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I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 3:14:55 PM   
MrsWargamer


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I picked 1980 out of the blue. It might have been 1979, or maybe 1985.

My point, I was happier with my wargaming then than now.

Gaming in general. D&D was still just Advanced. It was real, not a video game.

Wargames for me were Squad Leader and Third Reich. Played them to death.
I also had Tactics II and Blitzkrieg and Midway.

There are too many designs now.
It's like a drug, and I have become an addict.

The next guys design WILL be good. But so what, you can't play them all at once.
How do you decide? Don't answer that, we all know there is no answer.

Somehow, I need to end up with a 'Squad Leader' and a 'Third Reich' and something operational WW2.

I have a lot of games, and they are all good designs, but, I'm a single human. The day is only 24 hours long. I CAN'T play them all. And pretending I can play them all a bit, well, that is in my view, a recipe for frustration.

How do I pick?
Likely the same way I have had to limit my models.
It won't be pretty.

One thing is for sure though. Wargames were not a logical main source of income in 1980, and I don't think that has changed. So, if you make wargames, have a real job to pay the bills. Because I need to stop buying for the sake of buying.

_____________________________

Wargame, 05% of the time.
Play with Barbies 05% of the time.
Play with Legos 10% of the time.
Build models 20% of the time
Shopping 60% of the time.
Exlains why I buy em more than I play em.
Post #: 1
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 4:00:14 PM   
Lobster


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Heck I miss 1960.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 4:15:15 PM   
Zorch

 

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I prefer 1970. Panzerblitz, Jutland, and early SPI games, plus the classic AH games.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 4:24:05 PM   
RangerJoe


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In Third Reich, I took Paris in 1939 the turn after Poland.

I miss those games but there is no one around here that I know would play them.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 4:41:23 PM   
Kuokkanen

 

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And here we go again. Since I've already addressed this issue (at least for video games), I just link to it.

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Post #: 5
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 4:47:26 PM   
rico21

 

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I was twelve years old when I threw my little plastic soldiers in the trash to no longer be different from others, not to be misunderstood.
My life has become hell until I discover this forum and the presence of other intelligent creatures, in fact why it is good to be the most intelligent on the planet if nobody understands you.
Since then I discovered paradise on earth, that the most important thing was to be able to play again and again, against all odds.
Well, it's been two minutes since I stopped playing to write to you, it's time I returned to play!

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Post #: 6
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 5:38:53 PM   
MrsWargamer


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Kuokkanen

And here we go again. Since I've already addressed this issue (at least for video games), I just link to it.


Hehe, I never said it was easier to make the games. It's possible it's TOO easy to make them now.

I went through the PC with the uninstall function.
This is what survived so far.
Battle Academy (simple squad level fun).
Strategic Command War in Europe (not a knock on global, but I'm sticking to Europe for a while).
TOAW IV (operational) It's competing with Tiller Panzer Campaigns. Unsure at the moment which.
Unity of Command II
And there is always a spot for Steel Panthers :)


_____________________________

Wargame, 05% of the time.
Play with Barbies 05% of the time.
Play with Legos 10% of the time.
Build models 20% of the time
Shopping 60% of the time.
Exlains why I buy em more than I play em.

(in reply to Kuokkanen)
Post #: 7
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 5:45:03 PM   
Erik Rutins

 

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I think this is somewhat similar to what we see in many areas where content is being produced and delivered at a much higher rate than in the past. My advice is to not try to experience everything, but focus on fewer new things that are more up your alley and you'll get as much enjoyment out of them as in the past, if not more.

< Message edited by Erik Rutins -- 2/26/2020 8:57:54 PM >


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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 6:15:32 PM   
Hellen_slith


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For me, around 1965 or so was the year of my introduction to wargaming. I have fond memories of sitting on the front porch playing an "air war" game with the next door neighbor. That game (which I am still trying to find) had little plastic airplanes, and we drew cards to determine air movements / battles / outcomes, and we moved our little air pieces / airplanes around to position. Good times.

