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RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 12:36:41 AM   
Cap Mandrake


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Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
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2 1/3rd divisions in Western Sumatra and 5+ divisions in Vietnam. These are troops that will not participate in the attack at Luzon. Of course, the Japanese have to fight where they can.


If Luzon holds and can be supplied and reinforced with heavy bombers after an attack at Guam then it will be the end for the Empire. Luzon and Mindanao will choke off oil from the DEI.

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4741
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 12:48:11 AM   
Cap Mandrake


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Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
Logistical Issues: In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras, I have moved 162,000 Allied troops to Rabaul. This is a level 7 Port now and a level 9 AF. Normally, this would not be a problem but the base is rated at 45,000 troops. Either it doesn't rain there enough or there it's really hard to dig a latrine in RabauL.


I have nearly 40,000 supply there but it's asking for 80,000.




(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4742
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 12:58:10 AM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
SouPac HQ, Rabaul:[/b}

FAM: Bottled water, you say? That seems silly.

Young man in fine linen slacks: Wait till you taste it! It's rushes from a mountain spring in Fiji!

FAM: FIJI!? Dude, that's like thousands of miles away from here!

Young man in fine linen slacks: Sir, have you heard about Spangler's spring at Gettysburg?

FAM: I'm listening.....

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4743
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 2:28:11 AM   
RangerJoe


Posts: 11123
Joined: 11/16/2015
From: My Mother, although my Father had some small part.
Status: online
quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

SouPac HQ, Rabaul:[/b}

FAM: Bottled water, you say? That seems silly.

Young man in fine linen slacks: Wait till you taste it! It's rushes from a mountain spring in Fiji!

FAM: FIJI!? Dude, that's like thousands of miles away from here!

Young man in fine linen slacks: Sir, have you heard about Spangler's spring at Gettysburg?

FAM: I'm listening.....


I know of a community that drilled 600 feet for water, the last 300 feet through solid granite. They claim that it tastes so good but why do they pee and poop in it more than they drink of it?

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4744
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 2:33:31 AM   
RangerJoe


Posts: 11123
Joined: 11/16/2015
From: My Mother, although my Father had some small part.
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

Logistical Issues: In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras, I have moved 162,000 Allied troops to Rabaul. This is a level 7 Port now and a level 9 AF. Normally, this would not be a problem but the base is rated at 45,000 troops. Either it doesn't rain there enough or there it's really hard to dig a latrine in RabauL.


I have nearly 40,000 supply there but it's asking for 80,000.


This stacking limit is correct since the Japanese only had 100,000 troops there which is much less than the 45,000 rating.

quote:

In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras . . .


With pasta cooked el dente, lots of grated cheese topping, lots of garlic bread, and a good salad? Some nice lambrusco, a robust red table wine, as well?

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4745
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 2:45:32 AM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 16692
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

Logistical Issues: In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras, I have moved 162,000 Allied troops to Rabaul. This is a level 7 Port now and a level 9 AF. Normally, this would not be a problem but the base is rated at 45,000 troops. Either it doesn't rain there enough or there it's really hard to dig a latrine in RabauL.
I have nearly 40,000 supply there but it's asking for 80,000.


Are you kidding? There are two active volcanos there to incinerate waste and sterilize your backside with heat and Sulphur Dioxide. Water isn't the only answer!

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4746
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 3:14:09 AM   
RangerJoe


Posts: 11123
Joined: 11/16/2015
From: My Mother, although my Father had some small part.
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

Logistical Issues: In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras, I have moved 162,000 Allied troops to Rabaul. This is a level 7 Port now and a level 9 AF. Normally, this would not be a problem but the base is rated at 45,000 troops. Either it doesn't rain there enough or there it's really hard to dig a latrine in RabauL.
I have nearly 40,000 supply there but it's asking for 80,000.


Are you kidding? There are two active volcanos there to incinerate waste and sterilize your backside with heat and Sulphur Dioxide. Water isn't the only answer!


