfbridge) flies its first OM in the Boston IV
347 Sqn (Elvington) flies its last OM in the Halifax V
406 Sqn RCAF (Winkleigh) flies its last OM in the Mosquito NFXII
608 Sqn (Pomigliano) flies its last OM in the Hudson IIIA
627 Sqn (Woodhall Spa) flies its first OM in the Mosquito BXX
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

8-7-44
439 Sqn RCAF (B.9 Lantheuil – Typhoon IB)

A large Chateau at a cross-road just south-east of Palatae was believed to be a German Military Headquarters of some importance. Six aircraft, each carrying 2 x 500 lb, bambs, were led by F/L Scharff in the first attack on the target. While crossing over the enemy lines just west of Caen, a barrage of heavy flak caused damage to the aircraft flow by F/O Thomas, P.M. Frank reported damage to his aircraft, adding that he was turning back, In attempting an emergency landing at B,4, the aircraft suddenly fell out of control at 100 feet on the final approach, machine dove, burst into flames, and one bomb exploded. F/O Thomas was thrown clear of the burning wreckage and died instantly. The remaining five aircraft reached the target and dropped all 10 bombs in the immediate target area despite a rather shallow angle of dive from 6000 to 2000 feet in the attack from south-west to north-east, The crossing out of enemy territory was made east of Caen, No flak trouble there,

BOMBER COMMAND
MINOR OPERATIONS

10 Mosquitoes to Scholven/Buer, 8 Halifaxes and 4 Stirlings minelaying off Biscay coasts, 7 aircraft on Resistance operations, 8 Mosquitoes on flying-bomb patrols. No aircraft lost.
Screenshot (68023).png
Screenshot (68023).png (86.89 KiB) Viewed 78 times
2
Screenshot (68024).png
Screenshot (68024).png (117.14 KiB) Viewed 78 times
2nd TAF
The night of 7/8 July was to be an extremely busy one, Bomber Command launching a heavy raid on Caen preparatory to a new assault on the city in the morning. II. Jagdkorps launched 95 sorties and its night fighters claimed 66 bombers shot down, including 19 four-engined aircraft and five B-26s by I./JG 301 alone. Losses suffered during the night included a single Boston from 2nd TAF's 88 Squadron operating in the Loire-Seine area (and a considerable number of Ninth Air Force B-26s). A second Boston was damaged by Flak and force-landed on return to England, while a 21 Squadron Mosquito VI was also hit by Flak, making a wheels-up landing back at Thorney Island. One of 69 Squadron's Wellingtons was again intercepted, but escaped, Sgt T.S.Higgot, the tail gunner, claiming damage to a Fw 190.

In the other direction 91 IX. Fliegerkorps bombers undertook minelaying activities, while 24 more attacked villages and roads west of the Orne, and airfields in the Caen-Bayeux area. Five of this command's aircraft failed to return, most apparently falling to 85 Group Mosquitoes; a Ju 88R of I./NJG 4 was also lost over Beauvais. Flt Lt S.B.Huppert/Flg Off J.S.Christie of 410 Squadron claimed a Ju 88 between 0045-0100, whilst two more were claimed near Beauvais, one a Ju 188 by Flg Off H.F.Pearce/Plt Off P.J.Smith of 409 Squadron at 0050, this crew claiming a second - this time a Ju 88 - in the same area at 0105. Twenty minutes later Sqn Ldr I.A.March/Flt Lt Eyolfson of 410 Squadron claimed an Me 410 on the south-western outskirts of Paris. An unidentified aircraft was claimed by Flg Off Bennett/Wt Off Gordon of 29 Squadron during an intruder sortie to Brussels, this aircraft seen to crash without Bennett having to fire a shot. Further afield another Ju 88 was shot down by an ADGB intruder.

However, during the first of the engagements described above, Huppert's Mosquito had been hit by debris from his victim, and the starboard engine knocked out. Christie, the radar operator, managed to bale out into the sea from where he was safely picked up, but Huppert was killed.

During the night a new form of attack, which had commenced during June, was again undertaken by the Luftwaffe. It is generally thought that the air-launching of V-1 flying bombs from He 111 'mother' aircraft only began to occur after the main launching sites for these missiles in the Pas de Calais area were overrun by the Allied advance during late August and early September. In fact during the night of 7/8 July ten aircraft from III./KG 3 launched eight of these bombs against London, and by the end of July at least 243 would have been launched towards the British capital and 70 against the port of Southampton by this unit.

During the day II. Jagdkorps would launch 259 sorties in an effort to support the Wehrmacht, but recorded that "...owing to great enemy activity our own aircraft were only able to carry out their tasks to a limited extent, as they were intercepted by enemy fighters in the Paris-Dreux area before reaching the battle area." Under the circumstances, the Jagdwaffe was able to claim only two victories throughout the day, both of these against US aircraft. In return they lost two Fw 190s and six Bf 109s, one of the former and two of the latter being claimed by US pilots.

The only 2nd TAF unit to meet opposition was 19 Squadron, whose Mustangs flew an armed reconnaissance over the Caen-Villers Bocage area, where two Bf 109s were seen. Both were claimed shot down over Alencon by Flt Lt D.P.Lamb, Flg Off J.M.Maynard and Flt Sgt B.Vassiliades, and were probably TacR aircraft of 3/NAGr 14, which lost two aircraft within this area during the day:

2nd TAF did not escape unscathed however, Flak continuing to take its toll. One Typhoon of 439 Squadron was destroyed when it crashed whilst landing at B.4 after being hit by Flak; Flg Off F.McD.Thomas was killed. Three more 83 Group Typhoons and one Spitfire were damaged by Flak during the day, while a 182 Squadron Typhoon suffered severe damage on the ground when B.6 landing ground was bombed.

The day was also marked by the withdrawal of 133 Wing from 84 Group, the Polish Mustangs and those of 129 Squadron moving to Brenzett to undertake defensive patrols under ADGB control against the V-1s which were appearing in growing numbers over Southern England; they would not return to 2nd TAF.

