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Time Flows towards Yasukuni - IJN AAR (Anachro v. andydb)

 
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Time Flows towards Yasukuni - IJN AAR (Anachro v. andydb) - 12/9/2018 5:08:29 PM   
Anachro


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Time Flows towards Yasukuni

A Narrative-based Japan AAR


_________________________________________________________________________________________


Hello everyone,

Restarting an old concept for a Japanese AAR. I did this earlier with an opponent a few years back that dropped out due to other time commitments.

This will be a simple narrative PBEM from the viewpoint of Admiral Matome Ugaki, Chief-of-Staff to Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. The narrative will take the form of diary entries and I won't go into excessive detail of reports, combat events, or retelling of everything that happened. The inspiration is Ugaki's actual war diaries, which have been fully translated and are available through Amazon or other stores. Any IJN fanboy should really pick them up as they are fantastic. The book is titled Fading Victory: The Diary of Admiral Matome Ugaki, 1941-1945.

Settings
We are using DaBigBabes-C with the reduced shipping loads and the latest beta. Additionally, PDU is On, reinforcements are set to +/- 15 days variability, realistic R&D is on, USN torpedoes are terrible, and for some reason Allied damage control crews have the Harry Potter-esque power to repair things instantly with the wave of a wand.

Rules
1. Full PP to be paid to move units across national boundaries (except CAN/USA).
2. No carrier hunting on first turn.
3. Allied player can only move existing TFs and LCUs/Air force in China on first turn.

< Message edited by Anachro -- 12/9/2018 5:13:18 PM >
Post #: 1
RE: Time Flows towards Yasukuni - IJN AAR (Anachro v. a... - 12/9/2018 7:13:52 PM   
adarbrauner

 

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jAPANESE KNOW HOW TO PAINT, NO DOUBT...that's wonderful

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Post #: 2
RE: Time Flows towards Yasukuni - IJN AAR (Anachro v. a... - 12/9/2018 7:26:38 PM   
John 3rd


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Go get 'em!

_____________________________



Member: Treaty, Reluctant Admiral and Between the Storms Mod Team.

Reluctant Admiral Mod:
https://sites.google.com/site/reluctantadmiral/

(in reply to adarbrauner)
Post #: 3
Intro - 13 October 1941 - 12/9/2018 8:28:14 PM   
Anachro


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Introductory Entry, Monday, 13 October 1941

Four years have passed since the Chinese Incident started, but we have a long way to go before we can reach our goal. Changes in the development of the situation during these few years, especially the outbreak of the second European war in the northern part of Europe, our empire's entrance into the Axis alliance, together with the China Incident - these events are both nominally and virtually international and worldwide, and the latter two are inseparable from the former. Did the persons responsible for starting the incident ever dream or realize that it would eventually develop into the present state? We can't be proud of human wisdom. However, for two and a half years, holding the important office of chief of the First Bureau, Naval General Staff, I have tried my best to solve the problems of the incident, but in vain.

The Nomura-Hull talks had started already, beginning last March or April. Since our occupation of southern French Indochina, the attitude of the United States had turned firm, and it cut off our way of obtaining oil by freezing our funds. Trade with the United States was discontinued. Seeing these unfavorable changes, Konoye took a step forward and sent a message to the president of the United States, proposing that they hold a Pacific conference to arrange diplomatic adjustments between the two countries. After fifty days, an answer to that came on 2 October, after much meandering, because of the president's policy of delay. Of course, what it stated was discouraging to us Japanese. The most important and impassable barriers are the request for evacuation of our forces from China, and the United State's attitude of not recognizing our superior position in the western Pacific, including China.

As I see it, the army insists on no more discussion about this matter, and the government and the navy want to negotiate again. It won't be possible for us to continue to parley, even if we hope to, until they meet our minimum demands. Rain - or storm? A final situation - the most serious one, as we expected - is gradually approaching. This was will be the greatest on record, and a matter of vital importance to the welfare of our empire. With due reverence, I imagine the matter is causing His Imperial Majesty a good deal of concern. Unless I take up my pen beginning with this introduction, the following diary won't hang together. It's true that I don't know any cardinal state secrets, now that I'm serving at sea far from the center of government, but I'm sure it will be necessary to record frankly in my diary about matters of official business. This will be of use to someone else in the future, because of my past guilt in bringing events to the state they are in today, and because of my present post as chief of staff of the Combined Fleet that carriers the burden of the welfare of the state.

(in reply to John 3rd)
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20 October 1941 - 12/9/2018 8:36:15 PM   
Anachro


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Monday, 20 October 1941

Partly cloudy. Inspection at Saeki Bay. Sailed out at 0500, before daybreak. The commander in chief bantered me, "You got up this morning at the time you went to bed last night, eh?" Entered Saeki Bay after various exercises at sea.