We also created our own "war games" w/ the little Green Army Men in the garage, or in the street. We constructed "fortifications" from found blocks of wood or rocks, set our Green Army Men forces around those fortifications, and from 20 yards away, would then crash big Tonka Trucks into each others fortifications to "Defeat" the opposing force. The little machine gunner, who always laid prone, was always the hardest to get, as our "house rule" was that he had to be over turned over onto his back to be considered "taken". Good times, again. "Dirt Clod" wars, where "grenades" of loose dirt could be thrown (no rocks!) to achieve "victory!" in nieghborhood "street battles"

That eventually grew into subscriptions to S&T magazine, and we never really had enough time or space on the kitchen table to set those up and play them out, and then we went off to college and "discovered" D&D in the original rules. Then it was off to work and family IRL, and those games were laid aside...for a while.

Now, in retirement, I find great enjoyment from all the computer games we have now. Simply amazing. I'm a big fan of TOAW now, it is my hobby now. Sometimes, I look back by delving into the archives at archive.org, reading the old MOVES magazines etc.

Anyway, thanks for the reminder of great old days of Auld Lang Syne! Here's to another twenty years of happy gaming! I raise a toast to the best hobby of all!




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Post #: 9
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 6:35:45 PM   
Kuokkanen

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Hellen_slith

For me, around 1965 or so was the year of my introduction to wargaming. I have fond memories of sitting on the front porch playing an "air war" game with the next door neighbor. That game (which I am still trying to find) had little plastic airplanes, and we drew cards to determine air movements / battles / outcomes, and we moved our little air pieces / airplanes around to position. Good times.

Sounds something like this

quote:

We also created our own "war games" w/ the little Green Army Men in the garage, or in the street. We constructed "fortifications" from found blocks of wood or rocks, set our Green Army Men forces around those fortifications, and from 20 yards away, would then crash big Tonka Trucks into each others fortifications to "Defeat" the opposing force.

My father used to do something like that with his friends. With slingshots. Then some 12 years ago I showed him a miniature wargame (BattleTech) I had bought.

quote:

and then we went off to college and "discovered" D&D in the original rules.

Harold "Lindybeige" Lloyd details it here

[edit]
Do you remember any player playing a mage, or using other weapons besides bow and/or dagger?

< Message edited by Kuokkanen -- 2/26/2020 6:45:58 PM >


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You know what they say, don't you? About how us MechWarriors are the modern knights, how warfare has become civilized now that we have to abide by conventions and rules of war. Don't believe it.

MekWars

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Post #: 10
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/26/2020 8:44:34 PM   
MrsWargamer


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Erik Rutins

I think this is somewhat similar to what we see in many areas where content is being produced and delivered at a much higher rate in the past. My advice is to not try to experience everything, but focus on fewer new things that are more up your alley and you'll get as much enjoyment out of them as in the past, if not more.


Yeah, sometimes it is easy to buy something, but not so easy to get around to enjoying it :)

I'm assuming this happens with mainstream gaming, but not being a mainstream gamer, I couldn't comment.

_____________________________

Wargame, 05% of the time.
Play with Barbies 05% of the time.
Play with Legos 10% of the time.
Build models 20% of the time
Shopping 60% of the time.
Exlains why I buy em more than I play em.

(in reply to Erik Rutins)
Post #: 11
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 2:35:11 AM   
Titanwarrior89


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Same here. It's eighties for me. I still 80% of the time play Board wargames. Usually solo but not always. I have 4'x6' board setup and leave my game up. No children, no cat's. Board games last a life time video do not. But I still buy the video wargames but I am very selective. AWitP I played for ever but now it stutters way to much. Don't have that problem with board games. Third Reich is a gem.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 2:53:15 AM   
budd


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1980 was an excellent year........for music, Back in Black, Heaven and Hell, British Steel, Permanent Waves, Iron Maiden, Blizzard of Ozz, The River, man what a year, best year in music I can remember. There's a few more im forgetting I'm sure.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 8:39:47 AM   
Pvt_Grunt

 

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1980.........Grade 10 in High school. My older brothers' friends were the long haired "tough" guys who smoked the funny cigarettes on the far oval. We would play D & D at lunch in the library. One day another kid said sneeringly "That's the game geeks play" My brothers friends chased him out of the library and down the street! He never spoke to us again!

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 9:17:26 AM   
demyansk


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I love the long haired chasing the guy out of library, good one. Yes, 80's war gaming was fun. Now, too many games, I sort of stopped buying them and going into the old games to play. However, just bought The Hunters, both versions and Silent Victory from GMT games. I still play Panzer Korps almost everyday. Lots of games but not the time to play them. Still get on to play Battlefield 5.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 9:19:22 AM   
RangerJoe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Titanwarrior89

Same here. It's eighties for me. I still 80% of the time play Board wargames. Usually solo but not always. I have 4'x6' board setup and leave my game up. No children, no cat's. Board games last a life time video do not. But I still buy the video wargames but I am very selective. AWitP I played for ever but now it stutters way to much. Don't have that problem with board games. Third Reich is a gem.


