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RE: How many mine fields - 6/2/2018 4:17:05 PM   
geofflambert


Posts: 12843
Joined: 12/23/2010
From: St. Louis
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

I would like it if it went supernova in my lifetime.


How would you know? Betelgeuse is 642.5 light years distant. Forgive me if I suggest that you will not likely live to be 700 years of age to see such a sight.


Maybe Betelguese blew 641.5 years ago. By the way, some amateur recently got a supernova as it occurred on film. This one was in another galaxy far away.

< Message edited by geofflambert -- 6/2/2018 4:38:20 PM >

(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 31
RE: How many mine fields - 6/2/2018 4:19:13 PM   
geofflambert


Posts: 12843
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From: St. Louis
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Here's a list of supernovae since 2015

http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/lists/RecentSupernovae.html

(in reply to geofflambert)
Post #: 32
RE: How many mine fields - 6/2/2018 4:21:42 PM   
geofflambert


Posts: 12843
Joined: 12/23/2010
From: St. Louis
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Here's an article on the one caught on film. I'd like to have a few of these in my mine fields.

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25151.epdf?referrer_access_token=9x9_rFr6wE3Ux3GOQZGxqNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0N_dhtdyynGvm2o7_Il4pGV1KZsh09yugbD06QbEiBMV5oukkxinitA0LPmU1_heSWnj5dTC6O73z2t-NHVLYIcOxu7bl85omEgBApbT6MfrYRK_lvw9DK75PVzFzdkA65gE6ecB6deZPBIgxUYYb40vt0xSs69gAmYbPtKA-zNr59RJVmF-aHobWtuZWZxoC5XfngfjdiYLfHxRlV4LU6OId2xbQiYohDKyz91NH547dxaUl0HziUGCfD6_13lV0bAH4_eMyD88SJyMKdEzJ0yt9ZVddVvRcAzPN5WdPW95oVEInjyUpx2LDQ83VlrhXc%3D&tracking_referrer=www.washingtonpost.com

(in reply to geofflambert)
Post #: 33
RE: How many mine fields - 6/2/2018 9:27:15 PM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8153
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

I would like it if it went supernova in my lifetime.


How would you know? Betelgeuse is 642.5 light years distant. Forgive me if I suggest that you will not likely live to be 700 years of age to see such a sight.


I meant the light, not actually exploded.

(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 34
RE: How many mine fields - 6/3/2018 5:29:15 AM   
Chris21wen

 

Posts: 5204
Joined: 1/17/2002
From: Bexhill-on-Sea, E Sussex
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Kull


quote:

ORIGINAL: Chris21wen

That I know about but no mention of multiple minefields.


As they say, "RTM", specifically page 134. Multiple minefields in the same hex were part of the original AE design.


quote:



Japan Air-Engine Plan


The problem is in game play I can see no evidence that they exist.

(in reply to Kull)
Post #: 35
RE: How many mine fields - 6/3/2018 7:55:34 AM   
wdolson

 

Posts: 10353
Joined: 6/28/2006
From: Near Portland, OR
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quote:

ORIGINAL: geofflambert

Here's a list of supernovae since 2015

http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/lists/RecentSupernovae.html


Recent Geology has found that Earth was hit from debris from a supernova about 2 million years ago. About the time the current ice age started. There is a theory that our sun was part of a star cluster that was broken up by the supernova. The Voyager space craft found we are still in the middle of a cloud of particles from that supernova. More than 2 million years ago Earth was a lot hotter than is it today. Maybe the sun burned hotter due to influence from other stars?

I believe the closest supernova candidate is IK Pegasi, which is 150 light years away. That would be close enough to mess us up when the blast wave hit us.

