Matrix Games Forums

Forums  Register  Login  Photo Gallery  Member List  Search  Calendars  FAQ 

My Profile  Inbox  Address Book  My Subscription  My Forums  Log Out

RE: Heroes and Leaders mod

 
View related threads: (in this forum | in all forums)

Logged in as: Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Current Games From Matrix.] >> [World War II] >> Lock ‘n Load: Heroes of Stalingrad >> Mods and Scenarios >> RE: Heroes and Leaders mod Page: <<   < prev  6 7 [8] 9 10   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/14/2018 7:08:02 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
When in early 1941 Hitler learned that his earlier order regarding the installation of the long 5cm gun had been ignored, he ordered that it be immediately implemented. Even then, it did not begin to equip the PzKpfw III J until the end of the year. In the desert this AFV came to be known to the British as the Mark III Special. 1067 were built. Beginning in early 1943, 262 PzKpfw III J were converted into observation vehicles (termed Panzerbeobachtungswagen) for Panzerartillerie batteries. The game piece also represents the Ausf M and uparmored versions of the J. A total of 903 were built (Ausf. L and M). Only about 20 PzKpfw III were with the German Pz. battalions that fought in Normandy—and most of these were used as command tanks.
The version Ausf.J was a major upgrade produced in 1941 (482 units), with a lengthened hull and increased armor hull, 50 mmfor the frontal glacis. However, it was the late Ausf.J1 that was first equipped with the new KwK 39 L60, much more effective against Russian tanks. This late version was produced until mid-1942 in 1067 units, giving a total production for the Ausf.J of 1549, by far the most numerous variant of the Panzer III.
The Ausf.J was a real step forward because of its new, slightly larger and redesigned hull, with increased armor up to 50 mm at the front, and the J1 variant received the 50 mm KwK 38 L42 gun right from the start, with a new mantlet. The hull machine gun received a ball mount and the visor was also new.
Although nearly all Panzer IIIs were upgraded with the L42 gun, this medium barrel never gave satisfaction against the superior armor of the Russian KV-1 and thick sloped armor of the T-34. The late PzKpfw III J came just in time for the depleted German Panzerdivisions, which had already lost most of their combat effectiveness. The gun also used longer ammunition, thus reducing their storage from 90 to 84. Most served until 1944.
In October 1941, it was decided to use the standard Panzer III Ausf.J to accommodate a new, smaller radio, without giving up their main gun and firepower, but sacrificing one ammunition rack. 300 of these Panzerbefehlswagen Ausf.K mit 5cm KwK L/42 command tanks were converted and gradually introduced on the front in 1943.
The last Panzer IIIs fought in the Low Countries (Market Garden), Northern Italy (Gothic line), and in eastern Prussia. Perhaps a handful still operational were spread between desperately weakened companies in March-April 1945, like the Steiner Brigade. Others were kept inactive, in operational reserves, in quiet sectors like Norway or Holland, until the capitulation.
The Ausf. J model had a solid 50 mm plate on the front and rear. This additional frontal armor gave the Panzer III frontal protection from many light and medium Allied and Soviet anti-tank guns at all but close ranges. However, the sides were still vulnerable to many enemy weapons, including anti-tank rifles at close ranges.
The Panzer III Ausf. A through D were powered by a 250 PS, 12-cylinder Maybach HL 108 TR engine, giving a top speed of 35 km/h. All later models were powered by the 300 PS, 12-cylinder Maybach HL 120 TRM engine. Regulated top speed varied, depending on the transmission and weight, but was around 40 km/h. The fuel capacity was 300 l in Ausf A-D, 310 l in Ausf. E-G and 320 l in all later models. Road range on the main tank was 165 km in Ausf. A-J, the heavier later models had a reduced range of 155 km. Cross-country range was 95 km in all versions.
With the appearance of the T-34 and KV-1/-2 tanks, rearming the Panzer III with a longer-barreled and more powerful 50-millimetre gun was prioritized. The T-34 was generally invulnerable in frontal combat engagements with the Panzer III until the 50 mm KwK 39 L/60 tank gun was introduced on the Panzer III Ausf. J beginning in the spring of 1942 (this tank gun was based on the infantry's 50 mm Pak 38 L/60 towed anti-tank gun). This could penetrate the T-34's heavy sloped armor frontally at ranges under 500 meters.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 211
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/15/2018 7:01:13 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
With the growing obsolescence of the 5cm tank gun it was decided to convert production of the PzKpfw III to a support role, using the short 7.5cm gun of the early PzKpfw IV with its more effective HE capability. When first introduced the Panzer III Ausf N was issued to the new heavy tank companies, to provide close support for the Tiger tanks (at full strength one of these companies would contain ten Panzer III Ausf Ns and nine Tigers). They were also used by the Panzer regiments in the Panzer divisions, serving with the similarly armed Panzer IVs. Prior to 6/43, ten were allotted to each Tiger Company. Others were used in the PzKpfw IV role, and yet others probably equipped the Pz. battalion included in each of the newly-renamed Pz. Grenadier divisions. A total of 700 were constructed.
The Panzerkampfwagen III Ausf N was the final production version of the standard Panzer III, and the only version to be armed with the 7.5cm KwK L/24 gun. This gun had been used on early versions of the Panzer IV (from Ausf A to Ausf F1), and fired a more effective high explosive round than the long barrelled 5cm gun, as well as being able to fire a shaped-charge round. In 1942, the final version of the Panzer III, the Ausf. N, was created with a 75-millimetre KwK 37 L/24 cannon, the same short-barreled low-velocity gun used for the initial models of the Panzer IV and designed for anti-infantry and close-support work. For defensive purposes, the Ausf. N was equipped with rounds of HEAT ammunition that could penetrate 70 to 100 millimeters of armor depending on the round's variant, but these were strictly used for self-defense.
The 700 Ausf Ns were all produced on the chassis of earlier versions. Three were based on the Ausf J, 447 on the Ausf L and 213 on the Ausf M while the remaining 37 were produced by converting existing tanks when they were due an overhaul.
The increased weight of the 7.5cm gun meant that the spaced armor on the gun mantlet had to be removed. The increased space required for the ammunition meant that tanks based on the Ausf L could carry 56 rounds while those based on the Ausf M could carry 64.
