Matrix Games Forums

Forums  Register  Login  Photo Gallery  Member List  Search  Calendars  FAQ 

My Profile  Inbox  Address Book  My Subscription  My Forums  Log Out

RE: Improving the UK OOB

 
View related threads: (in this forum | in all forums)

Logged in as: Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [New Releases from Matrix Games] >> Campaign Series: Middle East 1948-1985 >> Mods and Scenarios >> RE: Improving the UK OOB Page: <<   < prev  1 [2] 3 4   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 1:48:47 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
These men under training with Sterling SMG are Trucial Oman Scouts. Considered a high quality and loyal unit, after 1958 they got better equipment including FAL SLRs. They maintaiend a distinctive uniform with blue grey shirts, khaki trousers and bediouin headdress.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/12/2020 1:49:37 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 31
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 7:07:13 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Another view of the Ferret Mk 5.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 32
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 7:08:57 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
And another picture of the Humber Hornet,




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/12/2020 7:09:12 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 33
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 7:22:38 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Although the Bofors L70 40mm AAA weapon may look superficially similar to its WW2 counterpart the L60, it was a giant leap forward in performance having powered gunlaying and twice the rate of fire and effective altitude. The British army adopted the type in 1957 and continued to use them to 1985 (some were even sent to the Falklands with 5 Brigade). The L70 remains in production to this day. They should demonstate much greater lethality against jets and helicopeters than the earlier L60s. The L70 40 mm design uses a larger 40×365R round firing a slightly lighter 870 g shell at a much higher 1,030 m/s (3,379 fps) muzzle velocity. The rate of fire was increased to 240 rounds per minute (4.0 rounds per second). Additionally, the carriage was modified to be power-laid, the power being supplied by a generator placed on the front of the carriage. The first version was produced in 1947, accepted in 1948 as the "40 mm lvakan m/48", and entered Swedish service in 1951. Additional changes over the years have improved the firing rate first to 300 rpm (5.0 rounds per second), and later to 330 rpm (5.5 rps). L70 bofors were used in Cyprus, Malaya, Borneo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Oman and Aden as well as with the RAF Regiment and BAOR in Germany.






Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 5:50:42 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 34
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 7:33:27 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The AEC Militant prime mover was adopted in 1946 and used until 1965 - it was the main prime mover for the 5.5" gun from 1947-1962. The Militant was a 6x6 development of the wartime AEC Matador with a more powerful diesel engine. It was also used as a recovery vehicle.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:40:05 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 35
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 7:45:52 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The M2 Alligator Amphibious Bridging Rig (German made) was in use from 1966-85. I believe you already have it in the game as part of the Israeli OOB.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 5:48:24 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 36
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 8:13:01 AM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Here is the Alvis Ferret Mk 1, command and liaison car, which replaced the Daimler Dingo. It had an open top and pintle mounted a Bren or (after 1957) a L4 LMG. It was used from 1951-85. This one is with the Royal Tank Regiment in Cyprus in 1956.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:42:27 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 37
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 12:16:05 PM   
Big Ivan


Posts: 1618
Joined: 6/9/2008
From: Mansfield, OH
Status: offline
Very nice and detailed presentation on UK equipment James!

Thank you!!

_____________________________

Blitz call sign Big Ivan.

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 38
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 12:40:08 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Thanks! - I'm trying to highlight iterms on the OOB that could be added! I'm having a go myself, but good for future Vietnam and Cold War iterations too.

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:43:02 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to Big Ivan)
Post #: 39
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 12:49:56 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Army Air Corps used the Westland Sioux AH-1 (licence built Bell 47) as its main training and light obvservation helicopter from 1965-80. Some were also used by the Royal Marine Commando Squadron - they replaced the Auster AOP 9, SR Skeeter and UH-12 Raven. From 1974 the Sioux was replaced with the arrival of the turbine powered Westland Gazelle. A flight of six Sioux was attached to every armoured recce regiment. The Bell 47 is included in the game but needs to be added to the UK OOB.





Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 11:53:24 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 40
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 12:53:50 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Army's first scout helicopter was the Saunder's Roe Skeeter AOP 12, in service from 1956 to 1965. It was replaced by the Sioux and Westland Scout.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 11:48:56 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 41
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 12:56:57 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Royal Marines Commando Squadron used Hiller UH-12 Ravens for scouting from 1958-65, before they too received the Sioux and Scout. The Ravens were used in Borneo in 1964. One AAC squadron operated the French made Alouette II (in Cyprus) from 1965 to 82.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 11:50:50 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 42
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 1:12:06 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Royal Marines began trading in their Wessex HU5 helicopters for Sea King HC4 Commando 'nicknamed Junglie' in 1978. Both the Wessex and Commando were used together until 1984 and in the Falklands, after which the Wessex was sent to reserve units. The Sea King continued in service into the 21st century The Sea King had twice the load carrying capacity (28 troops) of the Wessex. They also carried door mounted M2 Browning 12.7mm HMGs and 7.62mm GPMGs and could carry two AS-12 ATGMs.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:45:44 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 43
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 1:26:57 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The RAF used the Phanton FGR2 (F4M) as a strike fighter between 1969-76, they were attached to 38 Group for rapid deployment to trouble spots. From 1976 onwards they were re-rolled as air defence fighters and replaced in the strike-reconnaisance role by Jaguars. The Royal Navy also used its Phantom FG1s as strike-fighters from 1968-78. Phantoms could carry recce pods, SNEB 2.75" rocket pods, 1,000lb retarded bombs, 650lb CBUs, napalm and 20mm vulcan gun pods.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:46:52 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 44
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 1:36:16 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
From 1951-1969 the main RAF tactical strike bomber was the English Electric Canberra. Many variants were used and they provided close air support during the Suez crisis and in Borneo as well as for RAF Germany. They could carry up to 8,000lb of 500lb or 1,000lb bombs, AS 30 ASMs, SNEB 2.75" rockets and 4 x 20mm cannon as well as tactical nukes. This photo is the B(I) 8 interdictor variant of 1957. The Canberra was capable of Mach 0.85 (580 Mph) and was also used by Australia in Vietnam, Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, South Africa, New Zealand, India, Argentina, Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, Chile, France, Ethiopia, Sweden and West Germany.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 5:53:45 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 45
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 1:44:33 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
From 1947-52 the Bristol Brigand was used for counter-insurgency and close air support, especially in Malaya. The Brigand had been designed to replace the Beaufighter as a torpedo bomber in WW2, but its ability to loiter for up to two hours over the jungle gave it a new lease of life as flying artillery in counter-insurgency in Malaya. It was capable of 365mph and carried 4 x 20mm cannon, 8 x 60lb RP-3 rockets and up to 2,000lb of bombs.





Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:48:02 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 46
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 1:58:38 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Hornet FB4 was also used in Malaya after replacement in front line units in Germany by Vampires. Originally designed as a long range escort fighter for missions against Japan, it was used as a fighter bomber post war especially in Malaya. It was in service from 1948-55. Capable of 465mph is had 4 20mm cannon and carried four RP-3 roackets and 2 x 1,000lb bombs. The Navy used the Sea Hornet variant too.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:48:45 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 47
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 2:21:02 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Another WW2 type that saw its last operational tours in Malaya was the Spitfire from 1948-52. It was also used in the Middle East. The Griffon engined types FR 18 and 24 were last in service. They had 4 x 20mm cannon and could carry RP-3 rockets. The similar Seafire FR 47 was used in 1950-1 in Korea, the Royal Canadian Navy used the Seafire F 17.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:50:22 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 48
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 2:24:17 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
From 1953-55 Harvard T II trainers equipped with 25lb anti-personnel bombs were used as dive bombers against rebel hide outs in Kenya by the RAF.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 49
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 2:33:40 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
During the Dhofar war, seconded RAF pilots flew BAC Strikemaster armed trainers on CAS missions against communist rebels and Yemeni incursions. The type was available for the RAFO from 1970-85. Strikemasters were capable of 481 Mph, had two 7.62mm machine guns and carried 3,000lb of 2.75" SNEB rockets, 500lb bombs and addtional 7.62mm MG pods. Four were lost to anti-aircraft fire including one to a SA-7 SAM.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/12/2020 2:44:43 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 50
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 2:42:35 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The HS Buccaneer was used by both the Royal Navy and RAF from 1960-85 as a strike bomber. Buccaneers flew mission over Borneo in 1964-7 and Lebanon during the civil war in 1982 and went on to serve in the Gulf War. The Buccaneer could carry 16,000lb bombs and a range of unguided and guided rockets and air to surfece and anti-radiation missiles, and, after 1979, the Pave Spike target designator and Paveway PGMs. The Buccaneer was very tough and had long range and exceptional low level handling and all weather terrain following radar for day and night strikes. It was fitted with excellent ECM as time wore on. It was capable of Mach 0.95 and could make 670mph at 200 ft. It was also used by the SAAF in the Angola war.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/21/2020 11:47:24 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 51
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 2:56:20 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Supermarine Scimitar was the Royal Navy's primary strike aircraft from 1957-65, replacing the Sea Hawk. They flew operations in Kuwait, Aden and Borneo. The Scimitar was capable of 740 Mph and had 4 x 30mm cannon. It could carry 4 x 1,000lb bombs, napalm canisters, 4 x SNEB 2.75" rocket packs or 16 RP-3 rockets and up to 4 x Bullpup ASMs in addition to Sidewinder AAMs.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/13/2020 8:53:46 AM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 52
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 4:03:19 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Infantry

From 1948-50 British infantry and Royal Marines Commandos and RAF Regiment Field Squadrons were all armed with the WW2 SMLE Mk III bolt action rifle and sniper rifle as well as the newer SMLE Mk 5 'Jungle Carbine'. Some units, notably paratroopers, also had US Browning M1 semi-auto Carbines. Late production Sten Mk 5 9mm SMGs were standard issue as well as Bren LMGs. Every platoon had a 2" smoke mortar and a PIAT anti-tank weapon. Heavy weapons were mostly WW2 vintage - OBL 3" and 4.2" mortars, Vickers Medium Machine Guns and 6 pounder anti-tank guns, although a few units had an experimental 3.45" RCLR. Some 12.7mm HMGs and 20mm Polsten AA guns were allocated to elite light infantry and paratroopers. Tactically they were still using WW2 training and the Army was made up of mostly conscripts.

From 1950-56 improvements inlcuded the adoption of the vastly better Pachett Sterling 9mm SMG, while the PIAT was replaced by the US M20 90mm "Super Bazooka' and the Belgian-designed ENERGA anti-tank rifle grenade was issued at section level as well as combat shotguns in Malaya. A new hand grenade also replaced the venerable Mills Bomb. Overall the anti-tank and anti-structure power of the platoon increased and in Malaya it had more short ranged automatic weapons. Heavy weapons also improved with the adoption of the 120mm BAT RCLR for motorised and armoured infantry and the US 106mm RCLR for light infantry, paratroops and marines. The WW2 vintage 6 pounder and 17 pounder AT guns were retired.`Significant lessons were learned in Korea, Malaya and Suez that brought about the end of conscription, new weapons and a tactical and training rethink for the new 'all professional' infantry from 1957.

The modern SAS was re-born during this period in Malaya (initally being called the Malaya Scouts), and was armed with a mix of Brens, Australian Owen Gun SMGs, Patchett Sterlings, M1 Carbines and SMLE Mk 5 'Jungle Carbines'. The SBS was also reformed from the School of Combined Operations and SBS teams were deployed behind the lines from submarines in the Korean war.

