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RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War

 
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RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/12/2018 4:21:01 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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12 October 1918

On this date, the German government gave its answer to Woodrow Wilson, accepting the general framework of the 14 points for an armistice. The ball went back into the President's court.

Even though armistice discussions were underway, the Allies, and especially the British and French, were not about to relax their efforts. The further they pushed the Germans back, the better terms they would be in a position to demand. On this date, the French re-captured what was left of the town of Craonne, which was very little after the artillery of both sides had done its work.


Britain was favorable to the idea of Poland becoming an independent state again, but what its exact boundaries were to be was a delicate question. For one thing, some formerly Polish territory had been taken over by Russia, and having to give it back would anger both sides in the Russian Civil War, now in full swing. The British government therefore recognized the Polish National Army as an allied and co-belligerent force. This would give the Poles a seat at the table during the peace treaty negotiations. (The Polish National Army was often called the "Blue Army" for its uniforms.)





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_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 181
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/14/2018 3:31:25 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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14 October 1918

The Austro-Hungarian Empire continued to disintegrate. On this date the Czechoslovakia council declared that it was not only an independent state, but that it joined the Allies. On this same day, Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister Baron István Burián von Rajecz requested an armistice based on Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points.

Evidently, President Wilson had now become the primary contact for the Central Powers to negotiate armistices. Apparently, since the U. S. was still a relative newcomer in the war, it was believed he took a less hardened view and was willing to offer better terms. On this date the Ottoman government joined the other two Central Powers empires in suggesting an armistice to the U. S. President.

However, he was no longer willing to be as generous when it came to Germany. On this date Wilson further increased his armistice conditions, demanding withdrawal from all invaded territory, plus the cessation of all war crimes. By this last he meant the end of unrestricted U-boat warfare but apparently not Britain's starvation blockade of Germany.


This month was probably the worst month of the Spanish Flu epidemic for America and Europe. The sick rolls on both sides reached fearsome levels, and young adults died at the same or higher rates than the old. However, nutrition made a difference, and so food-short Germany was hit even harder the Allies were.

In the Middle East, disease was able to do what Ottoman soldiers could not: the Allied advances northward had to be slowed for a time. The flu and malaria not only severely cut the number of soldiers able to march and fight, but required shipments of ammunition and replacement troops to be curtailed in favor of medicines and medical staff.


At 0535, the G.A.F. (Flanders Army Group) kicked off its next big push in the sector of the Lys River. This time, the “creeping” barrage was more a rolling barrage, advancing at 90 meters (100 yards) per minute. The attack used British, French, and Belgian troops and all three were successful. By the end of the day the British took the village of Moorslede and occupied the high ground which dominated the area. The Belgian troops seized the village of Cortemarck, and French units surrounded the biggest prize, the city of Roulers. (which, being a part of Belgium, is now generally called Roeselare.)

If there had been any doubt that the Belgians were now first-string troops, those doubts were gone.




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_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 182
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/15/2018 1:46:34 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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15 October 1918

The days of “all quiet on the western front” were unquestionably over: the Allies continued to push forward from the English Channel all the way to the Argonne Forest. In the Flanders sector, the French completed their capture of the city of Roulers, bagging from 5,000 to 6,000 prisoners.


Although the Germans had been the first to use poison gas on a significant scale, nearly every country with a sufficiently large industrial base was now making it and using it. Churchill claimed that more Germans were killed or incapacitated by British gas then British were by German gas. The greatest number of casualties were suffered by the Russians, which is not surprising since they tended to be less well equipped than the troops of the other major combatants. After the withdrawal of Russia from the war and the refinement of gas masks, casualties lessened, though they were still serious, and there was nothing more feared by the soldiers on either side than a gas attack.

On this date, British artillery delivered a mustard gas attack in the Ypres sector. Some of the Germans’ gas masks seem to have allowed in the gas, leaving the soldiers temporarily blinded, including a gefreiter (equivalent to a corporal) named Adolf Hitler. Along the other incapacitated men, Hitler was evacuated and sent to a hospital in the town of Pasewalk, near the modern border with Poland.

(Hitler is on the right. He had not yet adopted the smaller style mustache.)




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_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 183
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/15/2018 7:05:00 AM   
IslandInland


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Capt. Harlock

15 October 1918

The days of “all quiet on the western front” were unquestionably over: the Allies continued to push forward from the English Channel all the way to the Argonne Forest. In the Flanders sector, the French completed their capture of the city of Roulers, bagging from 5,000 to 6,000 prisoners.


Although the Germans had been the first to use poison gas on a significant scale, nearly every country with a sufficiently large industrial base was now making it and using it. Churchill claimed that more Germans were killed or incapacitated by British gas then British were by German gas. The greatest number of casualties were suffered by the Russians, which is not surprising since they tended to be less well equipped than the troops of the other major combatants. After the withdrawal of Russia from the war and the refinement of gas masks, casualties lessened, though they were still serious, and there was nothing more feared by the soldiers on either side than a gas attack.

On this date, British artillery delivered a mustard gas attack in the Ypres sector. Some of the Germans’ gas masks seem to have allowed in the gas, leaving the soldiers temporarily blinded, including a gefreiter (equivalent to a corporal) named Adolf Hitler. Along the other incapacitated men, Hitler was evacuated and sent to a hospital in the town of Pasewalk, near the modern border with Poland.

(Hitler is on the right. He had not yet adopted the smaller style mustache.)





The "person" on the right in all senses of the word should have had a bullet through his brain during this war. It would have done the world a favour.

< Message edited by IslandInland -- 10/15/2018 7:06:15 AM >


_____________________________

I saw generals create imaginary "masses of manoeuvre" with a crayon and dispose of enemy concentrations, that were on the ground and on the map, with an eraser. Who was I to criticise them, hero as I was of a hundred "Chinagraph wars" of make-believe?

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 184
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/16/2018 4:36:32 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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16 October 1918

The British offensive in the area of the River Lys continued to gain ground. By this date, they had reached the river itself and crossed it at several points. The Germans realized that another significant retreat of their forces would be necessary – but where would they fall back to?


Austro-Hungarian Emperor Charles made a last attempt to save a semblance of his Empire. He issued the “Imperial Manifesto of 16 October 1918”, proposing radical changes. The nation of Poland had been literally erased from the map in 1795, its territory divided between Prussia, Russia, and the Austrian Empire. Now the regions of Galicia and Lodomeria, where the majority of the population still considered themselves Poles, were to be allowed to leave the Empire. This would almost certainly mean they would re-establish Polish statehood. Other areas such as Slovakia were to be governed by national councils and allowed to negotiate autonomy.




