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YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis)

 
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YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/11/2021 4:38:41 PM   
YueJin

 

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This is the mirror of my other game against Hadros, hopefully by running both simultaneously I can explain and explore the differences of thinking needed on both sides of the board. The Allied updates will likely be quite short for the first part of the war, at least until the transports arrive as agency is very limited until May at the earliest.

Allies – 7th December/21st December 1941

Fortunately for me, the PH strike goes poorly for the Japanese in this timeline, only sinking one BB and with mostly minor damage on the others, I have some hopes of being able to use the US surface fleet to inflict some setbacks to my opponent early on in the war.
Sadly however, the Prince of Wales and Repulse are both sunk at the other end of the Pacific. Not the end of the world as it can be hard to keep the Royal Navy supplied with sufficient oil early in the war anyway and mixed fleets can end up being really frustrating to run.



The retreat through Burma is proceeding according to plan and I’m hopeful of getting everything to the Dacca line in one piece. A small corps has been assigned to defend Madras from invasion which should hold against anything short of two armies trying to force the port. The Japanese light carrier fleet and surface battlegroup has been spotted at Port Blair and they’ll either be raiding the Indian Ocean convoys or supporting the Ceylon invasion.



Very importantly the Japanese 12th, 17th and 10th armies have all been identified. One at Hanoi, the other two in the Philippines, with the 25th tied up at Singapore for the next couple of turns, I can feel fairly secure in India and Australia at least until the Philippines campaign concludes. Tracking these free armies in the early turns is a big bonus for the Allies as it allows correct resource allocation and prediction of Japanese priorities. The two armies from Northern China have disappeared though so at least two large formations are available for invasion.



The Chinese front itself feels stable and I don’t think my opponent will overcommit to this theatre.



In the South Pacific, New Caledonia and Fiji are unthreatened yet and the Canberra and Swordfish are standing by to break any blockade attempts. The US surface fleet is beginning to build up in Tonga to potentially run supply missions to the island or launch a night attack on a understrength Japanese fleet.



Allied priorities in the early war are to trade space for time effectively without risking Carrier and Battleship assets that will be needed for 1943. Nothing larger than a CA will be committed to danger for any reason until land-based air can be in position to cover these moves. Although the Allies can only respond to Japanese moves, I intend to hold India at the Dacca line, with small corps defending Madras and Bombay (after Ceylon falls). The ZoC these provide really make naval invasions much harder for the Japanese to pull off successfully. In Australia, Ports from Rockhampton southwards are garrisoned, Perth is abandoned. Hopefully if it takes long enough to capture New Caledonia and Fiji, my opponent will be dissuaded from any more adventurous moves.


< Message edited by YueJin -- 8/11/2021 4:39:24 PM >
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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/11/2021 10:33:56 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – 21st December/18th January 1942

The action is heating up in the South Pacific. The sub groups are breaking the attempted Japanese blockades of Fiji and New Caledonia and will be invisible at least until Port Villa is taken, then the one at Nomea can be destroyed. A Japanese cruiser group also attempts to blockade Tonga but is sunk in a night raid by an American task force led by the New Orleans. I intend on making the few CA’s the Americans start with work hard. Another destroyer group in raider mode is then added to the stack to ensure they won’t try to interdict any Japanese carriers that come near.

I’m hopeful little skirmishes like this will slow the Japanese down and make them think twice about trying to blockade the small garrisons.





In Australia, the Japanese have landed at many minor ports but we will be keeping the line from Rockhampton to Port Augusta intact. I’ve no intention of letting anything of consequence fall without a major commitment here.





The Burma force continues an orderly retreat to the Dacca line where it will dig in along the short front. Already, most divisions have merged into small corps formations to make sure they exert Zone of Control, slowing the Japanese advance to one hex at a time.




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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/15/2021 12:27:29 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – 18th January/1st March 1942


A fantastic series of skirmishes in the South Pacific is really taking its toll on the Japanese ability to maintain blockades. I think my opponent is trying to prevent the blockade breakers moving next to the port or the defenders being reinforced now I have transports, by keeping some stacks in fleet mode but it’s allowed my task forces to make some damaging hit and run attacks.


The main Japanese carrier fleet finds and launches air strikes against the submarine group supplying Fiji heavily damaging her. Fortunately, a destroyer squadron is on hand to take over those duties, ensuring the island remains in good fighting condition.





Around the waters off New Caledonia, the New Orleans and her destroyer group initially succeed in sinking one Japanese destroyer group and heavily damaging another.







In the following weeks, the Japanese land a force North of Nomea showing they are determined to capture the island. Unwilling to let it go down without a fight, the American battleship fleet and cruiser San Francisco sortie to engage. Although the Japanese destroyers catch them by surprise in the rain, they are no match for the main guns of the battleships and two squadrons are sunk.





The battleships West Virginia and Pennsylvania alongside the Salt Lake City also attempt to find the Japanese destroyers surrounding Nomea but here, the main guns of the battleships are superfluous as torpedoes launched from the heavily modernised cruiser squadron obliterate the Japanese before they even realise they are engaged.






