Matrix Games Forums

Forums  Register  Login  Photo Gallery  Member List  Search  Calendars  FAQ 

My Profile  Inbox  Address Book  My Subscription  My Forums  Log Out

RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War

 
View related threads: (in this forum | in all forums)

Logged in as: Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [General] >> General Discussion >> RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War Page: <<   < prev  3 4 5 6 [7]
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/12/2018 4:21:01 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
12 October 1918

On this date, the German government gave its answer to Woodrow Wilson, accepting the general framework of the 14 points for an armistice. The ball went back into the President's court.

Even though armistice discussions were underway, the Allies, and especially the British and French, were not about to relax their efforts. The further they pushed the Germans back, the better terms they would be in a position to demand. On this date, the French re-captured what was left of the town of Craonne, which was very little after the artillery of both sides had done its work.


Britain was favorable to the idea of Poland becoming an independent state again, but what its exact boundaries were to be was a delicate question. For one thing, some formerly Polish territory had been taken over by Russia, and having to give it back would anger both sides in the Russian Civil War, now in full swing. The British government therefore recognized the Polish National Army as an allied and co-belligerent force. This would give the Poles a seat at the table during the peace treaty negotiations. (The Polish National Army was often called the "Blue Army" for its uniforms.)





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 181
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/14/2018 3:31:25 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
14 October 1918

The Austro-Hungarian Empire continued to disintegrate. On this date the Czechoslovakia council declared that it was not only an independent state, but that it joined the Allies. On this same day, Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister Baron István Burián von Rajecz requested an armistice based on Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points.

Evidently, President Wilson had now become the primary contact for the Central Powers to negotiate armistices. Apparently, since the U. S. was still a relative newcomer in the war, it was believed he took a less hardened view and was willing to offer better terms. On this date the Ottoman government joined the other two Central Powers empires in suggesting an armistice to the U. S. President.

However, he was no longer willing to be as generous when it came to Germany. On this date Wilson further increased his armistice conditions, demanding withdrawal from all invaded territory, plus the cessation of all war crimes. By this last he meant the end of unrestricted U-boat warfare but apparently not Britain's starvation blockade of Germany.


This month was probably the worst month of the Spanish Flu epidemic for America and Europe. The sick rolls on both sides reached fearsome levels, and young adults died at the same or higher rates than the old. However, nutrition made a difference, and so food-short Germany was hit even harder the Allies were.

In the Middle East, disease was able to do what Ottoman soldiers could not: the Allied advances northward had to be slowed for a time. The flu and malaria not only severely cut the number of soldiers able to march and fight, but required shipments of ammunition and replacement troops to be curtailed in favor of medicines and medical staff.


At 0535, the G.A.F. (Flanders Army Group) kicked off its next big push in the sector of the Lys River. This time, the “creeping” barrage was more a rolling barrage, advancing at 90 meters (100 yards) per minute. The attack used British, French, and Belgian troops and all three were successful. By the end of the day the British took the village of Moorslede and occupied the high ground which dominated the area. The Belgian troops seized the village of Cortemarck, and French units surrounded the biggest prize, the city of Roulers. (which, being a part of Belgium, is now generally called Roeselare.)

If there had been any doubt that the Belgians were now first-string troops, those doubts were gone.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 182
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/15/2018 1:46:34 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
15 October 1918

The days of “all quiet on the western front” were unquestionably over: the Allies continued to push forward from the English Channel all the way to the Argonne Forest. In the Flanders sector, the French completed their capture of the city of Roulers, bagging from 5,000 to 6,000 prisoners.


Although the Germans had been the first to use poison gas on a significant scale, nearly every country with a sufficiently large industrial base was now making it and using it. Churchill claimed that more Germans were killed or incapacitated by British gas then British were by German gas. The greatest number of casualties were suffered by the Russians, which is not surprising since they tended to be less well equipped than the troops of the other major combatants. After the withdrawal of Russia from the war and the refinement of gas masks, casualties lessened, though they were still serious, and there was nothing more feared by the soldiers on either side than a gas attack.

On this date, British artillery delivered a mustard gas attack in the Ypres sector. Some of the Germans’ gas masks seem to have allowed in the gas, leaving the soldiers temporarily blinded, including a gefreiter (equivalent to a corporal) named Adolf Hitler. Along the other incapacitated men, Hitler was evacuated and sent to a hospital in the town of Pasewalk, near the modern border with Poland.

(Hitler is on the right. He had not yet adopted the smaller style mustache.)