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< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 10/16/2018 4:37:43 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 185
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/17/2018 3:42:23 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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17 October 1918

The Allied advances in the Flanders sector had now gone far enough to threaten the Belgian coastal ports with encirclement. Unlike the British, the Germans had no chance of evacuating by sea, so they dared not risk being completely cut off. On this day, they abandoned Ostend, the site of the famous naval raids in April and May, and the Allies promptly reoccupied it. Next stop: Zeebrugge, and a setback to the German submarine effort.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 186
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/17/2018 7:45:08 PM   
redcoat


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The French city of Lille was liberated by the British Fifth Army on 17th October 1918. On the 28th the Mayor of Lille made the commander of the Fifth Army, General William Birdwood, an honorary citizen of Lille. British troops from the 47th (London) Division paraded through the city.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54ASSiWoGZg





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"Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won."

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 187
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/18/2018 3:59:51 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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18 October 1918

The formal reply to the Austro-Hungarian Imperial Manifesto came from U. S. Secretary of State Robert Lansing. In a written response, Lansing stated that, since the Czechoslovakians had declared alliance with the Western powers, simple autonomy for them, and the south Slavs as well, was no longer enough. They needed to be given the choice of independence (which they would almost certainly take.)

At the beginning of the war, Robert Lansing had advocated “benevolent neutrality”, trading with the Allies but not joining the war. He had actually swung against Britain for a time after the imposition of the blockade of Germany. But with the sinking of the Lusitania and eventually the U.S. declaration of war, he had become a whole-hearted supporter of the Allied cause. Now, with this diplomatic note, Lansing had effectively signed the death warrant of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.




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_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to redcoat)
Post #: 188
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/19/2018 4:30:59 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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19 October 1918

On this date, Belgian troops liberated both Zeebrugge and Bruges. What Admiral Keyes’ naval raids had only partially accomplished earlier in the year, was now complete: neither German U-boats nor surface raiders could take advantage of the shorter distances from the Belgian coast any longer.

It was now only a short distance up the coast until the Belgian forces reached the westernmost border of Holland. A nearly forgotten part of WWI is that, while the Germans never invaded Holland proper, they had problems with Belgian refugees escaping to the north. (This reduced the number of forced laborers they could send to Germany.) They soon constructed an electrified fence dubbed “The Wire of Death” along the border. It is estimated that 2,000 – 3,000 people were killed attempting to cross the fence.




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_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 189
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/20/2018 4:49:56 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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20 October 1918

The loss of the ports on the Belgian coast proved to be the last straw for the German U-boat campaign against Allied shipping. Convoy escorts and mines had already reduced the number of merchantmen sunk to a level that made little impact on the Allied war effort, and now the German submarines would be even less effective. Halting unrestricted submarine warfare was one of President Wilson’s demands for armistice negotiations. Warfare by “cruiser rules”, where the U-boat would have to surface, warn the cargo ship, and then wait while the crew evacuated into the lifeboats, would not sink ships at anything like a meaningful rate, and was dangerous to the U-boat besides. The Germans therefore decided to abandon targeting merchant ships altogether, and on this date the orders were sent out.


On this same day, losing no time, the German Government replied to President Wilson's Note, informing him that his proposals were accepted.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 190
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/20/2018 7:38:10 PM   
jwarrenw13

 

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A small commemoration takes place tonight in Tiger Stadium at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Special (American) football uniforms to commemorate the cancelled football season of 1918 due to many students and faculty at the former military school serving in World War I. I know there is a commercial element to it, but the history behind it is real.

https://lsucreative.exposure.co/commemorating-1918?_ga=2.99143576.706880947.1539993143-1424325679.1532644273

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Post #: 191
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/22/2018 3:27:27 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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22 October 1918

An argument can be made that the German navy did more than any other single institution or individual to lose the war for Germany. Their building of a rival fleet of battleships had made them a threat to the Royal Navy and turned British public opinion against them before the war, aiding Britain 's prompt declaration of war with tremendous public support. The fleet had retreated from the North Sea at the opening of the war, allowing the British Expeditionary Force to be rushed to France and there to play a significant part in the failure of the Von Schlieffen plan. The Navy's insistence that the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare could defeat Britain, before the United States could make a decisive contribution to the Allied war effort, had turned out to be disastrously wrong. And now, with the movement for an armistice underway, came the final touch.

Now that the U-boats had been called back, the German Navy would be virtually inactive while the final stages of the war played out. Apparently this was intolerable to Admiral Reinhard Scheer (below). He ordered Admiral Franz Ritter Hipper and the German Naval Staff to prepare a plan for one last great sortie against the British Grand Fleet, hopefully with assistance from the U-boats which would now be available to attack Allied warships.



It is not clear exactly what Scheer and Hipper hoped to accomplish. Radio messaging was not yet sophisticated enough to coordinate significant numbers of submarines, which was the main reason why there were hardly any “wolf pack” attacks against Allied convoys in WWI. An encounter in the North Sea against the reinforced Allied fleet would have been at roughly 2-to-1 odds, meaning no realistic hope of victory. Some have suggested that if significant losses were inflicted on the British they would become more anxious for an armistice to protect the remainder of their fleet and maintain their standing of the largest navy in the world. (The U. S. was building battleships at a great rate, and Britain was too financially exhausted to match the American shipyards.) Others have theorized that it was meant to scuttle the armistice negotiations, which were looking more and more like a surrender to the Allies.

In the event, it would prove to be one of the worst ideas in military history.


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< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 10/22/2018 3:28:12 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to jwarrenw13)
Post #: 192
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/23/2018 2:35:07 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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23 October 1918

General Diaz had preferred not to expend Italian soldiers when he could wait for the opposing Austro-Hungarian army to collapse by itself. But Italy had been induced to come into the war with promises of expanded territory, and it would not have a good position at the negotiating table unless it could make up for the help it had needed during the debacle of Caporetto. Now or never was the time to win a decisive victory.