So the volcanoes can incinerate the waste, no need to dig latrines. But there is only one volcano and Simpson harbor is the caldera for it:

quote:

The Rabaul caldera, or Rabaul Volcano, is a large volcano on the tip of the Gazelle Peninsula in East New Britain, Papua New Guinea, and derives its name from the town of Rabaul inside the caldera. The caldera has many sub-vents, Tavurvur being the most well known for its devastating eruptions over Rabaul. The outer flanks of the highest peak, a 688-metre-high asymmetrical pyroclastic shield, are formed by thick pyroclastic flow deposits.[1] There is no sign of a pyroclastic shield along the rim of the caldera, making the location likely underwater, on the caldera's floor.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabaul_caldera

quote:

. . . By 1943 there were about 110,000 Japanese troops based in Rabaul.
.
.
.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabaul

Of course, with Simpson Harbor over a volcano, just think if it would have went off when the Japanese fleet was there?

_____________________________

Seek peace but keep your gun handy.

I'm not a complete idiot, some parts are missing!

“Illegitemus non carborundum est (“Don’t let the bastards grind you down”).”
― Julia Child


(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 4747
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 3:38:48 AM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe


quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

Logistical Issues: In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras, I have moved 162,000 Allied troops to Rabaul. This is a level 7 Port now and a level 9 AF. Normally, this would not be a problem but the base is rated at 45,000 troops. Either it doesn't rain there enough or there it's really hard to dig a latrine in RabauL.


I have nearly 40,000 supply there but it's asking for 80,000.


This stacking limit is correct since the Japanese only had 100,000 troops there which is much less than the 45,000 rating.

quote:

In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras . . .


With pasta cooked el dente, lots of grated cheese topping, lots of garlic bread, and a good salad? Some nice lambrusco, a robust red table wine, as well?


.
Wait, 100,000 is > 45,000

By ra way, if you are in San Diego and want a really good high end Italian restaurant I would recommend Baci. If you want a fatntastic grilled veal chop try Mahattan in La Jola

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 4748
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 11:22:12 AM   
Disco Duck


Posts: 547
Joined: 11/16/2004
From: San Antonio
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: RangerJoe


quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

Logistical Issues: In anticipation of the attack on the Marinaras, I have moved 162,000 Allied troops to Rabaul. This is a level 7 Port now and a level 9 AF. Normally, this would not be a problem but the base is rated at 45,000 troops. Either it doesn't rain there enough or there it's really hard to dig a latrine in RabauL.
I have nearly 40,000 supply there but it's asking for 80,000.


Are you kidding? There are two active volcanos there to incinerate waste and sterilize your backside with heat and Sulphur Dioxide. Water isn't the only answer!


So the volcanoes can incinerate the waste, no need to dig latrines. But there is only one volcano and Simpson harbor is the caldera for it:

quote:

The Rabaul caldera, or Rabaul Volcano, is a large volcano on the tip of the Gazelle Peninsula in East New Britain, Papua New Guinea, and derives its name from the town of Rabaul inside the caldera. The caldera has many sub-vents, Tavurvur being the most well known for its devastating eruptions over Rabaul. The outer flanks of the highest peak, a 688-metre-high asymmetrical pyroclastic shield, are formed by thick pyroclastic flow deposits.[1] There is no sign of a pyroclastic shield along the rim of the caldera, making the location likely underwater, on the caldera's floor.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabaul_caldera

quote:

. . . By 1943 there were about 110,000 Japanese troops based in Rabaul.
.
.
.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabaul

Of course, with Simpson Harbor over a volcano, just think if it would have went off when the Japanese fleet was there?


A few years ago a category five storm hit Wake Island. Of course it was evacuated but it made wonder what would have happened during the way when it would have been a big surprise.

_____________________________

There is no point in believing in things that exist. -Didactylos

(in reply to RangerJoe)
Post #: 4749
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 1:37:46 PM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 16692
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Disco Duck

A few years ago a category five storm hit Wake Island. Of course it was evacuated but it made wonder what would have happened during the way when it would have been a big surprise.