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 183
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/15/2018 7:05:00 AM   
IslandInland


Posts: 463
Joined: 12/8/2014
From: YORKSHIRE
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: Capt. Harlock

15 October 1918

The days of “all quiet on the western front” were unquestionably over: the Allies continued to push forward from the English Channel all the way to the Argonne Forest. In the Flanders sector, the French completed their capture of the city of Roulers, bagging from 5,000 to 6,000 prisoners.


Although the Germans had been the first to use poison gas on a significant scale, nearly every country with a sufficiently large industrial base was now making it and using it. Churchill claimed that more Germans were killed or incapacitated by British gas then British were by German gas. The greatest number of casualties were suffered by the Russians, which is not surprising since they tended to be less well equipped than the troops of the other major combatants. After the withdrawal of Russia from the war and the refinement of gas masks, casualties lessened, though they were still serious, and there was nothing more feared by the soldiers on either side than a gas attack.

On this date, British artillery delivered a mustard gas attack in the Ypres sector. Some of the Germans’ gas masks seem to have allowed in the gas, leaving the soldiers temporarily blinded, including a gefreiter (equivalent to a corporal) named Adolf Hitler. Along the other incapacitated men, Hitler was evacuated and sent to a hospital in the town of Pasewalk, near the modern border with Poland.

(Hitler is on the right. He had not yet adopted the smaller style mustache.)





The "person" on the right in all senses of the word should have had a bullet through his brain during this war. It would have done the world a favour.

< Message edited by IslandInland -- 10/15/2018 7:06:15 AM >


_____________________________

I saw generals create imaginary "masses of manoeuvre" with a crayon and dispose of enemy concentrations, that were on the ground and on the map, with an eraser. Who was I to criticise them, hero as I was of a hundred "Chinagraph wars" of make-believe?

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 184
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/16/2018 4:36:32 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
16 October 1918

The British offensive in the area of the River Lys continued to gain ground. By this date, they had reached the river itself and crossed it at several points. The Germans realized that another significant retreat of their forces would be necessary – but where would they fall back to?


Austro-Hungarian Emperor Charles made a last attempt to save a semblance of his Empire. He issued the “Imperial Manifesto of 16 October 1918”, proposing radical changes. The nation of Poland had been literally erased from the map in 1795, its territory divided between Prussia, Russia, and the Austrian Empire. Now the regions of Galicia and Lodomeria, where the majority of the population still considered themselves Poles, were to be allowed to leave the Empire. This would almost certainly mean they would re-establish Polish statehood. Other areas such as Slovakia were to be governed by national councils and allowed to negotiate autonomy.




Attachment (1)

< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 10/16/2018 4:37:43 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 185
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/17/2018 3:42:23 PM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
17 October 1918

The Allied advances in the Flanders sector had now gone far enough to threaten the Belgian coastal ports with encirclement. Unlike the British, the Germans had no chance of evacuating by sea, so they dared not risk being completely cut off. On this day, they abandoned Ostend, the site of the famous naval raids in April and May, and the Allies promptly reoccupied it. Next stop: Zeebrugge, and a setback to the German submarine effort.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 186
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/17/2018 7:45:08 PM   
redcoat


Posts: 951
Joined: 8/31/2005
From: UK
Status: offline

The French city of Lille was liberated by the British Fifth Army on 17th October 1918. On the 28th the Mayor of Lille made the commander of the Fifth Army, General William Birdwood, an honorary citizen of Lille. British troops from the 47th (London) Division paraded through the city.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54ASSiWoGZg





Attachment (1)

_____________________________


(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 187
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/18/2018 3:59:51 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
18 October 1918

The formal reply to the Austro-Hungarian Imperial Manifesto came from U. S. Secretary of State Robert Lansing. In a written response, Lansing stated that, since the Czechoslovakians had declared alliance with the Western powers, simple autonomy for them, and the south Slavs as well, was no longer enough. They needed to be given the choice of independence (which they would almost certainly take.)

At the beginning of the war, Robert Lansing had advocated “benevolent neutrality”, trading with the Allies but not joining the war. He had actually swung against Britain for a time after the imposition of the blockade of Germany. But with the sinking of the Lusitania and eventually the U.S. declaration of war, he had become a whole-hearted supporter of the Allied cause. Now, with this diplomatic note, Lansing had effectively signed the death warrant of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to redcoat)
Post #: 188
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/19/2018 4:30:59 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
19 October 1918

On this date, Belgian troops liberated both Zeebrugge and Bruges. What Admiral Keyes’ naval raids had only partially accomplished earlier in the year, was now complete: neither German U-boats nor surface raiders could take advantage of the shorter distances from the Belgian coast any longer.