The chiefs of staff of the Sixth Fleet and First Air Fleet and the skipper of the Yamato, Miyazato, visited our ship. Chief of Staff Kusaka told us of the arrangements made at Tokyo concerning the "AMO" and "ME" Operations. The previous conference at Tokyo with the Navy General Staff would have settle the issue if he had been as enthusiastic then as he was this time, but he was rather troublesome and reversed his previous opinion. The senior staff officer must have had a worrisome time and there still appear to be grumblings about the risks being taken so close to the enemy's fortress at Singapore. I admit the Army's strategy seems overly risky and, even worse, the navy bears the brunt of it.

For the first time, I have seen a really huge ship navigating. Magnificent indeed! I am more than satisfied that this ship will add great power to the fleet. We must train her so that she can display her strength as soon as possible.

< Message edited by Anachro -- 12/9/2018 8:57:59 PM >

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3 November 1941 - 12/9/2018 8:45:59 PM   
Anachro


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Monday, 3 November 1941

Partly cloudy. Amid this ever-pressing situation, our full-dressed ships welcomed the birthday of the Emperor Meiji today. The autumn sky was serenely high, and my reflections deep. Oh, this sacred age of Showa! When I reflect upon the great achievements of the past heroes and the sacred virtue of the emperor with his great and glorious works, they inspire me with fresh courage. Can we who have received the gift of life in this age of Showa idle away our time without conquering this national peril and expanding the Imperial work, thus placing the state in a position of perfect security?

At 2000 received a telegram from the commander in chief, who has been in Tokyo, that he would arrive at Kure sometime tomorrow afternoon. According to the message, he will finish the conference at the ministers' official residence in the afternoon, so he will leave Tokyo a day early; this is evidence that the final decision has been reached. At the same time, received information from the chief of the First Bureau confirming that the conference with the army will be held from the 8th to the 10th. Everything is O.K.

You die,
You all die for the sake of the land.
I, too, will die.

(in reply to Anachro)
Post #: 6
7 November 1941 - 12/9/2018 8:56:12 PM   
Anachro


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Friday, 7 November 1941

Fine. Appeared at the navy ministry. Exchanged civilities with my fellows. The atmosphere of every department and section seemed to be very cheerful and aggressive, with active, lively business under way. One can fully realize that the people's on-the-job efficiency depends entirely on their mood.

The chief of the Naval General Staff, Admiral Nagano, again told me that he tried to discuss the Tripartite Alliance separately from the present issue, but in vain. But it is no use to talk about the alliance problem. It wasn't the German-Japanese alliance but the Manchurian incident that brought about the present situation. The chief warned me not to have a "slip 'twixt the cup and the lip," citing as an example the ships Hatsuse and Yashima, which sank by carelessly touching mines. I welcomed his well-intentioned advice. I also met the vice minister, vice chief, and the director of military affairs. I asked the director many questions. Then I called the staffs together at the First Council Chamber and made final amendments to the Combined Fleet's operational order.

The following are Imperial Japanese Naval Order No. 1 and Imperial Naval Directive No.1, which were sent and received by us just before we left ship yesterday:

quote:

IJNO No. 1
With an Imperial Order, the chief of the Naval General Staff orders the commander in chief of the Combined Fleet, Admiral Yamamoto as follows:

1. The Japanese empire expects to open war against the United States, England and Holland at the beginning of December for the sake of its self-existence and self-defense and has decided to prepare for operations in every department.
2. The commander in chief of the Combined Fleet will effect necessary operation preparations.
3. In regard to details, the chief of the Naval General Staff will direct you.

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6 December 1941 - 12/9/2018 9:08:33 PM   
Anachro


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Saturday, 6 December 1941

Fine, (X-2), Wrote letter to Hiromitsu. In that letter I enclosed another envelope to be opened at my special communication which might reach him later on; the additional envelope contained a bit of my hair and nail clippings as a memento. Don't ask me where I took that hair from, for there is still plenty of hair on my head!

In the afternoon an antitorpedo net was experimentally equipped on Nagato's starboard. At present, the operational situation is quite all right. Hawaii is just like a rat in a trap. Enjoy your dream of peace just one more day!

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Post #: 8
8 December, 1941 - 12/9/2018 10:03:42 PM   
Anachro


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Hashira-jima, Hiroshima, Japan
Battleship Nagato - 8 December, 1941


Admiral Yamamoto stood near the porthole in his cramped cabins aboard the Nagato—Hotel Yamato as some were starting to call the future luxurious flagship would not be available for a few more months—looking out upon the calm waters of Hashira-jima as the opaque depths of night slowly gave way before the first rays of morning. Sitting silently nearby, the poetic nature of it all was not lost upon Ugaki. The sun was rising—a fitting moment to describe the magnitude of current events. Months and years of confusion had finally been banished by the clarity of the present; and now, the land of the rising sun was setting out to strike a blow from which the very world would tremble.