The two 84 Group Typhoon Wings at Hurn, 123 and 136 (each with two squadrons) began a series of moves at the same time as reorganisation of Wings was taking place within 2nd TAF. The ground elements of 123 Wing had started moving in to B.10, Plumetot, a few days earlier, but now the aircraft of 198 and 609 Squadrons flew to B.5, as B.10 was unserviceable. They would continue operations from B.5, but the pilots would be transported to B.10 each evening to spend the night there, as no accommodation was available on the crowded strip near the villages of Le Fresne and Camilly. B.10 at this time was already occupied by 129 (RCAF) Wing, whose only resident unit was 184 Squadron, but this Wing would be disbanded on 12 July and replaced by 123 Wing (as will be detailed later). Meanwhile, despite the upheaval and the danger of being shelled, the evening trip to B.10 was popular with the pilots since the disbanding 129 Wing mess was disposing of its 'liquid assets' at no charge!

There were several further changes of command and promotions at this time which are of note. 135 Wing recorded the arrival of a famous Polish pilot, Wg Cdr Jan Zumbach, to lead the Wing for a few weeks, whilst next day Geoffrey Page would be promoted to lead 125 Wing, handing over 132 Squadron to Ken Charney, who was posted in from 602 Squadron. This latter unit also welcomed a new and distinguished commanding officer with the arrival on 8th of Sqn Ldr J.J. 'Chris' Le Roux, DFC & two Bars.

With the night fighters of 85 Group, Wg Cdr Constable-Maxwell handed over 604 Squadron to Wg Cdr F.Desmond Hughes, DFC & two Bars, although he would mark his departure by achieving a final victory over a Ju 88, also claiming a Do 217 as a probable during the night of 8/9th. In 2 Group, 613 Squadron's notable and well-respected leader, Wg Cdr Bateson, handed over to Wg Cdr C.W.M.Newman, DFC.

USAAF
AUSTRIA:
Fifteenth Air Force heavy bombers attack targets in the Vienna area: the Markersdorf, Munchendorf, and Zwolfaxing airdromes; a marshalling yard; refineries at Korneuburg and Vosendorf; and the Floridsdorf oil storage facilities.

Escort pilots of the 52d, 82d, and 325th Fighter groups down 29 Axis fighters near Vienna, including many twin-engine bomber destroyers. Two 82d Fighter Group P-38 pilots achieve ace status on this mission: 1stLt Walter J. Carroll, Jr., of the 96th Fighter Squadron, when he downs three Me-410s near Vienna; and 1stLt Robert C. Griffith, of the 97th Fighter Squadron, when he downs one Bf-109 near Vienna. Maj Ralph J. Watson, the commanding officer of the 52d Fighter Group’s 2d Fighter Squadron, in P-51s, also achieves ace status when he downs a Bf-109 at 1100 hours.

Altogether, 14 Fifteenth Air Force aircraft are lost.

FRANCE: Despite poor weather that results in more than 550 aborts, 462 Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s attack numerous tactical targets, including V-weapons sites, bridges, rail junctions, marshalling yards, and several airfields. Nine B-17s are lost.

Escort for the heavy bombers is provided by 588 VIII Fighter Command fighters, and 86 VIII Fighter Command P-47 fighter-bombers attack the St.-Andre- de-L’Eure Airdrome. VIII Fighter Command pilots claim the destruction of 15 locomotives during the day. One fighter and its pilot are lost.

Approximately 280 IX Bomber Command B-26s and A-20s attack the V-weapons headquarters at Chateau de Ribeaucourt as well as German Army strongpoints around Caen, fuel dumps, and road and rail bridges. Ninth Air Force escort fighters and IX TAC fighter-bombers conduct armed-reconnaissance missions over a broad area of France, but especially in the Normandy battle area, where numerous tactical targets are attacked.

Ninth Air Force fighter pilots down three GAF fighters over France during the morning.

HUNGARY: Fifteenth Air Force heavy bombers attack Veszprem Airdrome.

ITALY: Twelfth Air Force B-25s and B-26s attack a rail line near Parma, and several marshalling yards; XII TAC A-20s attack fuel dumps; and XII TAC fighter-bombers attack lines of communication north of the rather fluid U.S. Fifth Army battle area.

BASE CHANGES
451 Sqn RAAF (Spitfire LFIXB) moves to St. Catherines

FIRST AND LAST OPERATIONAL MISSIONS
118 Sqn (Skeabrae) flies its last OM in the Spitfire VB
151 Sqn (Predannack) flies its first OM in the Mosquito FBVI
227 Sqn (Berka 3) flies its last OMs in the Beaufighter VI/ITF/TFX/XIC and in the MTO. It now leaves for the UK to convert to Lancasters.
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

9-7-44
78 Sqn (Breighton – Halifax III)

27 Aircraft detailed for Operations, later announced 26 required. The Operation was cancelled at 18:45 hours, owing to expected thick ground mist over Base. All crews then stood by for early morning take off. The aircraft finally took off at 1130 hours in cloudy weather to attack a target in Northern France CHATEAU BERNAPRE. Weather was very cloudy, 10/10ths up to 16,000 feet, with icing conditions. 25 Aircraft dropped their bombs at heights from between 12,00 and 15,000 feet. Bombing done on GEE and instructions from Master Bomber. Crews reported a very scattered attack. Considered very unsatisfactory. One aircraft after losing two engines shortly after take off, was forced to ditch in the North Sea off Bridlington. All crew were soon rescued uninjured. The remainder of the aircraft landed safely in poor visibility low cloud and rain. 1 aircraft landed at RAF Burn.

BOMBER COMMAND
FLYING-BOMB SITES

347 aircraft – 197 Halifaxes, 120 Lancasters, 30 Mosquitoes – of 3, 4, 6 and 8 Groups bombed 6 launching sites but most of the targets were cloud-covered and some of the bombing was scattered. 1 Halifax and 1 Lancaster lost.

