CSA Bios: W.H. Stevens, C.H. Stevens, Steuart, Steele (Full Version)

All Forums >> [Current Games From Matrix.] >> [American Civil War] >> Forge of Freedom: The American Civil War 1861-1865 >> Generals' Biographies Project



Message


Battleline -> CSA Bios: W.H. Stevens, C.H. Stevens, Steuart, Steele (1/12/2007 1:16:03 AM)

Brig. Gen. Walter H. Stevens, CSA (b. 1827, d. 1867) Reported to be the last uniformed man across the Mayo Bridge from Richmond, Walter Husted Stevens made his brigadier’s mark as the commander of the Richmond defenses. Born in Penn Yan, N.Y., Aug. 24, 1827, Stevens was fourth in the U.S. Military Academy at West Point’s Class of 1848. He received his commission in the corps of engineers and was sent to Texas and Louisiana. While there, he met and married the sister of Louis Hebert (USMA Class of 1845, later a Confederate general) of Louisiana and became a southerner. He resigned his U.S. Army commission, but it was not accepted. He was dismissed from the army May 2, 1861, on a technicality. His Confederate service began as a captain of engineers in the regular Confederate Army. He was an engineering specialist on the staff of Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard at First Manassas. Promoted to major, he served as the chief engineer of Gen. Joseph Johnston’s Army of Virginia during the Peninsular and Seven Days Campaigns. When Gen. Robert E. Lee succeeded Johnston, Stevens again was promoted and placed in charge of the Richmond defenses. He spent much of the war strengthening and improving the city’s defenses. He was promoted to brigadier general Aug. 28, 1864 and was the chief engineer for the Army of Northern Virginia. Paroled at Appomattox, Stevens went to Mexico, becoming the chief engineer of the Imperial Railroad of Emperor Maximilian. That line ran from Vera Cruz to Mexico City. Stevens died in Vera Cruz Nov. 12, 1867. His body was removed to Richmond and buried in Hollywood Cemetery.

Brig. Gen. Clement H. Stevens, CSA (b. 1821, d. 1864) The son of a northern father, who was a U.S. Navy officer, and a South Carolina mother, Clement Hoffman Stevens was born in Northwich, Conn., Aug. 14, 1821. Stevens was raised in the south as the family first lived in Florida and later Pendleton, S.C. Stevens’ early life was spent at sea, serving as a secretary to his kinsmen, Commodores William Shubrick and William Bee. Following his return to land, he worked for the Planters and Mechanics Bank in Charleston, S.C., starting in 1842. He was the cashier of the bank at the outbreak of the Civil War. An inventor on the side, he came up with the first armored battery on Morris Island in Charleston Harbor. The battery was faced with railroad iron. During First Manassas, he was serving as an aide to his brother-in-law, Gen. Barnard Bee, when he was severely wounded and Bee killed. Stevens was elected colonel of the 24th South Carolina Infantry and led that unit at the Battle of Secessionville (S.C.), June 16, 1862. His unit was assigned to the brigade of Gen. States Rights Gist (who also aided Bee at Manassas) during the Vicksburg Campaign. When the brigade was moved to the Army of Tennessee, it fought at Chickamauga and Stevens once again suffered a severe wound. Gist called Stevens “the iron-nerved” and Stevens’ men called him “Rock” Stevens. Promoted to brigadier general Jan. 20, 1864, Stevens took charge of a brigade in W.H.T. Walker’s division during the Atlanta Campaign. Stevens suffered his third, and final, major wound at the Battle of Peach Tree Creek July 20, 1864. He lingered for over five days before dying in Atlanta July 25, 1864.

Brig. Gen. George H. Steuart, CSA (b. 1828, d. 1903) George Hume “Maryland” Steuart started his Confederate service with troops of his home state. Born in Baltimore, Md., Aug. 24, 1828, Steuart attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, graduating at 19. He stood 37th in a class of 38. He served in the cavalry on the frontier until he resigned his commission April 22, 1861. He became a captain in the Regular Confederate Army, but moved to the First Maryland Infantry when it was formed. He was elected the unit’s lieutenant colonel under Arnold Elzey. After First Manassas, he was promoted to colonel and succeeded Elzey as the regimental commander. Steuart was promoted to brigadier general March 6, 1862, and commanded a brigade of his regiment and four Virginia regiments. He served in Ewell’s division during the 1862 Valley Campaign. Wounded at Cross Keys, he had to leave his command for some time. His return came in time for the Battle of Gettysburg, where he led a Second Corps brigade in Gen. Edward Johnson’s division. He stayed with that unit until the Battle of Spotsylvania and was captured with most of his command in the Mule Shoe May 12, 1864. He was exchanged and was given a brigade in Gen. Pickett’s division, leading that unit at the Battle of Five Forks near the end of the war. Following the war, he moved to Anne Arundel County, Md., and became a farmer. He was the commander of the Maryland division of the United Confederate Veterans for many years. Steuart died in South River, Md., Nov. 22, 1903.