By 1943 the infantry had an effective anti-tank weapon, in the shape of the hand held projectors for hollow charge shells (most famously the Bazooka). From March 1943 the Ausf N was fitted with 5mm thick side skirts (Seitenschürzen). If a hollow charge hit these side skirts, it would be triggered, significantly reducing the threat to the main tank armor.
By 1942, the Panzer IV was becoming Germany's main medium tank because of its better upgrade potential. The Panzer III remained in production as a close support vehicle. The Ausf. N model mounted a low-velocity 7.5 cm KwK 37 L/24 gun - these guns had originally been fitted to older Panzer IV Ausf A to F1 models and had been placed in storage when those tanks had also been up armed to longer versions of the 75 mm gun.
Against the KV class of heavy breakthrough tanks, the Panzer III was a significant threat if it was armed with special high-velocity tungsten-tipped armor-piercing (AP) rounds. In addition, to counter enemy anti-tank rifles, starting from 1943, the Ausf. L version began the use of spaced armor side skirts and screens (known as Schürzen in German) around the turret and on the vulnerable hull-sides. However, due to the introduction of the upgunned and more-armored Panzer IV, the Panzer III was, after the German defeat at the Battle of Kursk in the summer of 1943, relegated to secondary/minor combat roles, such as tank-training, and it was finally replaced as the main German medium tank by the Panzer IV and the Panzer V Panther.
The Panzer III's strong, reliable and durable chassis was the basis for the turretless Sturmgeschütz III assault gun/tank destroyer, one of the most successful self-propelled guns of the war, as well as being the single most-produced German armored fighting vehicle design of World War II.
By the end of the war in 1945, the Panzer III saw almost no frontline use anymore and many of them had been returned to the few remaining armaments/tank factories for conversion into StuG III assault guns, which were in high demand due to the defensive warfare-style adopted by the German Army by then. A few other variants of the Panzer III were also experimented and produced by German industries towards the last phases of the war, but few were able to be mass-produced or even see action against the encroaching enemy forces of the US, UK and Soviet troops.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 212
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/16/2018 5:05:35 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
In 1943, in consideration of experiences at Stalingrad, approximately 100 Panzers III Ausf.M (built by MIAG) were converted by Wegmann into flame thrower tanks or PzKpfw III(FI) or Flammpanzer III or, officially, Sd.Kfz.141/3. They were produced early in 1943 and it took part in the battle of Kursk. Conversion was made by replacing the gun and the ammunition by a projector of flames and tanks of flammable liquid. The projector had a range of 55-60m according the weather. Flammpanzers III in majority were equipped with additional armor-plates of 30 mm mounted in front of the hull. The Sd.Kfz number was changed into Sd.Kfz.141/3 because of the change of armament. The projector made fire through a factitious gun intended to mislead the enemy on true the nature of the tank because the flame thrower tanks were priority targets for the Russian artillerists.
The idea of converting the Panzer III to carry a flamethrower had originated in November 1942, when it was intended to send them to Stalingrad to take part in the street fighting in the city, but none were ready in time. One hundred Panzer III Ausf Ms built by MIAG in Braunschweig were delivered to Wegmann Waggonfabrik of Kassel, who carried out the conversions. The 5cm gun of the Ausf M was removed and replaced by a 14cm flame oil projector, with a barrel 1.5m long. 1,000 liters of flame oil was carried, which was enough for 80 bursts of two-three second duration. The flames had a maximum range of 60 yards, but an effective range of nearer to 40 yards. A 2-stroke auxiliary engine was installed in the hull to power the flame thrower. They were almost identical externally to the regular Ausf.M, but with a 140 mm dummy gun, which concealed the flamethrower. They had additional 30 mm to 50 mm armor plates welded on the frontal part of the hull and glacis, because their range was quite short (limited to 60 m), hence exposing them to dangerous close fire. The two coaxial and hull machine-guns were retained, but they also carried 1020 liters of inflammable oil in two tanks inside the hull. All this additional weight made them the slowest of all versions.
Although the Panzerkampfwagen II (Fl) arrived too late for Stalingrad, forty one were involved in the battle of Kursk, split between the 6th and 11th Panzer Divisions and Panzer Division Grossdeutschland. Each PzKpfw III(FI) platoon had seven such AFV—usually two of which would be attached to a Pz. regiment HQ company when needed. First use was with the 6th, 1 1 th, and Grossdeutschland Pz. Divisions during the battle of Kursk. Flammpanzers III were versed in special battalions made up in theory each one of 30 tanks. The majority were used on the Russian front against the enemy fortifications. These tanks were often given to SS assault squads like that the fighting in Normandy in June 1944.
The Panzer III was used in German military campaigns against Poland, in France, the Soviet Union and North Africa. A significant number were still in combat service against Western Allied forces in Normandy in northern France, Anzio in Italy and in Operation Market Garden in the Netherlands throughout 1944 all the way until 1945. A sizeable number of Panzer IIIs also remained as armored reserves in German-occupied Norway and some saw action, alongside Panzer IVs, in the Lapland War against Finland towards the end of WWII in the fall of 1944.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 213
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/17/2018 7:02:09 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The PzKpfw IV was designed to be a support AFV, providing long range HE firepower. Foresight in design and reliability in use enabled it to be the only German tank to remain in production throughout the war—yet with only some 8,500 being built. The series had a modest be-ginning of only 35 Ausf A, which saw action in Poland, Norway, and France before being withdrawn. 134 PzKpfw IVC were built. The game piece also represents the earlier Ausf B, of which 42 were produced in 1938, and also the Ausf A. Neither model had a BMG. A few of these relics still labored on with the 21st and 116th Pz. Divisions in Normandy.
The Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.A was the first model of production and had already with one or the other detail close the quasi final form of Panzer IV. Indeed the general form, the suspension, the internal and external disposition of elements, the access hatches will change hardly or not during the production. Model A had a frontal plate of upper hull which the left part (that of the pilot) made bulge. Detail which one will find on the models D and E. The cupola of commander moreover made also bulge to the back of the turret. This latter will be relocated completely on the roof starting from the model E.