________________________________________
9/10 July 1944

MINOR OPERATIONS
8 Mosquitoes to Scholven/Buer, 14 R.C.M. sorties, 9 Serrate patrols, 8 Halifaxes and 4 Stirlings minelaying off Biscay ports, 19 aircraft on Resistance operations, 4 O.T.U. sorties. No aircraft lost.
Screenshot (68031).png
Screenshot (68031).png (102.94 KiB) Viewed 65 times
2
Screenshot (68032).png
Screenshot (68032).png (110.78 KiB) Viewed 65 times
2nd TAF
At last on 9th, British I Corps units fought their way into Caen, taking all the city to the north of the River Orne, and also securing Carpiquet airfield. The city had been almost completely destroyed by the efforts of Bomber Command and artillery shelling. The fighting for the airfield at Carpiquet had been particularly fierce and had inflicted severe casualties on the Canadian infantry. Effective support had been received from the Typhoons, which in the closing stages of the capture of this objective on 4th and 5th had expended much effort against 17 dug-in tanks at the east end of the runway.

Despite this conclusion, the suburb of Vaucelles on the southern bank of the Orne was still strongly held and all the bridges across the river had been blown. I Corps had suffered more than 3,500 casualties and the loss of 80 tanks in taking Caen.

With the city at last in his hands, Montgomery now ordered VIII Corps to attack south-east from the Odon bridgehead which it had secured by the end of Operation 'Epsom' on 30 June, towards the Falaise road. His grand strategy had now been taken a step forward, but required further extremely hard fighting to develop to its conclusion. The British and Canadian front now had to be expanded in the east, forcing Rommel to use the greater part of his eight Panzer divisions there, whilst the Americans were to break through to the open country south of the bocage, and from there swing east towards the Seine. First however, the two Allied armies needed time to regroup, but it was vital to ensure that the Panzers continued to be held around Caen. The task of the British and Canadian divisions had already proved to be a difficult and costly one. What the US First Army was now to experience as it drove deep into the bocage was to prove equally hard and bloody.

French Spitfire pilots of 340 and 341 Squadrons departed their airfield in England soon after midday to escort a large formation of Lancasters and Halifaxes to attack 'Noball' sites, while over Normandy more such aircraft from 453 Squadron undertook a patrol over the Lisieux area, both formations becoming engaged with German fighters at around 1330. The Australians of the latter squadron met some 40 Fw 190s and Bf 109s which, they recorded, were led by "the German ace Matoni". These dived on the Squadron and a large dogfight ensued. During this the commanding officer, Sqn Ldr D.H.Smith - another Malta veteran - claimed a Bf 109 probably destroyed (according to the unit history, confirmed), and an Fw 190 damaged, whilst his pilots claimed two more Fw 190s destroyed and three damaged, plus a Bf 109 destroyed and two damaged, all the Spitfires returning unscathed.

North of Bernay meanwhile, the French pilots had seen P-47s in combat with eight Bf 109s, and at once joined the fight. Wg Cdr Bill Crawford-Compton, the 145 Wing Leader, and Cdt J.A.M.Fournier, Commanding Officer of 340 Squadron, each claimed a Bf 109 shot down, while Capt Michel Boudier of 341 Squadron joined a P-47 on the tail of another Messerschmitt. Obviously mistaking the Spitfire for one of the Germans, the US pilot turned on Boudier and shot him down; the French 'ace' baled out, wounded, and spent the rest of the war as a prisoner.

These two engagements brought forth a considerable number of claims from the Luftwaffe pilots involved. At 1315 Lt Alfred Gross of III./JG 54 claimed one Spitfire over Lisieux, whilst between 1319-1324 Hptm Emil Lang, now Kommandeur of II./JG 26 (since 29 June), claimed three more over the Caen-Lisieux area. All these claims would appear to relate to the fight with 453 Squadron, but while this unit did not lose any Spitfires, neither did either of the German units lose any Fw 190s!

The P-47s which the pilots of 145 Wing joined in their fight with the Bf 109s, appear to have been from the 350th and 351st Squadrons of the US Eighth Air Force's 353rd Fighter Group, the pilots of these units claiming four Bf 109s. Their opponents seem to have been II. and III./JG 53 and IV./JG 27, which between them lost three Bf 109s (against total Allied claims here of six), Fw Edmund Wieland of JG 27 claiming a Spitfire at 1324, while at 1330-31 Oblt Günther Seeger of II./JG 53 claimed two P-47s.

In the evening, despite difficult weather conditions, eight Typhoons from 439 Squadron and a single aircraft from 438, dropped 18 x 500-pounders on enemy transport and tanks gathering for an offensive at St German d'Ectot. The assault broke up the German attack before it had started, in full view of the British troops, and drew an ecstatic 'strawberry' (the opposite of a 'raspberry') from 30 Corps HQ.

During the day a Typhoon of 175 Squadron flown by Flt Sgt R.C.Dale, had been shot down by a fighter south of St Lô, the pilot being killed, but no other Luftwaffe claims seem to have been made on this date. The possibility has to be considered that this aircraft had been shot down in error by a US pilot- something which would happen with increasing frequency as the war in Europe continued. Indeed, 341 Squadron lost one of its senior pilots, Cpt M.Boudier, to a USAAF P-47 later in the day. Two more Typhoons of 184 Squadron were damaged by ground fire whilst attacking tanks near Ardenne, while another of 257 Squadron was destroyed in a landing accident at B.3.

USAAF
FRANCE:
Despite bad weather over the target area that results in no attacks on assigned targets, 140 1st Bombardment Division B-17s attack several bridges and Chateaudun Airdrome during the morning.

Also during the morning, 60 of 250 IX Bomber Command B-26s and A-20s attack various lines-of-communication targets, but the remainder are thwarted by bad weather.

During the afternoon, 37 of the 104 3d Bombardment Division B-24s dispatched attack V-weapons launching sites, as assigned, and 15 of 77 3d Bombardment Division B-17s dispatched against V-weapond sites attack targets of oppor tunity, including St.-Omer/Longuenesse Airdrome.