With all the shipping and subbing in the Pacific, I doubt a Cat 5 storm could be a complete surprise. Once seen forming, both Japanese and US would have kept subs nearby to track direction of movement for their own forces. Halsey tried to play footsie with a typhoon, cruising close to the expected track, when it veered and took Third Fleet into the heart of the storm.

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to Disco Duck)
Post #: 4750
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 3:38:26 PM   
rtrapasso


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quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Disco Duck

A few years ago a category five storm hit Wake Island. Of course it was evacuated but it made wonder what would have happened during the way when it would have been a big surprise.

With all the shipping and subbing in the Pacific, I doubt a Cat 5 storm could be a complete surprise. Once seen forming, both Japanese and US would have kept subs nearby to track direction of movement for their own forces. Halsey tried to play footsie with a typhoon, cruising close to the expected track, when it veered and took Third Fleet into the heart of the storm.

Just finished "Halsey's Typhoon"...

It depends what you mean by "complete surprise"... In some cases, there were no ships or aircraft within hundreds of miles within major storms. In one case, a weather unit was told to produce a forecast about a major storm that might impinge on an operation and there were no units anywhere in the area that could give reliable data. The forecasters told their headquarters that the storm would affect the target area. Headquarters told them that they were wrong, ordered them to redo the forecast to show a different storm track. The forecasters complied, the mission went off, and there were heavy operational casualties and limited results... due to bad weather.

In the case of the typhoon that Halsey ran into ("Typhoon Cobra")- it had been detected by recon aircraft. The base from which they flew made a radio report to Pearl Harbor, and the reply was (i think exact wording) was "we do not believe you". The astonished recon folk tried to convince them without success.

After a considerable (several days at least) delay, the fleet sent an encoded radio message to Halsey. Weather reports were considered low priority, and it was not decoded for almost 2 more days. By this time, the fleet was in the thick of the storm. Yet Halsey and his staff refused to use the "t" word (Typhoon) for some time after that, and ships were already taking severe damage (they kept referring to it as a "tropical disturbance".) Halsey finally sent out a message for ships to break from their assigned positions and maneuver the best they could in the storm, but it was far too late.


(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 4751
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/21/2020 7:31:14 PM   
rtrapasso


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Here is a passage illustrating the above:

"Meteorology was not high on the U.S. Navy’s list of wartime priorities. It was, in essence, treated as small-bore intelligence. In the summer of 1944, to take one example, several army meteorological officers recently posted to Fleet Weather Central at Pearl were asked to provide a weather forecast for a carrier-based strike the following day against Marcus Island, an isolated speck of rock midway between Tokyo and Wake Island. They stared blankly at the weather map, at each other, and back at the weather map. There were seven areas on the map larger than the United States that contained no weather data whatsoever.

...they finally determined that a nearby storm system would curve north and collide with the carrier task force set to bombard Marcus Island, and so reported. Their senior commander, however, rejected the analysis. “Typhoons don’t recurve at that longitude at this season,” he told his weathermen. “They move straight west. Change that forecast!” The forecast was duly changed, and off the shores of Marcus Island the following morning planes were lost and brave men died when the cyclone struck the task force."

The book claims that weather forecasting was WORSE during the war, due to lack of cooperation between nations (for some reason, Japan wasn't giving the USA weather data), lack of independent ships that would provide data, radio silence of operational units, etc., etc.


From: Drury, Bob. Halsey's Typhoon: The True Story of a Fighting Admiral, an Epic Storm, and an Untold Rescue (pp. 103-104). Grove Atlantic. Kindle Edition.