The suspension included 2 front sprocket-wheels, 8 bogies including 2 pressed steel road wheels with rubber bindings, 8 return rollers, 2 rear idlers and a set of 360 mm broad tracks whose links were molded and constituted of steel manganese. The access hatch to the transmission on the glacis was embedded and screwed whereas the access hatches to the brakes laid out at each end of the width were assembled on hinges. The frontal plate of the superstructure (or upper hull) included a MG34 assembled on ball and a window of vision protected by an armored valve assembled on hinges. To the top of this window two holes were bored allowing the use of a retractable binocular episcope. Two ports of vision were laid out on each side of the superstructure to ensure a side vision the R.O. (Radio Operator) and the pilot. These ports included an armored intern glass and an external armored valve. To reach the front compartment, two hatches assembled on hinges (2 parts opening respectively forwards and backwards). These access hatches were slightly shifted, that of the R.O. being more in withdrawal considering its position in the front compartment and the withdrawal of the right part of frontal plate. Rails anti-glares protect these access hatches as well as the turret. The superstructure was assembled by welding and was bolted on the higher embossing of the lower hull. It overflowed largely on the overhangs of the tracks to be able to accommodate the broad turret ring.
The Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.B is extremely similar to Ausf.A. It differs from this one by its punt frontal plate of superstructure and the abandonment of the machine-gun of hull. The latter being replaced by a port of vision with armored glass and valve and a port of pistol shooting. Another change, the access hatches of the R.O. and the pilot are one-piece type (always on hinges) and open forwards. The shielding becomes also more consequent. On the turret the valve of visions on the frontal part are replaced by a molded armored valve and a new cupola is installed. This better armored cupola has sliding armored lids (5) protecting the ports of vision. Ports of pistol shooting are added on the side hatches and those of the turret back part now are protected by circular valves. A new transmission is assembled on Panzer IV Ausf.B, the SSG76 with 6 speeds.
The Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.C is nearly identical to Ausf.B. The only visible difference of outside is the armored cylinder protecting the coaxial MG 34 and the extension in "L" shape attached to this one to carefully push (behind) the radio antenna when the turret swivels on the right. The most significant change was the adoption of V12 Maybach HL 120 TRM developing 300 hp which became the standard engine of Panzer IV.
In 1939-40, a full-strength PzKpfw IV platoon had 4-6 such AFVs, varying from unit to unit. In 1939 each Pz. company contained only one PzKpfw IV platoon, except for the 1st Pz. Division which had a Medium Company (of 14 PzKpfw IV and 5 PzKpfw II) in its Pz. battalions, and the 1st Light Division which had eight PzKpfw IV per Pz. company.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 214
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/18/2018 6:13:28 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.D although succeeding Ausf.C finds the frontal plate of the superstructure of Ausf.A and the MG 34 of hull. The latter was assembled on ball. As on Ausf.A the port of pistol shooting was in the center on the oblique part of the frontal plate. By the time of the invasion of France the Pz. battalion had been reorganized to have a Medium (PzKpfw IV) Company, although at this time many of them contained only one or two platoons of five PzKpfw IV (and five PzKpfw II) each.
The 75 mm KwK L/24 will be equipped with a new external mantlet. The coaxial MG 34 kept its armored cylinder but the shape in "L" pusher is replaced by a metal framework assembled under the gun in order to push the radio antenna when the turret swivels to the right. In 40-41, Panzer IV Ausf.D will receive additional 20 mm armor-plates simply bolted on the original plates. There was nevertheless a space between the frontal plate of the superstructure and its addition because of the visor of the pilot and the MG 34 of hull.
The tracklinks always broad of 360 mm however had larger guides for the teeth of the sprocket-wheels. This details made there the use impossible for the former models. The shielding hardly varies compared to the preceding model if not that on the sides and to the back it passes to 20 mm.
Logically, the Ausf.D followed. The “Dora” was identified by the reintroduction of a hull machine gun, and the internal gun mantlet was now exteriorized. Side protection was also increased to 20 mm. 243 Ausf.D were built, the last being delivered in early 1940. The “D” was the last “pre-series”. Afterwards, it was decided to scale-up production.
When Fall Weiss was launched (invasion of France, Belgium and the Low Countries), according to Guderian, 278 PzKpfw IV were available. The slow rate of production made it the lesser type for all German AFVs. The 75 mm gun using AP shells was efficient against most tanks, but not against the French B1, SOMUA, and the British Matilda II. But, despite limitations in armor and in armament, the good use of the radio, good training and excellent tactical coordination proved superior in all tank to tank engagements. In Yugoslavia and Greece, there were perhaps 750 Panzer IVs available, although they were still in a minority compared to the Panzer III. Their dual-purpose gun proved invaluable on many occasions, although the terrain proved a serious limitation. By the start of operation Barbarossa, in June 1941, the bulk of Panzer IV force was mobilized, spread into the many army groups and depleted Panzerdivisions that took part in the campaign. They were all of the “short” type. However, against many the encountered AFVs, mainly T-26s, T-28s and light tanks of the BT series, they proved efficient enough, until the prelude of the battle of Moscow, when the first mass assaults of KV-1s and T-34s began. By early 1942, the Panzer III’s main gun had proven inadequate, and the rearmament of the Panzer IV seemed to impose itself as the situation deteriorated. After some attempts with the 50 mm, the natural choice was to go with a longer 75 mm, the KwK 40 L43.
On the back plate, the access to the engine compartment was done via 3 hatches: very broad on the left, narrow in the middle and that of right was assembled on hinges. Let us note that the back plate of the lower hull could be unbolted for more important maintenance or the change of engine. A very imposing silencer in the shape of cylinder (on this same plate) was coupled with the tailpipe of the engine to make this one less noisy. This silencer was surmounted by a smaller model for the traverse engine of the turret. The original engine was Maybach HL 108TR developing 300 hp and making possible a speed on road of 31 km/h. The transmission including 5 speeds was a SRG75. The direction was of clutch-brake type.
