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RE: OT: F4U Corsair

 
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RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 2/26/2020 7:15:44 AM   
Ian R

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bomccarthy

A turbo could not have been shoehorned into an F4U. Turbosupercharger installations are larger and heavier than mechanically driven auxiliary stage superchargers; .....

Rolls Royce refused to consider turbosupercharging for the Merlin; Rolls engineers calculated that the thrust from properly designed exhaust stacks made up for the power loss at high altitudes.


According to David Donald the production run of the F4U-1 was over 8,000 (4102 by Vought with the corresponding models from Goodyear totalling 3808, and Brewster 735.) During the production run 500 major, and 2500+ minor engineering changes were made - averaging almost 1 change per three aircraft completed.

He also confirms what Bearcat said, that they did jam a turbo-supercharger in there to see what happened. He refers to a "handful" of F4U-3 builds with the XR-2800-16 and what he describes as a turbo-supercharger, "ram air being admitted via a large ventral duct."

That said, the Corsair did have the "jet-thrust exhaust stacks" in the collar behind the cowling, but those only give maybe 3 or 4% performance increment, less than than the Meredith effect from the P51s ventral radiator.



_____________________________

"You may find that having is not so nearly pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
- Cdr Spock


Ian R

(in reply to bomccarthy)
Post #: 31
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 2/26/2020 10:28:52 PM   
bomccarthy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Jorge_Stanbury

quote:

ORIGINAL: bomccarthy
Production models of the Bf-109 and FW-190 used mechanically driven single stage, variable speed superchargers which gave best performance below 25,000 feet; the versions intended for high-altitude operation used liquid nitrous oxide injection (tank capacity lasted approx 20 minutes), although a few FW-190 prototypes were built with turbos.


the early versions, the later ones simply got a bigger super charger

from https://www.chuckhawks.com/evolution_ME-109.html
"In January 1944, the DB605AS with a larger supercharger was introduced. It was a little slower at low altitude, but above 23,400 ft, the AS-equipped models became increasingly superior, reaching 417 mph at 27,000 ft. This engine was not fitted for GM1"

that is why I think F4U could had better altitude performance if they needed to pursue it; not by adding turbo, which was too complicated for an existing design but by another solution; maybe a larger supercharger (like later BF109) or by 2-speed/ 2-stages (like P-51) or two superchargers (like P-63) or something else


The F4U (and F6F) did have two-stage supercharging, like the P-51 and P-63, but optimized for "medium altitudes", with a critical supercharger altitude of 22,000 feet (compared to 27,000 feet for the P-51B). Optimizing it for a higher critical altitude would have reduced performance at medium altitude; this showed up in comparison tests between the F4U-1 and the P-51B.

The P-47 and P-51B/D were developed to operate at the same altitude as the intended bombing altitude of the B-17 and B-24 (27,000 ft +); the Navy fighters were intended to operate at altitudes where enemy aircraft were typically encountered (below 25,000 feet). Ironically, USAAF lowered bombing altitudes in 1944, as studies showed that bombing accuracy increased significantly below 25,000 feet. By the Spring of 1945, even B-29s were dropping their bombs from 20,000 to 25,000 feet during their daylight raids over Japan, even though they were designed to operate close to 30,000 feet.

(in reply to Jorge_Stanbury)
Post #: 32
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 2/26/2020 10:47:51 PM   
bomccarthy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R


quote:

ORIGINAL: bomccarthy

A turbo could not have been shoehorned into an F4U. Turbosupercharger installations are larger and heavier than mechanically driven auxiliary stage superchargers; .....

Rolls Royce refused to consider turbosupercharging for the Merlin; Rolls engineers calculated that the thrust from properly designed exhaust stacks made up for the power loss at high altitudes.


According to David Donald the production run of the F4U-1 was over 8,000 (4102 by Vought with the corresponding models from Goodyear totalling 3808, and Brewster 735.) During the production run 500 major, and 2500+ minor engineering changes were made - averaging almost 1 change per three aircraft completed.

He also confirms what Bearcat said, that they did jam a turbo-supercharger in there to see what happened. He refers to a "handful" of F4U-3 builds with the XR-2800-16 and what he describes as a turbo-supercharger, "ram air being admitted via a large ventral duct."

That said, the Corsair did have the "jet-thrust exhaust stacks" in the collar behind the cowling, but those only give maybe 3 or 4% performance increment, less than than the Meredith effect from the P51s ventral radiator.




The XF4U-3 used a Birmann turbosupercharger, rather than a GE-designed turbo that was used in all US production aircraft with turbos; I am assuming that development problems with this turbo influenced the decision not to proceed with production, along with the test results that showed no performance improvement at the typical combat altitudes.

