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RE: White whales

 
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RE: White whales - 5/8/2004 12:20:21 PM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
(note: sorry for the delay...a monitor failure kept me down for a bit, but we're back in buisness)

20 May 42
Wx: Clear

0430L…onboard submarine S-44…at sea…

Chief Matson was relieved when the orders finally were decoded on the wireless. His commander had been pushing too hard after the debacle at the IJN base at Shortland Island. Then the missed attack on the Jap troop transport had a few of the crew whispering among themselves. Matson even heard the doubts from Commander Moore himself – something about “his” transport. The chief had seen this before, and he tried to remind the captain of that, but overtures leading up to an actual conversation were politely rebuffed.

This crew and its captain needed to put back to shore. And that’s where they were headed.

0800L…onboard PBY Catalina callsign “Shepherd six seven”…

Flying Officer Charlie Kilgore could have not been more alert. He desperately wanted to make up for the botched attack on the Japanese sub earlier. And now there was a sub contact 30 miles from Townsville itself! Flying at 1000 feet over the water as slow as he dared, he only checked his instruments out of sheer necessity. His eyes were glued to the ocean surface as he scanned for “his” sub…

0933L…Koumac airbase…New Caledonia

Capt. Eddie Baker listened as the major outlined the search pattern for the next 48 hours. With only seven aircraft, the 28th Bomb “Squadron” was barely over half strength. And no replacement aircraft were due in for quite a while. To further limit the “squadron’s” effectiveness, only himself, the major, and 2Lt. Henry ‘Hans’ Andersen had flown search patterns over the Pacific with any regularity. Today, Baker, Andersen, and one of the new pilots would fly sector searches from this new base. The facilities were adequate for the big bombers, and the engineers were working almost round the clock to continue improvements to the airbase. The previous residents, a squadron of Navy Catalinas, also had the range necessary to search out vast areas of ocean. “Why,” Baker wondered, “couldn’t they stay here and search?”

1212L…onboard HMAS Arunta…at sea…

Lt. White felt a bit out of place on the big destroyer. His own ship, SC640, was docked back at Noumea, while ever-present maintenance needs were being tended to. He was here, at the “request” of one Admiral Callaghan. This admiral was announced as the commander of TF201. Being part of a task force made White take notice. The newly arrived destroyer also brought with her six new sub chasers, and they now had a force any sub commander might think twice about engaging. The destroyer led three patrol gunboats and 8 sub chasers on this run to now familiar Mouly Island.

White took all of this in. The additional sub chasers meant that ships could be rotated in and out of the TF when their systems needed maintenance while all the while keeping enough ships in the TF to give them a chance of successfully engaging a submarine.

He wondered just how many subs were out there…

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 31
OJT - 5/9/2004 6:36:31 AM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
On the flight deck of the Shokaku. <location censored>. May 21st 1942. 1000h.

Lieutenant Hoshi paced impatiently in front of the line of replacement pilots standing rigidly at attention. Behind them, their shiny new Zeroes were being loaded by crane from the port onto the weather-beatened carrier.

"How many hours on Zeroes?" The query was sharp and demanded immediate response.

"50, sir!"

"40, sir!"

"46, sir!"

"47, sir!"

"49, sir!"

Hoshi shook his head. The average flying hours had gone down again. He remembered with a shudder how, when he was still a wet-behind-the-ears trainee at the Academy, the Old Man had made him do 20 loop-the-loops every morning on his Zero until he reached the 100-hour mark. That was now ancient history, before the China Incident.

"We're in the middle of a war here and Kasumigaura* sends me a bunch of half-baked idiots." He thought to himself.

"Tadao." He turned to his XO.

"Sir?" Lieutenant (JG) Tadao looked up from the clipboard, where he had been writing down the new pilots' details on the squadron register.

"I don't care what their Academy grades were, or who they are related to. I want their section leaders to take them up in their shiny new machines every waking hour. Give them tactics lectures, formation drills, night training, the lot. And I don't care how much fuel it takes either. Find it."

"Yes sir." Tadao never argued with Hoshi in front of the men. He made a mental note to have a little chat with him little later in the privacy of their cabin.

Hoshi had already turned back to the line of replacements, who by now were looking pretty apprehensive. "You lot have a lot to learn. And you better learn fast. Or you'll be getting on-the-job training from the blasted gaijin!"

He look resignedly at Tadao, then walked away. "That is all."

Tadao stood to attention. "Dismissed!"

The morning sun was shining brightly in the clear skies overhead.

"Perfect flying weather", Tadao thought.

*Kasumigaura Aviation Corps, naval pilots training academy

--------------------------------------
AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 05/21/42

Weather: Clear


< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/9/2004 12:41:45 PM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 32
RE: Bright shiny objects - 5/9/2004 11:18:36 PM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
24 May 42
Wx: Partly Cloudy

0720L…onboard B-17E “Lefty”…codename Bulldog-Four…

Tim Greer adjusted his seat and reached for the strap to adjust his seat harness. Ever since take-off from Garbutt airfield, his shoulder had been complaining. At about 240 miles out from the base, clear weather allowed his crew a virtually unobstructed view of the water’s surface. Muttering to himself, and playing with the buckle, he finally released the strap and he could feel his shoulder sigh in relief. Leaning back, he relaxed a bit. A veteran of 10 search missions, he knew the day’s flight was going to be long. One had to fight the boredom and ever-unchanging view outside the plane that threatened to lull one to sleep. Glancing rightt, he spoke to his copilot.

“Thanks, Phil. I’ll take her ba……”

A voice over the intercom cut off Greer.

“Sir…Jenkins. Dead ahead …ships.”

Greer scanned forward, and saw the dots on the surface of the ocean. His bombardier in the nose of the plane called out four ships he could make out through his bubble.

“Look alive guys…” Greer knew where there were ships, there were usually also planes.

Throughout the interior of the bomber, 7 men began to once more check their .50-caliber machine guns. The eighth, radio operator Sgt. Wilson, got out his pad, strapped it to his thigh and got ready to copy the contact report.

Greer dove towards the ships. There was nowhere to hide on such a clear day, so he decided to get the best look as possible at these ships. Wakes became visible north of the ships, who were coming into focus in the classic wedge shape of a task force.

Jenkins began calling off types as best he could. He counted four cruisers, one battleship, and several escorts around the perimeter of the force. Greer confirmed the contact report through the intercom and Wilson began keying the transmitter.

Explosions started to occur around the bomber, and Greer vectored the big aircraft away from the ships at a ninety degree angle, trying to give the ships as little of a target as he could. Two shells did hit the bomber, but its massive bulk simply absorbed them and continued away while the airspeed climbed towards, but tantalizingly close to 300 mph. Greer climbed up to 35,000 feet as the crew donned oxygen masks and turned on their suit and compartment heaters. He wanted to be above any fighters that happened to show up. He knew they would.

0744L…Townsville Command Center…

Major Jefferies showed his ID to the guard at the steel doors, and received a salute and entry into the Center. Walking through the airlock of this building always gave him the shivers. Claustrophobic at heart, he didn’t care to be anywhere where there weren’t at least windows.

Shoving that thought aside, he descended the stairs and entered the plotting room. A large sheet of Perspex showed the immediate area of the city, as well as the approaches offshore. About 240 miles out from the shore, he saw a large red arrow…

“Jefferies!” The colonel handed him the contact report. “From one of your “bulldog” aircraft on search. It looks like a bombardment group headed this way – maybe even the same one that blew the ‘ell out of the chaps in New Guinea.”

“Was the bomber intercepted, sir?” Jefferies knew what the bombardment force could do, but knew Townsville was in better shape to repel the force than Moresby ever could have been.

“No, he reported some ack-ack, but no fighters. He’s trailing force now.”

They were both interrupted by an announcement and a corporal making another red mark on the clear map.

"Enemy gound forces at Cairns."

Jefferies watched the corporal make the second red arrow further west along the coast road, and picked up the phone himself.

0747L…Aitkenville Weir airbase…near Townsville…

The klaxon had been going for some thirty seconds by the time Lt. McGee had clambered into his P-39D. While he was being strapped in by his ground crew, he ran through his orders mentally…not that there was a lot to them.

“Hit the nips while they’re out at sea. I don’t know why they sailed in this close. Maybe someone on their side screwed the pooch. Maybe we got lucky…I don’t care. You can bet your backside they’re going to try and high-tail it out of there now that they’ve been found.”

McGee looked left and right. With his engine running and the ground chocks cleared, he began to taxi towards the runway. The rest of the 36th Fighter Squadron’s “Flying Fiends” followed him.

1010L… engaging enemy task force…200 miles north of Townsville…

McGee led his section in at 100 feet. At this height, it was hoped he would remain under most of the enemy’s guns, yet still be able to hammer the ships with a variety of 50 caliber machine guns along with 20mm and 37mm cannon shells.

Unfortunately for McGee, and the others, the ships they targeted were heavy cruisers, designed to withstand assaults with armored decking. Still, they were there, they had bombs, and they pressed the attack. The squadron had trained for this kind of mission, and would strafe the target until they had to rise up to lob their bombs at the ships. McGee’s wingman, who had just joined the squadron two days earlier, pulled up too early, and drew the fire of almost every AA gun on the cruiser, with predictable results. This did, however give McGee an almost free pass as long as he did not fly to the other side of the ship. He banked and released the bomb a split second later. He vectored away from the ships at low altitude for a count of fifty, then climbed back to 6000 feet. Amazingly, no fighters were on hand to interfere with the planes.