The turret ring had a diameter of 1.67 meters and was slightly towards the left and was to 6 cm of the left edge and approximately 33 cm of the right edge. This eccentric position was conceived to place the base of the electric connection of the turret not on the driveshaft. The turret will hardly change throughout the production with share on the level of the shielding and the equipment. The shielding was everywhere of 15 mm. The frontal plate was equipped with 2 ports of vision provided with a valve for the loader and the gunner. Both also laid out each one of a side port on the front part of the turret side. Note that that of the gunner did not have of armored glass and slit of vision on the valve contrary to that of the loader (on the right). Each side on its back part, laid out a broad trap door (only one part) mounted on hinges to access to the turret. The commander for his vision had a cupola (drum type) provided with slits of vision protected by armored panes. The lid (rectangular) of the ventilator was visible in front of the turret top whose armored caps were laid out on each side of the hull. The mounting of the 75 mm KwK L/24 was assembled on a intern round mantlet protected by an external shield. A coaxial machine-gun was assembled to the right of the gun.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 215
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/19/2018 6:46:05 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
After the Battle of Poland and France, the deficiencies of the Ausf. C variant saw it being upgraded on October 1940 to the Ausf. E. Despite the new upgrades, the Panzer IV was upgraded again to refine its detail with the Panzer IV Ausf. F in April 1941. The Ausf.F was a landmark in the Panzer IV evolution and development. The early model, “F”, called “F1” when the next model appeared, was the last of the “short” versions. Still retaining the KwK 37 L/24 75 mm howitzer gun, but with now a full 50 mm thick glacis plate and an increase of side armor to 30 mm, and to the back of only 20 mm (except for the turret). The front bow plate appliqué was now replaced by a full thick armored plate. The tracks is also widened from 380 to 400 mm to balance the increased weight from the Ausf. C's (18 tons), to the Ausf. F (22 tons).
On this model one took again the frontal plate of the superstructure of models B/C but with a MG 34 mounted on ball. The ball mount of the MG 34 of hull is of type Kugelblende 50 (for shielding of 50 mm). Ausf.F keeps the same pilot visor as Ausf.E. The hatches of access to the disc brakes from now on are provided with air intake for ventilation, directed backwards. The shield of the 75 mm KwK L/24 is now thick 50 mm though that having the same form. On the sides of the turret, Ausf.F is equipped with double hatches assembled on hinges (the front section is broader than the back section). The front part (of the double door) accommodates a port of vision provided with an armored glass and an armored valve whereas the back part accomodates a port of pistol shooting protected by a swiveling valve. The opening in the turret is hardly modified by this new system. All these changes appreciably increased the weight of the tank requiring the installation of 400 mm broad tracks and the adoption of new sprocket-wheels. New rear idlers will be also installed (tubular type with 7 branches). On this model a new smaller silencer for the exhaust of the engine was installed. Indeed, the total weight rose to more than 22 tons, which triggered other modifications, like larger track links (from 380 to 400 mm) to reduce ground pressure, and both the idler wheel and front drive sprockets were modified in turn. The F1 was produced to an extent of 479 units, until its replacement in March 1942. The last 42 were modified to the new F2 standard.
The Ausf. F was the main Panzer IV variant during the start of Operation Barbarossa, but was soon found to be terribly outgunned by the appearance of the Soviet T-34 and KV-1 tanks. The short 75 mm howitzer was inadequate to deal with these new tanks at all. All was not lost though, as in the weeks before Barbarossa, a proposal was made to upgrade the Panzer IV with a new gun to increase its firepower, with the new 75 mm Pak 40 anti-tank gun. The resulting gun was the KwK 40 L/43 and upgunned the Panzer IV Ausf. F. The Ausf. F was then renamed to F1 for the variants retaining the shorter 75 mm howitzer, and Panzer IV Ausf. F2 for the variants with the more lethal 75 mm KwK 40 L/43 gun. 437 PzKpfw IVF1 were built. In June 1942 some 200 Ausf B-F1, were present on the Eastern front—although by the time of Kursk in July 1943, only 60 were still in use.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 216
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/20/2018 6:50:46 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The 7.5cm KwK 40 L/43 version was ordered 11/41 as a countermeasure to the Russian T-34 and KV, whose appearance had instantly made the PzKpfw III—the fist of the Pz. division—obsolete since it could neither successfully trade blows with them nor be effectively up-gunned to do so. 200 PzKpfw IVF2 were built, but the game piece also represents about 1,000 of the Ausf G, which is indistinguishable from the F2 in game terms. The British in North Africa referred to this tank as the Mark IV Special. In 1943 the PzKpfw III was no longer capable of being considered a main battle tank in other than name. Consequently, in September of that year the Medium (PzKpfw IV) Company in each Pa. battalion was ordered dropped in favor of equipping all companies in one battalion with the PzKpfw IV, while the other battalion (presumably containing the PzKpfw III) was to be with-drawn to be re-equipped with the Panther. This took quite some time to fully accomplish.
The now largely available Pak 38 L/60, which had been already proved lethal, was supposed to be mounted in the turret of the Panzer IV by Krupp. In November 1941, the prototype was ready, and production was scheduled to start on the F2 standard. But, with the first encounters of Russian KV-1s and T-34s, the 50 mm gun, also produced for the Panzer III, was dropped in favor to a new, more powerful model, built by Rheinmetall, based on the 7.5 cm Pak 40 L/46. This led to the KwK 40 L/43, a relatively long caliber gun, fitted with a muzzle-brake, which reduced its recoil. Muzzle velocity, with the Panzergranade 39, topped at 990 m/sec. It could penetrate 77 mm of armor up to 1850 m. After the first prototype was produced by Krupp, in February 1942, production of the F2 started. By July 1942, 175 had been delivered. However, in June 1942, the F2 was renamed Ausf.G, and further modifications were applied on the production line, but both types were known to the Waffenamt as the Sd.Kfz.161/1. Some nomenclatures and reports also speak of it as the F2/G version.
Production figures for the Panzer IV had been relatively small in size until 1942. From the Ausf.A to F2, only 1209 Panzer IVs (of the “short type”) had been delivered to the Wehrmacht. Subsequently, they served primarily in the infantry support role. However, the bulk of the production (around 7500) was spread in only three variants, The Ausf.G, H and J. These remained relatively unchanged until 1945, despite simplifications of the design. As the Panzer III‘s 50 mm gun was not up to the task against the best Russian mediums and heavies, the main model, carrying the bulk of any Panzerdivision, became the Panzer IV. The former was progressively phased out, and replaced on the production line by cheaper SPGs, like the StuG III.
