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RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/8/2020 3:25:26 PM   
fcooke

 

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There is an interesting museum in the the Docklands for anyone who gets into the area. Covers the history of the importance of the docks to London, the bombings and the transformations to what the docklands are today (mostly office towers).

dont believe I have been to that pub but there's a few interesting ones in Wapping and Southark that overlook the Thames.

(in reply to LargeSlowTarget)
Post #: 31
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/8/2020 5:00:12 PM   
RangerJoe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: LargeSlowTarget

quote:

ORIGINAL: RADM.Yamaguchi
Man! I hope it was August. That lake is deep and cold. Otherwise there must have been a lot of shrinkage going on.


Late September and Loch Lomond was so cold I was afraid the shrinkage might be permanent.

quote:

ORIGINAL: JeffroK
South London, my lot came from Rotherhithe in the late 1840's.


Made a short family trip to London last year for the Boxing Day Sales, some quick sight-seeing and to give the kids the occasion to practice their English. In order to max the available funds for shopping, economies concerning accomodation had to be made. We found a very affordable studio for rent for a few days at Rotherhithe. Not the nicest area of London for sure, but it looks like lots of efforts have been made to restructure it after the docks closed down. Still, lots of old brick housing around, some still showing the marks of the Blitz bombings. Spent a splendid evening in the "Ship and Whale" pub near the Greenland Dock with nice locals telling us more about the history of Rotherhithe, the indispensable fish'n'chips and a few pints of "Spitfire" ale and lager - so I can now brag back at home that I have crossed the channel and downed a couple of Spitfires . Looks like it was the last trip for some time, a few weeks later the Corona virus started to hit Europe, and since March I'm doing homeoffice and have rarely ventured far from home due to lock-down.


I spent a long, New Years weekend in London many years ago. I did enjoy it, especially the London Dungeon. I think that I would rather have German Lager than English Ale.

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to LargeSlowTarget)
Post #: 32
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 12:47:49 AM   
fcooke

 

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Best fish and chips I had while living in London was a place in Kentish town (north London). They literally had 30 different types of fish to choose from and still serve it wrapped in newspaper. Renting a flat rather than hotel rooms is the way to go if you are going for more than a few days. As for beer British Ale or German lager is better than 50% of what you can get in the US. Though the craft breweries are improving that situation.

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Post #: 33
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 4:11:15 AM   
Alfred

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: fcooke

... As for beer British Ale or German lager is better than 50% of what you can get in the US. Though the craft breweries are improving that situation.


From personal observation in the midwest, the main impact of US craft breweries has been to destroy the tradition of drinking bourbon.

Alfred

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Post #: 34
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 10:23:56 AM   
fcooke

 

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I still drink the occasional bourbon. And to be honest I drink more wine than beer these days. And Irish whiskey.

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Post #: 35
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 11:16:17 AM   
PaxMondo


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Alfred


quote:

ORIGINAL: fcooke

... As for beer British Ale or German lager is better than 50% of what you can get in the US. Though the craft breweries are improving that situation.


From personal observation in the midwest, the main impact of US craft breweries has been to destroy the tradition of drinking bourbon.

Alfred

Bourbon (and scotch) were always a social drink for me. I don't drink as much of either now as my social network has shrunk to the point where my last drinking buddy is 16 hours flight time away ... one more funeral and my whiskey days are done.

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Post #: 36
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 11:56:09 AM   
fcooke

 

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You could always put down a fire and enjoy a drink with your dog......

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Post #: 37
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 11:56:57 AM   
fcooke

 

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16 hour flight? where does your friend live?

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Post #: 38
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 2:00:14 PM   
Alfred

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo


quote:

ORIGINAL: Alfred


quote:

ORIGINAL: fcooke

... As for beer British Ale or German lager is better than 50% of what you can get in the US. Though the craft breweries are improving that situation.


From personal observation in the midwest, the main impact of US craft breweries has been to destroy the tradition of drinking bourbon.

Alfred

Bourbon (and scotch) were always a social drink for me. I don't drink as much of either now as my social network has shrunk to the point where my last drinking buddy is 16 hours flight time away ... one more funeral and my whiskey days are done.


But you can always consume them in the form of cocktails, and females are always more willing to imbibe hard liquor in the form of a cocktail. Tell them its reliving the Mad Men and Don Draper experience. They love it.