The bombs, however, did not produce spectacular results. Hits were scored, although none of the bombs found their way to the vital innards of the ships. Still, two ships were set afire, and one had slowed considerably. The planes reformed and flew back home, hoping to get another chance at the ships while light was still available.

1400L…Aitkenville Weir airfield…near Townsville…

McGee had counted noses when he returned, and found two missing. His wingman, who had been blotted out of the sky when he exposed his underbelly to every AA gun on the cruiser was one. His plane had been reloaded and refueled, but this time, when he tried to start the aircraft nothing happened. Cursing loudly, he waited while the ground crew tore apart the plane searching for the reason for the failure. Finally, the crew chief clambered up onto the wing and leaned in the cockpit.

“It’s no good, sir…The shaft has been hit, and it warped against the housing. She won’t turn.”

“Fix it now man, I need to get airborne!!!”

But the chief had already hopped off the wing, and was motioning the crew to put the chocks back on the wheels.

McGee yelled after him, but the NCO never looked back, running to another plane whose tire exploded while taxiing.

McGee fumed while the others in his squadron were taking off. He never got out of his cockpit until they returned…

1700L…briefing room…operations building…Noumea, New Caledonia…

“Troops ashore at Cairns, another expeditionary force. Not this time, tho. We have an entire brigade waiting for them. Enemy strength estimate less than a company ashore. I guess they figured we left Cairns as well.”

The admiral wasn’t looking at the Australian coast on the map. His eyes went from the action reports back to the map.

Finally, he asked the obvious question.

“The enemy ships had no fighter cover?”

A young commander spoke a little too quickly.

“No sir!! And the Army’s aircraft hit them good! One cruiser was seen to have slowed considerably, with two more on fire. They may have even blunted the attack. We anticipate this was a bombardment TF, ordered to hit Townsville to protect the invasion forces at Cairns.”

“With no fighter cover?” The admiral tried to keep his voice level. “I don’t think so. Barely 200 troops in an enemy landing…I don’t think so at all.”

Another admiral in the room picked up on the thought. “Pretty expensive bait though, sir.”

“Yes it is. So expensive we would be foolish to think it was anything other than a main threat axis. But I just don’t think so. It’s too easy.”

The young commander in the room wondered just what he had said that was so wrong……

The CR:

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 05/24/42

Weather: Partly Cloudy

Air attack on TF at 13,55


Allied aircraft
P-400 Airacobra x 14
P-39D Airacobra x 21
P-40E Kittyhawk x 16


Allied aircraft losses
P-400 Airacobra x 1 destroyed
P-400 Airacobra x 1 damaged
P-39D Airacobra x 1 destroyed
P-39D Airacobra x 1 damaged

Japanese Ships
CL Yubari, Shell hits 4
CA Aoba
CA Myoko, Shell hits 20, Bomb hits 6, on fire
CA Kinugasa, Shell hits 24, Bomb hits 2


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Air attack on TF at 13,55


Allied aircraft
P-400 Airacobra x 10
P-39D Airacobra x 3


Allied aircraft losses
P-400 Airacobra x 1 damaged

Japanese Ships
CA Myoko, Shell hits 12, Bomb hits 1, on fire
CL Yubari, Shell hits 4
CA Aoba, Shell hits 8, Bomb hits 1
CA Haguro, Shell hits 8


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Dobadura

Japanese Deliberate attack

Attacking force 441 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 9 to 1 (fort level 0)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Dobadura base !!!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/9/2004 8:49:39 PM >

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 33
RE: Thrust, and parry - 5/11/2004 7:31:11 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
25 May 42
Wx: Thunderstorms

0025L…Vana beach…

Lt. Powell and the rest of the “Black Cats” of VP-11 were about ready to take off for a harassment raid on the ports of Lunga. Supporting the squadron was the converted destroyer McFarland. The tender, however was having trouble finding a suitable anchorage. Operation Pacific Panther had not gotten off to a rousing start. Making matters worse was the fact that the supplies that were to be flown in by another PBY squadron never made it to them and were probably on a deserted island somewhere among the hundreds in the general vicinity.

To that end, one PBY flew back to Noumea and reported in person the problem, and the Mahan-class destroyer Perkins was tasked with a fast transport run carrying supplies.

That was two days ago. Finally, after what seemed an eternity, the destroyer was alongside McFarland, transferring supplies to the tender. The storms had abated, and for the time being, the clouds parted and a full moon illuminated the ocean. Being spotlighted like this, alone and far from home, neither captain cared for the break in the clouds.

Neither did the Japanese.

The loading was interrupted when two enemy destroyers appeared in the area. McFarland was able to get underway, but Perkins was having a more difficult time of it. The next ten minutes were a crystal clear example of confusion, luck, and the completeness of wartime chaos.

Commander Berg had gotten his ship up to 22 knots and immediately began to head out to sea, away from the intruders. A sharp-eyed lookout reported the lead ship had two stacks, separated from each other. That was all Berg needed to hear. He knew his ship and Perkins were the only ones supposed to be in the area. And he also knew his ship, lightly armed and armored, loaded with aviation fuel and 100-lb bombs was not the best choice for a surface duel.

So he ran.

The enemy, however chased McFarland. They had started to chase the tender when the American had a lead of almost 7000 yards. Within two minutes, they had closed the gap to 5000 yards. McFarland had one 3-inch gun trained aft, but the gunner was one of the holdovers from the ships days as a destroyer. He knew to aim short, and as soon as he opened fire, he had trained the gun up a fraction. Seven seconds later, a second shell was fired. The first salvo landed a bit short, but – seven seconds later – the second round fell squarely onto the deck of the lead destroyer. An explosion was seen and the enemy had begun to break off from the chase. They then turned towards Perkins, who was just now getting underway. Perkins was infinitely better able to defend herself, but the Japanese destroyers had hit Perkins with one shell, starting fires and slowing the destroyer down to 27 knots. Perkins responded and scored a hit of her own before both sides had enough and retired.

Lt. Powell had watched with fascination. Most of the PBYs had taken off when the enemy approached. Their cover blown, Operation Pacific Panther was compromised and everyone was running for home.

Powell, however, was left ashore with five other crews. Their planes were supposed to get spare parts to get airborne. The parts were delivered. And they were onboard McFarland…bound for Noumea.

0211L…Townsville, Australia…

The enemy TF came into harbor and opened fire on the base. S-37 had tried to intercept, but she had been chased away by the destroyers escorting the cruisers. The bombardment, however, caused only minor damage to the base.

0600L…onboard B-17 “Lefty” code name Bulldog four…

Greer finally caught up with the retreating TF, but they were already over 300 miles out to sea. There would be no retaliatory strike from the P-39 and P-400 aircraft today…

0611L…Cairns, Australia…

The major of the 36th battalion, 14th Infantry brigade didn’t really enjoy what he was about to do. The enemy had landed just over a reinforced platoon of infantry using a fast transport ship. The enemy forces never made it off the beach before searchlights illuminated them earlier in the morning. Plaintive calls in their native language asking for their surrender and promises of good treatment were not answered, until…as one man the entire platoon rose up and charged inland. The major had almost all of the brigade’s artillery at his disposal, already trained on the beach. He had three full companies of infantry in defensive positions. He wanted the enemy to understand they had no chance at all. When they charged, he realized he had no choice. He spoke into the handset.

“Fire.”


The CR

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 05/25/42

Weather: Thunderstorms

Night Time Surface Combat, near Vana at 52,44

Japanese Ships
DD Mutsuki, Shell hits 1, on fire
DD Mochizuki

Allied Ships
AV McFarland, Shell hits 1


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Night Time Surface Combat, near Vana at 52,44

Japanese Ships
DD Mutsuki, Shell hits 2, on fire, heavy damage
DD Mochizuki

Allied Ships
DD Perkins, Shell hits 1, on fire


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sub attack near Townsville at 10,62

Japanese Ships
CA Kinugasa

Allied Ships
SS S-37


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Naval bombardment of Townsville, at 10,62


Allied aircraft


Allied aircraft losses
P-39D Airacobra x 1 destroyed
P-39D Airacobra x 1 damaged

Airbase hits 1
Runway hits 12


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Cairns

Allied Shock attack

Attacking force 4419 troops, 40 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 132 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Allied assault odds: 154 to 1 (fort level 0)


Japanese ground losses:
Men lost 132


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 34
RE: Thrust, and parry - 5/11/2004 5:11:41 PM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
Aboard the Mutsuki, off Guadacanal. May 26th 1942. 1900h.

The sun was already setting, but they, the crew of the beleaguered Mutsuki, scarcely noticed. It had rained all day, and the rough seas did not make the job of saving their luckless ship any easier.

Commander Hatano, arm in sling and bandages swathed over his head, stood stoically on his shattered bridge, overlooking the shambles of what had been his vessel. They'd probably relieve him of his command when he got back, but till then he tried as best as he could to stay focussed and encourage his men. Half the crew were casualties in the night action against the American seaplane tender and her single destroyer escort. Twice, they had managed to get manoeuvre to launch their vaunted Type-93 torpedoes, only to have them miss. The gaijin had had better luck with their shells, though. Hatano shook his head, pushing away the self-incriminations.

"Time enough for that when we get home," he thought.

There were still small fires aboard the ship, but they had managed to work her back up to something like 15 knots. The hull leaks were a bigger worry. The best damage control team was the reserve X-turret gun crew. The whole lot of them had been killed when the 25mm ammo store was hit. The remaining teams were newer, and less experienced.