The G was an improved F2, with armor modifications, including a weight saving solution, consisting of a progressive glacis side armor, thicker at the base. The frontal glacis received a new 30 mm appliqué plate, giving a total of 80 mm. This was largely sufficient against the Russian medium-velocity 76 mm gun and the fearful 76.2 mm anti-tank gun. At first, it was decided to bring only half production to this standard, but Adolf Hitler personally ordered, in January 1943, that the full production would be upgraded, a decision well-received by the crews. However, the weight rose to 23.6 tons, further stressing the limited capacity of the chassis and transmission. Both unit reports and mass-production requirements commanded further modifications. The turret vision port slits were eliminated, the engine ventilation and ignition at low temperatures were improved, and additional racks were fitted for spare road wheels and brackets for track links on the glacis. These acted as makeshift protection as well. A new headlight was installed and the commander cupola was up-armored and modified. The late production versions, in March-April 1943, saw the introduction of side skirt armor (Schürzen) to the sides and turret, the latter equipped with smoke grenade launchers. Most importantly, they received the new KwK 40 L/48, with greater penetration power. After 1275 had been delivered by Krupp-Gruson, Vomag and Nibelungenwerke, plus 412 of the upgunned type, the production shifted towards the Ausf.H.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 217
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/21/2018 7:06:16 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
With 3,774 produced, the PzKpfw IVH was numerically the most important PzKpfw IV and formed the mainstay of the Pz. divisions during the latter years of the war. The Date and game piece also represent about 700 Ausf G which had extra armor bolted onto the hull and superstructure front (the Ausf H itself actually became available during the spring of 1943). An interesting gunnery aid found on the PzKpfw IV, Panther D, and Tiger E, was a rotating ring around the inside circumference of the commander's cupola. This cupola was marked from 1 to 12 like a clock, with further subdivisions also indicated. When the turret was traversed, the ring rotated at the same speed but in the opposite direction, thus allowing the commander to tell at a glance the turret's position relative to the vehicle's axis (some-thing easily forgotten in the heat of battle). In addition, he used it to quickly bring the gun to bear on a target; for this purpose the gunner had a clock scale indicator which he had only to align ac-cording to the bearing given by the commander and the target would appear in his gun sight. A full-strength PzKpfw IV platoon was officially comprised of five such AFV, but the ever-present tank shortage in reality reduced this to four in all but certain favored Pz. divisions.
The Ausf.H was equipped with the new long caliber KwK 40 L/48, and was subsequently registered as the Sd.Kfz. 161/2 by the ordnance department. Other modifications included simplifications to ease production, like the removal of the hull side vision ports, and, later, part sharing with the Panzer III. This was by far the biggest production of the type, with a total of 3774 machines, until its replacement by the Ausf.J, in June 1944. Krupp had received a request, in December 1942, for a new version featuring all-sloped armor, which would have also required a new chassis, transmission and probably engine as well, due to the added weight. However, production started with an upgraded version of the Ausf.G instead. A new headlight was set, a new Zahnradfabrik ZF SSG-76 transmission, new set of radios (FU2 and 5, and intercom). This was necessary in order to cope with the full glacis protection raised to 80 mm, with no appliqué parts. The H now stood at 25 tons in battle order, and maximum speed fell to 38 km/h, but only 25 km/h in real combat conditions, and far less on rough terrain. By the end of 1943, Zimmerit paste was factory-applied, new air filters were fitted, along with a turret anti-aircraft mount for an extra MG 34 (Fliegerbeschussgerat), as well as modifications to the commander cupola. Side and turret spaced armor was also factory-mounted.
Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.H differs from Ausf.G by the standardization of the armoured brackets (on the nose and the frontal plate of the superstructure) of 30 mm and of the final adoption of the 75 mm KwK 40 L/48. The models of end of production will be manufactured with a frontal shielding of 80 mm. The radio antenna is now relocated to the back of the left side of the superstructure in a fixed position. Ausf.H is also equipped with the thick armoured skirts of 5 mm "Schürzen" protecting the sides of the hull (mounted on notched frames) and the circumference of the turret (except with before). On the cupola one could install an anti-aircraft MG 34.
Ausf.H also sees the adoption of the Zimmerit antimagnetic paste applied to the vertical walls. The frontal port of vision of the loader is removed in front of the turret. New lighter sprocket-wheels are also adopted. Certain models will be equipped with any steel return rollers and new rear idlers (moulded). The only point which makes it possible to recognize with all the blows Ausf.H and Ausf.J, is the absence on this last of the silencer in the shape of box of the auxiliary engine (rotation of the turret) present on the left of the back plate.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 218
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/22/2018 5:10:28 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The model subsequent to the Ausf.D was called the Pz.Kpfw V Ausf.A (perhaps due to an administrative error?) although by rights it should have been designated the Pz.Kpfw V Ausf.E. Production of the Ausfuehrung A started in July 1943, after Hitler insisted on upgrading the armor, especially the front glacis. At the same time, a whole array of modifications were performed, including solving most earlier problems. Externally, the main difference was the adoption of a new commander cupola, cast, hemispheric and fitted with an AA ring, with armored periscopes and a swiveling hatch, plus a ball mount for the MG34 mounted in the hull front.. Later versions got a new ball mount for the hull machine gun. The very first Ausf.A was obtained by mounting a modified turret on an unchanged Ausf.D hull. Another noticeable change was the replacement of the gunner’s binocular sights by monocular sights s, which required only one sighting hole in the gun mantlet. Apart from the large back hatch and the cupola hatch, all the other turret apertures were removed.
The armor itself was at first face-hardened, but with the generalization of armor-piercing capped rounds, a March 1943 note dropped this specification in favor of a simpler homogeneous steel glacis plate. The turret sides also proved relatively weak and an alternative turret, the Schmalturm, was soon studied. A forged cupola replaced the cast one in earlier models. On the D-2, the commander cupola was cast instead of drum-type and side armor skirts became standard.
These plates were welded and interlocked for extra strength. The mantlet didn’t prove immune to the late 75 mm M1A1 (late Sherman versions), Russian IS-2 122 mm, and British 17-pdr. The side armor was not sufficient to deal with flanking attacks by most Allied tanks, contrary to the Tiger. Different tactics and 5 mm side skirts (Schürzen) were applied. Zimmerit anti-magnetic paste was applied relatively early, on the late Ausf.D, but dropped in September 1944 due to unverified rumors claiming this paste caught fire. Because of incessant Allied bombings, some precious alloys became hard to acquire. The production of composite armor was thus problematic, the lack of molybdenum, in particular, causing late armor plates to crack easily when hit.