Maybe check your switches for the game. It may be a problem if you are using windows 10.

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 9:33:44 AM   
Red2112

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: budd

1980 was an excellent year........for music, Back in Black, Heaven and Hell, British Steel, Permanent Waves, Iron Maiden, Blizzard of Ozz, The River, man what a year, best year in music I can remember. There's a few more im forgetting I'm sure.


You forgot skateboarding in the 80´s! Stacy Peralta, Tony Alva! I still have dead skin on my elbows 40 years later

It´s more like the 70´s through 80´s for me.

Ace of Spades (Motorhead), High n Dry (Def Leppard), Long Live Rock n Roll (Rainbow), Draw the Line (Aerosmith), Obsession (UFO), Women and Children First (Van Halen), Walls of Jericho (Helloween), Restless and Wild (Accept), and alot more!

I bet there was a Cristal Lake (Friday 13) around your area too, were us long haird, Levis and concert t-shirt dudes/chicks hanged out friday nights! Then spend Saturday morning pool hopping hotels in Miami Beach haha!

Those were the days!

Red

--

< Message edited by Red2112 -- 2/27/2020 2:42:27 PM >


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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 2:26:30 PM   
RFalvo69


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quote:

ORIGINAL: MrsWargamer

Gaming in general. D&D was still just Advanced. It was real, not a video game.


Only the 4th Edition of D&D tried to be "World of Warcraft" on paper - and it sank miserably.

I ran a AD&D/D&D campaign which lasted for 13 years (1999-2012). I switched midway from AD&D 2E to 3.5E and we had even more fun (*).

Today, D&D 5E is incredibly popular. I heard through the grapevine that it could be the most successful edition ever. I haven't tried it, but I gather that you can choose your level of complexity and have fun. Who knows? Maybe one day I'll run games for a new crowd.

quote:


Wargames for me were Squad Leader and Third Reich. Played them to death.


From what I gather, there are two wargames to whom people "totally devote their lives": World in Flames and Advanced Squad Leader. The info comes from people who play them...

Edit: (*) With 3.5E I was able to pull quite a stunt: The Hunt for Red October fantasy-style. It involved gnomes tinkerers, a Nautilus-like submarine and an immensely precious Artifact that ended on the submarine by mistake. Both the good guys and the bad guys discovered the thing at the same time, and the chase was on...

< Message edited by RFalvo69 -- 2/27/2020 3:27:39 PM >


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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 4:20:32 PM   
Kuokkanen

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: RFalvo69

Today, D&D 5E is incredibly popular. I heard through the grapevine that it could be the most successful edition ever.

Meh, don't really look that to me. In local cons it is Pathfinder galore and there has been times when nobody GMed any version of D&D.

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You know what they say, don't you? About how us MechWarriors are the modern knights, how warfare has become civilized now that we have to abide by conventions and rules of war. Don't believe it.

MekWars

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Post #: 19
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 7:55:28 PM   
MrsWargamer


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In as much as D&D goes, well, this is my take.

Advanced was well supported
2nd was the edition with lousy bindings and inconsistent manual formats.
3rd was the great rip off going from 3 to 3.5 and everyone and their aunt had to release something.
4th was one I liked, but, they diluted it to death and eventually, it became a marketing scam.
I have not played 5th the 'we can make them buy endless editions because they're gullible' edition.

I don't think it matters which editions were playable more so against the others. In the end, the fan base was essentially just 'used' as cash cows brazenly.

Of all the designs I have experienced, I like the mechanics of WFRP 2nd edition minus the doom and gloom element which I just ignore.
So if I'm running a game, that's it.
But I'll play anything if the GM isn't a total tragedy.


_____________________________

Wargame, 05% of the time.
Play with Barbies 05% of the time.
Play with Legos 10% of the time.
Build models 20% of the time
Shopping 60% of the time.
Exlains why I buy em more than I play em.