Normally, nerves betrayed a man is such situations; and yet, the commander-in-chief remained inscrutably composed in his solitude, barring brief pleasantries exchanged with the orderlies as they stopped by. Ugaki could not help but be impressed by it. He was reminded of concept of wabisabi so often stressed within the ceremonies surrounding chanoyu, only this time it was not the simplicity and subdued refinement of hospitality on display, but something of far greater importance. Yamamoto remained above the fray. Not unconcerned by it, of course, but admirably unmoved.

For his part, Ugaki was quite happy to admit to himself his own deficiencies. The day previous had had its bouts of pacing and fidgeting. Not infrequently had he played the potentials of today’s events in his head as he tried to rest in his futon. However, on the whole, he was satisfied. While absolute preparedness could never be achieved, the movement of the fleet had been exorbitantly planned and, for the moment, the actions of this first day seemed assured of success. Moreover, Ugaki had been agonizing over the communique to send out to those engaged in the southern operations, drafting and re-drafting a message that above all needed to expound strength and resolution. Altogether, he believe he had achieved this.

Now, all that was left was to await the result. Yamamoto continued to stand as if in trance, looking out into the depths of his own soul, but Ugaki, as time went by, grew somewhat restless and walked out to take a smoke and catch some air. While outside, Ugaki’s thoughts, like Yamamoto’s, turned inward. The coming war would not be easy—he knew that—and some trepidation shamefully remained, but he was committed. The kokutai had to be defended and transgressions of the United States through its cowardly embargo, and the European powers through their mere presence, could not be overlooked. However, Ugaki also reflected on the state of things in France, where war was underway, the China Incident that the nation found itself unable to escape, and now the events to come today. It all seemed too much. Once could not be proud of human wisdom. But Ugaki was a soldier; and he would do his duty.

Still, given the present circumstances and the momentous events unfolding, Ugaki was reminded of a popular radio song:

You and I are cherry blossoms,
Having bloomed, we’re resolved to die
But we’ll meet again at Yasukuni
Blooming on the same treetop.


Ugaki had often been to Yasukuni, he had passed beneath its great torii and stood before the great wooden shrine to Japan’s war dead. He was also a greater admirer of the Meiji-era general Maresuki Nogi, who had famously committed suicide on the day of the emperor’s funeral so as not to outlive his master. It was unknown whether such a death was warranted for Ugaki, but he was resolved to give it all if need be. Indeed, sometimes he yearned for it and he could not shake off the feeling that eventually his soul, too, would rest as Yasukuni before the present war was over. The feeling left him a bit cold, but he took comfort from it too.

With these thoughts coursing through his mind, suddenly Staff Officer Sasaki dropped by.

“Admiral, at 0319 wireless TO is being sent repeatedly.”

It had begun. Tora, Tora, Tora. Surprise had been achieved at Pearl Harbor and success was to be expected. The army's vaunted Mersing gambit (much dreaded by the navy) was also underway, as were various other task forces spreading out like the many tentacles of an octopus. Ugaki thought of the men going to fight, some to their deaths, he though of the ships, particularly CVL Ryujo and her dangerous assignment off Mersing, and he waited with his chief in silence.

< Message edited by Anachro -- 12/9/2018 10:40:14 PM >

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Post #: 9
RE: 8 December, 1941 - 12/9/2018 10:22:39 PM   
BBfanboy


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From: Winnipeg, MB
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Nicely written, and edited!

< Message edited by BBfanboy -- 12/9/2018 10:49:16 PM >


_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

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Post #: 10
RE: 8 December, 1941 - 12/9/2018 10:38:07 PM   
Anachro


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@Everyone Sad day, let this be a lesson to you all to never guess the enemy's intentions and always plan based on their capabilities.

Monday, 8 December, 1941

Fine, warm. X-day. The long-anticipated day has arrived at last and while mostly glorious, some major disasters keep my sober. I awoke at 0300 on my own. After leaving bed, I was having a smoke with the chief when Staff Officer Sasaki hurried into the room and reported, "At 0319 wireless TO is being sent repeatedly." With this I knew that the attack order had been issued to the two hundred planes of our task force which had been approaching Hawaii, and the first attack on Pearl Harbor was under way.

Then I confined myself to the operations room and listened with attention to every telegram: "I torpedoed enemy battleship with great war result," or "I bombed Hickam Airfield and got a great war result," which were wirelessed by our friendly planes, as well as enemy wireless mesages which were most interesting, We can see the fighting situation so clearly. Enemy consternation is beyond description. It is their breakfast time at 0320. While they were at their breakfast table, great masses of Japanese planes came like bolts from the blue; I can imagine their utter surprise. The following are some examples to show their uproar:

1. All ships sortie from Pearl Harbor.
2. An order to sweep magnetic and moored mines in the waters south of Ford Island.
3. An order at 0415 - the commander in chief of the Asiatic Fleet will operate according to Operational Plan No.4.