In May 1944, the production of the Ausf.A ceased. 2,200 had been built by MAN, Daimler-Benz, Demag and Henschel. A whole set of modifications took place after deliveries. First, reinforced roadwheels were issued with 24 rim bolts, then Zimmerit coating was applied systematically after September 1943. The Maybach HL-230 received modified blown head gaskets, with copper rings to prevent leakages, as well as a new coolant circulation system, also starting in September. By November, maximum engine rpm was mechanically limited to 2500. Faulty bearings were also systematically replaced. By early 1944, new crankshafts were issued, then a new piston design was introduced. In March came a reduction hand crank starter. Ice sprags, which increased traction on mud and snow, were also issued in mid-1944, a frame for the turret platform and, for some, a centered tow coupling was adopted, like the one on the Bergenpanther. Later, a new monocular gun sight TZF 12a was fitted for the gun and a ball mount for the hull machine gun.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 219
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/23/2018 5:29:46 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Ausf.D was the very first version, produced in January 1943. The first few were called Ausfuehrung A1, later renamed D1 to avoid confusion with the latter series.
The Panther PzKpfw VD was the German answer to the T-34, designed after study of the merits of the Soviet tank—but with typical German complication. Its hasty design and premature commitment to battle made for a most inauspicious debut in the Kursk offensive however; its drive train and suspension were overstrained, while its engine overheated easily and had a tendency to catch fire (all due to the Panther's combat weight exceeding its design specifications by about 8 tons). Indeed, many more were lost due to mechanical failure than were destroyed by Russian guns (116 of the available 192 Panther tanks allotted for the Kursk offensive were in need of repair just 7 days into the campaign). The only units to employ the Panther at Kursk were Panzerabteilungen 51 and 52, forming the 10th Pz. Brigade which was attached to Panzer Grenadier Division Grossdeutschland the morning the offensive began. Of the 184 Panther Ausf. D's fully operational on the morning of 5 July, 1943, (the beginning of Operation "Zitadelle") only 44 would be running a mere 12 days later. This teething problems were partly resolved on the D2.
The first Panther tanks to leave the assembly plants were designated the Pz.Kpfw V Ausf.A. Up to this point, the Germans had utilized a very precise and methodical system for designating vehicle models (Ausf.B followed Ausf.A and so on). However, this changed with the Panther. Indeed, the Ausf.A pre-production (prototype) model was subsequently reclassified as the Ausf.D1, with the Ausf.D production model sometimes being called the Ausf.D2.
The turret of Ausf. D was equipped with the early commander drum shaped cupola which stuck out on the right, fitted with six vision slits, while the turret had side and rear pistols ports. Overall vision was limited. There was a binocular Turmzielfernrhor 12 sighting telescope with 2.5x magnification. The driving window and the MG34 " mailbox " slit on the glacis, the smoke-throwers on the turret sides, the horizontal lower edge of the hull superstructure and the separate storage boxes installed under the back end of the hull. During its production life the Ausf.D was equipped with a new, flatter cupola and a bomb thrower on the roof, operated by the loader.
The hull had one piece hull plates, with all joints stepped and welded. The PzKpfw V Ausf.D also adopted armored metal skirts (schurzen), which became standard to protect the top of the tracks against bazookas, ..., and “Zimmerit” antimagnetic paste to the hull and turret sides, to prevent the adhesion of magnetic mines. The first 20 PzKpfw V Ausf.D were characterized by the early 75 mm KwK 42 L/70. The Panther Ausf.D (apart from the first model) was also fitted with a double deflector brake muzzle on its L/70 gun. Note that there was even one case of a Ausf.D1 with a PzKpfw IV Ausf H turret welded on, used as a command tank within schwere Heeres Panzerjager Abteilung 653 in Russia, during the first months of 1944.
There were 79 rounds, 40 stored horizontally in panniers along the superstructure and 36 stored vertically in bins along the hull sides. Empty-round ejection hatches were fitted in the turret side, and the hull machine-gun was served by a vertical flap. This early model also had turret side smoke dischargers. 5100 machine-gun rounds were stored in 34 bags. The engine was the early Maybach HL-210, and the overall weight was only 34.4 tons. The radio was a FUG-5 ultra-short wave length receiver. Hitler ordered the production to be stopped in July 1943. 600 more rolled of the assembly line until September 4.
The D2 was an upgraded version developed in late 1943 – early 1944 and retro-fitted with Schürzen side skirts (total width was 3.42 m). It had a Maybach HL-230 engine. To complicate version recognition even more, some turret repairs performed at local workshops included the fitting of the new Ausf.A cupola, when the original turret was not entirely replaced.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 220
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/24/2018 5:54:56 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
Most of the Panther D's flaws were eventually rectified (although the later models' engines remained capricious), and in the Ausf G. The panzer force had one of the best tanks of World War II. Its combination of firepower, mobility, and armor made it an extremely formidable opponent. The U.S. Army judged that it generally took five Shermans to destroy a Panther. Although over 2,953 were built, and the 1944 Pz. Regiment establishment called for one battalion each of Panthers and PzKpfw IV (with the Panthers generally equipping the 1st battalion), there were—fortunately for the Allies—never enough to go around. Like the PzKpfw IV, the Panther—in other than favored Pz. divisions—was used in four-vehicle platoons rather than the five called for in the official establishment.
The last production model, the Panther Ausf.G (the denomination Pz.Kpfw V had by then been abandoned at Hitler’s request) made its appearance in 1944. This model contained significant modifications. Indeed the sides of the superstructure were modified to simplify manufacture, and the rear storage boxes now formed an integral part of the hull. The sides of the hull were characterized by the absence of the lower projections at the back ends of the superstructure, present on the D and A models. The armor plating on the sides was increased to 50 mm thickness.