Bill

_____________________________

WitP AE - Test team lead, programmer

(in reply to geofflambert)
Post #: 36
RE: How many mine fields - 6/3/2018 1:20:52 PM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8153
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
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quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson


quote:

ORIGINAL: geofflambert

Here's a list of supernovae since 2015

http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/lists/RecentSupernovae.html


Recent Geology has found that Earth was hit from debris from a supernova about 2 million years ago. About the time the current ice age started. There is a theory that our sun was part of a star cluster that was broken up by the supernova. The Voyager space craft found we are still in the middle of a cloud of particles from that supernova. More than 2 million years ago Earth was a lot hotter than is it today. Maybe the sun burned hotter due to influence from other stars?

I believe the closest supernova candidate is IK Pegasi, which is 150 light years away. That would be close enough to mess us up when the blast wave hit us.

Bill


I'd be interested, if you could share where you read about the sun as part of star cluster theory, as I've not heard of it before. Everything I (we?) know about stellar formation and evolution doesn't jive with the idea that a supernova could make a star colder. It should just depend on how massive the star is when it's formed and what it's made out of. I thought.

According to this source (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10509-011-0873-9) that is citation 47 on the Wikipedia entry for IK Pegasi, a supernova would have to be about 1/5 of the distance as IK Pegasi to pose a threat to the biosphere (although the EM radiation would still do stuff).

(in reply to wdolson)
Post #: 37
RE: How many mine fields - 6/3/2018 3:05:54 PM   
Kull


Posts: 1312
Joined: 7/3/2007
From: El Paso, TX
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: Chris21wen

The problem is in game play I can see no evidence that they exist.


It should be possible to run a test. Apparently at least one reason for having code which handles "multiple minefields" is to ensure that they decay at different rates. Accordingly, you could set up a test to see how long it takes for a single 150 mine field in one hex to drop to zero vs two 75s placed in a different hex, but at the same time.

The hexes in question should be your own ports, the same size and in the same terrain, and both without the presence of ACMs.

If the code tracks decay per minefield (as stated in the manual), the single 150 mine field should last significantly longer than the twin 75s.

_____________________________


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Post #: 38
RE: How many mine fields - 6/3/2018 4:04:12 PM   
MakeeLearn

 

Posts: 2919
Joined: 9/11/2016
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Kull


quote:

ORIGINAL: Chris21wen

That I know about but no mention of multiple minefields.


As they say, "RTM", specifically page 134. Multiple minefields in the same hex were part of the original AE design.



And on page 221...

"Several minefields can exist within the same hex but minefields are represented on the map by only one minefield symbol per hex."

(in reply to Kull)
Post #: 39
RE: How many mine fields - 6/3/2018 5:07:12 PM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 11139
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson


quote:

ORIGINAL: geofflambert

Here's a list of supernovae since 2015

http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/lists/RecentSupernovae.html


Recent Geology has found that Earth was hit from debris from a supernova about 2 million years ago. About the time the current ice age started. There is a theory that our sun was part of a star cluster that was broken up by the supernova. The Voyager space craft found we are still in the middle of a cloud of particles from that supernova. More than 2 million years ago Earth was a lot hotter than is it today. Maybe the sun burned hotter due to influence from other stars?

I believe the closest supernova candidate is IK Pegasi, which is 150 light years away. That would be close enough to mess us up when the blast wave hit us.

Bill

I doubt the Sun is the only contributor to Earth's temperature in its formative stages. Isn't one of the theories about Earth's core that there is some nuclear reaction going on? That would imply it could have been more active in the distant past and since the mantle was thinner, more heat reached the surface.

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to wdolson)
Post #: 40
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 6:54:57 AM   
wdolson

 

Posts: 10353
Joined: 6/28/2006
From: Near Portland, OR
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

I'd be interested, if you could share where you read about the sun as part of star cluster theory, as I've not heard of it before. Everything I (we?) know about stellar formation and evolution doesn't jive with the idea that a supernova could make a star colder. It should just depend on how massive the star is when it's formed and what it's made out of. I thought.