We assume that the second air raid came an hour later than the first one, at which time the five midget submarines were to have attacked enemy ships in harbor. I suppose the enemy took these for mines, which were swept. I shall be very happy if these midget subs will return, but if they don't, who will make public their pains and merits? I regret their efforts can only be estimated by enemy situations at a later time.

quote:

Morning Air attack on Pearl Harbor , at 180,107

Japanese aircraft
A6M2 Zero x 100
B5N2 Kate x 144
D3A1 Val x 135

Japanese aircraft losses
A6M2 Zero: 5 damaged
A6M2 Zero: 1 destroyed by flak
B5N2 Kate: 8 damaged
B5N2 Kate: 5 destroyed by flak
D3A1 Val: 11 damaged
D3A1 Val: 2 destroyed by flak

Allied aircraft losses
R3D-2: 1 damaged
R3D-2: 1 destroyed on ground
A-20A Havoc: 14 damaged
P-36A Mohawk: 18 damaged
P-36A Mohawk: 1 destroyed on ground
PBY-5 Catalina: 95 damaged
PBY-5 Catalina: 4 destroyed on ground
B-17D Fortress: 37 damaged
B-17D Fortress: 1 destroyed on ground
B-18A Bolo: 41 damaged
SBD-1 Dauntless: 27 damaged
SBD-1 Dauntless: 2 destroyed on ground
P-40B Warhawk: 50 damaged
P-40B Warhawk: 5 destroyed on ground
F4F-3 Wildcat: 7 damaged
F4F-3 Wildcat: 1 destroyed on ground
B-17E Fortress: 13 damaged
C-33: 2 damaged
C-33: 1 destroyed on ground
O-47A: 14 damaged
OS2U-3 Kingfisher: 3 destroyed

Allied Ships
DM Sicard, Torpedo hits 1, and is sunk
BB Pennsylvania, Bomb hits 4, Torpedo hits 6, and is sunk
BB Nevada, Bomb hits 8, Torpedo hits 4, on fire
BB Tennessee, Bomb hits 10, on fire
BB California, Bomb hits 8, Torpedo hits 3, on fire
BB Maryland, Bomb hits 5, Torpedo hits 2, on fire, heavy damage
BB Arizona, Bomb hits 6, Torpedo hits 3, on fire, heavy damage
BB Oklahoma, Bomb hits 3, Torpedo hits 5, and is sunk
BB West Virginia, Bomb hits 2, Torpedo hits 3
CM Oglala, Torpedo hits 1, heavy damage
CL Helena, Bomb hits 2, on fire
CL Honolulu, Bomb hits 1
DM Preble, Bomb hits 2, heavy fires, heavy damage
CL Detroit, Torpedo hits 1
CL St. Louis, Torpedo hits 1
AR Vestal, Bomb hits 1
CL Phoenix, Torpedo hits 1
CA San Francisco, Torpedo hits 1
DD Allen, Bomb hits 1, and is sunk

Airbase hits 36
Airbase supply hits 1
Runway hits 93
Port hits 18
Port fuel hits 2
Port supply hits 2


On the other hand, our units succeeded in their landings at Vigan and San Fernando and should push out local enemy forces shortly. Paratroopers took Bataan and Tuguegarao so we now have airfields from which to establish local air superiority. Bombers from Formosa achieved surprise and success in raids on Clark Airfield and Manilla, where we destroyed a number of planes on the ground and sunk a number of ships (and submarines) in harbor.

In the Malaya area, our forces reported successful landings at Khota Bharu, Mersing, and Kuantan and the Army believes it will have control of these areas by the end of tomorrow. This is great success! Unfortunately, it comes at the cost of the navy, of course, and this particular incident has caused me and the chief incredible heartburn. CVL Ryujo and her escorts were converging on their rendezvous with Haruna and Kongo when theyw ere surprised by British battleships that seemed to have anticipated our movements out of Singapore. Ryujo and the cruiser Nagara were sunk in the engagement and subequently did not provider air cover for our landing forces. Quite a way to start the way, but better a light carrier like Ryujo than one of our battleships, I suppose! Such failures cannot be allowed to happen in the future against such enemies as we are facing.



The only pleasure to take from this is our battleships currently at Mersing should have a chance to bring their guns to bare on this British force over night and we might extract some recompense. Naval bombers will be set for naval strike tomorrow (it's unfortunate they were slated for a surprise raid on Singapore today!"



At 1000 I called in the skippers and chiefs of staff of the ships and had our staff explain the way situation to them as far as possible. I also gave them instructions concerning the forthcoming operation the Main Body was going to take.

At the present, barting the disaster near Mersing, the war situation is progressing at a favorable pace. At 1045, a Privy Council was held and the Imperial Declaration of War against England and the United Stated issued. After this, His Majesty summoned the ministers of the army and navy, giving a special message to the fighting men; the two answered him for all those men.


< Message edited by Anachro -- 12/9/2018 10:45:06 PM >

(in reply to Anachro)
Post #: 11
RE: 8 December, 1941 - 12/9/2018 10:39:36 PM   
Anachro


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From: The Coastal Elite
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@BBFanboy You are correct; I knew that but somehow didn't phrase it that way when writing. Fixed. Have fun reading my disaster at Mersing. I was not expecting my opponent to leave Force Z orders in place. Especially after deliberately asking me if he "could move TFs already created (like Force Z)"!