However, Diaz was still facing the obstacle of the Piave River. It was wide and flowing strongly in the area near the coast, and further inland the terrain was mountainous and difficult for attackers. Interestingly, the Allied attack plan was similar to the Austro-hungarian plan that had been a costly failure in June. The left wing would advance in the mountains near, while the right wing would attempt a bridgehead across the Piave. There was one difference: the crossing of the Piave would be in two steps. First the Tenth Army under General Robert. , 10th Earl of Cavan, would take Papadopoli Island in the middle of the river, which was wide at that point. From there, the mixed force of British and Italians would cross to the north bank of the Piave, and with luck punch through the Austro-hungarian defenses.

The battle opened with eerily similar results as the Austro-hungarian offensive four months before. Lord Cavan’s men gained a solid foothold on the island, and began to lay their pontoon bridges. Further to the west, however, the Allies were less successful. With the aid of one French division, they attacked mount Grappa, took some prisoners, but then had to fall back to their starting positions. It was true that mountainous terrain favors the defenders, but the strength of the Austrians in that area was still an unpleasant surprise to General Diaz and the rest of the Allies. The first day's advance had been, if anything worse than the Austrians had done in June. There was no movement in the mountains, and the Allies were no more than halfway across the Piave in the east.

But now the Austro-hungarians made a key mistake. Lord Cavan’s Tenth Army was only 4 divisions strong. Apparently the Austro-hungarians concluded this was not the main thrust, and they sent their reserves to the mountain front.


Another campaign kicked off on this day, this one in Mesopotamia (modern-day Iran). The British commander in the area, General Sir William Marshall, had kept his troops quiet even as the summer heat faded into autumn. Now he received instructions from the War Office that "every effort was to be made to score as heavily as possible on the Tigris before the whistle blew". Therefore, General Alexander Cobbe led a British force out from Baghdad, heading north.


And of course there was continued heavy fighting in France. Deneys Reitz had begun his military career fighting against the British Empire in the Second Boer war. Since South Africa was now on the Allied side, Reitz eventually became a Lieutenant Colonel, and found himself in command of the First Royal Scots Fusiliers. On this day, his troops were on the attack:

At 3.30 the British barrage came down. It was not the solid wall of flame of the old days, but it was heavy enough, and the Royal Scots went off behind it. In the dark we could see the figures of the advancing men outlined against the barrage with the light playing upon their bayonets. German machine-guns and rifles were spitting away, but they went on until they were swallowed up in the dark. As we were to follow fifteen hundred yards behind, we watched until we could no longer distinguish them, then when I judged that they would be nearing Vertain, I started my men off. We advanced in open order across the level plain, passing many Royal Scots lying dead or wounded. They had caught the brunt of the enemy fire, which already was slackening down, and we lost only four men killed, and five or six wounded, even though shells dropped freely among us. It was getting light by now, and we could see the dim shadow of Vertain before us. . . . We now came to a small stream, the Georges, through which we waded knee deep, and beyond that we were among the houses and gardens of Vertain.

German shells promptly began to drop into the village. It was a standard tactic: when the Germans evacuated a village they called in artillery to catch the Allied soldiers moving in, and Reitz realized it immediately. He led his men out and sheltered behind a nearby embankment, waiting for the next Allied barrage towards their next objective, the village of Escarmain.

At 8.30 the men were in the assembly line, ready for zero hour. It is always a trying time waiting for the final moment, but I had no fear of the outcome. From what I had seen of German army orders and newspapers, and of their infantry of late, I knew that their spirits were low, and that we were not so much fighting an army as hustling demoralised men. At 8.40 to the second, the barrage came roaring down. A British 6-inch howitzer shell dropped between our front and rear waves, and killed three men, and all the way to Escarmain this infernal gun dropped shorts among us, causing eight or nine further casualties. The rest of the barrage worked smoothly, and we followed behind it at a walk. The German infantry in the rifle pits opened fire on us, but they they were rattled by the shells, and their firing was wild, whilst their batteries were too thin to do much damage . . . And now we reached and entered the village, the elated men rushing down the streets, and fetching out more prisoners from houses and cellars. They speedily cleaned up the place of such Germans as were still lurking about, and we then waded the stream that runs through Escarmain and climbed the slope beyond to the Chapelle de la Rosaire, from which we had an extensive view across another open plain sloping down towards the Ecaillon, a small river two miles away. German infantry were streaming back, and we sped their passage with rifle-fire. Many gun teams too were galloping in the distance, and it was clear that the enemy was retiring on a wide front. Our instructions were to reach the red line on the battle map, and no further, so we made no attempt to pursue, and I had the satisfaction of sending a runner back to Brigade with a note to say that the 1st R.S.F. [Royal Scots Fusiliers] had reached its objective according to orders.

--Deneys Reitz, “Trekking On”




Woodrow Wilson again ramped up the demands for an armistice, sending the message: "If the Government of the United States must deal with the military masters and the monarchical autocrats of Germany now, or if it is likely to have to deal with them later in regard to the international obligations of the German Empire, it must demand not peace negotiations but surrender. “ To many in the German government, this was indistinguishable from an actual demand for surrender. (Although Germany had been united into a single political entity, it was an Empire in title as well as fact. There were a total of 22 kingdoms, principalities, and dukedoms.) The strong implication was the removal of the Kaiser, but it could also have meant the overthrow of the rulers of the German states, and apparently even the resignations of the top commanders of the Army and Navy. This was more than they were willing to do.


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< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 10/23/2018 2:36:54 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 193
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/23/2018 7:39:34 AM   
altipueri

 

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I just played as Italy in 1914 with the Paradox game Victoria - and kept Italy out of the War - avoiding the blandishments and entreaties of Austria and France.

Re an earlier post #183 with a photo of Hitler. Who could have thought that emaciated corporal with the wing nut ears would rule and destroy Europe?

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 194
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/24/2018 3:36:02 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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24 October 1918

The formal order for the do-or-die sortie of the High Seas Fleet was issued. The plan was to sail past the North Sea and attack the shipping in the northeast of the English Channel, possibly even in the entrance to the Thames River. This was something the Germans knew the British could not ignore, and the Germans hoped to reduce the enemy Grand Fleet as it chased after them with attacks from torpedo boats and submarines before the clash of the big ships.



True, the German surface fleet was still in existence and formidable on paper, but it was suffering from severe neglect. Food for the sailors was in short supply, as it was for nearly everyone in Germany. The ships were not being maintained very well, nor were there frequent gunnery drills or other exercises. Most of all, relations between officers and men had deteriorated badly. The officers expected discipline as always in the German military, which for them meant unquestioning obedience. The sailors, however, were now quietly questioning their leadership after Jutland, the failed U-boat campaign, and the failed convoy attack in April.

