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Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 5:49:26 AM   
Miamieagle

 

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Whats the difference between the units call Russian and the one's call Soviet!
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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 6:23:01 AM   
Jason Petho


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Miamieagle

Whats the difference between the units call Russian and the one's call Soviet!


How they function on the battlefield.

Russians are Allied, Soviets are Axis.

Jason Petho


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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 12:54:13 PM   
Dumnorix


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Well so a etymological separation can come only from America. The political and historical education on this continent nevertheless always appears against as unsatisfactory.

H.Balck

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 5:13:29 PM   
timshin42


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Etymological? Try memnonic: DUMNORIX = an intellectually challenged African antelope!
Absolutely last chance!

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 8:40:59 PM   
tide1212


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Those Anglo-Saxons always trying to change things

< Message edited by tide1212 -- 1/31/2008 8:41:44 PM >

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 10:12:04 PM   
1925frank

 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but the Germans themselves in WWII referred to the Soviets as Russians, although Russians made up only one component of Soviet population.  Stalin himself was Georgian.  Again, I could be wrong, but I don't believe Georgians considered themselves Russians.  When referring to Russians to mean Soviets, I don't think Americans are unique. 

I think perhaps a comparable example would be the reference to Prussians in the 19th century to mean what we today would refer to as Germany.  Not all the troops that fought for Prussia in the Austro-Prussian and the Franco-Prussian Wars were Prussian.  Some were Bavarians.

The reference to English for British troops is another example. Not all British troops were English. Some were Scottish, Welsh, or from Northern Ireland.

For game purposes, two names were needed for one country. 

< Message edited by 1925frank -- 1/31/2008 10:19:31 PM >

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 10:28:02 PM   
Arkady


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it is same in Europe, for us (in Czech Republic), Soviets were always Russians, and British are refered as English etc.

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 10:38:22 PM   
tide1212


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I think Frank has a good point also. At the colapse of the Soviet Union the only union that really wanted to be Russian aside from Russia proper was Beleruse.

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 11:17:21 PM   
1925frank

 

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"Yankee" is another ambiguous term.  Tide may know better than I, but my understanding was a "Yankee" originally meant a New Englander.  In the American Civil War, "Yankee" was broadened to mean anyone from one of the Union states, and in the World Wars, it came to mean any American. 


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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 11:51:56 PM   
Ladmo

 

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I live in a little town in south central Kentucky, and "Yankee" refers to the people living on the north side of my street.

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 1/31/2008 11:59:05 PM   
1925frank

 

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When I came to Texas, I was told a Yankee was anyone who had to cross the Red River to enter Texas.  By that definition, I was a Yankee, even though I didn't come from New England or any of the northern states that belonged to the Union.  

In Texas, there are two types of Yankees: Yankees and D....d Yankees. I qualified as a D....d Yankee. A D....d Yankee is a Yankee who comes to Texas and stays.

I believe Texans still celebrate Confederate Heroes' Day. 

< Message edited by 1925frank -- 2/1/2008 12:04:54 AM >

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 2/1/2008 1:18:08 AM   
tide1212


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Pretty close Frank although New Englanders inherited the nickname and then inherited D....d Yankees in The War of Northern Aggresion It was a baterdized form of the word English used by the American Indians on the East Coast.

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RE: Whats the the difference? - 2/1/2008 2:02:25 AM   
Dumnorix


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Hallo linguists (of the origin angli-saxones gentes)
Wau - pleases me however now very well - a linguistic discussion -I likes by the way the Yankee Doodle. The name Yankee is probably derived from the pointed name of the Netherlands immigrants, who were called "Jan Kees" - Jan and Kees are in the Netherlands both frequent pre as well as surnames.

H.Balck

PS:(I greet from the country of Teuriochamaea - gentes Hermundurii - pagus anglii)

< Message edited by Dumnorix -- 2/1/2008 2:33:48 AM >


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RE: Whats the the difference? - 2/1/2008 2:46:58 AM   
1925frank

 

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Excellent!  New York was originally called New Amsterdam, so there were apparently Dutch settlements in that area.   

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