How the area currently stands. Destroyer squadrons remain offshore of Fiji and Nomea, Battleship/Cruiser task forces are at Samoa and Tonga and the Main US carrier fleet is offscreen at Auckland, ready to strike back if the Japanese carriers still sailing around Fiji leave the theatre.





The Japanese have landed in the North, North East, and Western areas of Australia. An Australian small corps blocks the way South at Brisbane, another one is in place at Melbourne and Adelaide and Port Augusta are covered by weak divisions, just enough to force landing from a strong Japanese force if they intended to take it quickly. With transports arriving and the 2nd marine division on the way to Australia, the immediate danger should have passed now.







The small Royal navy fleet attempts to come to grips with the Japanese torpedo boats terrorising Jaffna but the small ships outmanoeuvre the British and take no damage. Destroyer squadrons again have been breaking the blockades here and the garrisons are almost up to full strength.




In China, the Nationalist forces have pulled back to shorten the line as the Japanese have largely stripped their rearward areas, including the home islands to try stretching the frontline. This has come at a cost however, with Chinese partisans rising up in unoccupied Peking, liberating the city temporarily and tearing up rail-line in the area.




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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/17/2021 3:31:10 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – 1st March/29th March 1942

All Japanese forces have been committed to the front lines now and their primary objectives have been determined as, New Caledonia, Ceylon, Calcutta and Northern Australia in order of importance.

The bloody naval skirmishes around New Caledonia have raged on through March with casualties being sustained by both sides. A Battleship/Cruiser task force once again attempted to frustrate the Japanese navy in the region but instead of the patrol boat they expected to fight, were surprised by a wolfpack of Japanese subs. Although several were sunk, the battleship California was torpedoed and quickly sunk. The results of this engagement have led to a increased destroyer presence in the US task forces as every known Japanese submarine is currently operating in the region.







Shortly after this engagement, the Japanese main carrier fleet swept in, chasing down the American destroyers keeping the supply lines open. The 27th destroyer flotilla, on station at Nomea moves out of the port to try to keep it functioning even in the face of this overwhelming force. Several more of the Japanese subs blockading the island are sunk in this next phase of the battle. (The night move meant the carriers were not eligible to intercept, so the subs did instead).


If the Japanese carriers maintain their position around Nomea it will be impossible to keep supply flowing there for too much longer as even with the USS Hornet on its way to Auckland, the US navy is not ready for a confrontation between carriers just yet. Fortunately, all Japanese activity around Fiji has ceased and the garrison is fully equipped to repel any invasion.









At Ceylon, the British battleships and cruisers finally manage to close with the Japanese torpedo boats sinking them in large numbers in another much-needed blow to Japanese blockading capabilities. However, they are compelled to withdraw to Bombay as the three Japanese light carriers escorted by no less than eight battleships and their escorts arrive to blockade the port at Jaffna. Once again, providing sustained supply to the island will be challenging whilst this fleet is in position to interdict any raids the British may attempt. Fortunately, the garrisons were built up to nearly full strength and will not be a pushover for Japanese landing forces.











In Australia, a full six large Japanese formations have been identified around Mackay and Normanton. The 2nd US marines and 1st Australian Corps are prepared to fight a delaying action through the treacherous terrain around Brisbane until more American forces can arrive to turn the tides.







In India as well, five Japanese armies have been spotted, but the Indian divisions have retreated in excellent order to the Dacca line suffering almost no casualties along the way. By the end of April, the Indian army will have 5 large corps sized formations as well as reinforcements from Africa which should be able to resist any force the Japanese bring against them.






With every Japanese army identified, a possibility exists for a counterattack in China once the rains clear. Chinese forces have only suffered 11 casualties since December 7th and are in particularly good condition across the front. Even attacks at 1:1 to build up experience are often beneficial for the Chinese.

My opponent has also stripped the garrisons from almost all rearward areas including Truk, the Marianas, the Palu islands, the Bonin islands, Okinawa, and Formosa. These are prime targets to distract the Japanese navy within a few months when I have more divisions and transports available. The Japanese really don’t want to be spending landing ships and carriers to retake these key positions in 1942.

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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/17/2021 9:57:12 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies –29th March/April 12th, 1942



A small update to the situation at Ceylon. The Japanese light carrier and battleship fleet returned to Singapore, likely to refuel as Japan no longer gets a ton of free oilers at the start of the war. This allowed the Royal Navy, recently reinforced by the battleship HMS Valiant to launch a devastating strike on the Torpedo boats blockading the port of Jaffna once again and a destroyer squadron to sneak into Madras allowing night supply missions in the future. Three full squadrons of the small ships were sunk proving that unless major IJN assets are committed to enforcing a blockade both the British and US navy have the capacity to break it and inflict significant losses.









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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/18/2021 12:38:51 AM   
stjeand


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Been trying to find out from Al if they were removed on purpose or by accident...he can't remember.

Those oilers are MISSED as the Japanese

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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/18/2021 11:45:04 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies –April 12th / April 26th, 1942


We have reached the critical point of Japanese expansionism, the next two months will determine whether they overreach themselves, losing critical material, act too slowly and fail to take important locations to slow down the Allied counterattack or make some successes in capturing VP locations and ports.