An operation as massive as the sortie of the whole High Seas Fleet could not be kept secret from the crews, and they were fully aware that most of the ships were in less-than-ideal shape. Now the battle line has to be made ready for sea again. The full details of the plan might conceivably have been kept secret, but a number of the officers were careless and drank toasts to "victory or death" at evening mess. The word spread among the sailors, who knew well which of the two it would almost certainly be.

There was an unsettling sign of trouble to come. As the battlecruisers Von der Tann and Derfflinger passed through the locks that separated Wilhelmshaven's inner harbour and roadstead, some 300 men from both ships climbed over the sides and disappeared ashore.


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< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 10/24/2018 3:37:02 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to altipueri)
Post #: 195
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/24/2018 3:38:50 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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quote:

I just played as Italy in 1914 with the Paradox game Victoria - and kept Italy out of the War - avoiding the blandishments and entreaties of Austria and France.


Interesting -- but the map of northern Italy would look a bit different than it does today.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to altipueri)
Post #: 196
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/25/2018 4:01:38 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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25 October 1918

In Italy, the Allies were still stalled in the area around Mount Grappa. However, the Allied Tenth Army eliminated the last Austro-hungarians on Papadopoli Island. Now for the north bank of the Piave River.


On the Mesopotamian front, the British were making up for lost time. Motorized transport had allowed them to cover 120 km (75 mi) in two days. Near the Little Zab River, they made contact with the Turkish Sixth Army, commanded by Ismail Hakki Bey (below). Although the British had only two divisions and two cavalry brigades (all Indian), and Bey had four divisions, the Ottoman general did not feel confident in his troops. He began withdrawing further north.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 197
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/26/2018 3:54:48 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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26 October 1918

In Berlin, Ludendorff was summoned to met with the Kaiser. Although at the beginning of the month he had argued that the war was lost, Ludendorff now insisted on fighting on. The terms that the Allies were pushing for looked less like a cease-fire and more like complete surrender, and Ludendorff preferred to go down fighting, regardless of the cost. The Kaiser, of course, wanted to save as much of the German government as possible (and his throne), even if the army was neutralized. The discussion deteriorated into a shouting match, with the Kaiser finally reminding his top field general that he was in the presence of his emperor. Unwilling to back down, Ludendorff declared that if the Kaiser no longer had confidence in him, he should accept his resignation. Kaiser Wilhelm promptly took him up on it.

Paul von Hindenburg then tendered his resignation as well. But the Kaiser rejected this one: the hero of Tannenburg was indispensable to the army’s morale.


In Italy, the Allied advance in the mountains had switched from Mount Grappa to Mount Pertica. This time it had more success: although the Austro-hungarians had the reinforcements from the eastern part of the front and counterattacked with surprising energy, the Italians held their gains.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 198
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/27/2018 4:27:12 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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27 October 1918

In Italy, the Allied Tenth Army under Lord Cavan crossed the remaining width of the Piave River and established a bridgehead on the north bank. They had expected a fight, but the Austrian defense broke down almost completely. The reserves were gone, and many of the Empire's troops remaining there were ethnic Czech or Jugo-Slav, and they surrendered by hundreds. Others, not willing to become prisoners but also not willing to be killed for a dying empire, retreated in notable disorder. By the end of the day the British had taken 3,520 prisoners and 54 guns, and penetrated 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) deep and 8 kilometers (5 miles) wide.

Farther upstream the Italian Twelfth Army and Eighth Army also managed to cross the river and establish lodgements. Lord Cavan promptly sent two units to clear the river banks of whatever Austro-Hungarians remained, and the two bridgeheads were joined.

The Austro-Hungarian commander Svetozar Boroević von Bojna tried to launch a counter-attack, but too many of his men refused to obey the order. The Allies were on the verge of another breakthrough.


The Ottomans were now well aware that their war was lost. The Allies were closing in on three fronts, for they had resumed the advance in Syria, the British were charging northward in Mesopotamia, and an Allied column in the Balkans was getting closer to Constantinople. The “three Pashas" had resigned, and the new government made overtures to the British for an armistice.

Although the war was being won on land, the ceasefire was to be agreed at sea. On this date, the Ottoman delegation came aboard the British battleship HMS Agamemnon, anchored off the isle of Lemnos, to begin negotiations. The British made sure they were in charge: the ranking French officer in the region was not invited aboard, and British Prime Minister Lloyd George was desirous to keep the Americans completely out of the matter. (He wanted control of as much of the Middle East’s oil as he could get.) Therefore, each side was unaware that the other side was quite anxious for a deal: the Ottomans had little left in the way of an army and wanted to conclude peace before there were further massacres in the Middle East or the Balkans, while the British wanted to wrap up the agreement before any of the other Allies had a say.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 199
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/28/2018 5:57:46 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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28 October 1918

Room 40 of British Intelligence was detecting signs of the German plan for a “last hurrah” sortie against the Grand Fleet. However, the British could not wholly believe that their enemies were willing to sacrifice the cream of their navy. Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff Vice Admiral Sydney Fremantle and Director of Naval Intelligence Rear Admiral Reginald Hall sent a missive to Home Fleet commander David Beatty:

Dispositions of enemy submarines combined with positions of their large minefield recently laid and now clear constitutes fairly decisive evidence of his desire to draw the Grand Fleet out ... No evidence of how he proposes to achieve this object but evidence that no move of his battlefleet can take place before ... tomorrow night. No objective of the enemy is apparent that will not involve great risk for him. Therefore he may confine himself to emerging from the Bight and returning after making us aware of his exit by W/T signals. Unlikely the enemy will risk fleet action until the Armistice negotiations are settled one way or another. Press reports of German submarines proceeding home via the Norwegian Coast probably emanate from Germany and are intended to conceal existence of submarine trap.


The Allied Army of the Orient was now moving through the Balkans, in many places linking up with locals who had already cast off Austro-Hungarian rule. The idea was spreading elsewhere as well. This date is often called the birthday of Czechoslovakia, for Czech leaders peacefully took over Prague. They would do the same in other cities in the following days.