Altogether during the day, 313 VIII Fighter Command fighters escort the heavy bombers, and, during the morning, 90 P-38s strafe ground targets.

VII Fighter Command pilots down six GAF aircraft over France between 0825 and 1400 hours. Capt William J. Maguire, a P-47 pilot with the 353d Fighter Group’s 351st Fighter Squadron, achieves ace status when he downs a Bf-109 near Argentan at 1400 hours. Also, 2dLt Billy G. Edens, a 56th Fighter Group P-51 pilot who achieved ace status two days earlier, is downed by flak and captured near Trier, Germany.

Throughout the day, Ninth Air Force fighters and fighter-bombers cover the beachhead area and attack numerous on-call targets and targets of opportunity.

ITALY: Most scheduled Twelfth Air Force flight operations are canceled in the face of bad weather, but XII TAC fighter-bombers are able to attack several rail lines, German Army tanks and motor vehicles, and several gun emplacements.

ROMANIA: Fifteenth Air Force B-17s and B-24s, led for the first time by B-24s equipped with H2X radar, attack Ploesti’s Xebia and Concordia-Vega refineries through an otherwise impenetrable smoke screen.

1stLt Donald R. Pucket, the pilot of a 98th Heavy Bombardment Group B-24 severely crippled by flak, administers first aid and words of encouragement to wounded crewmen while surveying the damage. Realizing that the bomber cannot possibly reach friendly territory, Pucket orders the crew to bail out, but he refuses to leave the descending bomber himself when he sees that three injured crewmen cannot do so. Pucket, who is killed with his three wounded comrades when the B-24 crashes into a mountainside, is awarded a posthumous Medal of Honor.

Pilots of the 1st, 52d, and 325th Fighter groups down 13 Axis fighters along the bomber route or over Ploesti between 1000 and 1115 hours. Two P-51 pilots of the 52d Fighter Group’s 2d Fighter Squadron achieve ace status while escorting the bombers: Capt Fred F. Ohr and 1stLt James E. Hoffman, Jr., who each down a Bf-109 over Ploesti at 1020 hours.

Altogether, six Fifteenth Air Force aircraft are lost.

BASE CHANGES
129 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Brenzett
198 Sqn (Typhoon IB) moves to B.5 La Fresne-Camilly
213 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Leverano
237 Sqn (Spitfire IX) moves to St. Catherines
250 Sqn (Kittyhawk IV) moves to Crete
306 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Brenzett

FIRST AND LAST OPERATIONAL MISSIONS
68 Sqn (Castle Camps) flies its first OM in the Mosquito NFXVII
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

10-7-44
692 Sqn (Graveley – Mosquito BXVI)

Twelve aircraft detailed for operations. Eleven of the aircraft completed operations successfully. One aircraft is missing.

ADDENDUM – Mosquito BXVI PF380 P3-? Crew:W/C SD Watts DSO DFC MiD RNZAF KIA, P/O AA Matheson DFM RNZAF KIA. Shot down by Maj. Hans Karlewski (5th victory) 2./NJG1 35 km N Terschelling at 0318.

BOMBER COMMAND
NUCOURT

213 Lancasters and 10 Mosquitoes of 1, 3 and 8 Groups attacked a flying-bomb storage dump but the target was covered by cloud and the bombing was not concentrated. No aircraft lost.

6 Mosquitoes carried out Ranger patrols without loss. 1 Ju 88 was claimed destroyed near Oldenburg.

________________________________________

10/11 July 1944
MINOR OPERATIONS

35 Mosquitoes to Berlin, 8 Halifaxes and 6 Lancasters minelaying in the Kattegat and in the Frisians, 13 Halifaxes and 9 Stirlings on Resistance operations, 4 O.T.U. sorties. 1 Mosquito lost on the Berlin raid.
Screenshot (68034).png
Screenshot (68034).png (117.64 KiB) Viewed 51 times
2
Screenshot (68035).png
Screenshot (68035).png (116.17 KiB) Viewed 51 times

2nd TAF
During the night a single Ju 88 was claimed shot down by Sqn Ldr Chase/Flg Off Watson of 264 Squadron from amongst 86 IX. Fliegerkorps aircraft minelaying in the Seine Bay and 12 bombing ground targets.

In the early hours a 487 Squadron Mosquito VI was hit by Flak over Orleans, returning on one engine and force-landing near Littlehampton. During an armed reconnaissance in the morning of 10th a Spitfire of 416 Squadron was shot down over Thury-Harcourt by Flak; Plt Off J.E.R.McCrea baled out and was back at his airfield by lunchtime! One other Spitfire was damaged by Flak during the day, but this was the extent of 2nd TAF's casualties for the day. II. Jagdkorps reported an apparent reduction in Allied air activity on this date, and submitted one claim - a Spitfire by Lt Wilhelm Hofmann of II./JG 26 north of Caen at 1135; had he actually been responsible for shooting down McCrea, rather than the Flak? Two Spitfire VBS of ADGB's 345 Squadron were shot down during the day during a 'Ramrod' to Rouen, both coming down in the Vernon area with the death of one of the French pilots, but both were again reported to have been the victims of Flak.

One of ADGB's remaining two Typhoon units was tranferred to 2nd TAF on this date, 263 Squadron flying to Hurn to join 164 and 183 Squadrons in 136 Wing. This Wing was also joined by 266 Squadron from 146 Wing, nominally at least for, as already noted, it was attending APC. In 122 Wing 65 Squadron bade farewell to their New Zealand Commanding Officer, 'Jerry' Westenra, whose place was taken by Deryck Lamb, one of the flight commanders. Flt Lt L.A.P.Burra-Robinson was posted in from 122 Squadron to take over the vacant flight commander position. In the latter unit next day Sqn Ldr R.L.Stillwell, DFM, took over command from Sqn Ldr J.T.Shaw.

USAAF
FRANCE:
On a day otherwise marred by mission cancellations in the face of bad weather, Ninth Air Force fighters and fighter-bombers attack targets of opportunity and lines of communication in the battle area.