"How's things below, Togo?" Hatano turned to Lieutenant Togo, temporary XO, formerly Gunnery Officer 1. He moved up the chain last night when Lieutenant Shinai got killed by a shell splinter. He was young and energetic, but the destroyer's struggles was pushing his limited experience to the edge.

"The port leak is under control. We're still working on the stern one. Engine room has been pumped out and another boiler has been relit. We might get more speed in another hour or so. And, uh...sir?"

"Yes?"

"It's a risk but I think we should jettison all our depth charges to get up more speed."

"Interesting suggestion. And what if we meet a sub on the way home, hmm?"

"Well sir, we've hardly any speed or manoeuvrability left to begin with. If we meet anything we're doomed anyway. We've nothing to lose." In any other situation, Hatano would've thought Togo was merely out to impress. But not tonight.

"Alright. Defuse the depth charges and jettison them."

"Yes, sir." He turned to go.

"Togo."

"Yes, sir?"

"If we make it back, I'll buy you all the beer you can drink at the Officer's Club, deal?"

"Yes, sir." He walked out, before Hatano could see his tears.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Shadow of the Condor

The CR

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 05/25/42

Weather: Thunderstorms

Night Time Surface Combat, near Vana at 52,44

Japanese Ships
DD Mutsuki, Shell hits 1, on fire
DD Mochizuki

Allied Ships
AV McFarland, Shell hits 1


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Night Time Surface Combat, near Vana at 52,44

Japanese Ships
DD Mutsuki, Shell hits 2, on fire, heavy damage
DD Mochizuki

Allied Ships
DD Perkins, Shell hits 1, on fire


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/11/2004 11:20:09 PM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 35
RE: Discoveries - 5/12/2004 8:45:59 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
26 May 42
Wx: Thunderstorms

1200L…briefing room…base operations building…Noumea, New Caledonia

“They found what?”

The admiral listened intently as Major General Allen’s intelligence officer repeated the report from the action the day before at Cairns.

“Currency, admiral. The Japanese soldiers at Cairns had Australian currency. Pound notes, shilling notes…this may not have been the prelude a landing in force after all, sir.”

Major General Allen, commander of the 7th Australian Infantry division tasked with buttressing the defense of the important Allied base, spoke up.

“Probably a recon, spy around a bit, do a little damage to radio stations and the like. And the big prize, of course, would be the Navy ammunition dump at Woree. AAII is chasing after sympathizers in the area but we believe this was a straight-forward military operation. If they thought the base was abandoned, they could start to get a military airfield in place to support a move against Townsville.”

The admiral mulled that one over. Getting a free airbase would be a big incentive, and the IJN staff may have believed they had to act quickly.

“They saw us pull out of New Guinea so naturally we would pull out of Cairns……it fits. And if they can ‘do a little damage’, as you say General, then they would have us reacting all along the coast highway. Our forces would be all over the place.”

“Exactly, admiral. Clever little op. Whoever came up with this one knew what they were about.” The general sounded genuinely impressed.

1500L…Aitkenville Weir airfield…near Townsville…

In the squadron ready room, the new arrivals were welcomed into the “Flying Fiends” and assigned to their section leaders. The 36th Fighter Squadron operated twenty-four planes in two sections. Each section had three elements of four planes each. Of the seven new arrivals, Lt. McGee got two of them in his element. One of the new arrivals was a lieutenant named Horace Daniels from Wetherfield, Connecticut. A mail pilot, Daniels had an idea of what flying here was like and was regaling a few other of the newcomers about how he would outfly those “little yellow people.”

“You try to outfly a Zero and those little yellow people will turn you into a little red spot on the ocean.” McGee had seen the bravado before, and he wanted to make sure the newcomers knew what they were capable of, and – more importantly – what they weren’t capable of.

Daniels looked back to McGee and was about to say something when he noticed the nametag.

“Lt. McGee, is it? You’re the element leader, right?”

“That’s right Lt. Daniels. I would recommend a bit of caution about trying to “outfly” a Zero. The P-39D isn’t made for that. The Zero is a lighter and faster plane. They can fly higher than the P-39. Their pilots have been flying combat missions for over two years. The only advantage we have is better armor and two more guns. Period.”

Daniels responded with the New England accent heavily lacing his words.

“You haven’t seen my flying yet. I’ve been flying for over a year now, and can make that P-39D do anything!”

McGee was already picturing this man’s replacement but gave one last attempt to bring Daniels back to the realm of common sense.

“Can you make it swim?”

< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/12/2004 12:47:32 AM >

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 36
RE: Discoveries - 5/12/2004 11:27:37 PM   
neuromancer


Posts: 532
Joined: 5/30/2002
From: Canada
Status: offline
Ah the joys of commando recon raids.

Sucks to be them.

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 37
RE: The Hawke vs The Condor - Sc 17 - 5/14/2004 10:41:55 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
29 May 42
Wx: Overcast

0944L…briefing room…base operations building…Noumea, New Caledonia…

The admiral addressed the assembled officers.

“At 0411L, our radio receivers picked up a coastwatcher message of a Japanese carrier with escorts, at least one of which is a heavy cruiser, at their base in the Shortland Islands. This is the second day the ship has been there. The question before us is what do we do about it?”

“Sending our carriers, admiral, against this lone contact is out of the question. We know the IJN has at lease two, and more likely 4 or 5 first line carriers somewhere in the theater. Plus, Shortland is far too deep into the IJN LBA range. As you said, sir…we have to counter, not jab.”

Vice Admiral Pye was considered to be cautious to a fault, but his reasoning seemed sound here.

The admiral looked to ComSubPac, Vice Admiral Lockwood, who simply shook his head.

“Sorry, admiral, nothing within three days. And I don’t like running boats into ports, though a carrier might be a good enough reason…”

The admiral nodded. “Very well, we wave off on this…next?”

An orderly spoke up from the doorway.

“Sir? Colonel Finely is here to see you…?”

“Show him in.” The orderly retreated, while the admiral continued. “Gentlemen, we now have tank support for our troops.”

The lieutenant colonel entered, saluted, and announced himself.

“Lieutenant Colonel Finley, 754th tank battalion, sir.”

“At ease colonel, we’re very happy to see you.” The admiral motioned to General Allen. “Colonel, for the time being, you’ll be attached to the 7th Australian Infantry division in defense of Noumea. This is General Allen.”

“Very happy to have you aboard, colonel.” The general shook the American’s hand, and then excused both of them as they headed out to see where the tanks were to be deployed.

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 38
TGIF... - 5/14/2004 11:51:29 AM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
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Aboard the Mutsuki, Shortlands. May 30th 1942. 1000h.

The morning sun was shining through the scattered clouds as the crew sailed their battered destroyer into harbor, in the company of the assembled fleet vessels. All round the spanking new port, the Army and Navy personnel gathered on the pierside to cheer and welcome home the Mutsuki.

Commander Hatano was still in the same combat fatigues he had worn throughout the past 3 days. Neither he nor Lieutenant Togo had slept a wink during their ordeal. But they were home, and that was enough.

"Sir," Togo was grinning from ear to ear. "You owe me a few beers, I think."

Aboard the Shokaku, <location censored>. May 30th 1942. 1130h.

Tadao leaned back on the deck chair on the flight deck. "A rest at last." he thought.

They had stood down for a little R&R this Saturday. A well-earned rest, for all their exertions this month. The pilots were exercising or playing basketball games with the mechanics.

He wondered what Hoshi was doing. "Probably writing letters home to his wife."

(continued in next message; see editor's note below)

< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/15/2004 12:50:04 AM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 39
TGIF (cont'd) - 5/14/2004 11:52:24 AM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
(Editor's note: I erroneously created this extra message, and the forum d/n allow deletion by author. So I've spread the AAR for this day over two messages. Apologies to the fans.)

Aboard the Yamato, <location censored>. May 30th 1942. 1700h.

The big battleship cut gracefully over the waters, escorted by its smaller brethren.

The Old Man was smoking at Turret A, under the big 18-inch monsters, as he normally did before dinner. There had been little to do this day, while the Operations Staff was sweating over the details for Operation Gunsen.

"A quiet day," he thought wistfully. In his heart, he wished the war was over. He'd retire and spend the rest of his life with Chiyoko as a gambler in Monte Carlo...

Irau, SE of the Solomon Islands. May 30th 1942.
As they splashed ashore on the beach of the little island, the men of the Special Naval Landing Force nearly missed the campsite of the Allied Coastwatcher party. But the tell-tale signs of a fire, and an empty ration tin gave it away.

Lieutenant Shingo did not expect to be left alone on this island. He sent out patrols immediately, and began to dig in...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 05/30/42

Weather: Partly Cloudy

Ground combat at Irau

Japanese Deliberate attack

Attacking force 290 troops, 4 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 4 to 1 (fort level 0)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Irau base !!!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/15/2004 12:56:58 AM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 40
RE: Contemplation - 5/15/2004 1:09:53 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
30 May 42
Wx: Partly Cloudy

0300L…Efate Port Vila…onboard SS Grenadier…

The submarine moored alongside the makeshift pier and began to take on fuel to top off its tanks used making the short trip from Noumea. Alongside the dock were about 45 men with a couple of crates. Everyone alongside the sub knew what the passengers were about to do, they just didn’t know where.

Nor would they find out.