According to this source (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10509-011-0873-9) that is citation 47 on the Wikipedia entry for IK Pegasi, a supernova would have to be about 1/5 of the distance as IK Pegasi to pose a threat to the biosphere (although the EM radiation would still do stuff).


Here's an article on the supernova:
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2093270-supernovae-2-million-years-ago-may-have-changed-human-behaviour/

I can't find the article on the star cluster right now. Though this article is 4 years old:
https://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/26aug_localbubble

quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy
I doubt the Sun is the only contributor to Earth's temperature in its formative stages. Isn't one of the theories about Earth's core that there is some nuclear reaction going on? That would imply it could have been more active in the distant past and since the mantle was thinner, more heat reached the surface.


The core of the Earth does contribute some to heating, but mostly it's a constant. It's been cooling down since the beginning but at a fairly predictable rate. We're also losing the Moon. It moves a little bit further from Earth every year. At some point total eclipses of the sun will be impossible.

We really don't know much about the historical output of the sun. We can get a good idea about the strength and orientation of Earth's magnetic field from studying the orientation of iron particles in old lava flows. We also have some idea of the composition of the atmosphere over time. Those things affect the amount of energy retained in the biosphere and what kind of cosmic radiation gets in.

Sunspots were discovered just before the Little Ice Age started, but it was thought they were a sort of one off phenomenon because very few were seen for a couple hundred years.

_____________________________

WitP AE - Test team lead, programmer

(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 41
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 4:56:19 PM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8153
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson


quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

I'd be interested, if you could share where you read about the sun as part of star cluster theory, as I've not heard of it before. Everything I (we?) know about stellar formation and evolution doesn't jive with the idea that a supernova could make a star colder. It should just depend on how massive the star is when it's formed and what it's made out of. I thought.

According to this source (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10509-011-0873-9) that is citation 47 on the Wikipedia entry for IK Pegasi, a supernova would have to be about 1/5 of the distance as IK Pegasi to pose a threat to the biosphere (although the EM radiation would still do stuff).


Here's an article on the supernova:
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2093270-supernovae-2-million-years-ago-may-have-changed-human-behaviour/

I can't find the article on the star cluster right now. Though this article is 4 years old:
https://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/26aug_localbubble

quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy
I doubt the Sun is the only contributor to Earth's temperature in its formative stages. Isn't one of the theories about Earth's core that there is some nuclear reaction going on? That would imply it could have been more active in the distant past and since the mantle was thinner, more heat reached the surface.


The core of the Earth does contribute some to heating, but mostly it's a constant. It's been cooling down since the beginning but at a fairly predictable rate. We're also losing the Moon. It moves a little bit further from Earth every year. At some point total eclipses of the sun will be impossible.

We really don't know much about the historical output of the sun. We can get a good idea about the strength and orientation of Earth's magnetic field from studying the orientation of iron particles in old lava flows. We also have some idea of the composition of the atmosphere over time. Those things affect the amount of energy retained in the biosphere and what kind of cosmic radiation gets in.

Sunspots were discovered just before the Little Ice Age started, but it was thought they were a sort of one off phenomenon because very few were seen for a couple hundred years.


Sunspots do result in some variation in solar energy, obviously, but the Little Ice Age may have actually been caused by vulcanism (seems far more likely to me, especially given evidence of 4 enormous eruptions within 50 years). Mount Samalas in the 1200s, and then there was Tambora in 1815 that caused wintry conditions in June and July in the northern hemisphere.

I'll go read that article on the supernova.

Another thing to note about the moon is that its presence creates a drag on the planet's rotation and eventually "we" will be tidally locked with the moon, just as it is with us (the same side always faces us). That won't happen for billions of years, though - and the planet would have to not be swallowed by the sun's red giant phase first.

(in reply to wdolson)
Post #: 42
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 7:23:43 PM   
HansBolter


Posts: 6184
Joined: 7/6/2006
From: St. Petersburg, Florida, USA
Status: online
Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Good job guys! I had no idea there were others here with "other" hobbies like me....well except for military modeling that is....we've already established there is a strong core of modelers here.