At Nomea, the Japanese carriers have withdrawn into Rabaul once again for refuelling signalling a resumption in the blockade war there. Casualties are light this turn on both sides but efforts from two task forces sink a Japanese sub group and allow US naval forces to base outside and in the port once again preparing for night supply. The Pennsylvania does catch a torpedo but is safely returned to Auckland for repairs.











The Japanese return at Ceylon with five light/escort carriers but are only able to inflict minor damage to the Valiant and Dutch light cruiser De Ruyter. The main British fleet retreats back to Bombay again whilst newly arrived US subs and a destroyer group operating under the cover of night resume supply operations.







Both of these islands are looking like increasingly tough prospects for the Japanese to starve out unless they commit to rotating battleships that can repel my small surface task forces and destroy the supply groups although at Ceylon they would need COMINT or an invasion to spot them.


In India, the Japanese assault the weakest of the Indian Corps, forcing them to retreat with heavy losses. To make matters even worse General Giffard was killed during this attack leaving the responsibility for Indian troops in the hands of General Irwin for the rest of the war, his death would be catastrophic leaving the Indian Army with no effective command.






The Japanese armies are exhausted after this series of attacks however and the 15th is thrown back from the positions they captured by the I and II corps.







The Japanese continue their advance in Australia, pushing up to Brisbane and threatening to outflank the city. The city will be abandoned shortly with allied forces withdrawing to a line in the hills near Newcastle where the Japanese advance will be permanently stopped. It is hoped the enemy push up as far as possible, leaving them very vulnerable to landing forces cutting off all supply in 1943.







The withdrawal of several Japanese armies from China has convinced General Chiang that a limited offensive to recover the rail line from Canton to Changsha is possible. At the very least it should force the return of at least one army from another theatre to deal with the threat.





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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/18/2021 10:49:00 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – April 26th/May 10th, 1942


An eventful turn with bitter fighting occurring across the Pacific. The main focus is on China as the Japanese attempt to batter their way through the defences at Changsha head on. After no less than five separate assaults with heavy casualties on both sides, the Japanese finally admit defeat for now and cease attacking. Tragically, General Zhang Fakui is killed in the last attack by a stray bullet whilst watching the Japanese retreat forcing Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek to take personal command of the central Chinese armies.







In Burma, the 4th army group stages a daring raid, overrunning a Japanese airbase that had been left undefended destroying many of the planes on the ground and capturing several Japanese pilots.








Elsewhere, Chinese armies leap into action striking at the enemy across the country. Fighting is heaviest in the woods North of Chungking and although little ground is taken, several Japanese divisions take significant casualties. Around Changsha, the fighting goes excellently. Chenzhou is recaptured, securing the Canton-Changsha railroad and the Japanese are forced back towards the coast.







Perhaps more important though is the experience being gained by Chinese soldiers and officers, the national experience has risen to 32% and several formations engaged heavily have reached 40% experience. This is vital in making the Chinese army able to launch a real counterattack in 1943/44 with army groups that overmatch Japanese divisions by a decent amount.






In Australia, the position around Brisbane proves to be overextended as a small Japanese force lands behind to cut off the rail-line whilst ships arrive to blockade the port itself. The Australian I Corps is pounded by two Japanese armies supported by significant airpower but the exceptionally strong defensive positions prepared prove too much for the attackers (2.22x combat modifier) and they suffer eleven step losses to the Australian seven.






Fortunately for the defenders, General Geiger had recently arrived on the continent to take command of the defence along with the 77th division and was in position to destroy the Japanese raiding party and reconnect supply. The position looks precarious momentarily, but more American forces are arriving daily to aid the beleaguered Australians. The defence will hinge on the hilly terrain between Newcastle and Tamworth.







Several air strikes are launched at the destroyer squadron based at Nomea and they are eventually sunk by a strike from the Japanese carriers. The USS Swordfish sub group is unmolested though and continues supplying the garrison which has been under siege since January.







The situation at Ceylon looks dire now as the Japanese finally land a division on the island. The trouble with this is that it will finally provide reconnaissance on the Allied ships around the island making resupply challenging. The Japanese carriers are also within interdiction range of Madras making safe night supply impossible. Thought is given to evacuating the defenders there while the option is there to bulk up the garrisons at Bombay and Mangalore but eventually the decision is made to fight on for now. Hopefully, the strain of keeping both the Nomea and Ceylon blockades in place will force one to give way.






Although the Allies are on the back foot in many of the ongoing areas of conflict, the Japanese are paying a high price. With 40 infantry step losses and 23 air casualties (largely due to the overrun unit and casualties to the AA guns at Changsha) they will begin to find replacements taking a toll on their production.




< Message edited by YueJin -- 8/18/2021 11:25:21 PM >

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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/21/2021 12:55:44 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies –May 10th/24th May, 1942


At Ceylon, the Japanese main fleet returns to Singapore once again allowing the Royal Navy to slip in and engage the ships left to blockade Jaffna. The initial volley of torpedoes from the Japanese is dodged and the Takao is left sinking beneath the waves under the fire of three British battleships. Unfortunately, the surviving Aoba finds a lucky shot onto the Ramillies, detonating a magazine and leaving the ship inoperable.
As the surviving Japanese ships try to retreat, more destroyers are sunk, and the British ships take cover from any retaliation in a patch of heavy rain blanketing the island.