With their empire fading away and their army in rout, the Austro-Hungarians asked for terms. The initial demands were stern, however. General Diaz wanted much the same as General d’Esperey had imposed on Bulgaria: the army was to disarm except for sidearms, and Austro-Hungarian territory would be opened to the passage of Allied troops.


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 200
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/29/2018 7:11:01 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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29 October 1918

On the Mesopotamian front, the Ottoman forces under Ismail Hakki Bey had not retreated fast enough. At Sharqat, the British-Indian force under Sir Alexander Cobbe attacked.

The Slavs in both the Balkans and central Europe proclaimed the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. And this was just the first step: they also declared a desire to unite with Serbia and Montenegro in a greater Slav state. Also on this date, the Czechs and Slovaks formally declared the indepence of the the new state of Czechoslovakia.


Lastly on this date, The German High Seas fleet was to sail at dusk on its desperate attempt to draw out the British Home Fleet. But in the late afternoon, crew after crew on board the big ships refused to make ready. Men declined to fire up the boilers, or to load coal, and in numerous cases even to return on board from shore leave. There were threats of violence against officers attempting to enforce the orders. Cheers for peace were heard from many parts of the fleet, and even cheers for Woodrow Wilson.

An astounded Admiral Hipper was forced to call off the sortie. Now, what to do with the rebellious crews?




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 201
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/30/2018 7:54:19 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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30 October 1918

In Mesopotamia, the Turkish General Hakki Bey surrendered his force at sharqat to British commander Cobbe after a single day’s battle. The Turkish lines were not yet breached, but there was no point in holding out, for the Ottomans were about to make peace. 18,000 Turkish soldiers became prisoners, while the British and Indians had taken less than 2,000 casualties.

In an event that would be echoed half-way around the world 27 years later, a surrender was signed on board a battleship. On this occasion the battleship was HMS Agamemnon, and the Ottomans and the British signed the Armistice of Mudros. In addition to the usual surrender of weapons, the Turks also gave the Allies the right to occupy the forts in the lower Dardanelles and sail through the straits into the Black Sea. And so, the object of the Gallipoli campaign had been gained after all, though rather late. Had it happened 22 months earlier, it seems possible that the Russian Revolution might never have happened, and the Soviet Union would never have existed.

Two of the Central Powers down, two to go.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 202
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/31/2018 6:49:45 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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31 October 1918

The high command of the German Navy, thinking that it was dangerous to allow the fleet to stay concentrated and let the spirit of rebellion grow, decided to split the fleet back up into the ships home-ported in Wilhelmshave, and those based in Kiel. Vizeadmiral Hugo Kraft was in command of the latter group, and he ordered a quick exercise in Heligoland Bight to test the stability of his command. The sailors knew it was only an exercise, and so all went smoothly. Kraft assumed that the mutiny was over, and as his ships moved back through the canal to Kiel, he had 47 sailors who he believed had been the ringleaders of the mutiny arrested.

He may have been right about the ringleaders, but he was completely wrong in believing that the rebellion was at an end. The remainder of the crews saw the men as heroes, and they were in no mood to let the arrests and the likely punishments stand.


In both Budapest and Vienna, there were demonstrations in the streets, with students and workers shouting “Down with the Hapsburgs!” Their wish was granted with remarkable speed. The Prime Minister of Hungary declared the union with Austria terminated. The Austrians could do nothing about it, as their army was being demolished in Italy, and so the Austro-Hungarian Empire effectively came to an end. The much older rule of the House of Hapsburg would inevitably follow.


In Berlin, the German Imperial War Cabinet met in the Reichstag, and the general argeement was that the Kaiser’s abdication was necessary for the armistice. The question was who would succeed him, and who would travel to Spa, Belgium, to tell Wihelm he must step down (and likely suffer the Kaiser's wrath). Chancellor Prince Max was not available for either task. The Spanish Flu had struck him as well, and though he would recover, at this point he was essentially comatose for three days.


In the month of October, a full 20 U-boats had gone to the bottom, but more than half had been scuttled instead of lost to combat. Especially, the defeat of Austria-Hungary had meant that all submarines in Mediterranean ports would be forfeit, so their crews scuttled them rather than surrender them to the Allies. Roughly 118,500 tons of Allied merchant shipping had been sunk before the order to cease had gone out.


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 203
Bonus Picture - 10/31/2018 6:51:53 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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The Imperial War Museum in London.

(And yes, that yellow object is a 15-inch shell.)




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 204
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 11/1/2018 5:54:06 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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1 November 1918

In northern Italy, the Italians and their Allies were now advancing as fast as they could move as an organized army. This was not as fast as the commanders would have liked, because there was still difficulty getting supplies across the Piave River and then bringing them forward to the troops. True, huge quantities of stores were being seized from the Austro-hungarian depots being overrun, but that could not replenish ammunition, which was running low.


Unlike against Bulgaria, the Ottomans, or the Austro-Hungarians, there would be no true breakthrough against the Germans in northern France. True, they were being driven steadily backwards, but surrounding and capturing/destroying the bulk of the army would not happen. However, there was a weakness:

It is now necessary to take a parting glance at the structure of railways on which the German armies in France had depended. during the four years of the war. The tap root of their supplies was the main trunk railway from the munition factories of Westphalia through Cologne, Liège, Namur and Maubeuge . . . ran in a crescent shaped T (lying thus) the great lateral line on which the invading front was built, viz. the railway from Germany through Metz, Mezières, Hirson, Maubeuge, Mons, Ghent and Bruges. From this railway there branched southward and westward all the lines which with various subsidiary laterals fed the German armies spread fanwise towards Calais, Amiens and Paris. Behind the southern portion lay the rugged forest region of the Ardennes, comparatively roadless and railless, and an impassable barrier to the organized retreat of huge modern armies. The German Army in France was therefore strategically to a large extent ‘formed to a flank’ along their main lateral communications. If these were broken or they were driven beyond them, the bulk would never get away. Further, nearly three-quarters of the whole German strength radiated from the lateral arc Mezières-Hirson-Aulnoye-Mons. The railway junctions of Mezières and Aulnoye (near the lost French fortress and railway centre of Maubeuge) were therefore vital organs of the enemy. If these junctions could be captured or paralysed, the immense mass of invaders depending on them, or on the lateral line between them, would be cut off.