_____________________________

Hans


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Post #: 43
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 9:16:35 PM   
Zorch

 

Posts: 4535
Joined: 3/7/2010
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: HansBolter

Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Good job guys! I had no idea there were others here with "other" hobbies like me....well except for military modeling that is....we've already established there is a strong core of modelers here.

Me, too.

(in reply to HansBolter)
Post #: 44
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 10:08:59 PM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 11139
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: HansBolter

Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Good job guys! I had no idea there were others here with "other" hobbies like me....well except for military modeling that is....we've already established there is a strong core of modelers here.

Military models? Seems like a good field to get into! (needs more training though - saluting with the left hand is not in the book!)






Attachment (1)

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to HansBolter)
Post #: 45
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 10:14:20 PM   
GetAssista

 

Posts: 1269
Joined: 9/19/2009
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: HansBolter
Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Explosions, we love explosions! And the biggest ones are in space - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GRB_080916C. With the potential of wiping out any life in a galaxy they occur in. Which is probably one of the reasons why there are so few aliens around.

< Message edited by GetAssista -- 6/4/2018 10:21:02 PM >

(in reply to HansBolter)
Post #: 46
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 11:10:07 PM   
MakeeLearn

 

Posts: 2919
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A free minefield program
http://stellarium.org/




Attachment (1)

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Post #: 47
RE: How many mine fields - 6/4/2018 11:44:09 PM   
Zorch

 

Posts: 4535
Joined: 3/7/2010
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: HansBolter

Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Good job guys! I had no idea there were others here with "other" hobbies like me....well except for military modeling that is....we've already established there is a strong core of modelers here.

Military models? Seems like a good field to get into! (needs more training though - saluting with the left hand is not in the book!)




She can salute any way she .... pleases.

(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 48
RE: How many mine fields - 6/5/2018 3:19:56 AM   
wdolson

 

Posts: 10353
Joined: 6/28/2006
From: Near Portland, OR
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna
Sunspots do result in some variation in solar energy, obviously, but the Little Ice Age may have actually been caused by vulcanism (seems far more likely to me, especially given evidence of 4 enormous eruptions within 50 years). Mount Samalas in the 1200s, and then there was Tambora in 1815 that caused wintry conditions in June and July in the northern hemisphere.

I'll go read that article on the supernova.

Another thing to note about the moon is that its presence creates a drag on the planet's rotation and eventually "we" will be tidally locked with the moon, just as it is with us (the same side always faces us). That won't happen for billions of years, though - and the planet would have to not be swallowed by the sun's red giant phase first.


Exactly when the Little Ice Age began has some debate, but around 1600-1650 is the most common start time. The Mount Tambora eruption for 1815 did affect global weather for a few years, but particles from a single eruption generally fall out of the atmosphere fairly quickly. An ongoing major eruption that spews for a period of time has more effect. The nearer the equator the bigger the impact too.

quote:

ORIGINAL: HansBolter

Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Good job guys! I had no idea there were others here with "other" hobbies like me....well except for military modeling that is....we've already established there is a strong core of modelers here.


I'm a poly-geek. I have at least a passing interest in just about anything. A couple of years ago we were at the Maryhill Museum which was the home built by Sam Hill who was one of the railroad tycoons of the 1800s. They collected a lot of art and the house and grounds were turned into a museum after Sam and Mary died. Interestingly Sam Hill also built a replica of Stonehenge overlooking the Columbia River not far away.

We were looking at all the exhibits at the museum and I realized I was taking a fair bit of interest in a room full of weaving examples from different North American tribes. I literally was interested in basket weaving. Though I probably will skip that part next time I go there.