(in reply to Kuokkanen)
Post #: 20
RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 8:21:30 PM   
RFalvo69


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Kuokkanen

quote:

ORIGINAL: RFalvo69

Today, D&D 5E is incredibly popular. I heard through the grapevine that it could be the most successful edition ever.

Meh, don't really look that to me. In local cons it is Pathfinder galore and there has been times when nobody GMed any version of D&D.


Pathfinder easily slapped 4E in the face - being it, basically, D&D 3.75E (so, if someone was GMing Pathfinder he was actually GMing a moderately revised version of D&D 3.5E, usually as a reaction to the ugliness of D&D 4E). Also, if you had a collection of D&D 3/3.5E books, it was easy to adapt them to Pathfinder: nothing on which you spent your hard-gotten money was lost (you didn't even need to buy Pathfinder: the basic rules were and are available for free).

This lasted until WotC debuted 5E. There is a reason as why Pathfinder all of sudden (in editorial time-keeping) is launching its Second Edition. Right now, D&D 5E managed what many people judged to be impossible: to fix the schism caused by D&D 4E and to reunite the fans around a new and accessible edition.

If you want to know more, this is the right forum. Be prepared: synthesis is not their forte.

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"Oh dad... so you were a God-damned cook?"

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RE: I miss 1980 - 2/27/2020 11:46:56 PM   
MrsWargamer


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quote:

ORIGINAL: RFalvo69

If you want to know more, this is the right forum. Be prepared: synthesis is not their forte.


It's a good site, sadly, I lost the needed drive to pursue RPG fandom about 20 years ago too.

Sort of how I lost the needed drive to pursue wargaming fandom about 10 years ago as well.

90% of my wargames are bought here. This is the logical place to be as a wargamer in my view.

_____________________________

Wargame, 05% of the time.
Play with Barbies 05% of the time.
Play with Legos 10% of the time.
Build models 20% of the time
Shopping 60% of the time.
Exlains why I buy em more than I play em.

(in reply to RFalvo69)
Post #: 22
RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 2:14:50 PM   
Rising-Sun


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Same here, I do miss the 80's too as well 90's. Enjoy playing my first time with D&D on pen and paper, all started out while I was put away in a pen. I had problem when I was a kid, least I started to became mature around 25.

So many things have changed over the years, I remember being around ppls in the pen, they missed the 60's, etc.

Also love that game "Warship" by gary grisby, sometimes I walk into radio shack, play that game lol.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 3:14:57 PM   
Curtis Lemay


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Personally, I would not want to go so far back in time that breast implants hadn't been invented yet. Those of us who actually lived it know it was a time of abject misery.

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RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 3:27:19 PM   
warspite1


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Curtis Lemay

Personally, I would not want to go so far back in time that breast implants hadn't been invented yet. Those of us who actually lived it know it was a time of abject misery.
warspite1

Agreed. I've had a whole new lease of life since my augmentation and I'm loving my fuller figure... wait? what?


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Post #: 25
RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 3:48:55 PM   
RangerJoe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: warspite1


quote:

ORIGINAL: Curtis Lemay

Personally, I would not want to go so far back in time that breast implants hadn't been invented yet. Those of us who actually lived it know it was a time of abject misery.
warspite1

Agreed. I've had a whole new lease of life since my augmentation and I'm loving my fuller figure... wait? what?



You don't want to go back to the 1880's?

quote:



To get the real story on fake breasts, let's open In The Beginning: A Mouthwatering Guide to the Origins of Everything and turn to the page on implants.

Nowadays, having one's breasts augmented seems nearly as commonplace as having one's hair permed. One of the most frequently performed cosmetic procedures, more than 200,000 U.S. women had the surgery in 2000 alone. But it wasn't always this way: once upon a time, breast augmentation was a highly questionable, semi-experimental procedure that frequently resulted in disfigurement and health-endangering complications. Of course, people subjected themselves to it anyway, jumping on the bandwagon whenever a new method came along.