Brig. Gen. William Steele, CSA (b. 1819, d. 1885) New York-born William Steele became a southerner by marriage and went with his adopted state, Texas, when it seceded. Steele was born in Albany, N.Y., May 1, 1819, of an New England father and Florida mother. He attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and graduated with the Class of 1840. During the Mexican War, he was breveted for gallantry in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco. He married into a Texas family in 1850 and felt it right to resign his commission May 30, 1861. Appointed colonel of the Seventh Texas Cavalry, he took part during Sibley’s New Mexico Campaign and was in charge of the Mesilla area. His promotion to brigadier general came Sept. 12, 1862. During 1863, Steele commanded the Indian Territory. He later took charge of the Galveston, Texas, defenses. He returned to active field duty under the command of Gen. Richard Taylor during the Red River Campaign, receiving compliments following the Battle of Pleasant Hill. After Gen. Thomas Green was killed during the Battle of Blair’s Landing, Steele took charge of Green’s cavalry division as the unit’s senior brigadier general until he was replaced by Maj. Gen. John A Wharton. Following the war, Steele settled in San Antonio, Texas, and was a commission merchant. He moved to Austin, Texas, in 1873 and was the state’s adjutant general under Governors Coke and Hubbard. Steele died in San Antonio Jan. 12, 1885.




Gil R. -> RE: CSA Bios: W.H. Stevens, C.H. Stevens, Steuart, Steele (1/13/2007 4:01:10 AM)

Thanks!




Battleline -> RE: CSA Bios: W.H. Stevens, C.H. Stevens, Steuart, Steele (5/18/2007 10:36:51 PM)

Brig. Gen. George H. Steuart, CSA (b. 1828, d. 1903) George Hume “Maryland” Steuart started his Confederate service with troops of his home state. Born in Baltimore, Maryland., Aug. 24, 1828, Steuart attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, graduating at 19 with the Class of 1844. He stood 37th in a class of 38. He served in the dragoons on the frontier in Texas for seven years. Promoted to captain in 1855, he served in the cavalry in Kansas and Nebraska. He participated in A.S. Johnston's Utah Campaign. He resigned his commission April 22, 1861, under the assumption Maryland would follow Virginia out of the Union. Made a major general of Maryland volunteers, he accepted Confederate rank when that state did not seced. When the First Maryland Infantry when it was formed. He was elected the unit’s lieutenant colonel under Arnold Elzey. After First Manassas, he was promoted to colonel and succeeded Elzey as the regimental commander. Steuart was promoted to brigadier general March 6, 1862, and commanded a brigade of his regiment and four Virginia regiments. He served in Ewell’s division during the 1862 Valley Campaign. Wounded in the shoulder at Cross Keys, he had to leave his command for some time. His return came in time for the Battle of Gettysburg, where he led a Second Corps brigade in Gen. Edward Johnson’s division. He stayed with that unit until the Battle of Spotsylvania and was captured with most of his command in the Mule Shoe May 12, 1864. At about the same time, Federal Gen. Lewis Wallace was confiscating Steuart's estate on the South River in Maryland. He was exchanged and was given a brigade in Gen. Pickett’s division, leading that unit at the Battle of Five Forks near the end of the war. Following the war, he moved to Anne Arundel County, Md., and became a farmer. He was the commander of the Maryland division of the United Confederate Veterans for many years. Steuart died in South River, Md., Nov. 22, 1903.




Gil R. -> RE: CSA Bios: W.H. Stevens, C.H. Stevens, Steuart, Steele (5/23/2007 7:17:01 AM)

Copied.




Page: [1]

Valid CSS!




Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI
0.0234375