(in reply to rtrapasso)
Post #: 4752
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/22/2020 7:36:32 AM   
JohnnieX

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: rtrapasso

Here is a passage illustrating the above:

"Meteorology was not high on the U.S. Navy’s list of wartime priorities. It was, in essence, treated as small-bore intelligence. In the summer of 1944, to take one example, several army meteorological officers recently posted to Fleet Weather Central at Pearl were asked to provide a weather forecast for a carrier-based strike the following day against Marcus Island, an isolated speck of rock midway between Tokyo and Wake Island. They stared blankly at the weather map, at each other, and back at the weather map. There were seven areas on the map larger than the United States that contained no weather data whatsoever.

...they finally determined that a nearby storm system would curve north and collide with the carrier task force set to bombard Marcus Island, and so reported. Their senior commander, however, rejected the analysis. “Typhoons don’t recurve at that longitude at this season,” he told his weathermen. “They move straight west. Change that forecast!” The forecast was duly changed, and off the shores of Marcus Island the following morning planes were lost and brave men died when the cyclone struck the task force."

The book claims that weather forecasting was WORSE during the war, due to lack of cooperation between nations (for some reason, Japan wasn't giving the USA weather data), lack of independent ships that would provide data, radio silence of operational units, etc., etc.


From: Drury, Bob. Halsey's Typhoon: The True Story of a Fighting Admiral, an Epic Storm, and an Untold Rescue (pp. 103-104). Grove Atlantic. Kindle Edition.


I read Down To The Sea by Bruce Henderson. I think it was a recommendation from an AAR a long time ago. It's the story of the four ships that sank in the typhoon. I enjoyed it whilst being horrified for the folk involved.

Weather information for the North Atlantic and Arctic was valued by both sides. Both Germans and Allies put a lot of effort into getting information. The density of ships and aircraft reporting in the North Atlantic would be far higher than in the Pacific.


(in reply to rtrapasso)
Post #: 4753
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/22/2020 11:37:48 AM   
Disco Duck


Posts: 547
Joined: 11/16/2004
From: San Antonio
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: rtrapasso


quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Disco Duck

A few years ago a category five storm hit Wake Island. Of course it was evacuated but it made wonder what would have happened during the way when it would have been a big surprise.

With all the shipping and subbing in the Pacific, I doubt a Cat 5 storm could be a complete surprise. Once seen forming, both Japanese and US would have kept subs nearby to track direction of movement for their own forces. Halsey tried to play footsie with a typhoon, cruising close to the expected track, when it veered and took Third Fleet into the heart of the storm.

Just finished "Halsey's Typhoon"...

It depends what you mean by "complete surprise"... In some cases, there were no ships or aircraft within hundreds of miles within major storms. In one case, a weather unit was told to produce a forecast about a major storm that might impinge on an operation and there were no units anywhere in the area that could give reliable data. The forecasters told their headquarters that the storm would affect the target area. Headquarters told them that they were wrong, ordered them to redo the forecast to show a different storm track. The forecasters complied, the mission went off, and there were heavy operational casualties and limited results... due to bad weather.

In the case of the typhoon that Halsey ran into ("Typhoon Cobra")- it had been detected by recon aircraft. The base from which they flew made a radio report to Pearl Harbor, and the reply was (i think exact wording) was "we do not believe you". The astonished recon folk tried to convince them without success.

After a considerable (several days at least) delay, the fleet sent an encoded radio message to Halsey. Weather reports were considered low priority, and it was not decoded for almost 2 more days. By this time, the fleet was in the thick of the storm. Yet Halsey and his staff refused to use the "t" word (Typhoon) for some time after that, and ships were already taking severe damage (they kept referring to it as a "tropical disturbance".) Halsey finally sent out a message for ships to break from their assigned positions and maneuver the best they could in the storm, but it was far too late.





And I bet the forecasters took the blame.

_____________________________

There is no point in believing in things that exist. -Didactylos

(in reply to rtrapasso)
Post #: 4754
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/22/2020 7:31:43 PM   
Bif1961


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From: Phenix City, Alabama
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Monty didn't believe his intel folks, before Market Garden, even when they had pictures, so many good men died and Monty said he was 90% successful.