ITALY: Twelfth Air Force B-25s and B-26s attack bridges, viaducts, and marshalling yards in north-central Italy; and XII TAC fighter-bombers attack gun emplacements, rail lines, roads, and the Modena Airdrome.

BASE CHANGES
3 Sqn RAAF (Kittyhawk IV) moves to Crete
5 Sqn SAAF (Kittyhawk IV) moves to Crete
112 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Crete
263 Sqn (Typhoon IB) moves to Hurn
315 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Brenzett
450 Sqn (Kittyhawk IV) moves to Crete

FIRST AND LAST OPERATIONAL MISSIONS
32 Sqn (Foggia Main) flies its last OM in the Spitfire VIII
310 Sqn (Lympne) flies its first OM and 2nd tour of duty in the Spitfire VB
313 Sqn (Lympne) flies its last OM in the Spitfire LFIXB
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

11-7-44
442 Sqn RCAF (B.3 St. Croix-sur-Mer –Spitfire LFIXB)

Dawn readiness, still cool and cloudy. Not airborne till 1450 hours when weather improved and twelve set out an Armed Recce. Saw Huns in the clouds but could’nt attack them. Flight Lieutenant T.H. Hallihan (J8904), on his first trip with the Squadron flying No. 2 on S/L Dowling and hit by flak near Caen. Smoke was seen coming from Y2-H and he was instructed to bale out, due to heavy flak and clouds he was not seen again. Only with 442 about 24 hours and is the first to be missing (or killed) in the five months since the squadron was formed. We pray it may be as long again. Two new pilots reported in- (J22982) P/O J.P. Lasion and (J14308) F/O R.K. Trumley. "The Ledger” a movie about Jack the Ripper shown in the officers' mess. Total flying hours-13:20.

ADDENDUM – Spitfire LFIXB NH325 Y2-H. Pilot:F/L THO Hallihan KIA. Burieds in St. Manview War Cemetery. F/L Hallihan had spent 1941-42 flying Spitfires out of Malta.

BOMBER COMMAND
GAPENNES

26 Lancasters and 6 Mosquitoes of 8 Group made two separate raids on this flying-bomb site. The Lancasters made the first ‘heavy Oboe’ attack of the war. A Lancaster of 582 Squadron had been fitted with Oboe equipment and Wing Commander G. F. Grant, from 109 Squadron, one of the Oboe Mosquito squadrons, flew in the Lancaster and directed the bombing. When Grant released his bombs, other Lancasters flying in formation did the same. This method allowed a greater tonnage of bombs to be dropped directly on the Oboe signals and it became one of Bomber Command’s most accurate bombing methods and enabled small targets like the flying-bomb sites to be bombed accurately in cloudy conditions. No aircraft were lost on this raid.

2 Mosquitoes flew Ranger patrols. 1 aircraft attacked a tanker with cannon-fire. The Mosquitoes returned safely.

________________________________________

11/12 July 1944
MINOR OPERATIONS

8 Mosquitoes to Homberg oil plant, 3 Serrate patrols, 21 aircraft on Resistance operations. No aircraft lost.
Screenshot (68041).png
Screenshot (68041).png (92.81 KiB) Viewed 40 times
2
Screenshot (68042).png
Screenshot (68042).png (78.6 KiB) Viewed 40 times
2nd TAF
About two hours after midnight a Mosquito VI of 305 Squadron was lost in the Lille-Amiens area, a second aircraft from this unit also failing to return from this area an hour later. Amongst the night fighters, Flt Lt K.G.Rayment/Flg Off Bone of 264 Squadron shot down a V-1, while Sqn Ldr Elwell/Flg Off Ferguson from this unit claimed a Do 217 probably destroyed. However, two Mosquitoes were lost; Flg Off R.E.Lee/Flt Sgt J.W.Wales, RAFVR, of 409 Squadron went down south of Folkestone whilst intercepting a V-1, whilst an ADGB aircraft of 219 Squadron was lost in combat with a hostile aircraft off Le Havre.

During the day two Typhoons and a Spitfire were shot down by Flak. At about 0900 an aircraft of 182 Squadron force-landed east of Cully, whilst around 1600 another such aircraft from 609 Squadron crashed south-east of Hottot and Flt Sgt L.E.Bliss was killed. 442 Squadron suffered its first casualty since being formed when Flt Lt T.H.O.Hallihan's Spitfire came down near Conde, and he was killed. A 3 Naval Fighter Wing Spitfire V also crashed into the sea, with the loss of Sub Lt Hughes.

However, when a pair of Bf 109s attempted to 'bounce' a formation of 198 Squadron Typhoons, Flt Lt J.M.G.Plamondon jettisoned his rockets, pursued one Messerschmitt and claimed to have shot it down.

On this date III. Flakkorps reported that in the period since 1 July its gunners had claimed 17 Allied aircraft shot down.

USAAF
FRANCE
: IX Bomber Command B-26s and A-20s attack V-weapons sites, fuel dumps, and a rail bridge. Ninth Air Force fighters and fighter-bombers escort the bombers and attack rail targets, fuel dumps, gun emplacements, and various targets of opportunity around the battle area in France.

While attacking German Army pillboxes through driving rain in the vicinity of St.-Lo, in the Normandy beachhead area, P-47s of the Ninth Air Force’s 366th Fighter Group discover a German Army tank column moving on an unsuspecting U.S. First Army ground unit. Despite the rain and intense flak, the group destroys the pillboxes against which it had been initially directed and severely damages many of the tanks from extremely low level, thus turning back the enemy attack on friendly forces. In fact, the group renews its attack on surviving tanks after landing at its base to rearm. Later, on their third mission of the day, 366th Fighter Group P-47s locate and defeat another German Army tank force. The group’s activities during the day are considered “decisive” by U.S. Army ground forces in the area.

When bad weather prevents missions from going to other areas, 87 Fifteenth Air Force B-24s attack the port area at Toulon.