Re jet thrust from the exhaust: Rolls Royce calculated that 200 thrust horsepower could be realized at 24,000 feet and 400 mph. After the war, Wright used engine exhaust to spin 3 large turbines in the R-3350 Turbo Compound engine - these turbines spun gears that were connected directly to the crankshaft, adding 800 hp to an engine already producing 3,000 hp. Four such engines powered all DC-7s and Super Constellations.

(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 33
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 2/28/2020 10:49:07 AM   
Ian R

 

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I was just watching a show on the history channel, that featured an interview with Robin Olds.

He stated quite firmly that in WW2, flying a P38, "I could out maneuver the 109 at the altitudes we flew".

The show at least loosely referred to an ME-109 wit 1 x 30mm and 2 x MG armament, but it was by no means clear if Olds was talking about one of the heavy hitter sub-types with diminished performance.



_____________________________

"You may find that having is not so nearly pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
- Cdr Spock


Ian R

(in reply to bomccarthy)
Post #: 34
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 2/28/2020 12:02:06 PM   
Macclan5


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Scott_USN

Yeah they lost before they even started production wise but that is not really the point. They still had capable and in some respects better planes, the F4U was supercharged it was not turbocharged as was the P47 but could have easily had the intercooler turbocharger of the P47 it was the same engine in both planes. 30k feet was not all that important in the Pacific. Water injection in the 1A model gave it another 250hp. There was nothing in the Pacific that really could put up much of a challenge to such a plane. I don't think it is simplistic at all I think it very complicated but the point was simplistic I love the Navy war birds (Especially F4U) and have always wondered how they would have fared against German fighters.


And here you and I respectfully disagree.

The Americans could have flown nothing but'upgraded P39's / P40's' till 1945 and still they would have won air superiority over Europe. Eventually - at a higher cost - but eventually.

There is an old adage around these forums. Stalin said "quantity is its own form of quality".

I do not think that the F4U with a super charger or turbo charger or whatever modifications were necessary - and the US would have made necessary modifications - makes any difference at all.

--

In the "what if" historical banter that often accompanies a lot of gamer sites - "what if the Nazi's had recognized the potential of / produced enough of / capitalized on the ME262" ? They could have won the war !!

Mehh...

Would have the ME262 really turned the tide of the Red Army - especially into Romanian Oil fields? Germany imported >80% of its oil from Russia prior to Barbarossa and failed... where is the oil / gas / resources to build thousands more ME262 and fly them? Would have the ME262 shut down 8th Air force Bombing ? Completely ? Would have the ME262 stopped Normandy completely....? It would have made a difference certainly / timing / losses. But won the war ?

So often these hypothetical debates focus on the deployment of 1 weapon type verses another and ignore the fact that Japanese / German militarism was focused on short wars due to their "national and genetic superiority" as warriors. That victory was inevitable. But both Japan and Germany started the war at severe disadvantages in terms of access to oil and raw materials for a protracted war of production and attrition - further manpower replacements/population bases were also too small and their mobilization rates were unsustainable. Therefore loss was inevitable. The tools of getting the job done no longer matter after the initial conquering wave lost its momentum due to the lack of sustainability in logistics.


< Message edited by Macclan5 -- 2/28/2020 12:03:22 PM >


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Post #: 35
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 2/28/2020 12:35:45 PM   
Jorge_Stanbury


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R

I was just watching a show on the history channel, that featured an interview with Robin Olds.

He stated quite firmly that in WW2, flying a P38, "I could out maneuver the 109 at the altitudes we flew".

The show at least loosely referred to an ME-109 wit 1 x 30mm and 2 x MG armament, but it was by no means clear if Olds was talking about one of the heavy hitter sub-types with diminished performance.




It will depend a lot on what version of P-38 he fought against what version of 109. Early P-38s were not that great in Europe/ Mediterranean and were mostly outclassed by 109s and 190s

Also, he likely faced a 109-G6 as this was the most numerous version built and it is the 1st that allows for the 30mm motor cannon; I doubt he could had outmaneuvered a late war 109-K4 or 109-G14/ G10



< Message edited by Jorge_Stanbury -- 2/28/2020 12:54:35 PM >

(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 36
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 2/28/2020 5:35:37 PM   
rustysi


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quote:

resources to build thousands more ME262 and fly them?


With the resources Germany had available she could not manufacture its engines with the necessary alloys (in quantity) to last more than 10-20 hours of flight time. Failure, not a war winner.