Strike at Manilla:

quote:

Morning Air attack on Manila , at 79,77

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 40 NM, estimated altitude 9,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 14 minutes

Japanese aircraft
A6M2 Zero x 36
G3M2 Nell x 36
G4M1 Betty x 54

Japanese aircraft losses
G3M2 Nell: 1 damaged
G4M1 Betty: 1 damaged
G4M1 Betty: 1 destroyed by flak

Allied Ships
SS Shark, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
SS S-41, Bomb hits 2, and is sunk
SS Seadragon, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
PG Isabel, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
SS Perch, Bomb hits 1
SS Skipjack, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
SS Swordfish, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
SS Sailfish, Bomb hits 1
TK Hai Kwang, Bomb hits 1, on fire
SS Seal, Bomb hits 1
SS S-40, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
SS Sealion, Bomb hits 1
SS Permit, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
TK Gertrude Kellogg, Bomb hits 1, on fire
AV Langley, Bomb hits 1, on fire
SS Porpoise, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage
SS Stingray, Bomb hits 1

Allied ground losses:
8 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Port hits 3
Port supply hits 1


quote:

Morning Air attack on Manila , at 79,77

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 7 NM, estimated altitude 14,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 2 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-21-IIa Sally x 18

Japanese aircraft losses
Ki-21-IIa Sally: 2 damaged

Allied Ships
TK La Estrella Caltex, Bomb hits 1, and is sunk
xAK Cape Fairweather, Bomb hits 1, on fire
xAP Rochambeau, Bomb hits 1, on fire
SS Pickerel, Bomb hits 1, heavy damage


Very middling strike at Singapore. I should have set these guys to Nav strike because then Force Z would be at the bottom of the sea, but I EXPECTED my opponent to move his Force Z south. Really stupid on my part, yes?

quote:

Morning Air attack on Singapore , at 50,84

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid detected at 36 NM, estimated altitude 25,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 14 minutes

Japanese aircraft
G3M2 Nell x 72

Allied aircraft
Buffalo I x 4

Japanese aircraft losses
G3M2 Nell: 2 damaged

No Allied losses

Allied Ships
AM Toowoomba, Bomb hits 1, heavy fires, heavy damage
xAP Matang, Bomb hits 1, heavy fires


< Message edited by Anachro -- 12/9/2018 10:47:55 PM >

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Post #: 12
RE: 8 December, 1941 - 12/12/2018 1:57:14 AM   
Bif1961


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From: Phenix City, Alabama
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Nice start, be careful he might drive hard against the KB as well if you hang around to close.

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Post #: 13
9 December, 1941 - 12/12/2018 4:58:40 PM   
Anachro


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From: The Coastal Elite
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@Bif1961 Actually, a pretty terrible start. Safe to say I rushed my final orders for the Mersing gambit and paid the price. Lesson learned.

Tuesday 9 December, 1941

Partly cloudy. X + 1 Day. Telegrams of congratulation on the war results came in from the navy minister and the chief of the Navy General Staff, the army minister, and the commander in chief of the Southern Army. Condolences were expressed by the army minister on the fate of the Ryujo, recognizing her sacrifice in pursuit of the Mersing landing. Just like last time, I did not hasten to answer.

The United States and England declared war against Japan this morning. A wireless interception told me that the U.S. secretary of the navy send the following to all ships and chiefs of U.S. navy stations:

quote:

The first treacherous attack of the enemy navy gave a tremendous shock to us who are in charge of the war. Now no time is to be lost. Our nation wants as many ships, as many guns and personnel as can be obtained, the sooner the better. Not a second will be lost in hesitation. Navy, stand up! What I have said is the real road the navy should tread and what our people earnestly want. Fank Knox.


How crazy this is at the eleventh hour! This means an absolutely knockout.



The same cannot be said for the follies happening in Malaya where our gambit has cost us dearly. This was my headache going into this war and already three ships are lost - first Ryujo and Nagara yesterday and now Mogami today where lack of air cover allowed her to be subjected to enemy air bombing. We were forced to scuttle her, or so I am told. On top of that, while our battleships engaged the British force that attacks Ryujo, by all accounts they failed to inflict adequate damage and the force escape mostly unscathed except for Prince of Wales. Haruna has taken decent damage and must retire; the local TF commander was heavily censured for his inadequate actions.

quote:

Night Time Surface Combat, near Mersing at 51,82, Range 9,000 Yards

Japanese Ships
BB Kongo, Shell hits 1
BB Haruna, Shell hits 5, heavy fires
CA Takao
CA Atago
CL Jintsu
DD Asashio
DD Oshio, Shell hits 1, on fire
DD Michishio
DD Arashio
DD Akatsuki
DD Hibiki

Allied Ships
BB Prince of Wales, Shell hits 9, Torpedo hits 2, on fire
BC Repulse, Shell hits 3
DD Express


Still, the occupation of Mersing, Kuantan, and Kota Bharu go on. According to the Third Destroyer Squadron report, they are engaged in hard fighting but the airfields have already been occupied at Kota Bharu. I was much relieved at that, but Kuantun still holds out despite our overwhelming local advantage. Nonetheless, with Kota Bharu we now can establish some air cover. Our landing ships will retire - Mersing has decent supply and we now move to cutoff enemy forces further north.