By 0600L, the sub was already out to sea and beginning to submerge. The last anyone had seen, the sub was headed north…

0900L…operations office…VMF-212…Noumea, New Caledonia…

Lt. Parker listened to his commander, Lieutenant Colonel Bauer explain patiently…almost fatherly, to the voice on the other end of the phone that while he had 24 of the new model Wildcats, how was he going to use them effectively to defend the base with only nine pilots. For almost five minutes, the conversation went, with the colonel getting more exasperated with each rebuff that he was adopting more and more of the demeanor of the squadron mascot “hell hound” (actually, a stray black puppy with a white belly and questionable lineage the men found roaming the camp one day – and whose only ‘hellish’ quality was a disposition to consider his newfound indoor environment to be sorely in need of continual puppy ‘marking’). Finally, the conversation ended with the phone being slammed in its cradle and the colonel storming away.

Parker doubted that it would be a good time to inquire of the old man whether or not any replacements were arriving soon…

1100L…1000 feet over Townsville harbor…aboard B-25 “Bloody Roo”…call sign Tango Eleven…

2nd Lieutenant Josh Cullen liked Charter Towers. Away from all of the headquarters personnel and hustle of the big city of Townsville. Fly your mission, and enjoy the quiet evenings. Today, he and half of the B-25 squadron based there, along with planes from no less than four other bomber squadrons were flying anti-submarine missions. They had been briefed about US subs in the area…and each plane was given a makeshift book with information about the differences between American and Japanese submarines. He had studied it. S-boats had their conning tower in the middle of the boat, while Japanese subs tended to move them to the rear of the boat (or, “aft of center”, as the booklet explained it).

Having crossed the beach and headed out to sea, the beach was about two minutes behind his plane when his co-pilot pointed down and starboard. Cullen banked the plane and saw a submarine on the surface. Banking around the sub, he could plainly see men scrambling into the boat. The conning tower was aft, and he called off the features of their target.

“Aft tower, flat rear, deck gun midships, anti-air guns forward…”

The co-pilot flipped through the identification booklet and found what he was looking for.

“Kaichu Type submarine…range, 8000 nautical miles at 2 knots on the surface. Maximum depth 246 feet. Carries 12 torpedoes with six forward tubes.”

Cullen nodded and flipped a switch, opening the bomb bay doors.

“Call it in”…

As the attack commenced, the co-pilot broadcast the warning on the assigned frequency.

“Tango-Eleven with CERTSUB report, enemy submarine identified and attacked…target is a Japanese Kilo Tango submarine. Current position is ten miles north of Magnetic Island…stand by … target is not, repeat not damaged…repeat…CERTSUB report north of Magnetic Island…”

Later in that same hour, a Hudson responded to the call and attacked the sub, but again, no hits were reported.

1125L…Townsville command center…

Major Jefferies was almost beginning to like being in the plotting room. Entering through an airlock and descending into the earth did not sit well with his claustrophobia, but at least it was becoming tolerable – barely.

The CERTSUB report got everyone’s attention in the room. The fact the plane had actually gotten off an attack on the contact was encouraging. Jefferies had confirmed no Allied subs were in Townsville. The pilots had been briefed that there weren’t any, but it didn’t hurt to double check.

Still, he wondered what in the world the sub was doing there. Every day search aircraft from the now Japanese bases of Port Moresby and Woodlark should have told the enemy no ships were here. Pre-war doctrine held the Japanese would use subs in scouting roles or…

“Commander, that sub…? It couldn’t have been here to attack anything…”

The Australian naval commander had been impressed so far with this American Army pilot. The fact he picked up on the reason for the sub’s presence was another reason he respected the man.

“Indeed, major…so why risk coming ‘ere at all?” The commander already had the phone in his hand and placed a call to Rockhampton.

1900L…base operations center…Noumea, New Caledonia…

The admiral had already taken up residence in the building’s basement and was sitting alone after his meal. He lit a cigar and contemplated the day’s events.

The fall of Irau had occurred earlier, and apparently the coastwatchers there had evaded the enemy. A transport was seen at Taivu – but was it headed south to reinforce Irau or north having delivered the troops who took the island?

He felt secure enough at Noumea. With the entire 7th division and the Americal Division in defensive positions, now buttressed with a battalion of Stuart tanks, the Japanese would need a large force to evict him from New Caledonia.

Australia wasn’t as strong, but they had the aircraft to help defeat the enemy while still at sea.

And he still had two aces to play. The question was where to play them. So far, the enemy had done things according to plan. The raid into Cairns was a bit of a surprise, but the Australians there had beaten it off well enough. And the encounter in the Santa Cruz islands was more luck than anything else.

So where to show his hand……?

He stubbed out the cigar and wondered if the IJN commander was a gambling man.

< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/14/2004 5:12:27 PM >

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 41
Flying Boats at night - 5/15/2004 5:48:37 AM   
LordHawke


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Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
Irau, SE of the Solomon Islands. May 31st 1942. 0300h.

The black shapes came in low. Shingo and his men had heard them approaching for the last half-an-hour. Now they loomed large as they prepared to make their bomb runs over their little island.

"Flying boats???" Shingo could scarcely believe his eyes.

The bombs fell harmlessly into the surf, making nice big waterspouts, but missing the beach altogether.

"These bakas, what did they hope to achieve?" Shingo thought as he made his report and turned in for the night.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 05/31/42

Weather: Partly Cloudy

Air attack on Irau , at 42,43


Allied aircraft
PBY Catalina x 8


no losses


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 42
RE: Cat's paw - 5/15/2004 8:15:48 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
31 May 42
Wx: Partly Cloudy

0640L…Efate Port Vila…

Lt. Powell climbed out of the big aircraft. It’s all black coloring marred only by the grey American insignia. He looked to the Army major on the field and gave him a thumbs down.

“It never showed. All we ended up doing was bombing the reef. You sure the intel for the mission was current?”

“Intel” said that a Japanese troop transport was going to rendezvous at Irau. “Intel” said they had broken the Japanese code. “Intel” offered a chance for the Black Cats to accomplish what they had tried to do at Vana.

“Intel” was wrong.

The major wasn’t thrilled about being on this forlorn piece of coral someone had the audacity to call a “base”. The mosquitoes and humidity seemed to feed off of each other as well as his body. A bit overweight to begin with, he was already missing the droning hum of the air conditioner back at his office on Noumea. No, it was safe to say he wasn’t thrilled at all to be here.

He was less thrilled to have his recommendations questioned by a hot-shot pilot.

“Look, lieutenant;” and he dragged the ‘looo’ part out a bit too long, emphasizing his dislike at being questioned; “the ship ‘was’ going to be there. Maybe it developed a problem and had to turn back. It happens. Then again, perhaps you and your band of merry men here bombed the wrong island? Perhaps that’s what happened, eh?”

Powell just stared at the man. The breeze that had been blowing suddenly vanished.

“No matter, looo-tenant. Here are your orders for the day. Your C.O. already has a copy.” The major had already turned and walked away.

“Perhaps, ‘major’”, Powell called out after him, “you would want to fly along with us tonight and see for yourself??!”

‘Idiot,’ Powell thought. He read his orders; then had to re-read them again. The major wasn’t going on this mission. Not at all…

0745L..Noumea harbor…onboard SC640…

Lt. White could hardly believe the change in his crew the training operations had made. True, there were no contacts, but that Admiral Callaghan had done what he promised he would do. In the two weeks since he had begun the training White’s crew had improved their response time to manning their weapons and learned how to use teamwork among the little wooden ships in mobbing a sub. Now, however, they were on their own. The admiral and his destroyer had been detached from ASW TF 201. No matter. The New Zealanders were still here, and everyone felt a bit better for the time practicing in theater. Nobody wanted a sub to show up, of course, but the entire TF had the feeling if one did show up it might regret it.

1000L…Townsville command center…

Reports of invaders in Townsville had nearly started a panic in the streets of the city. The Australians were already moving south, away from an expected invasion. Sheep and cattle were being driven away from their pastures and towards the south as well. And now, rumors of enemy troops actually landing in Townsville guaranteed the police would have a hard time keeping the population calmed.

The “invaders” were, in fact, another scout force, dropped by the IJN KT-class submarine. No doubt picked by the military for three traits – first, good eyesight to spot defenses, second, a capability to operate a radio, and third, a desire to sacrifice their lives for their Empire. This time, however, the word was passed specifically not to attack the invaders. At least, from the ground…

1010L…Aitkenville Weir airfield…near Townsville…

Three full squadrons of P-39Ds and P-400 fighter-bombers were already taxiing to the runway for their shortest flight of the war. The ground forces defending Townsville were told to stay out of the way, and the pilots would eliminate the reconnaissance force.

At least, that was the plan…

1200L…Cooktown airbase…

An eerie silence pervaded across the base. The security forces in their jeeps were literally the last men on the base. Before they left, however, the base had been well and properly torn up. Holes had been dug into the runways and drilled into the pilings of the docks and loaded with dynamite. The resulting explosions meant a lot of work would need to be done to get the base operational.

The four jeeps headed south…

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 43
A *small* victory - 5/15/2004 8:24:23 PM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
Luganville, Espiritu Santo. June 2nd 1942. 1200h.

Lieutenant Commander Morita couldn't help looking pleased. Things had taken a totally unexpected turn.

A few days ago, the men of entire SNLF platoon had all written their individual wills before they boarded the submarine. They had then made the rough journey south, all the time praying that enemy ASW forces would not spot them.

When they arrived at the Luganville anchorage on the 1st of June, Morita could sense that the gods were with them on this one. The harbor, still in a very primitive state, was devoid of ships. The enemy did not seem to be particularly alert either. The submarine slipped in as close as possible, before Morita and his men took to their inflatable boats. The landing on a nearby beach went smoothly.

