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RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/2/2018 12:43:45 AM   
mikemike

 

Posts: 499
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From: a maze of twisty little passages, all different
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quote:

ORIGINAL: wegman58

I was at -40 C in NEW YORK! Don't they have mountains in Germany? OK - Alps, but the Adirondacks aren't really high - I thought the Alps were high.


The Bavarian Alps are just over 9,700 feet high, but the Alps are a east-west mountain range, something that does not exist in North America. This normally tends to keep temperatures up, which is why snowfall is a rarity in, for example, Venice, which is at roughly the same latitude as Montreal, or Edina, MN, 45 degrees North.

_____________________________

DON´T PANIC - IT´S ALL JUST ONES AND ZEROES!

(in reply to wegman58)
Post #: 61
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/2/2018 4:26:30 AM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8378
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
Status: online
Why do Japanese cars start at lower temps than American cars?

(in reply to mikemike)
Post #: 62
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/2/2018 12:49:05 PM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 11555
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

Why do Japanese cars start at lower temps than American cars?

I'm not sure that is still the case. When Japanese cars first appeared they generally had small four cylinder engines with small diameter pistons, while American cars had six and eight cylinders which were bigger in diameter. Guess which one is easier for the battery to turn over?

But even the Japanese cars had trouble with the really cold weather in Canada so they designed the battery holder to take a larger battery if needed. Whenever I have to replace my original battery I get the one rated for the most cranking amps that will still fit on the battery tray.

The other original advantage the Japanese had was shifting to electronic ignition rather than the mechanically driven distributor on most NA cars. Distributors wear out the brushes and get dirty contact points that few owners bother to clean, so they had a weak battery and a poor contact for the circuit.

I don't know how much of that still applies, but I am betting (because of the warmer US climate) that NA cars ship with the smallest battery they can get away with. The Japanese were willing to spend the extra $20 or so to put in a better battery and get more customer satisfaction.

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to Lokasenna)
Post #: 63
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/2/2018 3:47:21 PM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8378
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
Status: online
Ah, so it's an old list.

I was going to say - the batteries/ignition systems that I've seen inside Nissan, Chevy, Ford, and Honda engines from model years 1994+ have all been basically identical.

(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 64
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/6/2018 7:17:07 AM   
wdolson

 

Posts: 10354
Joined: 6/28/2006
From: Near Portland, OR
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quote:

ORIGINAL: mikemike


quote:

ORIGINAL: wegman58

I was at -40 C in NEW YORK! Don't they have mountains in Germany? OK - Alps, but the Adirondacks aren't really high - I thought the Alps were high.


The Bavarian Alps are just over 9,700 feet high, but the Alps are a east-west mountain range, something that does not exist in North America. This normally tends to keep temperatures up, which is why snowfall is a rarity in, for example, Venice, which is at roughly the same latitude as Montreal, or Edina, MN, 45 degrees North.


Major mountain ranges tend to be parallel to plate boundaries and the Alps are upthrust mountains created by Africa moving north into Europe. The plate boundaries around North America are mostly north-south. There are some minor mountain ranges that are east-west in NA, the Uinta Mountains that run from NE Utah into Colorado are the biggest.

The San Gabriel Mountains are mostly north-south, but they are crescent shaped and fringe both the east and northern part of the Los Angeles basin.

Yeah, I'm a bit behind. Looks like the east got cold again, though it's a little colder than normal here, it isn't unusually cold for early March. Usually when we have this kind of weather this time of year, it marks the beginning of tornado season in the prairies (cold air coming off the Pacific, crossing the Rockies and mixing with warm Gulf air is what fuels the really strong tornadoes).

Bill

_____________________________

WitP AE - Test team lead, programmer

(in reply to mikemike)
Post #: 65
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/6/2018 11:51:20 AM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 11555
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson


quote:

ORIGINAL: mikemike


quote:

ORIGINAL: wegman58

I was at -40 C in NEW YORK! Don't they have mountains in Germany? OK - Alps, but the Adirondacks aren't really high - I thought the Alps were high.