Last night there was a telegram that our task force will return through L point via first course with the report of the war result. This is open to criticism as sneak-thievery and contentment with a humble lot in life. Since our loss is not more than twenty planes, it is most important for us to expand our results, especially in light of the debacle at Malaya.

At the news from the task force mentioned above, my staff officers proposed a new plan that our fleet also head for the same course. But I didn't agree with that. I ordered them to wait for today's war process, because I had my own idea. Although most of the enemy battleships were made unnavigable and many planes lost as a result of our attack, yet several cruisers and CVs are probably able to come out for battle. But they could hardly have enough courage to make a long chase because of supposedly insufficient battle preparations. Last night two destroyers assaulted Midway Island from the western part, but I wonder how much damage these two ships could give the enemy, even though the report says the attack did considerable damage to enemy installations.

Then I proposed that they make another attack on the island, but this was viewed as unnecessary. And there was another who insisted on assaulting Hawaii again, which is fairly reasonable. Others called to quickly retire to cover the WI operation. If I were the commander in chief of the task force, I would be prepared to expand the war result to the extent of completely destroying Pearl harbor, by encouraging my subordinates at this critical time. But I should not measure others by my standard; I should confine myself to myself. So the assault on WI was decided upon as the best action and the following was wirelessed to the commander in chief of the First Air Fleet: "If the circumstances permit, the task force will attack Wake Island by aircraft on its way back and support landing operations there; this is subservient to attacking and destroying enemy ships should they make their presence known."

We are sailing at 140 degrees as usual, but nothing happened, speed has been lowered to 14 knots since evening.

Today, small units made an air raid on the Philippines and much of northern Luzon is already in our control. England and the United States must be in commotion now, but no other news besides radio is available.


(in reply to Bif1961)
Post #: 14
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/12/2018 5:03:12 PM   
Anachro


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Seeing the initial ant farm that is Japan always amazes me.


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Post #: 15
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/12/2018 5:16:21 PM   
DanSez


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Interesting read. Please keep it coming.
Thanks

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Post #: 16
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/13/2018 10:54:46 PM   
Bif1961


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Your multiple landings along the Malayan East coast will have him running for the hills and a possible early victory there instead of the historic 15 Feb 42 Singapore surrender. As the SAS motto states, "nothing ventured, nothing gained!"

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Post #: 17
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/14/2018 4:55:50 PM   
Anachro


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Yes, it is hoped I can cutoff the movement to Singers. I really would have liked to have taken Kuantan last turn, but alas...it should fall this coming turn. I think given the early attrition I've taken and what I think will be stiff front-line resistance from my partner, I will be conservative in my expansion and invasions and really focus on establishing my defenses for '43 and '44/45. No new turn yet as my partner has a n Xmas party yesterday and should be able to get the turn to me tonight or tomorrow morning.

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Post #: 18
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/15/2018 11:15:34 PM   
Bif1961


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The Japanese are on a time schedule for two reasons, one the amphibious bonus that runs out the last day of March and two history, with his industry kicking in high gear starting in early 1943. You could land deep in Central Pac and back fill as needed. Raid with the KB and keep him off balance and taking the longer way around to reinforce and supply OZ-NZ region. Press hard in the Alaska barrier and focus him there, you have many options available and you will never have the advantage over him than you have now.

(in reply to Anachro)
Post #: 19
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/15/2018 11:31:03 PM   
John 3rd


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Pretty nasty losses for the first turns. HATE THAT! Also goes to show Allied Players that they should FIGHT from the first day on. The Allies can replace everything several times over. Japan cannot.

Mersing on Turn ONE is not something I do. I grab Kuantan and then fly CAP from it so my CV/CVLs are free to hunt enemy shipping. Usually land Turn 2-3 and am still able to cutoff the retreat.

Use your Paras. Do you have plans for them or are they already in it?




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Post #: 20
10 December, 1941 - 12/17/2018 1:51:00 AM   
Anachro


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Wednesday, 10 December 1941

Rainy. X+2 Day. At 0830, we turned to 90 degrees in order to pass between Haha Jima and Iwo Jima. In accordance with the report from our plane advising that it had sighted a track of some fishing boat at 50 miles northwest of northern Iwo Jima, since 1130 we began to navigate in a zigzag course at 16 knots, heading a little northward. Rain began to fall since morning owing to low pressure.