Japanese bombers based out of Port Villa sink the US submarines providing relief to the Nomea garrison and the carrier fleets continues to blockade the island. Further defence here is likely untenable without committing the US carriers in 1942, something I’m not willing to do for New Caledonia.







Casualties continue to be traded across China. The counterattack south of Changsha continues to find success and the city itself is now deemed secure for this campaigning season. In the north, the line has been stretched but it is hard to see how the Japanese can continue making progress through the mountains at Tien Shui.







The 17th army group has reached 44% experience and will be an absolute nightmare for the Japanese once it gets the elite specialty making it the most powerful unit in the theatre.








The withdrawal to Newcastle is completed without further problems as the Japanese are slowed by rain and rail repairs. The line here will be held by a US small corps, two Australian small corps and the US marine division. With the advantage of very defensible terrain and more American reinforcements arriving weekly it is believed this position will be strong enough.







Overall a decent turn for the Allies, losing the battleship was a blow but the trade for a cruiser and destroyer squadron as well as resupplying Ceylon is more than worth it. It looks like Nomea will fall soon unless I suicide another sub in to provide supply but it’s held the Japanese up for far longer than expected.

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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/23/2021 10:54:13 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – 24th May/7th June 1942

A slow turn across the board for the most part.


The British at Ceylon narrowly escape the pursuing Japanese carriers with the Valiant again taking punishment limping back to Bombay barely above the waterline. This ship has been through a lot in the few months it’s been in the pacific.



The main aim of the operation has been accomplished however, with supply lines to both Jaffna and Colombo intact. The best relieving ships in the game, American long-range subs are now available to perform long term supply to both ports on the island.







The Chinese summer offensive of 1942 continues with the Japanese crumbling around Changsha. If this continues throughout June without Japanese reinforcement, the Chinese have a decent chance of recapturing territory as far as the coastal cities of Shantou/Fuzhou and besieging Canton.







Chinese morale is at an all time high with the national experience reaching 37%. Most of the better equipped formations will now perform at an equivalent level to Indian troops when fully reinforced.



The Bullhead submarine squadron is sent in on a suicide mission to resupply Nomea. Whilst losing the sub will not be ideal, this could potentially delay the final Japanese conquest of the island by up to a month, enough time for the USS Wasp and bomber formations to cross the Pacific and prepare for a counterattack in Australia aimed at trapping the Japanese armies there.







This area of Australia is now Allied command’s main target. By the end of the year, all available allied sea and airpower will be dedicated to the task of blockading Brisbane with landings further north to cut off the ports there, whilst an American army of four large corps acts as the hammer to smash the trapped Japanese armies.




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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/25/2021 12:43:24 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – June 7th / July 5th, 1942

After a six-month siege of the island, the defenders of New Caledonia finally surrender after a fresh Japanese marine division is landed. With this, the Japanese carriers are released to operate elsewhere, and we will have to see where they decide to strike next.





In the dying days of the campaign, the Americans do score several minor victories. First, the Japanese submarines were left on patrolling operation, presumably to try to prevent a fresh division moving into Nomea and several of them are sunk by the mixed battlegroup operating from Sydney. Also, the commitment of the Japanese marines has meant that the airfields at Port Villa were left undefended. A small American force landed on the islands destroying many of the planes left there.












In China, forces on both sides are reaching exhaustion and it seems that operations for the year are likely to wind down. The Chinese army in 1943 is going to be a very different beast to the one from 1942, with time to reach full manpower, upgrade some equipment and with the experience gained from this year’s offensive, the average CV of a Chinese army should be closer to 7 than the 2-3 most had at the start of the year. In a devastating blow though, in one of the final attacks on a Japanese position, Generalissimo Chiang-Kai-Shek is killed when his staff car was hit by a mortar shell leaving the Kuomintang leaderless and the Chinese army with only one General with 5 combat value.







With the death of Chiang, the Young Marshal, Zhang Xueliang has emerged from house arrest to take charge of a government of national unity pledging closer cooperation with the Communists to deliver a devastating blow to the invaders next year.



In India, the Dacca line is looking impregnable with six large corps now available for the defence. Ceylon is also looking secure with the Japanese division on the island starving and the defenders in excellent condition. Short of the Japanese carrier fleet abandoning the Solomons to invest the island, the danger in this theatre seems to be over and planning can begin for the counterattack next year.







In Australia, the Japanese have taken the bait and moved a full five armies up to the Newcastle-Tamworth line. Already three American bomber groups are in the area with two more and an escort fighter group on the way. The American fleet is ready with six carriers and eight battleships and the scene is set for a decisive engagement off the coast of Brisbane later this year.





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July 5th/July 19th, 1942 - 8/26/2021 11:09:26 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – July 5th/July 19th, 1942


After a long seven months facing attempted starvation and invasion, the defenders of Ceylon have emerged triumphant from their ordeal. The Japanese division that landed on the island surrendered after being abandoned by their naval forces. The freshly raised 81st West African division disembarks at Colombo to firmly close the idea of any Japanese attempt to resume the siege. The victory here marks the high-water mark of Japanese aggression in the West and has done much to recover the prestige of imperial forces after the humiliating surrender in Malaya.