--Winston Churchill, "The World Crisis, Vol. 3"





In an attempt to mollify the increasingly restless German population, several political prisoners had been released. Perhaps the most prominent was one Dr Karl Liebknecht. His release may have been a mistake, for on this day he published his Call for Revolution:

Dear Comrades:
For more than four years our rulers have been engaged in a robber war for the oppression of our neighbours.
During the last ten or twelve years these same rulers have preached the bad doctrine of "Slavic danger." They sowed in our hearts fear of the Slays. But this was merely camouflage for further imperialistic aggression. As if the way to St. Petersburg lay through Belgium and northern France, they gave orders to let the armies loose.
During these four years the peoples of the world have bled until they can bleed no more. And what have we won? Have we won one hundredth part of what we and our rulers started out to get? Instead of this, we have lost until we have nothing more to lose. One thing we have won - the hatred of mankind.
And now we have, through the President of America, asked our enemies for peace. Comrades, now comes for you a fitting opportunity. Unite. Hold together under the banner of the "International."
You should not hold yourselves as discouraged. It was never your war. You were driven by your rulers into the world slaughter. You have got what you deserved. It now lies with you to dismiss your rulers.
Act at once. It is your only prospect. Stretch the tyrant at your feet with a mighty blow. He now wavers. A well-aimed blow will at this time win your freedom, and will to some extent recompense you for all the blood that has been shed during the last four sad years.
Lay down your weapons, you soldiers at the front. Lay down your tools, you workers at home. Do not let yourselves be deceived any longer by your rulers, the lip patriots, and the munitions profiteers. Rise with power and seize the reins of government. Yours is the force. To you belongs the right to rule. Answer the call for freedom and win your own war for liberty.
For more than four years have your oppressors used you as the tools with which to fill their pockets. More than four years have they offered your sons, fathers, brothers, as victims and have starved millions, so that they might coin profits out of your blood.
Had you won the war you would have remained helpless slaves; you are beaten. Victory is within your grasp. It lies with you to seize it.
Comrades! Soldiers! Sailors! And you workers! Arise by regiments and arise by factories. Disarm your officers, whose sympathies and ideas are those of the ruling classes. Conquer your foremen, who are on the side of the present order. Announce the fall of your masters and demonstrate your solidarity.
Do not heed the advice of the Kaiser Social Democrats. Do not let yourselves be led any longer by unworthy politicians, who play you false and deliver you into the hands of the enemy.
Stand fast like many of the genuine Social Democrats in your companies and regiments. Seize the quarters of your officers; disarm them immediately. Make sure that your officers sympathize with you. In case they do so, let them lead you. Shoot them immediately in case they betray you after they have declared themselves supporters of your cause.
Soldiers and marines! Fraternize! Take possession of your ships. Overpower first your officers. Place yourselves in communication with your comrades on land and seize all harbours and open fire, if necessary, on loyal groups.
Workers in munition factories: You are the masters of the situation. Stop work immediately. From this moment on you are only making bullets which will be used against you and yours. The bullets which you now make will never reach the front.
Stop making bayonets which will be thrust into your entrails by the knights of the Government. Arise, organize, seize weapons and use them against those who plan to make slaves of you after they have made their own peace. End the war yourselves and use your weapons against the rulers.

Source: Source Records of the Great War, Vol. VI, ed. Charles F. Horne



Prussian Minister of the Interior Dr. Wilhelm Drews arrived at Spa, Belgium, to ask Kaiser Wilhelm to abdicate. It did not go well: the enraged Kaiser was not at all ready to yield his throne.


In the Argonne Forest, the American First Army now launched its attack against the fourth and final German line. Although the Germans had had time to strengthen and reinforce their defenses, the Americans had done even more work. Older roads had been repaired, newer roads had been created, and the supply organization had been greatly improved. Fresh troops had been brought into line, and exhausted units rotated to the rear.

The revitalized Yanks quickly broke through the German defences. They had one other advantage: the month of October had been costly for both sides in terms of sickness from the Spanish flu, but the Germans had been hit especially hard. They were running low on manpower.



Attachment (3)

< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 11/3/2018 12:03:08 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 205
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 11/2/2018 11:58:29 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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2 November 1918

The Battle in the Argonne is arguably a full campaign rather than a single battle. But if it is called a battle, then it is the largest, and deadliest, battle that U. S. Forces have ever yet been involved in. Roughly 1.2 million American soldiers and Marines were committed, and 26,000 lost their lives.

But now, at last, the Americans and other Allied troops were winning clear of the forest that had done so much to impede their advance, and break down their supply efforts. Headed in large part by one George C. Marshall, who would of course go on to greater things, the logistics were back on track. The troops and commanders could now think about major objectives rather than a few yards day by day.

This was not without problems. These major objectives were the southern part of the great railway "fan" that had sustained the Germans in France since 1914. And the one whose capture would give the most prestige was Sedan. As much as Pershing would have liked American forces to have the credit, Foch even more wanted it taken by the French, for that would at least in part erase the humiliation at the hands of the Prussians in 1871. Since Foch was being given more and more authority as General-in-chief, Pershing would eventually agree to change the American direction of advance a second time.


The Allies were making steady progress against the northern part of the railway as well. On this date the British scored another victory at Valenciennes. It was not without cost: among others, Sergeant Hugh Cairns was mortally wounded after a feat rivaling that of Corporal Alvin York. He would be the last of 71 Canadians to be awarded the Victoria Cross in WWI.


In the port of Kiel, the German sailors sent delegates to their commanders to request that the suspected ringleaders be freed. The delegates were turned away without being heard. Stronger measures were in order, so the sailors began to make contacts with the local students and workers union, with the aim of conducting a general strike.

< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 11/3/2018 12:10:41 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 206
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 11/3/2018 1:28:04 AM   
GamerJack

 

Posts: 5
Joined: 11/3/2018
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fhdhgfd

Truth of this world and the end of humanity d

COPY THIS TEXT TO YOUR PC AND USB DRIVE NOW (not cloud drives and not smartphone notes!) — ALL CORPORATIONS, SOCNETWORKS AND FORUMS WILL BAN, CENSOR OR MODIFY IT EVERYWHERE. DO IT RIGHT NOW WITHOUT REFRESHING THE PAGE!!!
EVEN IF YOU DON'T BELIEVE IT YET.

IN SHORT: Humanity is being pushed into Third World War by cross-country media and political manipulation created by vampiric beasts that can dominate any human leaders.

This text may seem INSANE at first, but all in it IS true and WILL happen.