It was now only a short distance up the coast until the Belgian forces reached the westernmost border of Holland. A nearly forgotten part of WWI is that, while the Germans never invaded Holland proper, they had problems with Belgian refugees escaping to the north. (This reduced the number of forced laborers they could send to Germany.) They soon constructed an electrified fence dubbed “The Wire of Death” along the border. It is estimated that 2,000 – 3,000 people were killed attempting to cross the fence.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 189
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/20/2018 4:49:56 PM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
20 October 1918

The loss of the ports on the Belgian coast proved to be the last straw for the German U-boat campaign against Allied shipping. Convoy escorts and mines had already reduced the number of merchantmen sunk to a level that made little impact on the Allied war effort, and now the German submarines would be even less effective. Halting unrestricted submarine warfare was one of President Wilson’s demands for armistice negotiations. Warfare by “cruiser rules”, where the U-boat would have to surface, warn the cargo ship, and then wait while the crew evacuated into the lifeboats, would not sink ships at anything like a meaningful rate, and was dangerous to the U-boat besides. The Germans therefore decided to abandon targeting merchant ships altogether, and on this date the orders were sent out.


On this same day, losing no time, the German Government replied to President Wilson's Note, informing him that his proposals were accepted.

_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 190
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/20/2018 7:38:10 PM   
jwarrenw13

 

Posts: 1274
Joined: 8/12/2000
From: Monroe, LA, USA
Status: offline
A small commemoration takes place tonight in Tiger Stadium at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Special (American) football uniforms to commemorate the cancelled football season of 1918 due to many students and faculty at the former military school serving in World War I. I know there is a commercial element to it, but the history behind it is real.

https://lsucreative.exposure.co/commemorating-1918?_ga=2.99143576.706880947.1539993143-1424325679.1532644273

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 191
RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War - 10/22/2018 3:27:27 AM   
Capt. Harlock


Posts: 5177
Joined: 9/15/2001
From: Los Angeles
Status: offline
22 October 1918

An argument can be made that the German navy did more than any other single institution or individual to lose the war for Germany. Their building of a rival fleet of battleships had made them a threat to the Royal Navy and turned British public opinion against them before the war, aiding Britain 's prompt declaration of war with tremendous public support. The fleet had retreated from the North Sea at the opening of the war, allowing the British Expeditionary Force to be rushed to France and there to play a significant part in the failure of the Von Schlieffen plan. The Navy's insistence that the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare could defeat Britain, before the United States could make a decisive contribution to the Allied war effort, had turned out to be disastrously wrong. And now, with the movement for an armistice underway, came the final touch.

Now that the U-boats had been called back, the German Navy would be virtually inactive while the final stages of the war played out. Apparently this was intolerable to Admiral Reinhard Scheer (below). He ordered Admiral Franz Ritter Hipper and the German Naval Staff to prepare a plan for one last great sortie against the British Grand Fleet, hopefully with assistance from the U-boats which would now be available to attack Allied warships.



It is not clear exactly what Scheer and Hipper hoped to accomplish. Radio messaging was not yet sophisticated enough to coordinate significant numbers of submarines, which was the main reason why there were hardly any “wolf pack” attacks against Allied convoys in WWI. An encounter in the North Sea against the reinforced Allied fleet would have been at roughly 2-to-1 odds, meaning no realistic hope of victory. Some have suggested that if significant losses were inflicted on the British they would become more anxious for an armistice to protect the remainder of their fleet and maintain their standing of the largest navy in the world. (The U. S. was building battleships at a great rate, and Britain was too financially exhausted to match the American shipyards.) Others have theorized that it was meant to scuttle the armistice negotiations, which were looking more and more like a surrender to the Allies.

In the event, it would prove to be one of the worst ideas in military history.


Attachment (1)

< Message edited by Capt. Harlock -- 10/22/2018 3:28:12 AM >


_____________________________

Civil war? What does that mean? Is there any foreign war? Isn't every war fought between men, between brothers?

--Victor Hugo

(in reply to jwarrenw13)
Post #: 192
Page:   <<   < prev  3 4 5 6 [7]
All Forums >> [General] >> General Discussion >> RE: Centennial of the End of the Great War Page: <<   < prev  3 4 5 6 [7]
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.137