Alfred

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 39
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 2:01:04 PM   
RangerJoe


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The problem with bourbon is when you give two little paper cups away from the litre and you finish it, then you remember giving that much away from the litre bottle of cognac, remember drinking that much from the cognac and was told that you finished it. It was non-diluted. I made it to work the next day.

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


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Post #: 40
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 4:46:07 PM   
PaxMondo


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Alfred


quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo


quote:

ORIGINAL: Alfred


quote:

ORIGINAL: fcooke

... As for beer British Ale or German lager is better than 50% of what you can get in the US. Though the craft breweries are improving that situation.


From personal observation in the midwest, the main impact of US craft breweries has been to destroy the tradition of drinking bourbon.

Alfred

Bourbon (and scotch) were always a social drink for me. I don't drink as much of either now as my social network has shrunk to the point where my last drinking buddy is 16 hours flight time away ... one more funeral and my whiskey days are done.


But you can always consume them in the form of cocktails, and females are always more willing to imbibe hard liquor in the form of a cocktail. Tell them its reliving the Mad Men and Don Draper experience. They love it.

Alfred

Good advice. For me, not as applicable. I got a great wife who is a total light weight; we share a glass of wine and she's "cooked". :)



_____________________________

Pax

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Post #: 41
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 8:04:44 PM   
mind_messing

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: LargeSlowTarget


quote:

ORIGINAL: Andy Mac


quote:

ORIGINAL: RADM.Yamaguchi

Andy,

sorry no help with the tanks but i never noticed where you were from before. What a beautiful place. We drove by there last year on the way form Oban to Glasgow. Had a nice lunch at a place on Loch Lommond.

You probably don't miss all the American tourists that didn't come this year.


Unfortunately I now live in South London !!! Grew up in Gods Country moved to the other end of the spectrum :)


I echo the feelings. I have hiked a part of the West Highland Way from Drymen near Alexandria up to Tyndrum some 20 years ago. Fond memories of this beautiful area - skinny-dipping in Loch Lommond included . Spent the last three days of this vacation trip at London - interesting as well, but much less appreciated. If it hadn't been for the IWM and HMS Belfast...


I did the whole stretch earlier this year. The section you mentioned was what could absolutely be described in AE terms as "Wooded-Rough"...

(in reply to LargeSlowTarget)
Post #: 42
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/9/2020 8:55:15 PM   
fcooke

 

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The French make some pretty good cognac, especially in Normandy. And if you go there you will need some after seeing all the soldier's graves.

And if you do get to Normandy there are oodles of museums, mostly small, but a bunch of them. And a bunch of nice small hotels. And the sub pens in Cherbourg are still there - even has a sub in them - I think a Daphne class boat. My wife put up with me for a week as we explored the area.

(in reply to mind_messing)
Post #: 43
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 12:05:40 AM   
LargeSlowTarget


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Joined: 9/23/2000
From: Hessen, Germany - now living in France
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quote:

ORIGINAL: mind_messing
I did the whole stretch earlier this year. The section you mentioned was what could absolutely be described in AE terms as "Wooded-Rough"...


Oh yes absolutely! When I made the trip I was still in good shape after leaving the Army, but at the end of the first day I was pretty spent, cursing my backpack and wondering if I would have the force to continue. But then I remembered what I have read in the travel guide which had given me the idea to do the West Highland Way - that the southern stretch along Loch Lomond is the hardest and that may people "throw the towel" on the first day, but that it gets easier afterwards - which is true. I have had good luck with the weather, sunshine all the time. I have made a small detour to climb Ben Lomond and enjoyed a great view all around - back down the locals told me how lucky I have been because the summit is covered in clouds something like 360 days per year. At Tyndrum I left the trail to go west to the coast, slept in the ruins of Kilchurn Castle - hiding from the guardian who locks the entrance each evening, bright idea because he didn't show up next morning to open again so I had to climb down the wall to get out - then on to Inveraray to visit the "Combined Operations Museum" on the WW2 Commandos training site - the museum has closed shortly thereafter - then circling back to the East up and down the Glens and the appropriately named "Rest and be thankful" viewpoint at the top of the pass and back to Loch Lomond and the bus to the airport. Best hiking trip I have ever made, very tired at the end but the scenery was well worth it!

quote:

ORIGINAL: fcooke
The French make some pretty good cognac, especially in Normandy.


Cognac made in Normandy?!? Oh mon dieu!