The extent of Japanese exhaustion in China was underestimated as they retreat across much of the front lines. The 17th Army group, now recognised as the most elite force in the army drives the Japanese back from Changsha entirely threatening to cut the vital railroad across central China providing supply to the Japanese divisions that crossed the hilly terrain around Ankang. Further south, many Japanese divisions are at half strength or less and are pushed back even by heavily fatigued Chinese troops.





In Australia, the Japanese launch their assault at the Newcastle-Tamworth line, targeting the Australian corps outside of the two towns. All six assaults are repulsed in bitter fighting, the dug in Australians inflicting heavy casualties on their attackers. Total losses in the battle are 15 Japanese and 8 Australian, significant for both sides but with the aid of American resources the gaps in the line can be almost completely filled.







With three bomber groups now on station in Australia, the ships moored at Brisbane are targeted. Only light damage is inflicted on two Japanese destroyer groups, but this piles up the damage they need to repair and sends the message that the Allies are finally ready to contest Japanese overextension. Escort fighters and another bomber group will arrive in country next week providing extensive cover for potential naval operations.





< Message edited by YueJin -- 8/26/2021 1:05:02 PM >

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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/27/2021 11:37:19 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – July 19th/August 2nd, 1942

The war in China rages on with the Japanese withdrawing all the way to the coast. Thanks to the temperate weather in Southern China, we are likely to have plenty of time to reduce the defenders at Canton. The capture of this crucial port would bottle up Hong Kong and force the conflict onto one front as well as making it more challenging for the Japanese to supply their armies.







Japanese attacks in Australia are concentrated on the Australian 1st corps. Casualties are lighter than in the previous month with 6 losses on each side but the Australians hold with the American 5th corps taking their place in the line.







Things are quiet elsewhere other than the Japanese carrier fleet blockading the 3 strength division that landed at Port Villa. This certainly doesn’t worry me, it’s nice to keep tabs on them and know they’re not doing anything of importance for now.






The Japanese light carrier fleet is also known to still be in port at Singapore as this particularly useful land hex has not been flipped and provides reconnaissance. I don’t plan on counterattacking for a few turns yet but the perfect information on all Japanese carriers is great to have.





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RE: YueJin (Allies) Vs Hadros (Axis) - 8/29/2021 4:56:58 PM   
ncc1701e


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Your defense of Noumea was wonderful, well done. Good to see Allies containing the Japanese in this game.

_____________________________

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August 2nd/September 13th, 1942 - 8/31/2021 12:40:37 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – August 2nd/September 13th, 1942

Over the last couple of month skirmishing has continued on both the Chinese and Indian fronts with the Japanese being slowly pushed back one step at a time, the Chinese reaching the banks of the Yangtze and the Indians crossing the Brahmaputra. Losses are moderate and roughly even on both sides although with the arrival of the UK African corps the reinforcement costs are being shared between China, India and the UK who can afford it far more than the Japanese.







Ever since the arrival of five Japanese armies and supporting divisions in Australia though we have always known that the war would be won or lost there and on September 7th five of the Japanese fleet carriers that struck Pearl Harbour half a year ago and the CV Hiyo were spotted off the coast sailing in the direction of Newcastle.



(I assume my opponent wanted to try carrier striking the ships in port at Newcastle, but the attack failed, or something was miscalculated, due to the interdiction from the bombers the move wouldn’t have been possible to undo. I’d expected to have to lure the carriers in with the planned invasion at Brisbane, but they came to me first.)



The recently rebuilt USAFFE, led by the few pilots who escaped the Philippines reacted first and whilst losses were heavy, two bombs detonated on the flight deck of the Soryu putting her and her complement of aircraft out of action for the upcoming battle.







Over the next two days as the Japanese fleet proceeded along the coast of Australia thousands of American planes launch strike after strike at them. First, wings of fighters launched from Sydney Air Force Base clear the skies inflicting 8 strength points of losses on the carrier’s CAP. Following their sweeps four full bomber groups constantly harass the Japanese slowly inflicting damage and crippling their combat ability.


















Over the course of the bombing raids, in addition to the Soryu, the Shokaku and Akagi are mission killed, unable to launch planes and a further 13 strength points are destroyed from the carrier air wings. Noting the low number of supporting ships in the Japanese fleet (3BB, 1CA) the American and Australian fleet at Newcastle moves under the cover of night to unexpectedly come across the Japanese from the southeast. The opening volley of torpedoes from the American cruisers puts an end to the crippled Shokaku, and the heavily damaged Soryu and Akagi quickly follow. A titanic gunnery duel then erupts between the American and Japanese battleships. The most powerful ships in the US navy, battleships South Dakota and North Carolina engage the super-battleship Musashi at almost point-blank range whilst the three other battleships and cruisers close with the rest of the Japanese screen.