< Message edited by Bif1961 -- 9/22/2020 7:32:10 PM >

(in reply to Disco Duck)
Post #: 4755
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 3:50:20 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
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****************May 3, 1943(e)********************

I think I missed a day or two. Oh well. I think on May 2nd, the Japs managed a 1:2 attack and had their best lost ratio in a month 2:1 in our favor though we lost many vehicles.

PI: The barges sitting in Bataan harbor make the LYB's angry. British infantry was able to get ashore

quote:

Morning Air attack on Bataan , at 78,77

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid detected at 32 NM, estimated altitude 25,560 feet.
Estimated time to target is 8 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-44-IIa Tojo x 18

Allied aircraft
Kittyhawk III x 2
Hurricane XIIb x 3
Kittyhawk I x 1
P-40K Warhawk x 6
F4U-1 Corsair x 15

Japanese aircraft losses
Ki-44-IIa Tojo: 2 destroyed

Allied aircraft losses
Hurricane XIIb: 1 destroyed
Kittyhawk I: 1 destroyed
F4U-1 Corsair: 3 destroyed


< Message edited by Cap Mandrake -- 9/26/2020 3:52:40 PM >

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4756
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 3:53:28 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
More bombardment at Clark. Supply is bad.

quote:

Ground combat at Clark Field (79,76)

Japanese Bombardment attack

Attacking force 1542 troops, 130 guns, 87 vehicles, Assault Value = 1451

Defending force 31304 troops, 493 guns, 325 vehicles, Assault Value = 655

Allied ground losses:
57 casualties reported
Squads: 1 destroyed, 3 disabled
Non Combat: 1 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Guns lost 1 (1 destroyed, 0 disabled)

Assaulting units:
28th Division
16th Division
48th Division
33rd Division
8th Medium Field Artillery Regiment
3rd Ind.Hvy.Art. Battalion
3rd Ind. Mountain Gun Regiment
1st Art.Mortar Regiment
3rd Medium Field Artillery Regiment
20th Ind. Mtn Gun Battalion
14th Ind.Art.Mortar Battalion

Defending units:
4th Marine Regiment
31st Infantry Regiment
637th Tank Destroyer Battalion
54th British Brigade
57th PS Infantry Regiment
45th PS Infantry Regiment
91st PA Infantry Division
2nd PA Infantry Regiment
103rd PA Infantry Regiment
762nd Tank Battalion
2nd Constabulary Regiment
51st PA Infantry Division
4th Constabulary Regiment
Clark Field AAF Base Force
III/Prov'nl SPM Grp
86th PS Field Artillery Battalion
88th PS Field Artillery Regiment
501st Coast AA Regiment
24th PS FA Regiment
II/Prov'nl SPM Grp
200th & 515th Coast AA Regiment
I/Prov'nl SPM Grp
1st USMC AA Battalion
!/23rd PS FA Battalion
165th Field Artillery Battalion
301st PA Field Artillery Regiment


(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4757
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 3:55:24 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
Sumatra: All the aviation support at Batoe is disrupted and the AF is dinged badly. Anything flyable moves to Sinabong.
quote:


Morning Air attack on Batoe-eilanden , at 43,82

Weather in hex: Overcast

Raid spotted at 18 NM, estimated altitude 27,810 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Japanese aircraft
A6M3a Zero x 44

No Japanese losses

Aircraft Attacking:
44 x A6M3a Zero sweeping at 22810 feet



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Morning Air attack on Batoe-eilanden , at 43,82

Weather in hex: Overcast

Raid spotted at 18 NM, estimated altitude 7,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Japanese aircraft
A6M3a Zero x 45

No Japanese losses


This will not help matters.

quote:

Morning Air attack on Batoe-eilanden , at 43,82

Weather in hex: Overcast

Raid spotted at 33 NM, estimated altitude 6,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 12 minutes