Apparently she did know what was needed, I've read at least one test engine ran for 250 consecutive hours. Just didn't have the materials. Thus of some 1400 built no more than about 100 were operational at any given time.


_____________________________

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Hume

In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to Jorge_Stanbury)
Post #: 37
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 2/28/2020 10:30:37 PM   
bomccarthy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Jorge_Stanbury

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R

I was just watching a show on the history channel, that featured an interview with Robin Olds.

He stated quite firmly that in WW2, flying a P38, "I could out maneuver the 109 at the altitudes we flew".

The show at least loosely referred to an ME-109 wit 1 x 30mm and 2 x MG armament, but it was by no means clear if Olds was talking about one of the heavy hitter sub-types with diminished performance.




It will depend a lot on what version of P-38 he fought against what version of 109. Early P-38s were not that great in Europe/ Mediterranean and were mostly outclassed by 109s and 190s

Also, he likely faced a 109-G6 as this was the most numerous version built and it is the 1st that allows for the 30mm motor cannon; I doubt he could had outmaneuvered a late war 109-K4 or 109-G14/ G10




He could outturn any Bf-109 below 15,000 feet. Above 20,000 feet it would depend on whether he was flying a P-38F/H/G or a P-38J/L.

But trying to compare one fighter type against another of the same generation is somewhat pointless (unless the speed differential is vast). There are so many variables, especially individual pilot skill and experience. At his peak, Robin Olds could have taken on any Bf-109 while flying a P-39, or could have been shot down by a Ki-27 Nate while flying a P-51, if he was having a bad day. (Tommy McGuire stalled his P-38 in a hard turn at less than 300 mph and 200 ft while still carrying his drop tanks).

Most important was that Luftwaffe training had deteriorated severely by mid 1944, and the few remaining aces faced overwhelming numbers, such that survival became more important than victories. And an inexperienced pilot trying to fly a Bf-109G, or K, was often asking for trouble -- a Luftwaffe test pilot described the handling characteristics of the later Bf-109s during a landing approach as "malicious."

(in reply to Jorge_Stanbury)
Post #: 38
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 2/28/2020 10:37:32 PM   
bomccarthy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi

quote:

resources to build thousands more ME262 and fly them?


With the resources Germany had available she could not manufacture its engines with the necessary alloys (in quantity) to last more than 10-20 hours of flight time. Failure, not a war winner.

Apparently she did know what was needed, I've read at least one test engine ran for 250 consecutive hours. Just didn't have the materials. Thus of some 1400 built no more than about 100 were operational at any given time.



They had the right material for that test engine, but that was it. Junkers decided to get around the short lifespan by building lots of engines - lots and lots of engines - replacing them every 10-20 hours. They apparently didn't figure out how they were going to move these multitudes of spare engines from the factories to the airfields, once the 8th AF shattered Germany's rail network.

(in reply to rustysi)
Post #: 39
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 2/28/2020 11:58:40 PM   
Ian R

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Macclan5

Would have the ME262 really turned the tide of the Red Army - especially into Romanian Oil fields?



The irony is that the Jumo 004 ran on J2 produced from coal, and didn't need high octane avgas.

_____________________________

"You may find that having is not so nearly pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
- Cdr Spock


Ian R

(in reply to Macclan5)
Post #: 40
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/2/2020 1:00:46 AM   
Scott_USN

 

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Amazing story, I had not heard of this before until I was looking up the F4U.

https://youtu.be/Cuo1sia2-EI

(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 41
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 3/2/2020 1:44:59 AM   
RangerJoe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: bomccarthy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Jorge_Stanbury

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R

I was just watching a show on the history channel, that featured an interview with Robin Olds.

He stated quite firmly that in WW2, flying a P38, "I could out maneuver the 109 at the altitudes we flew".

The show at least loosely referred to an ME-109 wit 1 x 30mm and 2 x MG armament, but it was by no means clear if Olds was talking about one of the heavy hitter sub-types with diminished performance.




It will depend a lot on what version of P-38 he fought against what version of 109. Early P-38s were not that great in Europe/ Mediterranean and were mostly outclassed by 109s and 190s

Also, he likely faced a 109-G6 as this was the most numerous version built and it is the 1st that allows for the 30mm motor cannon; I doubt he could had outmaneuvered a late war 109-K4 or 109-G14/ G10




He could outturn any Bf-109 below 15,000 feet. Above 20,000 feet it would depend on whether he was flying a P-38F/H/G or a P-38J/L.