They were expecting much more than the decidedly unmilitary personnel at the base. In fact, they had expected to land in the midst of a hornet's nest. Morita had resigned to this being a suicide mission from Day 1. But now, as he observed the base engineers going about their business, the big flying boats taking off every few hours, and the half-finished airstrip, he thought he saw a big fat opportunity.

"Screw the orders," he thought. He began to plan an attack.

He ordered the mortar to start firing at 0400h. Create noise, confusion, and give the impression of strength. Squad 1 was to take out the harbour guards and secure the port buildings. Squad 2 to attack the barracks and a concrete structure which Morita surmised to be some sort of HQ. Squad 3, the storehouses. If all went well, the Americans will never know what hit them.

And they didn't. Most of the enemy ran as the mortar shells came crashing down on the unsuspecting base. The 'HQ' put up a more determined resistance, but Morita had had the mortar shift fire to it. A lucky shot penetrated the zinc roofing, and killed the stubborn defenders. in the confusion, a few American flying boats had managed to takeoff, leaving 2 which were apparently unserviceable. Morita made a mental note of their curious black paint scheme.

By 1000h, the enemy had fled into the surrounding jungle, and the platoon was digging in. A few scattered shots were still being fired, but things gradually quietened down as Morita organized and sent out patrols. He had sustained practically no casualties, had routed a larger enemy force, and was in control of the southernmost tip of the Japanese Empire.

"Sir, the flag." Sergeant Hanzo, the platoon NCO, pointed to the American flag still flying on the flagstaff outside the 'HQ'. In all the commotion, no one had noticed it till now.

"You know what to do."

"Yes, sir!"

They hadn't brought a Hinomaru, but a white bedsheet was found, and miraculously, some red paint. Before long, in place of the tattered Stars and Stripes, a makeshift Japanese flag fluttered in the gentle midday breeze.

The moment it unfurled, Morita, quite unconsciously, smiled.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/02/42

Weather: Thunderstorms

Ground combat at Wau

Japanese Deliberate attack

Attacking force 785 troops, 4 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 5 to 1 (fort level 0)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Wau base !!!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Luganville

Japanese Shock attack

Attacking force 32 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 60 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 0 to 1 (fort level 1)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Luganville base !!!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/16/2004 2:26:31 AM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 44
RE: On the edge... - 5/16/2004 2:01:57 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
2 Jun 42
Wx: Thunderstorms

1300L...briefing room...base operations building...Noumea, New Caledonia...

“So what went wrong, commander?”

The officer was an aide from COMSUBPAC, and had the dubious chore explaining why the Grenadier inexplicably rescued the air support troops, who salvaged 2 PBYs and had them flown out right before the IJN landed the recon force that eventually took the island, and then landed them right back on Luganville. 54 men. Dead or captured. And the commander had no answer.

“Sir, we don’t know. Perhaps Grenadier misread the message, decoded it wrong, or was forced to return. We will be finding out, though. COMSUBPAC asks me to pass that on to you, sir.”

The admiral just stared hard at the officer. Mistakes happen in warfare. But that logic didn’t make it any more palatable.

‘And what of the 3000 men you “left” at Port Moresby, admiral, hmmmm?’ his conscience taunted.

“Dismissed, commander.”

The theater operations officer chimed in after the aide from COMSUBPAC left the room.

“Sir, you were right. It appears that the enemy is making island hopping down the Solomons. We can’t stop him…yet. You were right to evacuate the base.”

The admiral sat down heavily. He rubbed his eyes and looked out the window. The storms returned.

“I do retreat well, don’t I?”

The operations officer protested. “But sir, with the amount of forces the IJN are sending…”

The admiral had enough. “Get out of here. All of you…out!”

The staff looked at each other and gathered their reports.

When the door closed, the admiral took out a pen and paper. Inside his head, a tune kept going on, and on, and on…

“Anchors away, me boy…anchors away…”

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 45
First contact - 5/16/2004 7:51:01 PM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
Aboard the Aoba, off Efate Port Vila. June 5th 1942. 0200h.

"Enemy destroyer off port bow. Bearing 324 Range 9000 Speed 25."

A bead of sweat trickled down Captain Hisamune's brow. "Tanaka's going to get us all killed, charging into an enemy port like this," he thought.

But there was little time for philosophical thoughts now. The ships of the Mobile Force were well-trained in night fighting, and now the Gunnery Officer, Commander Tomioka, was showing just how well as he calmly reported from the primary gun director. They had barely been at action stations for less than an hour when the lookouts spotted the enemy surface force, heading on a parallel course from South West at battle speed.

Almost immediately, the Haruna flashed "Follow my lead". As they had drilled so often before, Commander Toshima on the Isokaze simultaneously led the other destroyers of the 3rd Squadron to form the screen. The rest of the Mobile Force formed line ahead.

At the prearranged time, the Isokaze began firing starshells to illuminate the enemy. The flares lit up the night sea and silhouetted the enemy ships perfectly.

"Enemy in line ahead Bearing 310 Range 8900 Speed 26. I count 2 cruisers and 5 destroyers. Enemy destroyers preparing for torpedo run."

Hisamune's adrenalin was pumping now. "Target the lead destroyer. Fire when ready."

"Firing main battery." With a roar, the 8-inch guns fired off a salvo. Ahead, the Haruna's main guns were also going off. Hisamune thought she was going for the bigger ships.

"Enemy destroyer straddled. Fire for effect." A textbook performance from Tomioka tonight, as the 8-inchers opened up with rapid fire on the hapless ship, still too far to launch her torpedoes.

Then, suddenly, the Aoba herself was being targeted. Somewhere up ahead, the enemy cruisers had found the range and now a salvo straddled her.

"Take cover!" Someone cried as the high-pitched whistle of the incoming shells crescendoed in volume. Waterspouts rose all around the cruiser as the shells fell. Then, the clear hammer-blows of shell hits on armour.

"Report!" Hisamune shouted above the din.

Commander Kitano, the XO, was already on it. "Two hits. Port quarter and starboard. Minimal damage. Sir!"

"Enemy destroyer is burning." Tomioka's calm voice over the conn, interrupting the excitement on the bridge.

Hisamune's training kicked in, "Make course 180, maximum speed." Then, to Toshima. "Leave the destroyers. Concentrate on the lead cruiser."

"Yes sir. Lead Cruiser bearing 280 range 9500 speed 28 knots. Preparing to fire...wait. Enemy ships turning away."

"Sir, The Haruna is turning to port. Admiral Tanaka..."

"Intends to close the range," Hisamune cut off Kitano. "Very well. Make course 040. Follow her lead."

Silently, he gave thanks for the victory and hoped they would make it through the night. He hoped they would not end up like the luckless American destroyer, now burning brightly astern.

Behind the Haruna, the entire Japanese battle line worked up to flank speed and the hunt began...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/05/42

Weather: Rain

Night Time Surface Combat, near Efate Port Vila at 55,57

Japanese Ships
BB Haruna
CA Myoko
CA Mikuma
CA Aoba, Shell hits 2
CL Naka
CL Tatsuta
DD Isokaze, Shell hits 1, on fire
DD Tokitsukaze
DD Nowaki
DD Hagikaze
DD Asagumo
DD Arare
DD Ayanami
DD Akebono
DD Ushio
DD Uzuki

Allied Ships
CA Indianapolis, Shell hits 4
CA Louisville, Shell hits 2
DD Hughes
DD O'Brien
DD Bagley
DD Dunlap, Shell hits 32, on fire, heavy damage
DD Dale


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Night Time Surface Combat, near Efate Port Vila at 55,57

Japanese Ships
BB Haruna
CA Myoko
CA Mikuma
CA Aoba
CL Naka, Shell hits 1
CL Tatsuta
DD Isokaze, on fire
DD Tokitsukaze
DD Nowaki
DD Hagikaze
DD Asagumo, Shell hits 1
DD Arare
DD Ayanami
DD Akebono
DD Ushio
DD Uzuki

Allied Ships
CA Indianapolis, Shell hits 2
CA Louisville
DD Hughes
DD O'Brien, Shell hits 3, on fire
DD Bagley
DD Dunlap, Shell hits 3, and is sunk
DD Dale


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/17/2004 1:53:17 AM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 46
RE: Temptations - 5/16/2004 11:19:50 PM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
5 Jun 42
Wx: Rain

0430L…briefing room…base operations building…Noumea, New Caledonia

The orderly had entered the room to get it ready for the morning briefing when he saw the admiral in his chair, slumped over the desk. Alarmed, the orderly took two steps for the phone and stopped when he saw the nearly empty bottle on the floor……

1000L…basement residence of theater commander, base operations room…Noumea, New Caledonia

The admiral awoke in his own bed, wondering how he had got there…then remembering the events of the night before and………singing?

Half an hour later, he was dressed, shaved, and staring at the tray of breakfast the orderly had laid on the table. Eschewing the food, he poured a cup of coffee…black…and nodded to the orderly.

“Thank you, Jimmy.”

Lance Corporal Jimmy Anderson was an imposing figure for an orderly. A Kansas native, the slow drawl seemed to fit the farmboy image that he had been tagged with since being assigned to the admiral.

In fact, he was on loan from Naval Intelligence Service, acting as orderly, bodyguard, sometimes confidant and, of course, the one who fed reports of the Admiral’s “activities” to his supervisor at Pearl Harbor.

1300L…briefing room…base operations building

The theater operations officer had been reading the order penned by the admiral when the man himself entered and stopped the conversation.

“Sir!…We were told you were……’indisposed.’”

“I was, but I’m not anymore. Let me have that order.”