After many hours of exhausting night-time combat, the sun begins to rise revealing the extent of the Allied success. Only three Japanese carriers and a few attendant destroyers have escaped the carnage and whilst heavy damage was sustained by almost all the American battleships, even the Arizona will be able to limp back to port at Sydney for repairs.







To turn this battle from a major victory, into a decisive one the three remaining carriers must be chased down and sunk. The American carrier fleet finally sails forth from Auckland where they have been waiting for this moment. Following the plumes of smoke from the damaged ships, the dive-bombers are easily able to find their targets and sweeping through the few remaining planes that could be launched send the Hiyo, Zuikaku and Kaga to the bottom of the ocean.






Coinciding with the victory at sea, a major offensive is launched by American and Australian troops on the front lines shattering the Japanese right flank. US marines land south of Brisbane whilst the XI corps lands to the north, cutting off the city and threatening to completely encircle the Japanese armies.

This really shows how one turn completely changes the complexion of the war in the Pacific. Moving within range of my land-based air was a major mistake by the Japanese particularly without a surface complement that could fight off the American battleships. It’s almost a certainty that I can pick up the surrender of all Japanese units in Australia now due to unopposed blockades of the ports (the light carriers are in the Indian Ocean convoy raiding) and I can perform operations at a lightning pace in 1943 now. If my opponent is willing to keep on fighting after this setback I’m looking at landing in Formosa and Korea fairly soon.


< Message edited by YueJin -- 8/31/2021 12:50:53 AM >

(in reply to ncc1701e)
Post #: 15
RE: August 2nd/September 13th, 1942 - 8/31/2021 7:55:18 AM   
ncc1701e


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Fabulous! What a turn!

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You don't trust me, do you? I don't blame you. If there is to be a brave new world, our generation is going to have the hardest time living in it.

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Post #: 16
RE: August 2nd/September 13th, 1942 - 8/31/2021 7:09:22 PM   
YueJin

 

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Thanks, I got lucky with the rather odd move of the Japanese carriers but I think the results were going to be the same either way as soon as the armies extended past Brisbane. Single track rail-lines by the coast are incredibly vunerable to being cut off and the trap was too big to not draw the Japanese navy in. The Kido Butai may be a powerful force but not when 50% of their air wings are destroyed before the fight can even start.

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Post #: 17
September 13th/September 27th, 1942 - 9/1/2021 9:16:58 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – September 13th/September 27th, 1942

The Japanese begin an arduous retreat through the harsh terrain of Australia as the American landings cut off all supply to their front line. Partisans have also been performing a remarkable job for the last month, cutting the alternative rail from Mackay to Brisbane. Allied forces pursue them through the outback and along the coastal rail whilst naval forces blockade Brisbane and resupply the beachhead. It will be vital to link up with the 1st corps next turn, trapping as much of the Japanese army as possible.



< Message edited by YueJin -- 9/1/2021 9:18:15 AM >

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Post #: 18
September 27th/October 11th, 1942 - 9/1/2021 4:31:31 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – September 27th/October 11th, 1942

Japanese planes launch many attacks against the ships blockading Brisbane and although suffering 10 losses manage to sink the North Carolina, a heavy loss to our battleship force.



Despite this setback, the operational objective was accomplished, and the Japanese are retreating in total disarray. Connection with the marine forces has been established, Brisbane is back in allied hands one Japanese army is overrun and three more almost trapped. Six sub groups have also arrived in theatre and are ready to blockade all Japanese controlled ports on the eastern seaboard of Australia, sealing the destruction of all forces on the continent.




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Post #: 19
October 11th/October 25th, 1942 - 9/1/2021 8:48:35 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – October 11th/October 25th, 1942


The pursuit continues and two full armies are overrun as the noose continues to close on the Japanese in Australia. Blockades are unleashed at the four remaining ports held on the eastern coast which should leave them completely out of supply. American and Australian troops are nearing exhaustion after the tough fighting and manoeuvring through difficult terrain but with two more corps on the way, Allied forces should have the strength to see things through to final victory in Australia.







Rain has quieted the fighting in China for the time being, but the threat of a breakthrough here has forced the Japanese to send two addition armies. The 6th army at Canton is likely to be an immovable obstacle for some time and the Chinese will have to continue picking off the weaker Japanese divisions where possible.







In India, the Chinese have cut the rail from Rangoon which should cause several Japanese formations to be put on basic supply allowing the counterattack of the imperial forces to continue. The British fleet is not blockading Chittagong yet as it’s believed that the Japanese light carriers are still in the area. Should they show up around Australia, the Royal Navy will join in the fight once again.





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Post #: 20
October 25th/November 8th, 1942 - 9/2/2021 6:37:30 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – October 25th/November 8th, 1942

The blockades in Australia hold with some minor damage on a couple of destroyer squadrons from the Japanese air force. With the removal of supply from all forces, only two marine divisions are still considered combat capable in the theatre. The fresh US 3rd corps will continue the push north to liberate Rockhampton as soon as possible. Wrapping up the Australia campaign by February 1943 would be ideal to coincide with the formation of a second carrier fleet. Invasion of key objectives can then be accomplished rapidly.