Careful, don't let the people from Cognac hear that - nor a true Norman. The French are very attached to their regional specialities - which are heavily protected by trademarks.

Cognac is a brandy made exclusively from vineyards around the city of Cognac north of Bordeaux. Normandy is known for excellent ciders and the famous fruit brandy called Calvados.

From my place near Paris I can reach Normandy by car in 2 hours, and I fetch my cider and Calvados directly from a small independent producer who runs his own orchard, juicer and storage in the middle of nowhere east of Caen. A mobile distillery - a kind of legalized moonshiner - is setting up on his farm once a year when the fermentation of the apple juice is just right.

If you wonder why the Germans have tried to conquer France on two occasions in the last century, think Cognac, Calvados, Champagne, Clairet to name just the best-known. And then there is the food . In Germany we have the expression "Leben wie Gott in Frankreich" - literally "Living like God in France" - the English equivalent would be "to live the life of Riley". I have left Germany 16 years ago and I'm not planning to go back.


Okay okay I'm ranting on and on - it's the fault of IdahoNYer, who still keeps me waiting for the first turn of our rematch!

< Message edited by LargeSlowTarget -- 11/10/2020 12:11:46 AM >


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Post #: 44
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 12:14:19 AM   
RangerJoe


Posts: 9213
Joined: 11/16/2015
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quote:

ORIGINAL: LargeSlowTarget

quote:

ORIGINAL: mind_messing
I did the whole stretch earlier this year. The section you mentioned was what could absolutely be described in AE terms as "Wooded-Rough"...


Oh yes absolutely! When I made the trip I was still in good shape after leaving the Army, but at the end of the first day I was pretty spent, cursing my backpack and wondering if I would have the force to continue. But then I remembered what I have read in the travel guide which had given me the idea to do the West Highland Way - that the southern stretch along Loch Lomond is the hardest and that may people "throw the towel" on the first day, but that it gets easier afterwards - which is true. I have had good luck with the weather, sunshine all the time. I have made a small detour to climb Ben Lomond and enjoyed a great view all around - back down the locals told me how lucky I have been because the summit is covered in clouds something like 360 days per year. At Tyndrum I left the trail to go west to the coast, slept in the ruins of Kilchurn Castle - hiding from the guardian who locks the entrance each evening, bright idea because he didn't show up next morning to open again so I had to climb down the wall to get out - then on to Inveraray to visit the "Combined Operations Museum" on the WW2 Commandos training site - the museum has closed shortly thereafter - then circling back to the East up and down the Glens and the appropriately named "Rest and be thankful" viewpoint at the top of the pass and back to Loch Lomond and the bus to the airport. Best hiking trip I have ever made, very tired at the end but the scenery was well worth it!

quote:

ORIGINAL: fcooke
The French make some pretty good cognac, especially in Normandy.


Cognac made in Normandy?!? Oh mon dieu!

Careful, don't let the people from Cognac hear that - nor a true Norman. The French are very attached to their regional specialities - which are heavily protected by trademarks.

Cognac is a brandy made exclusively from vineyards around the city of Cognac north of Bordeaux. Normandy is known for excellent ciders and the famous fruit brandy called Calvados.

From my place near Paris I can reach Normandy by car in 2 hours, and I fetch my cider and Calvados directly from a small independent producer who runs his own orchard, juicer and storage in the middle of nowhere east of Caen. A mobile distillery - a kind of legalized moonshiner - is setting up on his farm once a year when the fermentation of the apple juice is just right.

If you wonder why the Germans have tried to conquer France on two occasions in the last century, think Cognac, Calvados, Champagne, Clairet to name just the best-known. And then there is the food . In Germany we have the expression "Leben wie Gott in Frankreich" - literally "Living like God in France" - the English equivalent would be "to live the life of Riley". I have left Germany 16 years ago and I'm not planning to go back.


Okay okay I'm ranting on and on - it's the fault of IdahoNYer, who still keeps me waiting for the first turn of our rematch!


But Germany has Asbach, among other things.

Changing the subject, were you celebrating 31 years ago because of what happened?