First they will eat fringe small cities in all countries while lying in all news/socnetworks/apps about riots, natural disasters or attacks in them by neighbooring countries.
They will also ban/restrict local and cross-country travel with insane laws or under disguise of false reasons.
In the end, they will block cross-country internet.

COPY-PASTE THIS TEXT EVERYWHERE YOU CAN (do not repost/share! do not use links! they will be deleted and banned!), ON EVERY FORUM, IN EVERY MESSENGER APP (especially to other countries). Request detailed relationship-specific confirmation that recipient read it (messenger apps will ban or falsify it)!

PRINT THIS TEXT IN AS MANY COPIES AS YOU CAN AND SHOW THEM TO MAXIMUM NUMBER OF OTHER PEOPLE IN REAL LIFE.

TRANSLATE THIS TEXT TO YOUR LANGUAGE AND SEND IT TO EVERYONE IN YOUR COUNTRY, BOTH ELECTRONICALLY AND VIA POST MAIL.

Add random letters here and at the beginning of this text so it will not be blocked by content:
jfgjhdfj

1. Currently all countries across the globe experience unprecedented media storm of rage, hate and warmongering. This text explains why is that and what will happen next.

2. For at least a century (or more) humanity lives alongside hidden beasts, something like vampire/alien hybrid, with telepatic/telekinetic abilities. They can remain invisible if in eyesight of small number of humans (up to 50 I guess), but most probably can be caught on camera.

3. These beasts are carnivorous — specifically, they eat humans and their innards.

4. They manipulate human societies with purpose of periodic creation of slaughter and bloodshed to harvest their food (human flesh and innards).

5. For that, they conspired with ALL world's governments — or more like shadow power groups — and established their own puppet governments that consist of crisis actors and thralls (just like in recent USA school shootings and most airplane crashes in the world).

6. The beasts themselves have ability to create "thralls" — either by overpowering human will via drugs or bites (I don't know which of those). Visually and mimically thrall is almost indistinguishable from original and has ALL of his knowledge and mannerisms.

7. Some countries like USA have entire industries full of these thralls, others — like european countries — are converting them in recent days.

8. All accounts with large number of followers in ALL social networks and apps are controlled (or will be controlled) by newly converted thralls — they will post hate and warmongering from the name of their previous selves, including videos with themselves. All other accounts (yours too) are hacked and under their control. Do not trust anything you read in social networks or you see in any media of any type.

9. Purpose of these thralls is to infiltrate and totally dominate ALL media in all countries to be able to falsify observable reality — to show events that really are just hoaxes or created only by human servants of the beasts disguised as political opponents in fake conflicts.

10. ALL CORPORATIONS, SOCIAL NETWORKS, FORUMS, COMMENTS, MESSENGERS AND APPS ARE UNDER THEIR CONTROL OR SOON WILL BE INDEFINITELY. They turned off SSL for login to most third-party forums that they haven't compromised yet. Twitter, Facebook and YouTube will not show your posts to others often enough and will falsify views and likes/dislikes count.

11. COMMAND OF ALL ARMIES AND ALL SPECIAL AGENCIES OF ALL COUNTRIES ARE UNDER THEIR CONTROL AND WILL REMAIN SO.

12. ALL POLITICIANS OF ALL SIDES AND ALL COUNTRIES ARE UNDER THEIR CONTROL AND WILL ALWAYS BE.

13. As the result, ALMOST ALL terrorist acts that you believe in (in particular, 9/11, Columbine, Sandy Hook shootings, Florida shootings, Paris and Boston attacks) are hoaxes (often with real victims) with purpose to instill rage and bloodshed across the globe.

14. Most problems related to human disappearances in various countries are really just human flesh harvesting for the beasts, disguised by the controlled media as accidents/crimes.

15. All recent local "wars" (like Lybia, Syria) are falsified in the sense that their TV/media picture is a hoax — it is captured in small number of places in some of the cities, but all soldiers and civilians in remaining territory in these wars died very different deaths — becoming food for the beasts.

16. They are also for many years actively DEPOPULATING and DAMAGING the humanity via lies about medicine. For example: they tell you that AIDS is the result of HIV, but HIV virus doesn't exist (AIDS occurs because of heavy metals that they add into vaccines are causing immune deficiency condition; and HIV detection tests detect just resulting immune deficiency condition, not the virus itself). Also SIX hiv experts were killed in MH17 Boeing crash (which is also fake news, but with real eaten people). Same with cancer and its treatment.

17. Beasts (together with all puppet governments of the world) also lying to you for years about USA moon landing, which were impossible due to Van Allen radiation belts that would FRY all astronauts in minutes without hundreds of tons of radiation protection.

18. ALL NEWS ARE FAKE, ALL MEDIA IS LYING, all people in them are just thousands of Crisis Actors and thralls. Because they NEVER cite real sources or give full-length full-scale video. ALL SOCIAL NETWORKS AND MESSENGERS ARE HACKED, DO NOT TRUST ANYONE YOU TALK NOT IN PERSON.

19. Beasts are now advancing their plan to full-scale Third World War by instilling country-specific protests, revolutions and wars. In USA, it is race war and Trump-Democrat hatred (both sides are puppets). In other countries it is the same with ideological specifics to local populace.

20. Beasts want to create worldwide bloodshed where they will eat people alive. They already done that and WILL do it again. And after that, they will falsify history again, hiding their the very presence.

21. They are initiating and converting humans to become cannibals and to fight for them, disguised as soldiers of opposite political side. Except that they're not humans — they are cannibals disguised as humans.

22. They will first eat small fringe cities in all countries while lying in all news media and social networks about continuing social life in them. They will also lie about riots and natural disasters in them as an excuse why travelling there is impossible. They will turn off the electricity, cell coverage and water in entire city, but will falsify social activity for it in social networks for outside world.

23. They WILL try to silence the truth by both censorship and by many lunatic conspiracy theories.

24. DISABLE NEW PHONE OR PC UPDATES — THEY CONTAIN CENSORSHIP CODE. DO NOT USE CLOUD STORAGE OR DRIVES.

25. DO NOT FOLLOW OR TRUST ANY LEADERS — THEY WILL BE CONVERTED, DOMINATED AND THEIR WILL HIJACKED.

26. DO NOT BELIEVE LIES ABOUT RIOTS, PROTESTS, REVOLUTIONS, DISASTERS AND WARS.

27. DO NOT TRUST "PEOPLE" THAT INSTILL HATRED AGAINST ANY OTHER HUMAN. THEY ARE YOUR ENEMIES.

28. DO NOT PARTICIPATE IN OR SUPPORT BLOODSHED DIRECTED BY MEDIA OF EITHER SIDE. PROTECT YOURSELF AGAINST THE BEASTS, THEIR THRALLS AND THEIR ARMIES OF CANNIBALS DISGUISED AS SOLDIERS OF OTHER POLITICAL "SIDES".