Japanese aircraft
G3M3 Nell x 36
Ki-43-IIb Oscar x 10

Allied aircraft
no flights

Japanese aircraft losses
G3M3 Nell: 2 damaged

Allied aircraft losses
P-40K Warhawk: 6 damaged
PBY-5A Catalina: 5 damaged
PBY-5A Catalina: 1 destroyed on ground
Kittyhawk III: 4 damaged
PBY-5 Catalina: 1 damaged
Catalina I: 5 damaged
Catalina I: 1 destroyed on ground

Airbase hits 5
Airbase supply hits 10
Runway hits 42


or this

quote:

Morning Air attack on Batoe-eilanden , at 43,82

Weather in hex: Overcast

Raid spotted at 28 NM, estimated altitude 10,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 10 minutes

Japanese aircraft
G3M3 Nell x 35

Allied aircraft
no flights

Japanese aircraft losses
G3M3 Nell: 1 damaged

Allied aircraft losses
P-40K Warhawk: 3 damaged
P-40K Warhawk: 1 destroyed on ground
PBY-5A Catalina: 2 damaged
Kittyhawk III: 1 damaged

Airbase hits 5
Airbase supply hits 7
Runway hits 16


< Message edited by Cap Mandrake -- 9/26/2020 3:57:13 PM >

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4758
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 3:59:54 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
The C-87's at Mergui (in Burma) dropped some commandoes on Langawaki (off the coast of Malaysia). This had the effect of taking some of the heat off the Aussies still stuck in Western Sumatra

Morning Air attack on 111th LRP Brigade, at 49,72 (Langkawi)

Weather in hex: Heavy rain

Raid spotted at 20 NM, estimated altitude 8,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 6 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-49-IIa Helen x 23

No Japanese losses

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4759
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:02:31 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
There are two ground units at Sabang out in clear terrain. We start softening them up by air.

quote:

Morning Air attack on 91st Naval Guard Unit, at 44,70 (Sabang)

Weather in hex: Light cloud

Raid spotted at 14 NM, estimated altitude 11,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Allied aircraft
Liberator II x 5
B-24D Liberator x 4
B-24D1 Liberator x 4

No Allied losses

Japanese ground losses:
100 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 4 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled


AND

Morning Air attack on 91st Naval Guard Unit, at 44,70 (Sabang)

Weather in hex: Light cloud

Raid spotted at 17 NM, estimated altitude 13,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Allied aircraft
B-24D Liberator x 11
B-24D1 Liberator x 5

No Allied losses

Japanese ground losses:
106 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 4 disabled
Non Combat: 1 destroyed, 3 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 2 disabled


(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4760
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:04:15 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
JJ stationed some Helens at Medan AF (level 2) so we attack there two. I don't even think they can operate there. Maybe just a distraction?

quote:

Morning Air attack on Medan , at 46,76

Weather in hex: Severe storms

Raid detected at 21 NM, estimated altitude 14,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 7 minutes

Japanese aircraft
no flights

Allied aircraft
B-24D1 Liberator x 21

Japanese aircraft losses
Ki-49-IIa Helen: 1 destroyed on ground

No Allied losses

Japanese ground losses:
9 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Airbase hits 1
Airbase supply hits 2
Runway hits 7

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4761
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:07:09 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
New Guinea: We wipe out the main body of 1st Raiding Regiment at Biak. Engineers being pushed up toward Samri and Biak to build up those AF further. Hollandia reaches its maximum level 8.

quote:

Ground combat at Biak (87,110)

Allied Deliberate attack

Attacking force 3999 troops, 78 guns, 21 vehicles, Assault Value = 156

Defending force 527 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 3

Allied adjusted assault: 60

Japanese adjusted defense: 1

Allied assault odds: 60 to 1

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), leaders(+), experience(-)
Attacker: supply(-)

Japanese ground losses:
64 casualties reported
Squads: 1 destroyed, 1 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 2 disabled
Engineers: 3 destroyed, 0 disabled

Assaulting units:
7th Marine Regiment
44th British/B Division

Defending units:
1st Raiding Regiment

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4762
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:27:28 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
We recon everything in the area from Ulithi westward