The landings at Vigan and San Fernando continued mostly unopposed today, though the commander of part of the Vigan landing convoy was sufficiently disturbed by enemy torpedo boats in the area that he had been forced to vacate the beaches. No harm was caused and perhaps it was more a case of ghosts in the night; he will be reprimanded. More interestingly, CL Naka and her escorts moved down from our landings to prey on enemy shipping and managed to find and sink what appears to be two enemy destroyers about a hundred miles west of Manilla. Given the location, it was unclear if these were American vessels or British ones seen fleeing Hong Kong yesterday, but during the day it was confirmed the British destroyers Scout and Thanet were sunk. A great war result was achieved and, moreover, done in textbook fashion with an opening long-lancer attack! Our night tactics are proven well-founded.



On Malaya, Kuantan finally fell with much damage to the enemy and now the airfield is ours; we should be able to bring in reinforcements unopposed, particularly at Mersing which is in dire need of troops to shore up our attempts to cutoff the enemy. South of Malaya where we had stationed our submariners in anticipation of fleeing enemy craft, the submarine I-165 sighted and successfully attacked an enemy convoy, in a series of torpedo attacks it successfully sank what appears to be an Danae-class British cruiser. We begin to enact our revenge for the Mogami and Ryujo.



However, a worry appears as a strong cruiser force seems to be on an intercept course with our landing force destined for Kuching. The force is ordered to conduct a hard full speed turn away while surface ships move in to support.



Elsewhere, the Southern Area Forces’ landings were successful at Nauru Island and Tarawa in the South Pacific, but unknown ships were spotted southeast of Tarawa. What could this be? Has the enemy come out to fight?

While I was engrossed in these war results, at 1600 another report was intercepted for our side from planes around Chichi-jima: “Enemy forces sighted 40 miles south of Haha Jima, advancing in zigzag movement!” What a thing! These are simply our main forces! Immediately, a warning was wirelessed, and a first disposition was issued to prevent mistaken bombings. Afterwards, the plane retracted her wireless.

The radio reports that the air defense commander of Hawaii; the commander-in-chief; Admiral Kimmel, commander in chief of the U.S. Fleet; Admiral Stark, chief of naval operations; or Secretary of the Navy Knox should be court-martialed. This tells us so much about the shock they received. It is a gross error for the authorities to want to punish their subordinates when some misfortune occurs, when a state wants to force its national policies, that state must be sufficiently prepared for war to carry them out. It is natural that he should be defeated when he is not fully prepared to back up his braggadocio, and responsibility always rests with the president. Shall we send out judge advocates there to defend those officers, saying that Japan should be accused instead, since it was Japan that attacked there? Ha! Ha!

Tonight, we took a southwestern course at 18 knots, under strict watch.

Italy and Germany declared war on the United States today and vice-versa. Now, it has really turned out to be the Second World War. Everything connected with future operations and leadership of the new world order rests upon the shoulders of our empire. The whole world will revolve around our empire, which forms an axis. We must stress this idea.


< Message edited by Anachro -- 12/17/2018 1:57:31 AM >

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Post #: 21
RE: 9 December, 1941 - 12/17/2018 9:08:58 AM   
GetAssista

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: John 3rd
HATE THAT! Also goes to show Allied Players that they should FIGHT from the first day on. The Allies can replace everything several times over. Japan cannot.


This, many times!
Even more important reason to fight with your surface fleet is to slow down and scare off Japan. There are so many options for amphibious invasions the first months, and not nearly enough surface cover for them all. So if JFB understands early that Allied CL/DDs are not captained by Sir Robins, he will halt those invasions until cover is available. Means Allies have more time to prepare, reinforce or evacuate

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Post #: 22
12 December 1941 - 12/19/2018 11:10:27 PM   
Anachro


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Friday, 12 December 1941

Cloudy. X+4 Day. At dawn this morning, landings at Digos on the island Mindanao succeeded. The defense at that place was quite weak and quickly overcome with local forces routed at heavy loss to their side. We had thought the worst going into this operation, but the landings were done quite easily. Fear is often greater than the danger.South of Mindanao, a number of our cruisers came into contact with enemy ships most likely fleeing our invasion of the Philippines and in a number of engagements a few were sunk. Natori reported running into what appears to be the a Brooklyn-class cruiser and escorts and managed to drive this force off with minimal damage received and most likely one or two enemy destroyers sunk. Natori must retire for replenishment, but Naka, Myoko, Haguro, and Nachi are in the area seeking to destroy more enemy ships.



Unfortunately, while this was going on, enemy cruisers bombarded our ships in port at Miri, causing minor damage to the base installations but worse damage to our ships, including one seaplane tender! How is it the our reconnaissance planes in the are failed to pick up these enemy ships approaching! Can we not act with a little more professionalism? It's one thing to suffer the damage from these mistakes, but proper search would have allowed our naval bombers to exact retribution on these raiders. Fortunately, Kongo and her escorts are nearby with the Kuching invasion force and are in prime position to wreak havoc on enemy ships returning to Singapore.