GERMANY: Guided by H2X radar, 1,047 Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s, escorted by 699 VIII Fighter Command fighters, attack marshalling yards, industrial targets, an airdrome, and several targets of opportunity in and around Munich. Sixteen B-24s, four B-17s, and four escort fighters are lost.

ITALY: Despite bad weather, a number of Twelfth Air Force medium bombers are able to mount attacks against several rail targets and bridges; and XII TAC fighter-bombers attack fuel dumps, gun emplacements, rail lines, Rimini Airdrome, and targets of opportunity in the battle area.

BASE CHANGES
1 Sqn (Spitfire LFIXB) moves to Lympne
41 Sqn (Spitfire XII) moves to Lympne
154 Sqn (Spitfire IX) moves to Calenza
193 Sqn (Typhoon IB) moves to B.15 Ryes
198 Sqn (Typhoon IB) moves to B.10 Plumetot
206 Sqn (Liberator VI) moves to Leuchars
232 Sqn (Spitfire IX) moves to Calenza
243 Sqn (Spitfire IX) moves to Calenza
310 Sqn (Spitfire VB/IX) moves to Digby
312 Sqn (Spitfire HFIX) moves to Coltishall
313 Sqn (Non-Op) moves to Skeabrae
316 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Friston
504 Sqn (Non-Op) moves to Detling

FIRST AND LAST OPERATIONAL MISSIONS
32 Sqn (Foggia Main) flies its last OM in the Spitfire IX
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

12-7-44
416 Sqn RCAF (B.2 Bazenville – Spitfire LFIXB)

Squadron escorted Mitchells on a bombing show and from this Show F/L J Campbell failed to return. He was forced to bale out 12 miles east of Caen. Let’s hope he landed okay. F/L Dave Herrling left today <unreadable> at <unreadable> back in old “Blighty”, and you can be sure he wasn’t happy to leave just when things were beginning to pop.

ADDENDUM – Spitfire LFIXB MJ141 DN-? Pilot:F/L JC Campbell SAFE. Fuel ran out.

BOMBER COMMAND
FLYING-BOMB SITES

222 aircraft – 168 Halifaxes, 46 Lancasters, 8 Mosquitoes – of 4, 6 and 8 Groups bombed a storage dump at Thiverny but the target was cloud-covered and no results were seen. 18 Lancasters and 5 Mosquitoes of 8 Group used Oboe to bomb the Rollez launching site. No aircraft lost.

VAIRES
153 Lancasters and 6 Mosquitoes of 1, 3 and 8 Groups to attack the important railway yards on the outskirts of Paris; the target area was covered by cloud and the Master Bomber ordered the attack to be abandoned after 2 Mosquitoes had marked and 12 Lancasters had bombed. No aircraft lost.

________________________________________

12/13 July 1944
RAILWAYS

378 Lancasters and 7 Mosquitoes of 1, 5 and 8 Groups attacked railway targets at Culmont, Revigny and Tours. Culmont and Tours were accurately bombed but cloud interfered with the all-1 Group raid at Revigny and only half of the force bombed. 10 Lancasters were lost on the Revigny raid and 2 on the Culmont raid.

FLYING-BOMB SITES
230 aircraft – 196 Halifaxes, 17 Lancasters, 17 Mosquitoes – of 4, 6 and 8 Groups attacked 4 launching sites. All targets were hit, the raid on the Bremont-les-Hautes site being particularly accurate. No aircraft were lost.

SUPPORT AND MINOR OPERATIONS
168 aircraft of all Main Force groups and 92 and 93 (O.T.U.) Groups on a diversionary sweep over the North Sea, 8 Mosquitoes to Homberg, 32 R.C.M. sorties, 32 Mosquito patrols, 12 Halifaxes minelaying off Heligoland, 14 O.T.U. sorties. No aircraft lost.

Total effort for the night: 881 sorties, 12 aircraft (1.4 percent) lost.
Screenshot (68045).png
Screenshot (68045).png (94.81 KiB) Viewed 24 times
2
Screenshot (68046).png
Screenshot (68046).png (82.68 KiB) Viewed 24 times
2nd TAF
Increasingly, morning mists were reducing operational flying over Normandy even on days of generally better weather. On the finer days this burnt off as the sun rose in the sky, but the consequence of this meteorological phenomenon was to ensure that most encounters between opposing aircraft tended to occur during the afternoon, whilst most close-support sorties were constrained in the same manner to allow target identification to be achieved reliably.

At 1450 on 12th, 19 Squadron undertook an armed reconnaissance to the Alencon-Le Mans- Laval area. South of Caen at about 1610, 16 Bf 109s and a lone Fw 190, which appeared to be leading the Messerschmitts, were seen. At once bombs, which were still being carried, were jettisoned, two Bf 109s being claimed shot down by Sqn Ldr W.M.M.Gilmour and Flg Off Jim Paton, while three more were claimed damaged, Flg Off J.E.Staples also claiming damage to the Focke-Wulf. One of the unit's Mustangs crash-landed at B.7 a few minutes later, a second suffering damage during the fight. Claims for two P-51s were submitted by III./JG 1 as a result of this encounter.

Typhoons of 183 Squadron then set off from Hurn to attack a 'Giant Würzberg' radar at Cap d'Antifer. When attacking this target two months earlier (see 11 May) Sqn Ldr F.H.L.Scarlett had a narrow escape; this time the Flak proved deadly and he was shot down, crashing in the target area. At much the same time Spitfires of 421 Squadron escorted Mitchells to Chartres. In the Pont l'Eveque area at 1815, Flg Off G.M.Smith claimed a Bf 109 shot down and a second damaged, Flg Off J.M.Calvert claiming a probable and Flg Off R.C.McRoberts another damaged. The latter pilot's aircraft was hit and damaged by fire from a German aircraft, and he was wounded.