The driver's slit present on Ausf.D and Ausf.A was removed and the driver’s fixed episcopes were replaced by a rotary periscope, much more practical and offering a considerably wider field of vision. New hatches with hinges (with spring openings) replaced the old swivelling hatches on the top of the driving compartment. The ammo boxes placed within the hull overhanging the tracks now had sliding armored walls doors in order to prevent fire hazard. The number of rounds carried increased from 79 to 82. The system for attaching of the armoured skirts was improved. In another notable change, a new mantlet, designed to eliminate the shot trap present on the old model, was developed and adopted by many of the Panther Ausf.G tanks.
The later Ausf.G Panthers included an innovation planned for the proposed Panther II and also adopted by the Tiger II. This was the use of road wheels with elastic steel binding. The Maybach HL 230 P30 engine was also re-worked, to address the serious overheating problems which plagued the early Panthers. A second pump was added to improve coolant distribution, along with improved bearings and cylinder head joints. As a result, reliability improved noticeably. In order to improve power output, it was proposed to change the engine into a fuel injection engine, increasing the compression ratio and adding superchargers. Prototypes were developed and tested but the war ended before production could commence.
The last, best and most prolific version came in the fall of 1943, the Ausf.G. It was the sum of battlefield experience and careful fixing of previous issues found on earlier models. The decision came in May 1943, during a reunion with officers at the MAN factory. There was a whole set of modifications for the hull, retaining an unchanged turret. The main concern was to increase the armor protection. As an example, the hull front glacis was raised to 80 mm. Other changes included the ball mount, suspensions, shock absorber locations, track sprocket, guard, adjustment, motor, fuel system, throttle linkage, brake & transmission, ventilation, floor plates, radio racks, ammo dust covers, electrical equipment, turret drive, both driver and radioman hatch, periscope and seats, steering brakes, external stowage, transmission, rear deck, foot controls, steering gear, clutch linkage, final driven, steering and brake linkages, cooling water heater and thermostat and the tracks. The side sloped mudguard shape was also distinctive. More rounds were also stored, up to 82. However, few changes were dictated with mass-production in mind, with simplified parts and processes, contrary to the late Panzer IV Ausf.H. It was all about excellence on the battlefield.
Production started in March 1944 and lasted until April 1945. Total deliveries were 1143 by MAN, 1004 by DB and 806 by MNH. In November 1944, a comprehensive array of correspondences between the Waffenamt and MAN was turned into a report, asking for a range of late modifications.
These included previously delayed modifications, and new ones, concerning the guards for the exhaust pipes, socket for 2-ton jib boom, handle on the rear turret access hatch, the commander’s cupola periscope mount, air intake cover, periscope observation mount, rain guard over the driver’s periscope and, later, gun sight aperture, jettisonable hatches, debris guard over gap behind the gun mantlet, factory-applied camouflage patterns and multicolored paints applied in patches on primer, to end the Zimmerit coating, infrared searchlight and scope, chin gun mantlet, steel rubber-clad roadwheels, modified ammunition stowage, radiator cooling fans, improved final drives, self-cleaning idler wheels, flame suppressor exhaust mufflers, crew compartment heater, elimination of the rear shock absorbers, an elevated seat for the driver, new instrument panel, defense against poison gas attacks, a cleaner for the gun sight, stencils, a new AA machine-gun mount, modified rear deck, loader’s seat, internal turret ivory paint finishing, rings for attached camouflage. Many of these changes had been previously authorized in the field by the Waffenamt.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 221
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/25/2018 5:37:04 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The PzKpfw M15/42(i) was the final version of the Italian M13/40 series of tanks. It was just coming into service when the Italian Army was disarmed by the Germans, and subsequently about 100 were used against the Allies. The Carro Armato M15/42 was the last Italian medium tank produced during World War II. It was based on the earlier M13/40 and M14/41 medium tanks, and was built with the lessons from the North African Campaign in mind. The tank was meant to be a stopgap until the heavier P26/40 tank could be produced in numbers. It did not serve in North Africa, the theatre in which it was intended to operate, but served in Italy and in Yugoslavia with the German Wehrmacht.
The M15/42 was equipped with a 47 mm M39 L/40 gun wit a 900 m/s initial speed, and a new gasoline 15TB engine developing 192 hp (170 hp in practice). The return to a gasoline engine is the consequence of the decrease of the reserves of diesel of Italy. M15/42 was slightly longer and broader than M13/40. This tank would be 12 centimeters longer than the original M14/41, and would mount a new gun originally meant for the M16/43, a new gasoline engine (the 12 litre FIAT 190 hp SPA 15TB M42, chosen due to a shortage of diesel fuel in Italy at the time) and a new drive. The vehicle, officially known as the Carro Armato M15/42 ("M" for medium tank, the weight in tones (15), and the year of adoption (1942)), incorporated improvements learned from the battles in North Africa; but development of the tank's main gun and ammunition meant that it could not enter production until 1 January 1943, when it was already obsolete. The main armament consisted of an improved version of the 47 mm/L32 main gun, known as the 47 mm/L40. It was mounted in a fully rotating, electrically driven turret, and had an elevation of 20 degrees, and a depression of 10 degrees. The gun was capable of firing hollow charge, high explosive, and armor piercing rounds. The secondary armament consisted of five Breda 38 machine guns (two mounted in the hull, another two in a coaxial mount, and the fifth on top of the tank in an anti-aircraft mount.)
Italy began producing the M15/42 on 1 January 1943, and Only 90 tanks were produced (from 1943) before the armistice in September 1943. After the armistice, Germany confiscated all remaining M15/42s. Under the Germans, a in 1944 an additional 28 incomplete M15/42s were manufactured by the German Army. After the armistice of Cassibile on 8 September 1943, Italian formations from the 135th Armoured Division Ariete II fought with German troops moving to disarm them in Rome. The M15/42s were among the tanks they used in this battle. In German service, the M15/42 fought mostly in Yugoslavia, with 85 tanks being stationed there by December 1944. Most remained in Italy, but in 1944 some saw combat with the 22nd Maria Theresa Freiwilligenkavalleriedivision der SS in Hungary.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 222
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/26/2018 5:53:35 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The PzKpfw P26/40(i) was an Italian heavy tank whose design had been started in 1940 (although by Sept. 1943 none had yet become operational with the Italian Army). The irony of the Carro Armato Pesante P26/40 is that it never saw service with Italian forces, but supplemented the Wehrmacht during the bitter fighting of the Italian campaign, from November 1943 to May 1945. After the Italian armistice the Germans seized the few that had been built and, seeing that it was a fair design with production facilities already set up, they continued its manufacture. Slightly over 100 in all were built, and were used only in Italy. A persistent shortage of engines resulted in about forty being used as static fortifications around the Anzio beachhead and in the Gustav Line. On an initial order of 1200 tanks, only 3 to 5 were built by Ansaldo-FIAT before the armistice of September 1943. However the production will continue in profit of the Germans and a hundred specimens will still leave the lines of assembly. However much will be never operational because of the lack of adequate engines.