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to LargeSlowTarget)
Post #: 45
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 1:56:50 AM   
LargeSlowTarget


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Don't mention Asbach! It might be a nice brandy, yet for me the name triggers faint and foggy but nonetheless painful memories of a terrible hangover the first - and only - time I have tasted it, birthday party when I was 16. First party with sleep-over of the guests, we had pitched some tents in the garden for us boys to sleep outside, so had no immediate parental supervision after "lights out". Of course we did not sleep. A friend had smuggled a bottle of Asbach past the "perimeter guards" and it made the rounds. I was too young and inexperienced with demon alcohol and had too much too fast. Terrible headache next morning and not in the best physical form... As luck would have it, that day I had a sports competition, at this time I was into athletism. Yet that day on the 100 meter sprint I was last - no wonder, I ran at least 150 meters, zig-zagging . Never ever had Asbach since. Can't say that of hangovers, but due to different stuff. No more Jägermeister either.

31 years ago - German unification. I was 15, already had my share of cold war indoctrination, with the Russians being evil of course - but Reagan not being too popular either with his arms race and Pershing II in Germany etc - and Bush sen. who had just taken over seemed to continue the trend. For most kids of my generation the division of Germany after WW2 was an accepted fact, the role of both Germanies was seen as pawns to be sacrificed, battlefields for the super powers in case the cold war turned hot. Unification seemed unrealistic and we were just glad and happy to be on the western side of the iron curtain and not under Russian occupation. Nobody had any reason to suspect that the wall would fall by the end of 1989. When it did, I was well aware that it was history in the making, but I wasn't particulary excited about the prospects of a reunited Germany - I had always known two seperate German states and unification wasn't high on my wish list. In fact, I was mildly concerned about the wave of patriotism / nationalism in the wake of the fall of the Berlin wall - always have been wary and sceptical of excessive pride concerning one's country.
Anyway, for my grandma it was totally different story, a dream coming true and the fatherland united again after four decades of unnatural and artificial division.

< Message edited by LargeSlowTarget -- 11/10/2020 2:00:09 AM >


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Post #: 46
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 2:05:40 AM   
RangerJoe


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Joined: 11/16/2015
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I understand about the Asbach although for me it was other things.

I understand how your grandmother felt and I can understand how you felt since you grew up with the division.

Let me just say this, I became fairly familiar with the area from just north of Philippstahl to just south of Tann. Later I met a woman who, as a child, left the East with her grandmother and mother to live in the West here her mother worked.

< Message edited by RangerJoe -- 11/10/2020 2:08:46 AM >


_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to LargeSlowTarget)
Post #: 47
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 2:30:13 AM   
LargeSlowTarget


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From: Hessen, Germany - now living in France
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Oh, the Fulda Gap. I'm from Marburg, a city just to the NW of the Vogelsberg Mountains in the Lahn valley. In case of a Warsaw Pact attack, Marburg would have been right in the path of the northern pincer from the Fulda Gap in direction of Frankfurt.

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Post #: 48
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 5:55:50 AM   
BBfanboy


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From: Winnipeg, MB
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quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe

I understand about the Asbach although for me it was other things.

I understand how your grandmother felt and I can understand how you felt since you grew up with the division.

Let me just say this, I became fairly familiar with the area from just north of Philippstahl to just south of Tann. Later I met a woman who, as a child, left the East with her grandmother and mother to live in the West here her mother worked.

I was in the Canadian Forces during the Cold War and once had a classified briefing about what it was like to live in Russia, the quality of their weapons and their leadership. It was apparent that much of our fears of Russia was a paper (or tinfoil) tiger conjured up to ensure much was spent in the West on more defense material than was really necessary. The US strategy was to outspend the USSR in armaments and cause the USSR to bankrupt itself trying and keep up. It worked.

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Post #: 49
RE: Type 95 Tank - 11/10/2020 9:38:53 AM   
RangerJoe


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Joined: 11/16/2015
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quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe

I understand about the Asbach although for me it was other things.

I understand how your grandmother felt and I can understand how you felt since you grew up with the division.

Let me just say this, I became fairly familiar with the area from just north of Philippstahl to just south of Tann. Later I met a woman who, as a child, left the East with her grandmother and mother to live in the West here her mother worked.

I was in the Canadian Forces during the Cold War and once had a classified briefing about what it was like to live in Russia, the quality of their weapons and their leadership. It was apparent that much of our fears of Russia was a paper (or tinfoil) tiger conjured up to ensure much was spent in the West on more defense material than was really necessary. The US strategy was to outspend the USSR in armaments and cause the USSR to bankrupt itself trying and keep up. It worked.


The USSR built a lot of tanks but not enough spare parts.

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 50
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