Whilst providing beach cover between 1820-1845, two 132 Squadron Spitfires were damaged by German fighters, Flt Lt M.Graham being wounded, while Flg Off W.A.Doyle force-landed in the beachhead area. Some 25 minutes later, four 412 Squadron pilots who had gone off to bomb a railway bridge at Le Mesnil, saw two Bf 109s near Mortagne, Flg Off W.J.Banks claiming one shot down. A few minutes later other Spitfires of 453 Squadron, also escorting Mitchells to Chartres, met more enemy fighters, Wg Cdr Page and Wt Off E.F.Cowpe claiming one Bf 109 between them.

During the evening period a Mustang of 65 Squadron, which had been dive-bombing in the Evreux area, suddenly dived vertically into the ground; Flt Lt E.Cooper was killed. This was the Wing's second loss, for a couple of hours earlier Flg Off H.St.J. Smith had baled out of his 122 Squadron aircraft, east of Alencon, when it suffered an engine failure, possibly the result of Flak damage. A 416 Squadron Spitfire was also lost when Flt Lt J.C.Campbell ran out of fuel, baling out east of Caen.

During the evening engagements with 421 and 132 Squadrons, Oberstleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld, Geschwaderkommodore of JG 1, claimed three Spitfires shot down between 1903-1905, whilst at the latter time one was also claimed by Ofw Kaiser of the Geschwader's III. Gruppe.

Earlier, in the morning, two pilots of I./JG 11 had claimed two Spitfires in the Tours area. Two possibilities exist; during a shipping reconnaissance two Spitfire Vs of 501 Squadron were shot down, reportedly by Allied AA, and both crashed on the coast, their pilots being killed. Alternatively, a PR Spitfire of 400 Squadron was attacked by 25 Bf 109s when at 21,500 feet, south-west of Caen; the pilot escaped, but only after his aircraft had been damaged.

On this date II. Jagdkorps lost ten Bf 109 fighters and five Fw 190s, two TacR Bf 109s also failing to return. US fighters claimed only Fw 190s - six of them - while 2nd TAF pilots claimed a total of five Bf 109s.

USAAF
FRANCE:
One hundred thirty-one 3d Bombardment B-24s and 131 RAF Spitfire escorts dispatched against ten V-weapons sites in the Pas-de-Calais area are thwarted by bad weather.

During morning and afternoon missions, more than 300 IX Bomber Command B-26 and A-20 sorties are flown against fuel dumps, troop concentrations, and road and rail targets. Also, Ninth Air Force fighters and fighter-bombers attack rail lines, bridges, motor vehicles, parked airplanes, and infantry and artillery emplacements in and around the battle area.

Ninth Air Force fighter pilots down six GAF fighters between 0955 and 1545 hours.

More than 420 Fifteenth Air Force B-24s attack marshalling yards at Miramas and Nimes, and bridges spanning the Var and Theoule rivers.

GERMANY: Unable to visually attack assigned targets in and around Munich, 1,124 Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s, escorted by 717 VIII Fighter Command fighters, employ radar to conduct an area attack on the city of Munich. Also, 27 heavy bombers attack other targets of opportunity. Twenty-four heavy bombers are lost, and 297 are damaged.

ITALY: Operation MALLORY MAJOR opens with attacks by Twelfth Air Force B-25s and B-26s against bridges spanning the Po River. Also, XII TAC A-20s attack ammunition dumps, and fighter-bombers attack small boats and barges on the Arno River as well as roads and rail lines, gun emplacements, ammunition dumps, and motor vehicles in and north of the battle area.

BASE CHANGES
118 Sqn(Non-Op) moves to Detling
213 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Biferno
260 Sqn (Mustang III) moves to Crete
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
User avatar
warshipbuilder
Posts: 2773
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:52 pm
Location: C-eh-n-eh-d-eh

Re: Action This Day

Post by warshipbuilder »

13-7-44
105 Sqn (Bourn – Mosquito BXVI)

2 aircraft attacked the HOMBERG area with 11 x 500 M.C., one of F/O Whipp’s hanging up.

2/2 aircraft attacked SCHOLVEN with 10 x 500 M.C. W/O Lickley had 2 hang ups. There was 10/10 aloud over the target and flak man accurate and intense. W/O Lickley was hit over the target and was forced to return an one Engine. Whilst trying to land at COLTISHALL he crashed near NORTH WALSHAM, completely wrecking the aircraft. W/O Lickley sustained cuts on his head and F/S. Cameron was cut on the hand.

BOMBER COMMAND
13 Lancasters of 8 Group to attack a flying-bomb site and 2 Mosquitoes on Ranger patrols but thick cloud prevented all aircraft from operating.

________________________________________

13/14 July 1944
Minor Operations

4 Mosquitoes to Homberg and Scholven/Buer, 4 Serrate patrols over Denmark, 6 Stirlings minelaying off Brest, 3 Halifaxes on Resistance operations. No aircraft lost.
Screenshot (68049).png
Screenshot (68049).png (90.5 KiB) Viewed 14 times
2
Screenshot (68050).png
Screenshot (68050).png (109.53 KiB) Viewed 14 times
2nd TAF
During the night, one of 69 Squadron's Wellingtons was again intercepted, and once more made good its escape, with one of the gunners claiming damage to a Fw 190 near Jumieges. Flg Off R.L.J.Barbour/Flg Off Paine of 264 Squadron claimed a Ju 188 shot down, while Sqn Ldr J.A.Hatch/Flg Off Eames of 409 Squadron claimed damage to a Bf 110 over Jouvincourt airfield.

On a morning sortie Flg Off M.H.Pinches of 122 Squadron claimed damage to a Bf 109 in the Evreux area, whilst at about 1715 that evening Flt Lt Bill Klersy of 401 Squadron made a similar claim east of Caen, his opponent identified as a Fw 190 however.

At this time the sky was quite full of Typhoons. Wg Cdr Baldwin had led three 197 Squadron aircraft on an armed reconnaissance south-east of Cabourne, while Sqn Ldr W.C.Ahrens led a 257 Squadron formation to attack the Verneuil rail yards. Both formations were 'bounced' by Bf 109s of III./JG 1 and I./JG 5, but although outnumbered, Baldwin and Flt Sgt A.Shannon of 257 Squadron each claimed a Bf 109 shot down, while five more were claimed damaged by pilots of the latter unit.