But trying to compare one fighter type against another of the same generation is somewhat pointless (unless the speed differential is vast). There are so many variables, especially individual pilot skill and experience. At his peak, Robin Olds could have taken on any Bf-109 while flying a P-39, or could have been shot down by a Ki-27 Nate while flying a P-51, if he was having a bad day. (Tommy McGuire stalled his P-38 in a hard turn at less than 300 mph and 200 ft while still carrying his drop tanks).

Most important was that Luftwaffe training had deteriorated severely by mid 1944, and the few remaining aces faced overwhelming numbers, such that survival became more important than victories. And an inexperienced pilot trying to fly a Bf-109G, or K, was often asking for trouble -- a Luftwaffe test pilot described the handling characteristics of the later Bf-109s during a landing approach as "malicious."


If I remember correctly, Tommy McGuire was shot down by a one eyed pilot named Sakai . . .

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to bomccarthy)
Post #: 42
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/2/2020 12:34:18 PM   
Joe D.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: DConn

You can't be serious about the "ugly duckling." javascript:void(AddText('')) Probably one of the best-looking WW2 fighers IMHO (surpassed only by the Spitfire and maybe the P-51)!


I agree.



_____________________________

Stratford, Connecticut, U.S.A.

"The Angel of Okinawa"

Home of the Chance-Vought Corsair, F4U
The best fighter-bomber of World War II

(in reply to DConn)
Post #: 43
RE: OT: F4U Corsair: and the P38 - 3/2/2020 8:50:15 PM   
bomccarthy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe


quote:

ORIGINAL: bomccarthy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Jorge_Stanbury

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R

I was just watching a show on the history channel, that featured an interview with Robin Olds.

He stated quite firmly that in WW2, flying a P38, "I could out maneuver the 109 at the altitudes we flew".

The show at least loosely referred to an ME-109 wit 1 x 30mm and 2 x MG armament, but it was by no means clear if Olds was talking about one of the heavy hitter sub-types with diminished performance.




It will depend a lot on what version of P-38 he fought against what version of 109. Early P-38s were not that great in Europe/ Mediterranean and were mostly outclassed by 109s and 190s

Also, he likely faced a 109-G6 as this was the most numerous version built and it is the 1st that allows for the 30mm motor cannon; I doubt he could had outmaneuvered a late war 109-K4 or 109-G14/ G10




He could outturn any Bf-109 below 15,000 feet. Above 20,000 feet it would depend on whether he was flying a P-38F/H/G or a P-38J/L.

But trying to compare one fighter type against another of the same generation is somewhat pointless (unless the speed differential is vast). There are so many variables, especially individual pilot skill and experience. At his peak, Robin Olds could have taken on any Bf-109 while flying a P-39, or could have been shot down by a Ki-27 Nate while flying a P-51, if he was having a bad day. (Tommy McGuire stalled his P-38 in a hard turn at less than 300 mph and 200 ft while still carrying his drop tanks).

Most important was that Luftwaffe training had deteriorated severely by mid 1944, and the few remaining aces faced overwhelming numbers, such that survival became more important than victories. And an inexperienced pilot trying to fly a Bf-109G, or K, was often asking for trouble -- a Luftwaffe test pilot described the handling characteristics of the later Bf-109s during a landing approach as "malicious."


If I remember correctly, Tommy McGuire was shot down by a one eyed pilot named Sakai . . .


Read Martin Caiden, Fork-Tailed Devil: The P-38 (Ballantine, 1971), pp. 310-11. On Jan 7, 1945, McGuire led a flight of four P-38s that got into a fight with Shoichi Sugita, an 80-kill ace. Sugita caught McGuire's flight unaware, but was then caught in the middle of a Lufberry circle. At 200 ft, the circle scattered and Sugita got on the tail of one of the P-38s. McGuire turned too tight while trying to come to the aid of his squadron mate and stalled.

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 44
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/2/2020 9:26:45 PM   
rustysi


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R


quote:

ORIGINAL: Macclan5

Would have the ME262 really turned the tide of the Red Army - especially into Romanian Oil fields?



The irony is that the Jumo 004 ran on J2 produced from coal, and didn't need high octane avgas.


True, but by mid to late '44, even the synthetic fuels were in jeopardy due to Allied bombing.

Even without any interruption of the process, synthetics were not going to solve Germany's fuel problems. I don't recall the exact numbers, but it took multiple tons of coal to produce one ton of fuel. Along with other demands for coal, Germany just couldn't produce enough to meet all needs.

_____________________________

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Hume

In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 45
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 11:01:53 AM   
Ian R

 

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But a least they could produce diesel or J2 or whatever was needed.

They could not afford to produce avgas at the high octane levels that effectively boosted allied fighter performance.