The Bavarian Alps are just over 9,700 feet high, but the Alps are a east-west mountain range, something that does not exist in North America. This normally tends to keep temperatures up, which is why snowfall is a rarity in, for example, Venice, which is at roughly the same latitude as Montreal, or Edina, MN, 45 degrees North.


Major mountain ranges tend to be parallel to plate boundaries and the Alps are upthrust mountains created by Africa moving north into Europe. The plate boundaries around North America are mostly north-south. There are some minor mountain ranges that are east-west in NA, the Uinta Mountains that run from NE Utah into Colorado are the biggest.

The San Gabriel Mountains are mostly north-south, but they are crescent shaped and fringe both the east and northern part of the Los Angeles basin.

Yeah, I'm a bit behind. Looks like the east got cold again, though it's a little colder than normal here, it isn't unusually cold for early March. Usually when we have this kind of weather this time of year, it marks the beginning of tornado season in the prairies (cold air coming off the Pacific, crossing the Rockies and mixing with warm Gulf air is what fuels the really strong tornadoes).

Bill

We Canadians are doing our best to combat this by sending a lot of really cold bodies down toward the Gulf to soak up the excess heat. No need to thank us!

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to wdolson)
Post #: 66
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/6/2018 2:49:03 PM   
Lokasenna


Posts: 8378
Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson


quote:

ORIGINAL: mikemike


quote:

ORIGINAL: wegman58

I was at -40 C in NEW YORK! Don't they have mountains in Germany? OK - Alps, but the Adirondacks aren't really high - I thought the Alps were high.


The Bavarian Alps are just over 9,700 feet high, but the Alps are a east-west mountain range, something that does not exist in North America. This normally tends to keep temperatures up, which is why snowfall is a rarity in, for example, Venice, which is at roughly the same latitude as Montreal, or Edina, MN, 45 degrees North.


Major mountain ranges tend to be parallel to plate boundaries and the Alps are upthrust mountains created by Africa moving north into Europe. The plate boundaries around North America are mostly north-south. There are some minor mountain ranges that are east-west in NA, the Uinta Mountains that run from NE Utah into Colorado are the biggest.

The San Gabriel Mountains are mostly north-south, but they are crescent shaped and fringe both the east and northern part of the Los Angeles basin.

Yeah, I'm a bit behind. Looks like the east got cold again, though it's a little colder than normal here, it isn't unusually cold for early March. Usually when we have this kind of weather this time of year, it marks the beginning of tornado season in the prairies (cold air coming off the Pacific, crossing the Rockies and mixing with warm Gulf air is what fuels the really strong tornadoes).

Bill


Really?

In Iowa, tornado season was always later in the year. It's warmer in Texas right now, though, obviously... (where Twister was set IIRC) but "Tornado Alley" should be a bit more similar to what I grew up with. While a tornado can really occur at any time, the prime season in Iowa was when you started to see the first big open prairie thunderstorms (the ones that pop up out of nowhere and develop the iconic bow shock pattern) - May through July being the peak. Maybe starting in April if it was particularly warm that year, and running through August or early September. As a kid, it dovetailed so nicely into the start of "hurricane season" that I used to think there were just storm seasons to go along with the calendar seasons.

(in reply to wdolson)
Post #: 67
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/6/2018 8:26:52 PM   
Zorch

 

Posts: 4801
Joined: 3/7/2010
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: BBfanboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson


quote:

ORIGINAL: mikemike


quote:

ORIGINAL: wegman58

I was at -40 C in NEW YORK! Don't they have mountains in Germany? OK - Alps, but the Adirondacks aren't really high - I thought the Alps were high.


The Bavarian Alps are just over 9,700 feet high, but the Alps are a east-west mountain range, something that does not exist in North America. This normally tends to keep temperatures up, which is why snowfall is a rarity in, for example, Venice, which is at roughly the same latitude as Montreal, or Edina, MN, 45 degrees North.