The theater operations officer handed the paper back to the admiral, who tore it in half.

“Now then, tell me about Lee’s cruisers.”

The officer tried, in vain, not to raise his eyebrows, but did succeed in composing himself quickly.

“Sir, we lost the Dunlap. Admiral Lee sailed Indianapolis and Louisville with their escorts last night and responded to an incursion into Efate by an IJN fast transport force. Ten destroyers, five cruisers, and the battleship Haruna were intercepted. The destroyers unloaded, and the 102nd base force reports about 300 combat troops are on the ground.”

“Where is Lee now?”

“30 miles out, sir. He’ll dock tonight, and…”

“Belay that and order Lee not to dock at Noumea tomorrow.”

The men in the room looked at each other. Finally, one of them spoke up.

“Sir, the destroyer O’Brien was also hit. Both cruisers were hit, but report no damage. O’Brien, however reports flooding and fires on board. “With all due respect, sir, they need to dock.”

The admiral didn’t respond, but asked the next question.

“Where are their carriers?”

“Sir?? Um, sir…we have no reports of enemy carriers…”

“Give me a list of all contacts within 300 miles of Luganville.”

“Well, sir, there’s the fast transport force headed north, and this unknown contact between Luganville and Koumac. The search pilot didn’t get a good look at it, but thought it was a destroyer.”

The admiral focused on the unknown contact intently.

No one spoke as he fixed his gaze on the map. Those close to him heard him mutter to himself.

“You really want me to show my aces…don’t you…?”

The admiral looked up.

“That”, he spoke while pointing to the contact that was not retreating, “is Admiral Nagumo’s carrier force. And they aren’t happy. So they will taunt us until they get what they want.”

The room looked at their commander, expectantly.

“They want our carriers.”

No one breathed. Would the admiral finally commit his carriers now?

“Effective immediately, all non-combatant shipping at Noumea will disperse according to Oplan Baker One. Contact Admiral Lee and advise him to proceed to…”

The admiral finished laying out his orders… smiling for the first time in almost a month. The Japanese were getting impatient.

1900L…onboard USS Indianapolis…30 miles NE of Noumea…

“Admiral, we have to get O’Brien to shore.”

Lee spoke up.

“Their damage control is sufficient. We have more important things to be concerned about.”

Lee knew that although he could face Tanaka with only half as many ships and survive, he didn’t stand that good of a chance against a sky full of torpedo planes.

< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/16/2004 3:22:07 PM >

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 47
RE: Milk runs...and walks - 5/18/2004 9:42:54 PM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
8 Jun 42
Wx: Partly Cloudy

1400L…briefing room…base operations building…Noumea, New Caledonia…

The admiral reviewed the morning reports. Strikes from Koumac, Noumea, and Efate itself were making life miserable for the IJN invaders there. With the prospect of no fighter cover, squadrons were actually volunteering to be included in the attack. They did serve as a great tool to train new crews in wartime conditions, but the admiral knew the IJN commander wasn’t satisfied with sending a unit to Efate to simply provide target practice for his bombers.

2000L..briefing room…Townsville Combined Operational Intelligence Center…

LTC Murray, commander of the 113th Base Force, was a bit harried but happy to have finally arrived. He had been ushered into the secure facility dug into the side of Castle Hill.

Major General Morris, commander of the New Guinea Force, was also happy to see the American. Murray’s arrival meant the addition of 150 airbase support personnel. Major Arnold, of the 808th EAB, had been sent ahead from Cooktown and was assigned to the center for the past month. Now that his bulldozers and other construction equipment had arrived and been improving the base, Townsville could handle 300 aircraft. That was good news for the general, and he now had the support personnel who could service those aircraft properly. But there was an even greater prize Colonel Murray had brought with him from Cooktown. Murray reported the SCR-270 was going through its final calibration and should be operational by 0400L the next morning.

Townsville now had radar.

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 48
RE: Wings and things... - 5/20/2004 7:42:38 PM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
10 Jun 42
Wx: Partly Cloudy

0800L…60 miles east of Rockhampton…onboard B-17 “Southern Angel” at 10,000 feet…call sign Bulldog Two…

Captain Gold was focusing on the wake they saw on the ocean far below. It wasn’t much, but it was there. Having orbited for three minutes and not being fired upon, he thought about radioing the contact report in, but all he had seen was a single wake. It would have been easier – if more dangerous - had he been fired upon, then he could climb to safety and report an enemy contact. But he had nothing but a single wake…

Gold keyed his mike. “Hang on..” and nosed the giant bomber forward, spiraling down onto the contact.

At 4000 feet, they confirmed it was a single ship…and very small. Much smaller than even a destroyer…perhaps it was a fishing boat whose captain didn’t know these waters were dangerous or didn’t care. Leveling off, the bombardier, Lt. Frank Jenkins, in the nose of the plane shook his head for a second, and keyed his own intercom mike as his eyes grew wide.

“Submarine! Sir…it’s a sub!”

The plane’s navigator, Lt. Carl Adder, whose position was in what was affectionately known as the “cheek” of the plane was seated just above and behind the bombardier. He leaned down and looked over the bombardier’s shoulder.

I don’t believe it…" he whispered in a voice so low even the bombardier didn’t hear it.

Up in the top of the plane, the radio operator, Sgt. Parkins, was ready with his pad and began to write up the contact. His single .50 caliber machine gun position was designed to defend from fighters attacking the bomber from overhead and behind, and not much use against ships on the sea. Upon confirmation from the pilot, he began to transmit the CERTSUB report back to Rockhampton.

“Southern Angel” carried no bombs for this mission. Her job was to spot the enemy and report back in. But she did have 10 .50 caliber machine guns fully loaded – five of which she could bring to bear on the sub if she overflew it…

Gold dropped the bomber even further and began to line up the sub. At 500 feet, they approached their target when the sub finally caught on what was happening over her head, when Jenkins, in the nose of the bomber keyed his mike again.

“She’s going under!”

But it wouldn’t be fast enough…the bomber would get one pass over the sub. “Southern Angel” approached the sub from astern, and when she got close enough, Jenkins began hosing the sub’s deck with machine gun fire. In the ball turret, Sgt. Stan ‘Stosh’ Waldowski had rotated the turret forward and added his twin .50 caliber mount’s fire onto the sub. Bullets were seen splashing in the water on both sides of the sub, and hits were seen on the deck and conning tower. Even the deck gun, positioned aft of the tower was taking hits. Finally, as the plane flew past, the tail gunner, Sgt. Anthony Micelli, was able to fire his twin .50 caliber guns onto the sub. He used the least ammunition, since the plane had already begun to climb back to altitude and bank away from the sub. By the time the plane leveled off at 2000 feet and circled back, the sub was gone.

Gold climbed back to 10,000 feet as Sgt. Parkins transmitted the attack…

0847L...plotting room...Townsville Combined Office Intelligence Center...

Major Jeffries, US Army Intelligence Liason officer, had read the transcript of the CERTSUB report and subsequent attack by the bomber.

"A B-17 against a Japanese sub... amazing"

"Quite a lot will be 'amazing' after a while, Major."

Jefferies had turned and nodded to the Australian colonel who worked here with him. The Japanese had been thorough about their reconnaisance of Australia...having deposited soldiers on Cairns and Townsville. The defenders easily eliminated them, and the location of the CERTSUB contact led everyone to believe this sub had soldiers whose job it was to explore Rockhampton. Maybe the attack on the sub was enough to drive it off and prevent it from completing its mission, but more likely the sub commander would still be able to land his troops, even if the sub was crippled.

It was, however, the first report of their airborne ASW damaging a Japanese sub...

2000L…headquarters, VMF-212…Noumea New Caledonia…

Lt. Steve Parker was sitting outside the Quonset hut his squadron called home. The colonel’s phone call earlier in the week had gotten the point across. The “Hell Hounds” finally had a full compliment of pilots. The nine “veterans” who had been here since early May had help. Maybe it wasn’t so bad after all. The pilots were new, of course. Sending combat trained pilots to a war zone would be logical, and the military would have none of that, no siree. Actually, combat trained pilots were in short supply, and Parker couldn’t remember a report of any air-to-air action anywhere in the theater.

He looked down at the squadron’s mascot who was sleeping on his back, legs pointed skyward, no doubt blissfully engaged in a dream chasing down a slow-footed rabbit. Still a puppy, the dog found the squadron back when there were only the nine pilots, and adopted the nine men as his own rather than the other way around. The men even joked about giving the puppy one of the new F4F-4s to fly since headquarters didn’t see fit to send them human pilots. The replacements liked the idea of a mascot, and were happy to have him along. The puppy even had his own hook in the flight room with a small rope collar and leash hanging from it.

Parker turned his head quickly back towards the hut, where an expletive was hurled at no one in particular as one of the replacements just learned that “Hell Hound” hadn’t quite been “hut-broken” yet. Parker smiled, and Hell Hound started kicking his leg furiously as he chased his dream…

< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/20/2004 11:42:16 AM >

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 49
RE: The Hawke vs The Condor - Sc 17 - 5/22/2004 8:17:35 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
14 Jun 42
Wx: Overcast

0430L…Noumea Harbor…onboard USS Meredith…

He was ready.

Petty Officer first class David Ellis was that.

Ready.

Top graduate of the West Coast Sonar School in San Diego two years earlier. Trained with the British invented Attack Trainer in 1941 near Boston. Back to San Diego as an instructor in 1941, he never got to teach a class there. Pearl Harbor changed all of that.