Ulithi...no garrison, no AF
Yap....level 2 AF, 480 troops? Sounds like Koreans in diapers
Bealzebob...28K plus...jungle hex, level 5 AF....a beast. This would require a multidivisional landing
Peleliu.....4K troops.. level 1 AF..atoll...probably a beast
Morotai (Moluccas)...8K troops..Jungle rough..level 2 AF...forget it
Lolobatio (Moluccas)...3K...jungle rough...level 3...forget it
Tailud-elenaden (eastern end of Celebes Sea)...6K+ troops...jungle...forget it

Judging from these dispositions, JJ is anticipating a push up the Moluccas/Bealzebob axis to Mindanao. That might have worked 3 months ago if we had the resources but now it is a nightmare.

The plan is to reduce Truk AF by air and then drive right toward Truk...but sail right by toward Guam while the Eastern arms sails from Midway and Pearl. There will be a carrier battle and if the USN wins we keep going.

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4763
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:44:34 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
SE Asia: JJ has brought up 3-4 divisions to our blocking position in Laos. Time to get help from the Allied air forces/

quote:

Morning Air attack on 41st Division, at 64,60 , near Vinh

Weather in hex: Heavy cloud

Raid spotted at 13 NM, estimated altitude 10,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 4 minutes

Allied aircraft
Hurricane IIc Trop x 5
Wellington Ic x 9

No Allied losses

Japanese ground losses:
24 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 2 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled



(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4764
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:45:30 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
It's jungle so they are not easy to hit

quote:

Morning Air attack on 41st Division, at 64,60 , near Vinh

Weather in hex: Heavy cloud

Raid spotted at 14 NM, estimated altitude 8,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 4 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-44-IIa Tojo x 3

Allied aircraft
Hurricane IIc Trop x 5
Mitchell II x 10
B-25D1 Mitchell x 6

No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
Mitchell II: 1 damaged

Japanese ground losses:
52 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 2 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 3 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4765
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:46:14 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
quote:

Morning Air attack on 116th Division, at 64,60 , near Vinh

Weather in hex: Heavy cloud

Raid spotted at 20 NM, estimated altitude 8,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 7 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-44-IIa Tojo x 28

Allied aircraft
Hurricane IIc Trop x 22
Vengeance I x 10

Japanese aircraft losses
Ki-44-IIa Tojo: 5 destroyed

Allied aircraft losses
Hurricane IIc Trop: 4 destroyed

Japanese ground losses:
18 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4766
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:47:42 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
They are fling ether from Vinh or Haiphong and we are flying from Nakon in Siam

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4767
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 4:49:40 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
Oz: Sanitizing the last bits of Northern Oz.

quote:

Ground combat at Broome (62,127)

Allied Deliberate attack

Attacking force 3955 troops, 63 guns, 72 vehicles, Assault Value = 134

Defending force 1360 troops, 10 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 10

Allied adjusted assault: 25

Japanese adjusted defense: 9

Allied assault odds: 2 to 1 (fort level 3)

Allied Assault reduces fortifications to 2

Combat modifiers
Defender: experience(-)
Attacker: supply(-)

Japanese ground losses:
124 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 3 disabled
Engineers: 2 destroyed, 2 disabled

Allied ground losses:
37 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 4 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Assaulting units:
7th Australian Brigade
101st LH Motor Regiment

Defending units:
21th JNAF AF Unit

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4768
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 9:30:01 PM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 16692
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: offline
quote:

Cap Mandrake: Supply is bad.


This is obvious Russian disinformation meant to disrupt our favorite pastime.
Supply is NOT bad. Lack of supply is bad!

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 4769
RE: At dawn we slept.....in the cab on the way back fro... - 9/26/2020 10:21:56 PM   
Cap Mandrake


Posts: 23019
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
Where do RN ships have to go for withdrawal. I know Colombo works but where else?

(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 4770
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