From 1957-62 the new 7.62mm FN FAL 'SLR' began to replace the SMLE. Colonial troops and armed police still kept the SMLE. Also a 7.62 chambered version of the Bren, the L7A1 'LMG' was introduced to replace the Bren. The MOBAT, a more mobile version of the 120mm BAT RCLR replaced the BAT in general use and some light infantry units received Vigilant ATGMs. Overall the firepower and mobiliy of the platoon increased. This period saw the end of national service (conscription) and some sigificant improvements in fire and movement training, learning from lessons identified from analysis of WW2 and Korea on both sides of the Atlantic. Some units began to specialise in desert, jungle and arctic warfare too.

From 1962-84 the platoon replaced the M20 and ENERGA combination with the 84mm Carl Gustav at platoon level and the US M72 LAW at section level. The Vickers Medium Machine Gun was replaced by the FN MAG 7.62 GMPG (or Gimpy to the troops) in 1962 and bipod versions were issued at section level to some units like armoured infantry, paras, marines and SAS from 1964. The L42A1 7.62mm sniper rifle was introduced in 1971 and The new L19 81mm mortar replaced the OBL 3" from 1962, although the 2" smoke mortar and 4.2" heavy mortar were retained (the 4.2" in airborne units). SAS and SBS units in Borneo, Oman and Northern Ireland received the M16A1/A2 assault rifle and 40mm UGL. The professional army units of this period were highly capable with excellent training and firepower.

From 1962 the lightwieght WOMBAT 120mm RCRL replaced the 106mm RCRL in light infantry, airborne and commando units and supplemented the MOBAT in regular infantry units. The SLR, SMG, LMG and GPMG incrementally improved with nylon/glass fibre furniture, the SUIT 4 x optical sight for designated marksmen and GPMG gunners and so on. The 4.2" Mortar was phased out in 1975 and the Milan ATGM replaced the WOMBAT RCLR from 1978. HK MP5 and MAC-10 SMGs were also used by SAS and SBS units. A number of specialised covert reconnaissance and counter-terrorist units were formed such as 14 Intelligence Company in Northern Ireland and the Counter-Revolutionary Warfare Group within 22 SAS.

From 1984-85 the SLR, Sterling SMG and L7 LMG were replaced with the L85A1 5.56mm Assault Rifle and L86A1 5.56mm Light Support Weapon (LSW). 7.62mm GPMGs were issued at platoon level to armoured infantry and the Carl Gustav/LAW combination was replaced by a single AT weapon issued at section level, the 94mm LAW-80. The improved Milan 2 ATGM replaced the Milan and remaining WOMBAT RCRLs. Both close combat firepower and antitank strength improved although long range hitting power anti-structure capacity reduced somewhat. The excellent L96 sniper rifle entered service in 1982 and provided an important improvement in long ranged firepower.

The picture is taken in Aden and shows the ENERGA HEAT rifle grenade mounted on a L1A1 SLR.










Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/15/2020 4:13:31 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 53
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 4:31:04 PM   
Jason Petho


Posts: 14089
Joined: 6/22/2004
From: Terrace, BC, Canada
Status: online
This is exceptional information, thank you, James!!

_____________________________


(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 54
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 5:11:54 PM   
Jason Petho


Posts: 14089
Joined: 6/22/2004
From: Terrace, BC, Canada
Status: online
FYI, I have started incorporating these into the Platoon files:

quote:

P090008 4 8 22 35 40 30 40 20 53 2 4 1 12 0 0 1 254 8 P090008 9 97 16 1 4 2097167 63 1 85 12 67 42 30 Chieftain Mk. 2 , Chieftain Mk. 2 ,
P090009 3 8 22 35 40 30 40 20 53 2 4 1 12 0 0 1 254 8 P090008 9 97 16 1 4 2097167 63 1 85 12 67 42 30 Chieftain Mk. 2 , Chieftain Mk. 2 ,
P090010 2 8 22 35 40 30 40 20 53 2 4 1 12 0 0 1 254 8 P090008 9 97 16 1 4 2097167 63 1 85 12 67 42 30 Chieftain Mk. 2 , Chieftain Mk. 2 ,
P090XXX 4 8 22 35 40 30 43 22 55 2 4 1 12 0 0 1 254 8 P090XXX 9 97 16 1 4 2113551 74 1 85 12 67 42 30 Chieftain Mk. 5 , Chieftain Mk. 5 ,
P090XXX 3 8 22 35 40 30 43 22 55 2 4 1 12 0 0 1 254 8 P090XXX 9 97 16 1 4 2113551 74 1 85 12 67 42 30 Chieftain Mk. 5 , Chieftain Mk. 5 ,
P090XXX 2 8 22 35 40 30 43 22 55 2 4 1 12 0 0 1 254 8 P090XXX 9 97 16 1 4 2113551 74 1 85 12 67 42 30 Chieftain Mk. 5 , Chieftain Mk. 5 ,


_____________________________


(in reply to Jason Petho)
Post #: 55
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 5:17:51 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Brilliant - thank you! I keep providing info as it comes to me!

_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to Jason Petho)
Post #: 56
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 5:44:13 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
The Royal Marines were one of the units specializing in both arctic and jungle warfare. As a result they adopted the Swedish 'Snow Trac' light weapons carrier from 1962-75. The Snow Trac had exceptional mobility in soft snow or sand and allowed RM Commando heavy weapons to keep up with the infantry platoons over difficult terrain. The Snow tracs were used to carry WOMBAT RCRLs, 81mm mortars and GPMG and M2 Browning HMG teams. The size of a compact car, it was capable of 20mph in snow or sand and 35mph on roads. They were mostly used in Norway. In the game the Snow Trac and its sucessors probably need to have fewer movement penalties and the ability to cross some more inacessible terrain types.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/12/2020 7:17:46 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 57
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 5:56:49 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
From 1966-85 the Snow trac was supplemented and then replaced by the much more capable Bandvagn Bv 202. This had two track units but like the Snow Trac still had a ground pressure less than a single skier. It was also fully amphibious. The Bv 202 could carry up to 8 troops, but was principally used as a heavy weapons carrier and logistics vehicle by the Royal Marines. It was large enough to be used as prime mover for the L5 105mm pack howitzer and was often used as such by the commando artillery. The Bv 202 had a top speed of 20 mph off road and 40 mph on roads. Both the Snow Trac and Bv 202 could be airlifted by a Wessex or Sea King helicopter.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/12/2020 7:17:16 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 58
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 6:10:42 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
In 1982 the much improved Bv 206 began to enter service with the Royal Marines. With all the advantages of the Bv 202, the Bv 206 could carry the L118 105mm light gun which had replaced the L5 pack howitzer as well as Milan ATGM teams. total load carrying cpacity was 5,000lbs or 17 troops. The Bv 206 was capable of 50mph on the road and weighed 4.5 tons. Most were armed with a ring mounted 7.62mm GPMG on the forward track unit. The BV 206 can be airlifted by a CH47 Chinook.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by James Fennell -- 8/12/2020 7:16:22 PM >


_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 59
RE: Improving the UK OOB - 8/12/2020 6:22:27 PM   
James Fennell


Posts: 135
Joined: 12/25/2010
From: Gloucestershire
Status: offline
Another British amphibious warfare vehicle is the BARV - beach armoured recovery vehicle. These are based on MBTs but are capable of deep wading in surf and are used to keep the landing beaches free of stranded and wrecked vehicles and landing craft during amphibious operations - they were used at Suez and the Falklands. The original BARV was the Sherman BARV developed for the Normandy landings. Based on a standard Sherman M4A4 chassis they remained in service from 1948-63.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

....gone to the dark side

(in reply to James Fennell)
Post #: 60
Page:   <<   < prev  1 [2] 3 4   next >   >>
All Forums >> [New Releases from Matrix Games] >> Campaign Series: Middle East 1948-1985 >> Mods and Scenarios >> RE: Improving the UK OOB Page: <<   < prev  1 [2] 3 4   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.172