He had transferred to Meredith within a week of the attack. He spent last Christmas off the coast of Cuba participating in trials of the new “Q”-type sonar, which allowed depth changes to be measured while the contact was in front of the ship (a welcome addition to the basic “searchlight” sonar system that could sweep 360 degrees, but a very narrow beam with which to “spot” the sub). He worked with both American and British sailors there, and heard of a new modification supposedly allowing side to side detection as well, thereby pinning the sub in three dimensions instead of two.

And now he was in the South Pacific. About to play his game for real.

Together with Wilkes and Swanson, they were about to head out after a submarine contact reported off of Efate Port Vila. If the sub stayed in the area, they might have a chance at catching it. Even Captain Mendenhall had stopped by to wish him luck. After which he promptly ordered Ellis to get as much sleep as he could during the short trip to the target’s last reported location.

1500L…south runway…Efate Port Vila…

Captain Taylor deployed his force. Having arrived at the base yesterday, the men of the 132nd RCT were there to eliminate the IJN recon force that had attacked the base support personnel almost a week earlier. The enemy on Efate had been subjected to almost a week’s worth of bombing, including low-level strafing runs from Efate’s own P-400 squadron, the last one a mere 40 minutes ago. The enemy should be softened up by now. Taylor checked his watch…

1502L…Efate Port Vila…

Artillery fired exactly on schedule. Not an overwhelming barrage, but enough to keep the enemy’s heads down.

1505L…south runway…Efate Port Vila…

Taylor nodded to the private who keyed his radio handset four times…

1530L…south runway…Efate Port Vila…

Taylor’s three platoon leaders had assembled. The combat had been brutally short, and the only causality was one man in first platoon who broke his ankle during the assault when he tripped over a tree root. According to his platoon leaders, the enemy had been completely wiped out. Two prisoners had been taken out of the 100+ men the enemy had landed.

Taylor got into the jeep and was driven back to the base operations building. He had to report to the colonel in charge of the air support personnel that his base was secure again.

For now…

1700L…briefing room…base operations building…Noumea, New Caledonia…

Word had spread about the successful operation at Efate. The admiral cautioned that this was only the first move and counter move of what promised to be a long campaign. His own intelligence staff has concluded that the Japanese had used the reconnaissance force as bait. The base was probably mined, and the IJN carriers might still be around. Reports from coastwatchers at the Shortlands continue to place IJN battleships, cruisers, and tankers there. They would be back. Of that, the admiral was certain.

1900L…30 miles SW of Efate…onboard the USS Meredith…

Petty Officer Ellis was at work. He was listening for the telltale deep rumble of a submarine’s electric motors. He had learned the IJN submarines could barely dive past 150 feet, but he knew to search below that depth as well. Working in concert with Wilkes and Swanson, they searched almost 10 miles of open ocean for the enemy submarine.

There was no sub in the area. Of that, Ellis was sure. Sure enough that he made the report to the captain personally.

The captain ordered the little task force to its next location, where Ellis could start his exercise all over again…

The CR:

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/14/42

Weather: Overcast

Air attack on Luganville , at 53,53


Allied aircraft
A-20B Havoc x 9


no losses

Airbase hits 1
Runway hits 2

Attacking Level Bombers:
9 x A-20B Havoc at 6000 feet

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Air attack on Luganville , at 53,53


Allied aircraft
B-17E Fortress x 6


no losses

Airbase supply hits 1
Runway hits 7

Attacking Level Bombers:
3 x B-17E Fortress at 6000 feet
3 x B-17E Fortress at 6000 feet

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Air attack on 82nd Naval Garrison Unit, at 55,57


Allied aircraft
P-400 Airacobra x 14


no losses


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Efate Port Vila

Allied Shock attack

Attacking force 1544 troops, 22 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 104 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Allied assault odds: 62 to 1 (fort level 0)


Japanese ground losses:
Men lost 117


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/22/2004 3:01:32 PM >

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 50
RE: The Hawke vs The Condor - Sc 17 - 5/24/2004 10:16:21 PM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
18 Jun 42
Wx: Partly Cloudy

0611L…30 miles NE of Noumea…onboard USS Swanson leading ASW TF 204…

There it was again...

…clickclickclickclickclickthrumclickclickthrumclickclickclick…

“Contact!…bearing 025…depth 80 feet…”

All eyes on the bridge turned to the sonarman. The radio had already relayed the report to the other sub hunters in the task force. The New Zealand gunboat Kiwi had been vectored to the contact and was already within 1000 yards of the position. If it was a sub, it picked a very bad place to make an attack…

“Sorry sir…just a whale…”

The sonarman had heard this before. It seemed a whale was the object of the searchlight’s attention. The clicking noise was definitely biological. It was classified as mammalian…probably a whale or maybe a porpoise – although the deeper sound mixed in was definitely something larger than a porpoise. He yawned and rubbed his eyes. They were inbound from another sub hunt, and so far nothing had happened. He would be happy to get back to a regular daytime schedule, as these overnight missions took a lot out of a person. He lit a cigarette and inhaled deeply and then let out a long, slow breath as he tried again to pick out the noises from his headsets…

0614L…onboard SC 640 with ASW TF 204…

Lt White was happy to have Swanson along with them. Arunta had been a welcome addition in the early days of this operation, but the entire task force knew Swanson had all the latest gear to hunt subs. The report of the contact a few minutes earlier raised a momentary alarm, but the sound was from a whale of some type. He marveled at technology and its ability to make such a distinction. He headed below to the mess where, thankfully, the refrigerator had finally been repaired. He wanted something cold to drink. Getting to the mess meant he had to duck his head every time he entered – he had two small welts on his forehead as a reminder – and got a drink of juice in today’s flavor: green.

0615L…onboard USS Swanson…

The sonarman started to take another pull on his cigarette when he stopped abruptly. The clicks made by the whale stopped…but the deeper noise didn’t. He listened for the noise again, only to keep hearing the ‘…thrum…….thrum……thrum…..’. The noise started to change in pitch and he heard what sounded like someone sneezed…and again…and again…

“……oh no…oh please no………”

“Torpedoes in the water!! Bearing 024, distance 3000 yards……”

Admiral Callaghan turned immediately to the sonar operator, then to the radioman in the bridge.

“Signal all ships…enemy sub at location…”

“Sir!! Kiwi reports engaging a submarine!!”

The sonar operator’s cigarette trailed a long ash that now dropped from the end of it onto his pants…

0615L…onboard New Zealand naval gunboat Kiwi…

The radio delivered the warning…and classification of the sound as being from a whale. The captain on the Kiwi had brought his ship up to full throttle and was about to order back to half speed when the torpedo warning was broadcast. He caught himself and saw the faintest of bubble trails leaving the point he was headed for. He knew he had the sub. It was already diving, but it wouldn’t get more than ten or twelve meters deep by the time he would be on top of it.

“Stand by to roll depth charges!…”

0616L…onboard SC 640…

Lt. White had finished his drink and was headed back up the stairs when his own radioman relayed the sub contact.

“Finally!” White thought and he almost forgot to duck his head in his hurry to get topside. “That was close,” he thought as he stepped off the last stair.

The explosion literally lifted the wooden craft out of the water and slammed her down again, breaking her in half. White was hurled skyward and dumped back down the stairs he had just climbed. The second explosion hit the ship at the stern and simply blew that portion of the ship away. What didn’t disintegrate under the force of the two Type 95 torpedoes burned furiously before being extinguished by the sea.

0645L…onboard USS Swanson…

White saw two people bending over him – they appeared to be talking, but he couldn’t hear anything. Not that it mattered much. All he wanted to do was sleep. He couldn’t remember ever being this tired…but the radioman said there was a message…why were these people looking at him?…he was so tired…

The medic pulled the sheet over the dead lieutenant’s face.

0650L…onboard USS Swanson…

Admiral Callaghan stared out to sea. The sub had long since eluded his task force. Kiwi dropped depth charges on the sub, and had bracketed the intruder, but no telltale signs of a hit were visible. By the time all the noise had abated for the sonar operator to make sense of things, the ocean was silent.

The admiral had been beaten. One of his ships was sunk. Of the compliment of sailors onboard SC640, only 3 were still alive.

1500L…Townsville COIC…plotting room…

Major Jefferies, the Army pilot who had been transferred to Intelligence, looked at the reports and then at the sheet of Perspex with the coastline of Queensland, Australia outlined. The Japanese landed troops at both Cooktown and Cairns. Not a lot, but the bases were now officially “enemy” possessions. Jefferies had heard about how the Japanese landed at Efate Port Vila as well as Luganville. They were defeated at Efate, but they did take the base at Luganville, but had apparently abandoned it after they captured it. He wondered if the Japanese would also abandon Cairns and Cooktown…



The CR:

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/18/42

Weather: Partly Cloudy

Sub attack at 53,66

Japanese Ships
SS I-22

Allied Ships
SC 640, Torpedo hits 2, on fire, heavy damage (sunk)
PG Kiwi


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Cooktown

Japanese Deliberate attack

Attacking force 214 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 7 to 1 (fort level 5)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Cooktown base !!!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Cairns

Japanese Deliberate attack

Attacking force 191 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 5 to 1 (fort level 9)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Cairns base !!!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/24/2004 2:14:59 PM >

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 51
RE: Interlude - 5/25/2004 8:40:34 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
20 Jun in our game, and time for an update.

First, the IJN leads 6791 - 2334. I have lost 48 aircraft (20 of them C-47s) while Hawke has lost 36 aircraft (14 of them H6k Mavis recon planes - two today claimed by AA fire ).

