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The Tige of the Andersons: G.T. Anderson

 
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The Tige of the Andersons: G.T. Anderson - 10/18/2008 2:37:34 PM   
jkBluesman


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Brig. Gen. George Thomas Anderson (b. 1824, d. 1901). Nicknamed „Tige“, to distinguish him from the other Andersons in the Army of Northern Virginia, George Thomas Anderson became one of its best combat officers. A quarrel with Gov. Jospeh Brown in 1864 about supplies withheld by the governor may have hindered his promotion to major general. Born in Covington, Georgia he attended Emory College in Atlanta before starting a military career during the Mexican-American War. He served as second lieutenant of the Georgia Mounted Volunteers through Gen. Winfield Scott’s campaign. After the war he returned home before accepting a commission as cavalry captain. He stayed in the army for three years and then resigned and returned home. When the Civil War broke out Anderson was living on his family’s plantation. He helped to raise the 11th Georgia Regiment and went as its colonel to Virginia. He did not see any fighting until the Peninsular Campaign in spring of 1862. Anderson led a brigade in Gen. David R. Jones division which was part of Gen. John Magruder’s force that delayed the Federal advance on Richmond. During the Seven Days his brigade fought at Golding’s Farm (the fourth battle) and Malvern Hill where it was almost cut to pieces by Union artillery while advancing in a frontal attack. Anderson survived the slaughter and led his brigade during the Second Manassas Campaign. The Georgians played a crucial role in securing Thoroughfare Gap for Gen. James Longstreet’s corps which was thus able to reunite with the II Corps at Second Manassas, the Army of Northern Virginia’s biggest victory. Anderson was wounded in the battle but returned to duty in time for the Maryland invasion. At South Mountain his brigade helped to gain time for the Confederates to concentrate at Sharpsburg. On September 17 the Federals attacked. Anderson’s brigade was originally posted on the right but was shifted to the left during the battle. It fought in the woods north of the Dunker Church and later helped to hold the line after the Confederates lost the Sunken Road which was later called “Bloody Lane”. Commended for his conduct Anderson was finally promoted to brigadier general in November. A month later he fought at Fredericksburg before his brigade was sent to Suffolk, Virginia as part of a force under Longstreet to secure supplies for the army. In summer of 1863 Gen. Robert E. Lee invaded Pennsylvania. On July 1 the Battle of Gettysburg began. Anderson’s brigade fought on the second day near “Devil’s Den”, where its commander was heavily wounded. Upon recovery he rejoined Longstreet in Tennessee where he arrived in October. He participated in the failed siege of Knoxville before returning to Virginia for the Overland Campaign of 1864. He fought in every battle from the Wilderness – there being part of Longstreet’s successful flank-attack – to Cold Harbor. He led his men through the siege at Petersburg and surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. After the war Anderson returned to Georgia where he served in civic offices in Atlanta before moving to Anniston, Alabama. There he died on April 4, 1901 and was buried in Edgemont Cemetery.

Ldr: 4
Tact: 6
Init: 3
Cmd: 3
Cav: 0

Teaches: Independent, Woodsmen
Post #: 1
RE: The Tige of the Andersons: G.T. Anderson - 11/14/2008 7:51:52 AM   
Gil R.


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Copied, thanks.

(in reply to jkBluesman)
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RE: The Tige of the Andersons: G.T. Anderson - 12/12/2008 1:23:59 AM   
Gil R.


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All done, with no major additions or subtractions. Any idea where the nickname came from?

Brig. Gen. George Thomas “Tige” Anderson (b. 1824, d. 1901). Nicknamed “Tige” to distinguish him from the other Andersons in the Army of Northern Virginia, Anderson became one of its best combat officers. However, a quarrel with Georgia Gov. Joseph Brown in 1864 about supplies withheld by the governor may have hindered his promotion to major general. Born in Covington, Georgia, he attended Emory College in Atlanta before starting a military career during the Mexican-American War. Anderson served as 2nd lieutenant of the Georgia Mounted Volunteers through Gen. Winfield Scott’s campaign. After the war he returned home before accepting a commission as a cavalry captain. Anderson stayed in the army for three years before resigning and returning home again. When the Civil War broke out he was living on his family’s plantation. He helped to raise the 11th Georgia Infantry Regiment and went to Virginia as its colonel. He did not see any fighting until the Peninsula Campaign in spring of 1862. Anderson led a brigade in Gen. David R. Jones’s division, which was part of the force under Gen. John Magruder that delayed Gen. George B. McClellan’s advance on Richmond. During the Seven Days’ Battles of June 25-July 1 his brigade fought at Golding’s Farm, the fourth battle, and Malvern Hill on July 1, where it was almost cut to pieces by Union artillery while advancing in a frontal attack. Anderson survived the slaughter and led his brigade during the Second Manassas Campaign the following month. The Georgians played a crucial role in securing nearby Thoroughfare Gap for Gen. James Longstreet’s corps, which was thus able to reunite with the II Corps at Manassas, leading to the Army of Northern Virginia’s biggest victory when that corps launched a crushing attack on the Union left on August 30. Anderson was wounded in the battle but returned to duty in time for Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Maryland invasion. At South Mountain his brigade helped to gain time for the Confederates to concentrate at Sharpsburg, holding back McClellan’s army and thus preventing the possible piecemeal destruction of Lee’s army. On September 17, McClellan finally attacked Lee, precipitating the Battle of Antietam. Anderson’s brigade was originally posted on the right but was shifted to the left during the battle. It fought in the woods north of the Dunker Church and later helped to hold the line after the Confederates lost their valuable defensive position along the Sunken Road (which was later called “Bloody Lane”). Commended for his conduct, Anderson was finally promoted to brigadier general in November. A month later he fought at Fredericksburg, before his brigade was sent to Suffolk, Virginia as part of a force under Longstreet intended to secure supplies for the army. In summer of 1863 Lee invaded the North again, this time targeting Pennsylvania. On July 1, the Battle of Gettysburg began. Anderson’s brigade fought on the second day near the “Devil’s Den,” the area at the southern end of the battlefield filled with rocky outcroppings and large boulders, where its commander was heavily wounded. Upon recovery Anderson rejoined Longstreet in Tennessee, arriving in October in the aftermath of the Union’s defeat at Chickamauga and retreat to Chattanooga. He participated in the failed siege of Knoxville before returning to Virginia for the Overland Campaign of 1864, during which he fought in every battle from the Wilderness – participating in Longstreet’s successful flank-attack – to Cold Harbor. Anderson led his men through the siege at Petersburg and surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. After the war he returned to Georgia, where he served in civic offices in Atlanta before moving to Anniston, Alabama. There Anderson died on April 4, 1901 and was buried in Edgemont Cemetery. (Bio by Joern Kaesebier)

Ldr: 4
Tact: 6
Init: 3
Cmd: 3
Cav: 0

Teaches: Independent (9), Woodsmen (19), Aggressive (30) I added this last one

Start date: 44


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Michael Jordan plays ball. Charles Manson kills people. I torment eager potential customers by not sharing screenshots of "Brother Against Brother." Everyone has a talent.

(in reply to Gil R.)
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RE: The Tige of the Andersons: G.T. Anderson - 12/12/2008 8:53:19 AM   
jkBluesman


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Joined: 2/12/2007
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The only remark on his nickname I found said it was chosen to distinguish him from the other Andersons.

(in reply to Gil R.)
Post #: 4
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