Speaking of astronomy, this is my SO's favorite nebula:
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2009/b1509/

I recently made it one of the wall paper images on our media computer (the one we use for streaming to the TV). She also loves the Pleiades. I made her a glow in the dark panel of the stars around the Pleiades that hangs over her side of the bed. And to tie in with modeling, I used a rattle can of Testors glossy dark Navy Blue (USN late war early 50s color) for the background. Charge it up with a black light and it glows most of the night.

Bill

_____________________________

WitP AE - Test team lead, programmer

(in reply to HansBolter)
Post #: 49
RE: How many mine fields - 6/5/2018 3:29:25 AM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8153
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna
Sunspots do result in some variation in solar energy, obviously, but the Little Ice Age may have actually been caused by vulcanism (seems far more likely to me, especially given evidence of 4 enormous eruptions within 50 years). Mount Samalas in the 1200s, and then there was Tambora in 1815 that caused wintry conditions in June and July in the northern hemisphere.

I'll go read that article on the supernova.

Another thing to note about the moon is that its presence creates a drag on the planet's rotation and eventually "we" will be tidally locked with the moon, just as it is with us (the same side always faces us). That won't happen for billions of years, though - and the planet would have to not be swallowed by the sun's red giant phase first.


Exactly when the Little Ice Age began has some debate, but around 1600-1650 is the most common start time. The Mount Tambora eruption for 1815 did affect global weather for a few years, but particles from a single eruption generally fall out of the atmosphere fairly quickly. An ongoing major eruption that spews for a period of time has more effect. The nearer the equator the bigger the impact too.

quote:

ORIGINAL: HansBolter

Damn.....threw an astronomy reference into the thread like a hand grenade and it brought all the astronomy bugs out of hiding.

Good job guys! I had no idea there were others here with "other" hobbies like me....well except for military modeling that is....we've already established there is a strong core of modelers here.


I'm a poly-geek. I have at least a passing interest in just about anything. A couple of years ago we were at the Maryhill Museum which was the home built by Sam Hill who was one of the railroad tycoons of the 1800s. They collected a lot of art and the house and grounds were turned into a museum after Sam and Mary died. Interestingly Sam Hill also built a replica of Stonehenge overlooking the Columbia River not far away.

We were looking at all the exhibits at the museum and I realized I was taking a fair bit of interest in a room full of weaving examples from different North American tribes. I literally was interested in basket weaving. Though I probably will skip that part next time I go there.

Speaking of astronomy, this is my SO's favorite nebula:
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2009/b1509/

I recently made it one of the wall paper images on our media computer (the one we use for streaming to the TV). She also loves the Pleiades. I made her a glow in the dark panel of the stars around the Pleiades that hangs over her side of the bed. And to tie in with modeling, I used a rattle can of Testors glossy dark Navy Blue (USN late war early 50s color) for the background. Charge it up with a black light and it glows most of the night.

Bill


The sources I saw show the Little Ice Age as beginning in the 1200s (when the temperature began to fall, anyway). The most extreme variances from the temperature trend were in the 1500-1600s, however. I was looking at the graph on the top right of the Wiki article. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age

In addition to particular matter such as ash, there's also the matter of sulfur dioxides from large explosions, which reflect more sunlight until it's out of the atmosphere, which is also why those 4 large eruptions in the 1200s are so persuasive to me as a cause. There were also a series of eruptions from the late 1500s into the late 1600s. A source on the 1200s eruptions here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120130131509.htm


We're all poly-geeks around here. I stop short of saying polymath, but lots of us know a lot about a lot. Such is the nature of life.

(in reply to wdolson)
Post #: 50
RE: How many mine fields - 6/7/2018 7:35:21 PM   
rustysi


Posts: 4212
Joined: 2/21/2012
From: LI, NY
Status: offline
quote:

saluting with the left hand is not in the book!


You noticed that?????

quote:

but lots of us know a lot about a lot. Such is the nature of life.


Considering the average age of the group, I would hope so.

< Message edited by rustysi -- 6/7/2018 9:36:47 PM >


_____________________________

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In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to Lokasenna)
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