Meanwhile, at Manilla on Luzon where our air forces managed to virtually wipe out enemy fighter opposition yesterday, bombers continued to bomb Manilla harbor and airfields unmolested, finding a number of enemy ships and submarines still in port. One must question the enemy commanders and their decision not to evacuate these vulnerable boats, but we'll take it!



Details of the occupation of Wake, which began this morning, are not entirely known, but the chief of staff of that fleet reported to me favorable tidings that the airfield and island were in our hands. This should allow us a favorable vantage point from which to watch for enemy forces from Pearl Harbor. More interestingly, the the 1st Air Fleet moved south from Johnson Island this turn and found a number of enemy support ships moving northwest of Palmyra, virtually obliterating these forces and undoubtedly causing havoc to the United States' support abilities in that area for the near-term.

Elsewhere, landings at Kavieng, Manus, Madang, Wewak, Aitape, and Hollandia were successful. Victoria Point was secured on the Malayan peninsula.



The watch against subs has been strict since the night before last. Beginning at 0800, speed was heightened to 18 knots, zigzagging. While I was bathing in the rest room, suddenly I heard "battle disposition!" Then I was informed of the approach of an enemy sub. I hurried to the bridge. Our patrol plane dropped a bomb at 3.5 or 4 kilometers, starboard, in the direction of 340 degrees. I ordered my ship to turn port at 90 degrees with speed of 20 knots. Two destroyers were sent to make a depth charge attack. During our dodging movement we could intercept enemy wireless between subs:

quote:

A. How are you doing?
B. O.K.
C. Nice. Nice.


If heard in peacetime, that might not sound like a hostile interception, because it was nothing bu ordinary conversation, but at that time it was an ominous communication to us. We could ascertain by the sensitivity that at least two ships were around us as well as know the distance of these subs. These communications will be useful for a war of nerves, but, upon reflection, such private communication between personnel in charge of wireless should be strictly prohibited. This is an example by which we can judge the American navy. It is very rare that U.S. subs move alone; they always operate with a companion. Is it for the sake of safety, or to dispel loneliness?

Visibility tonight is not good, if not poor. As darkness fell, we changed course to 0 degrees heading north.

(in reply to GetAssista)
Post #: 23
13 December 1941 - 12/21/2018 5:09:46 PM   
Anachro


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Saturday, 13 December 1941

Cloudy. X+5 Day. After passing through Hayasui Channel, at 0230 our fleet headed eastward with antimine and torpedo equipment hauled up. On our way, we challenged three boats, which proved to be subchasers from the Kure Naval Station. These were sent against enemy subs discovered a few days ago. After passing Kudako Channel, we arrived at the buoy at 0630. I do not feel tired, though I have had little sleep. This is partly owing to the excitement caused by my feeling of responsibility and partly the metabolin which Miyake gave me. In action, physical power is eveything.

During my little nap, the adjutant captain called me, saying there were guests. At 1030, the chief of the Education Bureau, Tokunaga, Adjutant of the Naval General Staff Kanome, representing the navy minister and the chief of the Naval General Staff respectively, with the chief of staff of the Kure Naval Station, Nakajima, visited to extend congratulations. I said to myself, "Don't make a mountain of a molehill," cognizant of our many failures even this day, but appreciated their words anyway. "At they very start everything has mostly gone favorably for us. But it is just a prelude; the drama is not yet on and the many setbacks we have suffered despite the advantage of surprise should serve as a foreboding warning. I am not so satisfied with our initial results, but of course I'm not off my guard." I am going to do my bit all the more. When you see your chiefs after your return, tell them this, please." They left at 1330.

The landings at Kuching succeeded today despite heavy enemy presence nearby and most of the troops were landed. However, despite the presence of our cruisers and battleships in the vicinity, enemy cruisers and even the Repulse were able to get into our transports and sink the lot of them. Invaluable ships, but every loss counts and even more galling was the failure of our surface vessels to do real damage, sinking only one enemy destroyer. In the Makassar Stait, our ships sunk a number of smaller vessels but more importantly the old American carrier Langley and most likely a submarine tender ship of some sort.

In the evening, a report came from destroyer Sanae of the Kure Naval Station that an enemy sub was sighted at three miles near the Okinoshima Lighthouse. Is it one of those that we met during our voyage, or another one? It is not certain. But it was at the time when Hosho, which had left the main body, should enter the harbor. I sent a destroyer division and some planes to watch and guard.

I read newpapers since the 7th and got the impression that the people's mental attitude is rather satisfactory, but I fear their zeal will cool in the course of time. For the time being, they will not cool down, thanks to our good war results. But when the was becomes protracted, can our leaders and authorities lead our nation for as long as five or ten years maintaining the people's morale and overcoming every difficulty?

Today, our Philippine Air Force once again attacked Manila and did considerable damage to enemy ships and subs there.

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