Fighting in India and China has largely stalled for the rest of the year with the imperial forces making slow but steady progress back towards the Burmese border. The recovery of the Japanese armies in Southern China means that the next major offensive will likely be conducted by the Communist forces towards the ancient city of Xi’an



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Post #: 21
November 8th/November 22nd, 1942 - 9/2/2021 11:26:58 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – November 8th/November 22nd, 1942

A bloody turn in India and Australia sees the Japanese overrunning the British 10th corps completely demolishing the formation





The efforts exerted by the Japanese left them vulnerable to a counterattack however, and the Indian army plus 9th corps advance back through the jungle towards Imphal. Additionally, the Japanese carrier fleet has been spotted at Port Moresby, leaving the door open for the Royal Navy to blockade Chittagong. This should force a withdrawal towards Rangoon, accelerating the timetable of operations in South East Asia.





One of the submarine groups blockading Cairns is sunk and a small Japanese fleet of the cruiser Aoba and two destroyer groups is attempting to reopen supply to the troops trapped in Australia. This would be unacceptable, so the battleships Nevada, West Virginia and South Dakota with HMAS Canberra escorting move in to maintain control of the coast. The Aoba and one of the destroyer groups is sunk in exchange for moderate damage on the South Dakota.





In the land campaign, the Americans succeed in capturing Rockhampton with the aid of naval gunnery from the cruisers San Francisco and New Orleans. It will be important to break out onto the plains of Northern Australia next turn to allow the air force to keep pace with the advance. Most of the US bomber groups are still stuck around Sydney and desperate need to rebase north to cover the blockading forces from the Japanese carriers. They may decide to strike the battleships off of Cairns next turn meaning another major engagement could ensue shortly.





< Message edited by YueJin -- 9/2/2021 11:27:41 PM >

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Post #: 22
RE: November 8th/November 22nd, 1942 - 9/3/2021 6:10:12 AM   
ncc1701e


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What is the situation in Central Pacific? Do you still own Wake island?

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You don't trust me, do you? I don't blame you. If there is to be a brave new world, our generation is going to have the hardest time living in it.

(in reply to YueJin)
Post #: 23
November 22nd/December 6th, 1942 - 9/4/2021 1:59:01 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – November 22nd/December 6th, 1942

The Japanese light carriers come out to attack the battleships that sunk the Aoba off of Cairns managing to sink the battleship Nevada and the Canberra. The decision is taken not to seek an engagement as Japanese air bases in New Guinea would be in range and the US air force would not be able to contribute as the bases in Southern Australia are out of range.





The blockades have done their job though and the American/Australian forces recapture the town of Mackay cutting off any possible retreat north of the Belyando river. The USAF rebases around Rockhampton and will be able to strike at any Japanese ships off the east coast of Australia now.





India is the other major conflict zone currently and the Indian army has made a breakthrough to Chittagong aided by supplies and gunnery from the Royal Navy. Japanese forces in the north are not receiving acceptable supplies with the port cut off and the line here should begin to bend very soon.





The position in the Pacific currently. The Japanese control all ports north of Fiji but you can see a serious lack of garrisons in the inner ring. In a couple of months when the US navy has been further reinforced, landings at Truk, Guam, Palau and Yap could be carried out very easily.




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Post #: 24
RE: November 22nd/December 6th, 1942 - 9/4/2021 4:25:56 PM   
ncc1701e


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quote:

ORIGINAL: YueJin

The position in the Pacific currently. The Japanese control all ports north of Fiji but you can see a serious lack of garrisons in the inner ring. In a couple of months when the US navy has been further reinforced, landings at Truk, Guam, Palau and Yap could be carried out very easily.


Thanks, can't wait to see the latest news.

_____________________________

Chancellor Gorkon to Captain James T. Kirk:
You don't trust me, do you? I don't blame you. If there is to be a brave new world, our generation is going to have the hardest time living in it.

(in reply to YueJin)
Post #: 25
December 6th/December 20th, 1942 - 9/5/2021 12:32:23 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – December 6th/December 20th, 1942

Surprisingly, the Japanese carriers attempt to press the attack at Australia, continuing on to sink the Arizona and the destroyer groups accompanying her. However, the US Air Force now has plenty of bases around Rockhampton and Mackay, the US carrier fleet is in strike range and the enemy is in a medium reconnaissance hex even before COMINT is used. The stage is set for a potentially war winning battle.





Seven airstrikes inflict 15 points of damage on the Japanese air wings as well as damaging the battleships Fuso and Yamashiro plus the cruiser Furutaka. This is a little under half the air force on the Japanese carriers wiped out, leaving the door wide open for a favourable carrier engagement.


The battle is largely one sided with the remaining Japanese planes being forced to provide CAP over their fleet but the presence of eight battleships makes target acquisition extremely challenging for the American pilots and whilst many ships are left with severe damage only the carrier Junyo and battleship Fuso are sunk.








Although a very disappointing outcome considering how skewed things were in the Allied favour, these are still significant blows to the dwindling Japanese navy and repairing the damage from this battle plus the 29 points of air strength lost will take up Japanese production for several months. The Americans could fight another battle like this again next turn and still be near full power.