I recall that a Ki-100 was test flown, in the US, post war, with the high octane juice that was beyond Japan's manufacturing capacity. I have a vague recollection that its performance was way better than in IJA service.

_____________________________

"You may find that having is not so nearly pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
- Cdr Spock


Ian R

(in reply to rustysi)
Post #: 46
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 11:55:01 AM   
RangerJoe


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I recall that a Prince of Romania filled his car's fuel tank with fuel from a downed US bomber. He burned out his engine.

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 47
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 5:58:35 PM   
rustysi


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quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe

I recall that a Prince of Romania filled his car's fuel tank with fuel from a downed US bomber. He burned out his engine.


Well, avgas is of a higher octane, and has a tendency to do that to other type engines. Read a story once where Patton did the same with some German avgas his units captured. They too had engine problems.

_____________________________

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Hume

In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 48
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 6:06:51 PM   
RangerJoe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi


quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe

I recall that a Prince of Romania filled his car's fuel tank with fuel from a downed US bomber. He burned out his engine.


Well, avgas is of a higher octane, and has a tendency to do that to other type engines. Read a story once where Patton did the same with some German avgas his units captured. They too had engine problems.


He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to rustysi)
Post #: 49
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 6:28:19 PM   
rustysi


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quote:

He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .




_____________________________

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Hume

In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 50
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 9:11:36 PM   
BBfanboy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi

quote:

He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .




What!? Didn't Monty catch on to who dunnit?

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to rustysi)
Post #: 51
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/3/2020 10:07:59 PM   
RangerJoe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi

quote:

He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .




What!? Didn't Monty catch on to who dunnit?


I think Ike said something about it.

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 52
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/4/2020 12:05:21 AM   
Ian R

 

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From: Sydney
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quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe


quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi

quote:

He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .




What!? Didn't Monty catch on to who dunnit?


I think Ike said something about it.


Patton reportedly used to get his artillery spotter planes to locate the POL convoys in the Com-Z.

_____________________________

"You may find that having is not so nearly pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
- Cdr Spock


Ian R

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 53
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/4/2020 7:17:22 PM   
rustysi


Posts: 6460
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From: LI, NY
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R


quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe


quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi

quote:

He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .




What!? Didn't Monty catch on to who dunnit?


I think Ike said something about it.


Patton reportedly used to get his artillery spotter planes to locate the POL convoys in the Com-Z.


Wouldn't surprise me if he did.


_____________________________

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Hume

In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 54
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/4/2020 7:51:42 PM   
RangerJoe


Posts: 8209
Joined: 11/16/2015
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quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi


quote:

ORIGINAL: Ian R


quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe


quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: rustysi

quote:

He also captured some that was supposed to go to another army. A supply officer received a medal the next day . . .




What!? Didn't Monty catch on to who dunnit?


I think Ike said something about it.


Patton reportedly used to get his artillery spotter planes to locate the POL convoys in the Com-Z.


Wouldn't surprise me if he did.



A good Cavalry officer needs good intelligence. Observe and report!

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to rustysi)
Post #: 55
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/5/2020 3:24:31 AM   
Ian R

 

Posts: 2576
Joined: 8/1/2000
From: Sydney
Status: offline
The source of that story is D'Este's "A Genius for War". Page 651.

quote:

Muller [Third Army G4 Col Walter J 'Maud' Muller] and his supply officers resembled Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. They became masters at hijacking supplies and sending out raiding parties to relieve First Army supply dumps of whatever was not nailed down. Light aircraft were sent on reconnaissance missions to locate fuel dumps suitable for "attack"....

Muller was a legendary scavenger, and his supply officers were regarded somewhat as licensed pirates. They were understood to rove back as far as the ports, where it was said they not only misrepresented themselves as coming from other armies but brought with them truckloads of souvenirs - German flags and weapons - for purposes of barter, garnering steaks and fresh eggs as well as gasoline and ammunition..


Edit: the bit about diverting a battalion of gas tankers includes GSP writing "... this is not war but it is magnificent" .

When First Army complained, Patton denied it. As D'Este puts it, it was coincidental that several clever young quartermaster officers were promoted soon afterward.

Also, I reckon Maud Miller was the inspiration for Milo Minderbinder. At one point, Third Army was operating its own captured German ammunition factory.

< Message edited by Ian R -- 3/5/2020 3:32:24 AM >


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Ian R

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 56
RE: OT: F4U Corsair - 3/5/2020 5:36:15 PM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 15480
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: offline
Gotta make ammo for all those captured German Lugers and other weapons!

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No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to Ian R)
Post #: 57
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