I have lost 79 Army points (mostly due to the base force I couldn't get off of Port Moresby) while Hawke has lost 13 Army points.

I have lost 2 ships for 9 points and Hawke has lost no ships.

So far, the "bloodbath" of 200% commitment has failed to materialize. Hawke has landed at six different points south of Port Moresby. First, a recon force at Cairns that I kicked out, then one at Townsville that also got the boot. He then landed at Luganville (which he still holds - in name only; I think his troops left the base) and Efate. The force at Efate tried to take the base, but it was too small to take out the ENG unit defending there. I then sent part of the 132nd RCT from Noumea via C47 to Efate and they evicted the intruders there as well. The 132nd has since returned to Noumea.

The Shortlands are reported to have battleships and cruisers there, and have had them there for a few days now.

Hawke admits in his e-mail that he was waiting "anxiously" for my turn to get back to him, and that he now has some "hard decisions to make."

Stand by folks, I have a feeling things are going to heat up here shortly.

More to come...

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 52
RE: Interlude - 5/25/2004 9:15:30 PM   
marky


Posts: 5747
Joined: 3/8/2004
From: Wisconsin, its really cold
Status: offline
will u be using any carriers to perform a "Taranto" raid on the shortlands?

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 53
RE: Interlude - 5/26/2004 1:40:33 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
quote:

originally posted by marky

will u be using any carriers to perform a "Taranto" raid on the shortlands?


Actually, a bit to early to contemplate offensive operations north of Luganville. My first priority is to deny auto victory. And there's no need to go to him yet. He'll be coming south soon enough.

Also, to finish the update, the air losses I posted earlier are correct, but not a single plane for either side has participated in any air-to-air combat yet.

With both sides hoarding their forces like this, when combat comes the CR may take up two pages per day.

More to come...

(in reply to marky)
Post #: 54
RE: Interlude - 5/26/2004 8:06:03 AM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: marky

will u be using any carriers to perform a "Taranto" raid on the shortlands?


Hmmm... Taranto, eh? That would be nice. Especially when the Bettys are tearing through the CAP and torpedoing the CVs. And then my CVs counterattack...

See neuromancer's previous experience with a Shortlands raid on me for a preview. Oh, he used CAs then.

Condor's right, it's been a rather dull 2 months. Well, that should end soon. Both sides have been building up (I guess he's probably been sending his CVs back for upgrades). Should be bursting point even for the Allies by now. Time for the two sumo wrestlers to collide.

Stay tuned, folks.

_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to marky)
Post #: 55
RE: Horsehoes and hand grenades - 5/26/2004 8:50:32 AM   
Shadow of the Condor

 

Posts: 394
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Chicago
Status: offline
No commentary today...

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/22/42

Weather: Partly Cloudy

Sub attack at 23,77

Japanese Ships
SS I-24

Allied Ships
DD Hammann, Torpedo hits 1, on fire
DD Anderson
DM Preble

Three different ships drop depth charges on the sub, and not one hit. When did I get IJN destroyers?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Air attack on Cairns , at 7,56


Allied aircraft
Hudson x 29
B-26B Marauder x 48


no losses

Airbase hits 16
Runway hits 51

Attacking Level Bombers:
6 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
5 x Hudson at 6000 feet
4 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
4 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
6 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
6 x Hudson at 6000 feet
7 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
6 x Hudson at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet

Cairns is all yours...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Rennell Island

Japanese Deliberate attack

Attacking force 296 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 11 to 1 (fort level 0)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Rennell Island base !!!


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by Shadow of the Condor -- 5/26/2004 12:54:31 AM >

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 56
A charmed life... - 5/26/2004 11:22:01 AM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
Aboard the I-24, off Brisbane. June 23rd 1942. 0400h.

"So, they want to play..."

Commander Kiso muttered to no one in particular as he peered through the periscope, watching the approaching destoryers in the predawn light.

That destroyer yesterday had been lucky. Only one torpedo had hit out of a spread of three, and the gaijin had hastily retired, albeit with a show of depth charges. The I-24's veteran crew had nerves of steel, however, and were not about to abandon the patrol just yet.

"4 ships bearing 270 range 8000 yards speed 18 knots" Kiso whispered down the tube.

The tension in the control room was palpable. The skipper was going to 'go for the glory' again. Didn't he know the mission was to sink transports, not enemy warships?

"Tubes 1 and 2 ready."

Kiso was an old-school submariner, however. And old-school doctrine meant going one-on-one with enemy warships, whittling them down before the big guns came up for the coup-de-grace. None of this namby-pamby-sinking-defenseless-and-slow-transports for him. He'd show the Old Man a thing or two.

"Target destroyer straight ahead range 5000 yards."

"Set."

"Fire Tubes 1 and 2."

A whoosh, as each torpedo left its launch tube. Kiso said a silent prayer...

Then, an explosion, and another! Not long after, the screech of metal twisting and hull plates buckling as the hapless ship sank.

"Jackpot!" Kiso thought. Now, to sit out the depth charges again. He braced himself.

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/23/42

Weather: Thunderstorms

Naval bombardment of Luganville, at 53,53

Airbase hits 1
Runway hits 12
Port hits 2
Port fuel hits 1


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sub attack at 23,77

Japanese Ships
SS I-24

Allied Ships
DD Monaghan, Torpedo hits 2, on fire, heavy damage
DD Dale
MSW Cessnock


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Townsville

Japanese Shock attack

Attacking force 39 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 30909 troops, 161 guns, 20 vehicles

Japanese assault odds: 0 to 1 (fort level 9)


Japanese ground losses:
Men lost 29


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to Shadow of the Condor)
Post #: 57
RE: Interlude - 5/27/2004 1:06:09 AM   
neuromancer


Posts: 532
Joined: 5/30/2002
From: Canada
Status: offline
quote:


See neuromancer's previous experience with a Shortlands raid on me for a preview. Oh, he used CAs then.


Yes, but I screwed up and accidentally sent them during the day instead of at night! It probably would have worked much better at night.

I expect Condor not to make that kind of silly mistake.

And a CV strike on Shortlands would probably be considered a silly mistake.

< Message edited by neuromancer -- 5/26/2004 4:14:18 PM >

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 58
RE: Interlude - 5/27/2004 3:56:13 PM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: neuromancer

quote:


See neuromancer's previous experience with a Shortlands raid on me for a preview. Oh, he used CAs then.


Yes, but I screwed up and accidentally sent them during the day instead of at night! It probably would have worked much better at night.

I expect Condor not to make that kind of silly mistake.

And a CV strike on Shortlands would probably be considered a silly mistake.


Heh, just trying to disabuse marky (and maybe Condor) of any heroic notions.

I don't know, maybe he will pit his 5 CVs against the KB soon...

_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to neuromancer)
Post #: 59
A little revenge... - 5/27/2004 4:18:28 PM   
LordHawke


Posts: 80
Joined: 2/12/2004
From: Singapore
Status: offline
Aboard the Tsugaru, S of Lunga. June 24th 1942. 0300h.

Commander Takeshi was just thinking about that nice hot bath he was going to have when he got back to Truk when the lookout shouted his warning.

"Torpedo off starboard bow!"

"Right full rudder! Engines reverse full!" Lieutenant Gunichi, the officer of the watch, reacted instinctively. In the blink of an eye, the helmsman spun the wheel to the right and the grey hulk of the minelayer reared and threshed as it fought its own momentum to conform to the instructions from the bridge.

Takeshi had just enough time to see the tell-tale trail of bubbles heading to the ship. It was going to be close...

A flash, followed by a roar and a waterspout 10 meters high leapt up near the ship's bow. It rocked the Tsugaru from stem to stern, throwing off everyone on the bridge.

"Engines full ahead! Helm, make course 357!" Takeshi took over in an instant. "Damage report!"

It took about 5 minutes to come.

"Bow section hit, sir." Gunichi reported. "A 2 meter wide hole in Compartment 2. We've sealed it off. 10 men dead and 6 wounded. No other visible damage."

Then, as an afterthought, Gunichi added. "Could've been worse, sir."

"I know that," Takeshi snapped. The tension in him was still high, as he forced himself to relax a little. "Magnetic detonators. A little closer and we'd have had it. The gaijin sub commander must've been hopping mad not to have did us in."

As Gunichi went back to supervise the damage control, Takeshi heaved a rather audible sigh of relief. They'd get back after all, if they managed to shake that sub, and didn't meet others along the way. The bath would've to wait.

AFTER ACTION REPORTS FOR 06/24/42

Weather: Partly Cloudy

Sub attack at 38,42

Japanese Ships
ML Tsugaru, Torpedo hits 1

Allied Ships
SS Tautog


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Air attack on Cairns , at 7,56


Allied aircraft
Hudson x 30
B-26B Marauder x 44


no losses

Airbase hits 15
Airbase supply hits 5
Runway hits 54

Attacking Level Bombers:
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
9 x Hudson at 6000 feet
9 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
9 x Hudson at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
5 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
12 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x Hudson at 6000 feet
6 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet
3 x B-26B Marauder at 6000 feet

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ground combat at Townsville

Allied Shock attack

Attacking force 16764 troops, 127 guns, 0 vehicles

Defending force 18 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles

Allied assault odds: 704 to 1 (fort level 0)


Japanese ground losses:
Men lost 22


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


< Message edited by LordHawke -- 5/27/2004 10:23:27 PM >


_____________________________

Lord Hawke

Qui desiderat pacem, preparet bellum.
"He who desires peace, prepares for war."

(in reply to LordHawke)
Post #: 60
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