However, Flt Sgt M.E.Marriot of this unit was shot down, and Flg Off K.A.J.Trott of 197 Squadron, collided with a Bf 109. He later recalled: "As I came out of cloud I noticed a solitary Me 109 coming towards me. I lined up for a head-on attack, firing my cannon. The next minute I realised I would have to break to avoid collision. As I did so my starboard wing collided with the wing of the 109 and I felt my head hit the cockpit cover and my left shoulder the side of the cockpit. My helmet, oxygen mask, goggles and revolver holster were torn from my body and I hurtled into space with only my parachute intact. I realised I would have to pull the ripcord as my altitude was only about 3,000 ft. The next moment the canopy opened and I lost conciousness. I came round to find myself hanging from a tree in an orchard surrounded by several armed Germans..."

Plt Off Rook's Typhoon was badly shot-up. An aircraft from 245 Squadron seems also to have blundered into this engagement, Flt Lt W.E.Reynolds being shot down near Forge-a-Cambro, and killed. Five claims for Typhoons were submitted by the Luftwaffe units, all made by leading 'Experten. Hptm Alfred Grislawski and Ofw Herbert Kaiser of III./JG 1 each claiming one (their 126th and 67th victories respectively), while Hptm Theodore Weissenberger of I./JG 5 claimed two (his 191st and 192nd) and Lt Alfred Mors claimed one as his 50th. These two units lost one Bf 109 apiece.

As this combat came to an end, Spitfires of 132 Squadron entered the area on patrol, reporting 12 Fw 190s and Bf 109s with long-range tanks, Sqn Ldr Ken Charney claiming a Bf 109 damaged ten miles south of Lisieux and a Fw 190 damaged south-east of Cabourg. A quarter of an hour later Flt Lt W.A.Prest of 443 Squadron claimed damage to another Fw 190 in the Falaise area, while at 1845 another was claimed damaged by Plt Off J.N.Thorne of 122 Squadron over Gisors. At 2025 damage to a Bf 109 was claimed by Flg Off S.M.McClarty of 442 Squadron south- east of Cabourg, although Flt Lt A.W.Roseland of this unit was shot down and killed. He would appear to have fallen to Ofw Karl-Heinz Munsche of III./JG 2, who claimed a Spitfire over Vimoutiers at 2035. One other claim for a Spitfire had been made at 1715 in the Lisieux area by Oblt Schauder of III./JG 26, while a IV./JG 27 pilot had claimed a 'Lysander' at 1858 over Bayeux.

441 Squadron then took off on an armed reconnaissance over Argentan, where at 2035, 12 Fw 190s were seen and attacked, with no fewer than ten claimed shot down north of L'Aigle without loss, Flg Off W.J.Myers claiming three of these and Sqn Ldr T.A.Brannagan, two. It seems likely that on this occasion much double- and even triple-claiming took place, for II. Jagdkorps losses do not substantiate casualties of this magnitude. Indeed, no more than five Focke-Wulfs were lost on this date, only two of these being from the same unit - 4./JG 26.

In England, 127 Squadron, so recently a new member of 134 Wing, departed for 17 APC at Southend, where it would remain until 23rd, training in dive-bombing. On 14th 183 Squadron would go to 18 APC, Eastchurch, also to undertake armament training and practice. 604 Squadron now moved to Colerne, while the French personnel of 145 Wing received RAF battledress to replace their dark blue Armée de l'Air uniforms prior to a forthcoming move to their homeland.

USAAF
ENGLAND:
All IX Bomber Command bombers are grounded by bad weather.


FRANCE: A limited number of Ninth Air Force fighters and fighter-bombers attack road and rail traffic, warehouses, a barracks, and armored vehicles. IX TAC fighters also provide close air support for Allied ground troops and attack gun emplacements, vehicles, and troop concentrations.


GERMANY: Using H2X radar in the face of heavy cloud cover, 356 1st Bombardment Division B-17s and 139 3d Bombardment Division B-17s attack the city of Munich; 100 3d Bombardment Division B-17s attack aircraft-industry targets at Munich; 12 B-17s attack targets of opportunity; and 298 2d Bombardment Division B-24s attack a marshalling yard at Saarbrucken. Nine B-17s and one B-24 are lost.


Escort for the various heavy-bomber formations is provided by 543 VIII Fighter Command fighters, of which five airplanes and three pilots are lost. Escort pilots down two GAF fighters between 1045 and 1150 hours.


ITALY: Fifteenth Air Force B-24s attack the port at Fiume, oil storage facilities at Porto Marghera and Trieste, and marshalling yards at four locations; Fifteenth Air Force B-17s attack a marshalling yard and rail bridges at three locations; Twelfth Air Force medium bombers continue Operation MALLORY MAJOR with attacks on Po River bridges; XII TAC A-20s attack an ammunition plant; and XII TAC fighter-bombers concentrate on rail facilities servicing the battle area.


LUXEMBOURG: Two IX TAC P-47 pilots down four FW-190s over Luxembourg City at 1705 hours. One of them, Capt Edwin O. Fisher, of the 362d Fighter Group’s 377th Fighter Squadron, achieves ace status.

BASE CHANGES
39 Sqn (Beaufighter TFX) moves to Biferno
165 Sqn (Spitfire LFIXB) moves to Lympne
266 Sqn (Typhoon IB) moves to Hurn
336 Sqm=n (Spitfire VB/VC) moves to El Adem

FIRST AND LAST OPERATIONAL MISSIONS
124 Sqn (Bradwell Bay) flies its last OM in the Spitfire VII
313 Sqn (Skeabrae) flies its first OM and starts its second tour of duty in the Spitfire VB
347 Sqn (Elvington) flies its first OM in the Halifax III
warshipbuilder

Any ship can be a minesweeper, once.
ED/BTR Ressurection Project
https://www.bombercommandmuseumarchives.ca/
Post Reply

Return to “Gary Grigsby's Eagle Day to Bombing the Reich”