Major mountain ranges tend to be parallel to plate boundaries and the Alps are upthrust mountains created by Africa moving north into Europe. The plate boundaries around North America are mostly north-south. There are some minor mountain ranges that are east-west in NA, the Uinta Mountains that run from NE Utah into Colorado are the biggest.

The San Gabriel Mountains are mostly north-south, but they are crescent shaped and fringe both the east and northern part of the Los Angeles basin.

Yeah, I'm a bit behind. Looks like the east got cold again, though it's a little colder than normal here, it isn't unusually cold for early March. Usually when we have this kind of weather this time of year, it marks the beginning of tornado season in the prairies (cold air coming off the Pacific, crossing the Rockies and mixing with warm Gulf air is what fuels the really strong tornadoes).

Bill

We Canadians are doing our best to combat this by sending a lot of really cold bodies down toward the Gulf to soak up the excess heat. No need to thank us!

How about a Thermal Air exchange program? We Yankees have plenty of hot air.

(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 68
RE: Snow Panic Scale - 3/7/2018 9:24:21 AM   
wdolson

 

Posts: 10354
Joined: 6/28/2006
From: Near Portland, OR
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: wdolson

Major mountain ranges tend to be parallel to plate boundaries and the Alps are upthrust mountains created by Africa moving north into Europe. The plate boundaries around North America are mostly north-south. There are some minor mountain ranges that are east-west in NA, the Uinta Mountains that run from NE Utah into Colorado are the biggest.

The San Gabriel Mountains are mostly north-south, but they are crescent shaped and fringe both the east and northern part of the Los Angeles basin.

Yeah, I'm a bit behind. Looks like the east got cold again, though it's a little colder than normal here, it isn't unusually cold for early March. Usually when we have this kind of weather this time of year, it marks the beginning of tornado season in the prairies (cold air coming off the Pacific, crossing the Rockies and mixing with warm Gulf air is what fuels the really strong tornadoes).

Bill


quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna
Really?

In Iowa, tornado season was always later in the year. It's warmer in Texas right now, though, obviously... (where Twister was set IIRC) but "Tornado Alley" should be a bit more similar to what I grew up with. While a tornado can really occur at any time, the prime season in Iowa was when you started to see the first big open prairie thunderstorms (the ones that pop up out of nowhere and develop the iconic bow shock pattern) - May through July being the peak. Maybe starting in April if it was particularly warm that year, and running through August or early September. As a kid, it dovetailed so nicely into the start of "hurricane season" that I used to think there were just storm seasons to go along with the calendar seasons.


The Western US has a Mediterranean climate, ie there is a clear wet season and dry season (I thought this was normal until I learned how the weather was in the eastern 2/3 of North America. The wet season is longer the further north you go. Seattle gets about 3 months of dry, Portland about 5, and California about 7 or 8. Wet weather almost always coincides with a drop in temperature. Most storms in the North Pacific are born in the Aleutians. We get the atmospheric river phenomenon a few times every winter when tropical weather comes in, but that's a rarity.

Here in Portland the rains usually stop and the weather starts getting warm around early to mid-June, but the joke in Seattle is summer starts July 5. There is some truth to that, I did see rain on the 4th of July when I lived there. The rain doesn't make it over the Rockies, but the jet stream can push the cold front that was associated with a storm over the Continental Divide.

Seattle has a rep for being very rainy, but quite a few eastern US cities get more rain. Seattle gets about 30-35 inches of rain a year and summers are warm (80sF usually with at least one heat wave into the high 90s) and dry. Portland is drier and warmer in the summer. Seattle is very gloomy in the winter though. I believe Seattle has the fewest sunlight hours in the lower 48 and almost all of them are between July and September.

Portland is a little better, we do see the sun some in the winter, but we get pounded with the sun in the summer. My office is upstairs on the SW side of the house. I had to install an air conditioner in the office to supplement the house A/C because with the air conditioner running so much the non-sunny parts of the house were freezing, the office would be 85F. I have thought about putting in solar on that side of the house, we have a long stretch of roof pointing SW.




_____________________________

WitP AE - Test team lead, programmer

(in reply to Lokasenna)
Post #: 69
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