The story begins in 1890, when Austrian doctor Robert Gersuny kicked things off by injecting paraffin into women's chests. The results looked fine for awhile, but over time grew hard and lumpy. Worse yet, infection rates were alarmingly high, so by the 1920s the procedure had been totally abandoned. In its place, surgeons experimented with the transplantation of fatty tissue from the abdomen and buttocks to the breasts, but the fat was often reabsorbed by the body, leaving the subject with asymmetrical breasts and unsightly scars where the fat had been harvested.
Pains and Needles

While the painful failures scared women away from the surgical methods for some time, that did nothing to stop American worship of the well-endowed woman. Icons like Marilyn Monroe, Ava Gardner and Lana Turner helped solidify the gravity-defying, bombshell-shaped breast as the de rigueur "new look"ť in the 1940s and 1950s, and many women turned to "falsies"ť and bra-stuffing to keep up. It didn't take long, however, for surgeons to get out their scalpels and needles again, and in the 1950s women began to have various types of synthetic and polyvinyl sponges implanted. This may have been the worst approach yet: the sponges began to shrink and harden a few months after surgery, and infections, inflammations and a cancer scare eventually doomed the s es to the graveyard of failed breast augmentation therapies.
Pros and Silicones

Increasingly desperate, surgeons in the late 1950s went for a collective Hail Mary. They implanted everything from ivory balls and wool to ox cartilage into their unwitting guinea pigs' breasts "“ but none of it worked. During World War II, Japanese prostitutes reportedly injected themselves with silicone to better attract the patronage of American GIs, a technique that became so popular that silicone became a precious commodity. Topless dancers in the U.S. also got hip to silicone shots, but it wasn't long before complications like discoloration and infection put a damper on the silicone fever.

Then, in 1961, everything changed. That's when a little corporation called Dow Corning collaborated with two Houston cosmetic surgeons to create the first silicone breast prosthetic, made from a rubber sac filled with viscous silicone gel. The basic design remained unchanged for 30 years, though it was modified slightly for safety reasons in 1982. Ten years later, after nearly 100,000 women had the modified version implanted, the FDA announced that the polyurethane in the implants could break down into the body and form a carcinogen. As a result, many U.S. surgeons turned to the safer, but less natural feeling, saline implants (pictured) designed in France back in the 1960s.


https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/20576/brief-history-breast-implants

Also:

https://www.nap.edu/read/9618/chapter/6

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


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Post #: 26
RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 7:31:11 PM   
ttollefsen

 

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Hellen_slith - Was it Dogfight?

< Message edited by ttollefsen -- 3/8/2020 7:32:41 PM >

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Post #: 27
RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 9:30:55 PM   
DD696

 

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1980? Hell, I was 33 then and everyone was supposed to be dead if they were over 30. I remember 1960. Elvis was back and life was good. I saved for a couple months to buy a transistor radio and "Stuck on You" and "A Mess of Blues" was what life was all about. The Beach Boys were not there. The Beatles were also were just a fart in the wind then. Remember eating potatoes swiped from a farmer's field and cooked in the dirt under a campfire at a beach on American Falls reservoir. They were the best russet potatoes grown in the world at the time.

1957 Chevys and the cars that would kick ass from one corner to any other. Corvettes. Life was good.

Edit: Yeah, 1960. My uncle built me 2 cars: a cut down Ford with a Crosley engine, and a rail job with a 60 hp ford flathead. Used to drive them around - in Idaho at them time you could get a daytime driver's license at the age of 14, but I was just 13 but what the hell - life was good. Had a gal that I used to bury my elbow in her chest when I shifted gears - took me another 6 years to figure out what those hooters were good for. My flathead squashed a 58 chevy in a drag race, and those hooters, well, I reckon I was pretty dumb back then.

< Message edited by DD696 -- 3/8/2020 10:07:36 PM >


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Post #: 28
RE: I miss 1980 - 3/8/2020 10:30:09 PM   
RangerJoe


Posts: 5188
Joined: 11/16/2015
Status: offline
It took you that long? As a young child I knew that they were for feeding . . .

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(in reply to DD696)
Post #: 29
RE: I miss 1980 - 3/9/2020 3:20:25 PM   
MrsWargamer


Posts: 1085
Joined: 6/18/2014
Status: offline
I suppose my favourite year was between 69-71.

Dinosaurs, Tonka trucks, climbing trees, and creeks.

By 75 it became Matchbox models and wargames.

79 I took a major diversion, I wasn't playing soldier, I was one.

Developers have taken all the trees and creeks from me. But I get to play with models and wargames again. And Barbies and teddy bears and Legos :)

I miss climbing trees and playing in creeks though.

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Wargame, 05% of the time.
Play with Barbies 05% of the time.
Play with Legos 10% of the time.
Build models 20% of the time
Shopping 60% of the time.
Exlains why I buy em more than I play em.

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 30
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