mission preparation (Full Version)

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bladesinger79 -> mission preparation (2/17/2021 6:38:44 PM)

When I play a scenario, I go so far as to write down my OOB and take extensive notes on strengths and weaknesses of my battle platforms. This happens far more often on very large battles such as the Northern Fury games. It gets me immersed into the game, but few things worse than suffering a scene such as, "I didn't know it can't do that!"

Anyone else go this far? Just wondering...heheh.

[:D]




thewood1 -> RE: mission preparation (2/17/2021 7:01:08 PM)

I do something similar. I also track WRA for missiles in a spreadsheet so I have a quick reference. I used to do a lot more, but additions to the OOB, ROE, etc. screens have alleviated the load quite a bit.

I used to do a lot with mission tracking but the unit status and other changes have made that much easier to do in real time.




CV60 -> RE: mission preparation (2/17/2021 8:15:19 PM)

quote:

When I play a scenario, I go so far as to write down my OOB and take extensive notes on strengths and weaknesses of my battle platforms. This happens far more often on very large battles such as the Northern Fury games. It gets me immersed into the game, but few things worse than suffering a scene such as, "I didn't know it can't do that!"

Anyone else go this far? Just wondering...heheh.


[raise hand] [:D] I actually do truncated IPBs.....




Kushan04 -> RE: mission preparation (2/17/2021 8:35:29 PM)

Planning? Whats that?

I may save a message from the log here or there but for the most part I wing it. [:D]

... Actually that may explain a lot.




SeaQueen -> RE: mission preparation (2/17/2021 11:19:22 PM)

I usually have a blank spreadsheet opened or a calculator for quick math. Since I usually play my own scenarios, I know what the OOB is roughly but I randomly determine how many aircraft are mission capable, so I don't know exactly how many I have. That means I'm usually pretty familiar with the platform and weapon capabilities, none the less, I do check the database viewer frequently.




stww2 -> RE: mission preparation (2/18/2021 4:13:09 AM)

Occasionally I've prepared weapon allocation plans (usually in a txt file) for strikes in which there are a large number of targets being struck and I need to keep track of which flight is supposed to hit what, but that's generally the exception and not the rule.




JFS737 -> RE: mission preparation (2/18/2021 2:55:12 PM)

I make quick reference sheets for enemy and friendly ship OOB with things like how many ASCM's, LACM's or SAMs a ship or sub has plus gun size/range. I note if it has TASS or VDS, how many missiles are needed to "overcome" and sink it. I also list the air assets ashore and at sea for strike planning and draw a crude "map" of their locations. I usually use the "Browse Scenario Platforms" as an "intel" asset and get up to speed on the enemy and on assets under my command. It can be a lot of work, but going into a scenario without this would usually be unrealistic. Most commanders would get some basic information regarding their opposition and would be familiar with their own capabilities before hand. I read that the Brits read "Jane's Fighting Ships" on the way south to the Falklands.




Gunner98 -> RE: mission preparation (2/19/2021 10:24:14 AM)

Yes.

It can sometimes take me an evening just planning and thinking through the options.

Strike planning especially, working from the target backwards - determining which assets/munitions go for which and figuring out how best and most efficiently to to achieve the mission.

I always have a word doc handy, the new message window removes the need but I like to do it anyway. Designers have been known to drop hints and clues into messages and I like to be able to highlight threads in multiple messages etc.

Spreadsheet for calculations, I don't worry about being exact but want platforms/wpns to arrive within a few min of each other or in a predictable sequence etc.




BDukes -> RE: mission preparation (2/19/2021 3:12:19 PM)

2-3 Gummies depending on your size and weight (Never do 4!), a couple of cups of coffee and a few om-mani-padme-hums[&o]

Or I just sit for a few and put together a master plan with a few contingencies. If there is anything complicated will use a spreadsheet or calculator to do the math and putting together a small list either in my head or on paper to implement how I'd do the thing in CMO. Missing steps or rushing to fill in something that often burns me. Sometimes I even jot down notes as to why I did something (ASW/Sea Control). I also make it a habit to use reference points to mark targets (especially lost ASW contacts) and periodically do a clean up of the old reference point messes I've made on the map to clear the decks[:)]

I think the more valuable stuff comes after the first play-through and how you approach the second or third. I think by the fourth I'm usually modding something my way because I've thought of stuff and want to see how it plays out. This why I like the more sandbox scenarios, give you room to explore a bit on both sides.


Mike






kevinkins -> RE: mission preparation (2/20/2021 9:13:59 PM)

I think the use of spreadsheets to plan is a great idea. I wonder how professional militaries do this type of stuff. It would seem they would be regimented by using some sort of classified software. That said, I think it's great various players have their own way of planning with tools they like. Keeping the mind active is important as one gets older in general.

Kevin




SeaQueen -> RE: mission preparation (2/22/2021 2:14:29 PM)

It depends. Sometimes they just use a spreadsheet too. There does exist tactical decision aids to assist in planning certain complicated things, like optimizing routing, or weaponeering, where it isn't just simple math, but a lot of stuff is just measuring distances on maps, timing, and just doing the math and geometry. They all have some kind of formalized planning process (e.g. METT-TC in the USMC, which is based on but slightly different from the Army's planning process).

The thing to remember, though, is that there isn't necessarily a single way to solve the problem. This stuff is very complicated and it's completely possible for two identically trained individuals to arrive at very different solutions to the same problem. There's often better and worse ways to solve it, though, and always room for improvement. A good scenario ought to be sufficiently rich that you can play it over and over again, changing your plan now and then to account for an ever improving understanding of what's important (and you won't necessarily always be successful).


quote:

ORIGINAL: kevinkins

I think the use of spreadsheets to plan is a great idea. I wonder how professional militaries do this type of stuff. It would seem they would be regimented by using some sort of classified software. That said, I think it's great various players have their own way of planning with tools they like. Keeping the mind active is important as one gets older in general.

Kevin





SunlitZelkova -> RE: mission preparation (2/23/2021 11:20:42 AM)

I will make a note on my phone titled "[Scenario Title] Planning".

I will make a list of my strike units, and depending on the geography of the battlefield or target area, I will divide the forces in the OOB on my phone by region (for example, in the CoW scenario God of War, there is a northern group focused on Hanoi, a central group focused on Da Nang, and a southern group focused on Ho Chi Minh City). I then make a list of the targets, and with a total of the aim points, grouped by the type of target (radar, hardened structure, etc.). As part of the list of units, I then make a list of the weapons they each have, along with the warhead type. From there I then assign weapons to targets. For air-to-air combat however, unless there is a clear discrepancy in capability (like using stealth fighters against poorly trained enemy pilots in early 4th gen fighters) I usually just try to ensure there is a balanced number on station at all times and make sure there are as many in the air as possible, and then let the AI do the targeting and shooting.

I use a similar method with anti-surface operations, however often times due to the excellent air defence capabilities of the enemy ships, and an unwillingness to calculate the exact number of weapons needed to defeat the defences and destroy them, combined with a fear of large numbers of malfunctions, results in a sort of "as many as possible" with little regard for how much destructive power is actually needed and whether it would be possible to conserve ammunition/ordnance.

For subs, due to their independent nature, unless they are in a decent position to participate in an ASM strike, I have them do there own thing with no planning at all.




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