On the land, the Australians manage to reach Townsville ahead of the retreating Japanese despite the onset of heavy rain making the march more arduous. Australia will not quite be liberated by the new year, but the day is close at hand.


In the South Pacific, the 1st marine division lands at Nomea, reclaiming the island only a couple of months after it finally fell to the Japanese. New Zealanders also land at Espirito Santo which will be used as an airbase to support further operations in the region.





As predicted, in India the Japanese front line begins to crumble. The Chinese 4th army group strikes out through Myitkyina, further constricting the route supplies can take to reach the troops. If the Thai forces defending Imphal can be broken next turn a further two Japanese armies could potentially be encircled and destroyed.




< Message edited by YueJin -- 9/5/2021 12:33:45 AM >

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Post #: 26
December 20th/January 3rd, 1943 - 9/5/2021 6:58:28 PM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – December 20th/January 3rd, 1943

The Japanese fleet launches one overly ambitious last strike before returning to Rabaul which proves to be a disastrous decision. The few remaining planes fail to hit any of the American ships, guarded by fighters from Rockhampton AFB. In return, the battleships Nagato and Mutsu are sunk leaving Japan with only 6-7 remaining capital ships.





The chase through Australia continues. It remains imperative that the two Japanese armies remaining in Australia be completely destroyed or they could hold up operations by months garrisoning key islands. Fighters arrive at the New Hebrides islands and the New Zealanders land and prepare airstrips on Ndeni. If Guadalcanal and Bougainville can be taken, the Japanese fleet will be forced out of Rabaul for good.





The race through Burma is also on, as the Japanese retreat as quickly as they advanced last year. Chittagong is secured by the Indian 3rd corps and the airfields at Ledo should be captured next week, allowing vital resources to be delivered to the Chinese.





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Post #: 27
January 3rd/January 17th, 1943 - 9/6/2021 10:41:34 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies – January 3rd/January 17th, 1943


Cairns is liberated by the Americans leaving Normanton as the only remaining port possible for the remnants of the Japanese army to evacuate from. General Yamashita is also killed trying to rally the stragglers as his staff car is hit by a bombing raid.





With the recapture of Chittagong, the battle moves into Burma proper. The Japanese troops near the Chinese border are exhausted and the Indian national army is overrun. Although the Imperial forces are also tired from months of hard fighting in the jungle, keeping up the pressure may inflict crippling damage to the enemy in this theatre.




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Post #: 28
January 17th/February 14th 1943 - 9/17/2021 3:37:06 PM   
YueJin

 

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Apologies to any readers for the delay, we had a weeks break but should be back on now.

Allies January 17th/February 14th 1943

The mopping up operation in Australia is finally completed with the sinking of the Ryuho and Hiryu which attempted to break the submarine blockade of Normanton port in the Japanese turn. I think one Japanese army was able to escape in the final days of the campaign but the rest of the force that invaded Australia has surrendered.






The remaining Japanese carriers showed themselves at Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, sinking an American submarine. It's certainly nice to see them this far away from the main operational area.






The Burma offensive continues to gather pace with a daring attempt by the 3rd corps to cut the railroad from Rangoon. As the Japanese paratroopers are the only combat capable corps left in the area, a counterattack is not greatly feared.







The Japanese have pulled back their garrisons in the Gilbert and Marshall islands to reinforce Truk and the Marianas. As such, small landing parties will recapture the island of Kwajalein to use as a staging point for further operation in the Eastern Pacific.





Finally, the island hopping campaign in the Solomon islands has achieved it's first goal of putting allied fighters and bombers in range of Rabaul. With air cover in place, we can begin blockading the garrisoned ports in the area and isolate the Japanese on New Guinea.



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Post #: 29
RE: January 17th/February 14th 1943 - 9/18/2021 12:09:08 AM   
YueJin

 

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Allies-February 14th/March 14th, 1943


With Australia secured and the remnants of the Japanese fleet still in the Indian Ocean, the Allies are now firmly on the offensive in the Eastern Pacific. Rabaul, the key port in the Solomon islands is defended by the well dug in 16th army, a tough target surrounded by jungle and Japanese coastal defences, overwhelming force or starvation would be needed to capture it. Intending to push forward an aggressive timetable, two full American corps and marine divisions are committed to breaking the defenders within two weeks. Thanks to support from seven of the most powerful capital ships in the US Navy the morale of the defenders is broken in two assaults and the vital port is secured. With this success, Japanese positions on New Guinea are now indefensible and will be targeted next not allowing the Japanese time to react.





We could have left the garrison to starve for a couple of turns and achieved this with half the landing craft but I have 270 more in production and want to push the tempo up as I intend to be landing on Japan by the end of 1944 this game.


In the Marshall islands, small American landing forces have captured Kwajalein, Enewetak and Wotje to use as staging positions for further raids into the Caroline and Mariana island groups.





In Burma, the oilfields at Yenangyaung have been recaptured which will provide very useful fuel for British bombers arriving in the area shortly, even with American aid keeping the British oil reserves up has been slightly difficult. The presence of all surviving Japanese warships in the area though is preventing amphibious operations to speed up the jungle trek.




< Message edited by YueJin -- 9/18/2021 12:26:55 AM >

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Post #: 30
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