29. Do not trust any other similar text that will appear, they are all lies from beasts and their thralls.

30. All history of original author of this text is a lie. He is not important. There was none and will be no more messages from him (otherwise it is NOT him). He died after writing this text.

God save us all.
God save humanity.

hgkhjfgh

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 207
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 11/3/2018 4:47:42 AM   
vonRocko

 

Posts: 1404
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GamerJack, this thread was for historical reference. There was no need for your drivel here. True or false your post does not belong here and I hope you or the moderators remove it.

(in reply to GamerJack)
Post #: 208
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 11/3/2018 5:10:21 PM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5228
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
3 November 1918

The German sailors continued to coordinate with the unions. In the afternoon of this date, several thousand sailors, students, and laborers gathered in the Großer Exerzierplatz, a large drill ground at Kiel. Here the slogan of “Frieden und Brot" (peace and bread) began to be chanted, and eventually the demonstrators moved in the direction of the prison where the arrested mutineers were being held. A military patrol under one sub-lieutenant Steinhäuser fired warning shots, which were apparently ineffective. Steinhäuser then ordered his men to fire directly into the crowd. Some of them were armed and fired back. 7 men were killed and 29 seriously wounded, this last including Steinhäuser himself.

Apparently both sides were taken aback by the bloodshed. The crowd dispersed, and the patrol pulled back. But this was only over for the day: the German Revolution had begun.


The Italians had threatened to break of negotiations with the Austro-hungarians, and simply keep advancing. Realizing that they could not stop either the Italians or the Allied Army of the Orient, the Austrians submitted, and signed the Armistice of Villa Giusti. It was supposed to take effect the next day, but the Austro-hungarian high command immediately sent out orders to their units to cease fighting. They saw no point in losing any more men.

And now Germany was alone.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to vonRocko)
Post #: 209
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 11/4/2018 3:43:27 AM   
Capt. Harlock


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4 November 1918

In Italy, General Armando Diaz issued the Bollettino della Vittoria (bulletin of victory), one of the most famous documents in modern Italian history. (It is believed that the text was actually written by spokesman of the General Staff General Domenico Siciliani.)

From the Supreme Headquarters 12:00 hours, November 4, 1918

The war against Austria-Hungary, which the Italian Army, inferior in number and equipment, began on 24 May 1915 under the leadership of His Majesty and supreme leader the King and conducted with unwavering faith and tenacious bravery without rest for 41 months, is won.
The gigantic battle, which opened on the 24th of last October and in which fifty-one Italian divisions, three British, two French, one Czechoslovak and a US regiment joined against seventy-three Austrian divisions, is over.
The lightning-fast and most audacious advance of the XXIX Army Corps on Trento, blocking the retreat of the enemy armies from Trentino, as they were overwhelmed from the west by the troops of the VII army and from the east by those of the I, VI, and the IV armies, led to the utter collapse of the enemy's front. From the Brenta to the Torre, the fleeing enemy is pushed ever further back by the irresistible onslaught of the XII, VIII, X Armies and of the cavalry divisions.
In the plains, His Royal Highness the Duke of Aosta is advancing at the head of his undefeated III Army, eager to return to the previously successfully conquered positions, which they had never lost.
The Austro-Hungarian Army is vanquished: it suffered terrible losses in the dogged resistance of the early days, and during the pursuit it lost an enormous quantity of materials of every kind as well as almost all its stockpiles and supply depots. The Austro-Hungarian Army has so far left about 300,000 prisoners of war in our hands along with multiple entire officer corps and at least 5,000 pieces of artillery.
The remnants of what was one of the world's most powerful armies are returning in hopelessness and chaos up the valleys from which they had descended with boastful confidence.

Army Chief of Staff, General Diaz


It was not mere propaganda. The Austro-hungarians are now estimated to have lost 30,000 men dead, 50,000 wounded, and as many as 448,000 captured. Along with the over 5,000 pieces of artillery, they lost massive quantities of other equipment and supplies. The cost to the Allies had been less than 41,000 casualties in all; about 37,500 Italians, 2,100 British, and around 1,000 of the other Allies.


In Kiel, Germany, the mutineers returned to the city streets. Various troops were sent against them by the authorities, but they either retreated in the face of superior numbers or joined in the revolt. The governor of the naval station tried to negotiate a peace by freeing the imprisoned mutineers, but it broke down. By nightfall the city was for all practical purposes under the control of 40,000 sailors, workers, and soldiers who had joined in the rebellion.

A meeting in a union house established a “soldiers and workers” council, which issued a 14-point demand. They were mostly military in nature, including a prohibition against launching the fleet under any circumstances, but the last point was a revolutionary one. All measures to be introduced in the future would need the consent of the council.


On the Western Front, General Haig launched another attack, this time at the Sambre River. The British forces were now almost at the same point where they had first engaged the Germans in August 1914, but this time it was the Germans who were being forced back. There was no general collapse of the defense, partly because only 37 working Allied tanks were available to help the attackers. Casualties were considerable, including Wilfred Owen, author of "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility", "Dulce Et Decorum Est", and "Strange Meeting", and the most famous poet of the war.



Nonetheless, the German lines were broken. Especially noteworthy was the capture of the town of Le Quesnoy, which had a medieval wall built around it easily thick enough to defy rifle or machine-gun fire. The New Zealand Division was assigned to capture it, but the German garrison held them off for several hours, causing serious losses. In the afternoon, Second Lieutenant Leslie Averill (an intelligence officer rather than a platoon leader) found a section of the wall that was unmanned, and lead a small group of men over the wall with the aid of a scaling ladder. Shortly after, the Kiwis opened one of the main gates of the town, and the Germans soon surrendered.


Painting by George Edmund Butler


In the southern part of the front, the American III Corps crossed the Meuse River. From this point on, combat on the Western front would be essentially Allied pursuit of retreating German forces.



Attachment (2)

< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 11/4/2018 3:45:01 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

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