It originated from a General Staff (Stato Maggiore) specification of 1939 for a heavy tank with 60 mm of armor, a 75 mm gun, 25 ton weight and a diesel engine. It was called the P26/40, for “Pesante, 26 tons, model 1940”. But, by this time, FIAT-Ansaldo was far from being capable of producing a diesel engine powerful enough, nor found it easy to convert an aviation gasoline engine for a tank. Engine development was very slow, and if by 1940 the design was ready, there was no power-plant available. The first prototype of this tank heavy (Carro Armato Pesante) was drawn in 1940 but was not completed before 1942. On the level of the engine there was a dissension between military staff (Stato Maggiore) which wished a diesel engine and the manufacturers who wanted a gasoline engine. However with at the time no gasoline and diesel engines was able to get the necessary power of 330 hp to propel the 25 tons of the tank. Several armament were tested like an howitzer, a gun 75/18 with short barrel; but finally will be the 75/34 which will be selected for the model of production. The prototypes were equipped with a bow machine-gun of assembled in a barbette which was removed on the model of production. The 75 mm Ansaldo cannone da 75/34 was derived from the Model 37 divisional gun, and had a much better muzzle velocity than the 75/18 (700 m/s). The tank’s role shifted from infantry support to anti-tank warfare, requiring a redesign of the interior as well. Secondary armament comprised, at first, twin 8 mm Breda machine-guns in the hull barbette, and another coaxial. But the twin mount was later replaced by a single machine-gun with 600 rounds.
The crew of 4 comprised the driver and hull machine-gunner/radioman, with the commander/gunner and loader in the turret, which was rather cramped compared to the German standard, with no intercom. The turret had two periscopes (one for the gunner, one for the loader), a radio, a rear two-piece hatch and two sight slits on the rear side slopes. The rear engine deck had three slopes, the central one, equipped with a ventilation grid being larger at the base, and access hatches on the two side slopes. The rear end slope also had the large exhaust grids. The turret design was similar to a larger M13/40 turret, but still too cramped to accommodate a crew of three. In result, the commander was somewhat overloaded. The drivetrain was similar to previous models, although larger, still reliable, but it did not allow high speeds. The armor was a real improvement, despite still being riveted. A 420 hp (310 kW) petrol engine was first tested in 1941, giving an excellent power-to-weight ratio, but was not approved by the army. Eventually, in 1942, the FIAT company succeeded in providing a reliable V-12 SPA 342 diesel, which was eventually adopted.
By 1943, three prototypes had been successfully tested, and a production order for 1200 units was issued. It took a month to gear up, so much so that only a handful of pre-production models made it out of the factory floor at the time of the Italian armistice, in September 1943. The factory was seized by the German military, and production was resumed until 1944. Eventually, only 100 were delivered, and integrated into the Wehrmacht. It was known as the Panzerkampfwagen P40 737(i). The P40 was intended, originally, to support the mediums, with one company of heavy tanks with three medium companies in each battalion. In 1944, the Germans used the P40 in small Abteilungs, like a regular medium tank. But, apart their engagement at Anzio, they saw little action. Eventually, many turrets were re-used in strongpoints which composed the German defensive lines.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 223
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/27/2018 5:09:54 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Tiger (PzKpfw VIE) is probably the most legendary AFV of World War II. At the time of its introduction, its "88" gun—used in a tank for the first time—combined with its heavy armor, made it a most deadly adversary. Indeed, at that time it could rarely be knocked out except by a close-range flank or rear shot—although its great weight, lack of mobility, and poor reliability (due to a very complicated drive train and suspension) diminished its overall effectiveness.
The Tiger of the beginning of production differed from the original model (VK 4501 (H)) by the presence on the sides of the turret of ports of shooting for light weapons, non-skid front mud-guards and a broad canister to the back of the turret. The other difference, it was also equipped with air prefilters "Feifel" to thwart the ingestion of fine dust by the engine. The Tigers sent in North Africa all were equipped with this system and were called Tigers(Tp) (Tp=Tropisch) or tropical Tigers. The filters will not be any more mounted later for reasons of economies.
Mudguards were also installed on the two sides of the hull. 6 generators of smoke of 90mm were assembled on each side of the turret sometimes replaced by launchers of grenade of 90 mm installed on the roof of the tank. The suspension consisted of 2 X 24 wheels of road with rubber bindings.
The Tiger of the beginning of production suffered from different problems which knew all the new vehicles. improvements will be so brought (in the demand notably crews on the battle zones). The most significant was the replacement of the commander's impressive cupola of style "drum" (the episcopes with armored glasses offered only a restricted vision) by a cupola (from July, 1943) with seven episcopes, a swiveling hatch and a support for antiaircraft machine gun, and the suppression of Feifel pre-air cleaners to simplify and relieve the production.
From September, 1943, " Zimmerit's " cover (anti-magnetic pate to prevent the pose of mines) will be applied to the vertical walls. A gun lock was installed on the rear deck of Tiger one month later to maintain immovable cannon during the transit. Both lighthouses placed on the front of the roof of the hull will be replaced by an unique lighthouse mounted on the center of the frontal plate of the superstructure. From the beginning of 1944, the stubbles of shot on the turret will be abolished. These Tigers preserved still the road wheels with rubber bandages, but mostly the outside road wheels were removed in battle zone (in everything 8 road wheels less) to decrease the risks of blocking caused by muds and the snow frozen on the eastern front. The other remarkable fact of the outside, on the mantlet, both holes of the binocular sight of the gunner were protected by an armored block. Tigers which were produced between July, 1943 and January, 1944, was classified in this category and about 470-480 copies of this type were realized and sent for the greater part to Russia. It is necessary to notice that this classification is not absolute indeed the intermediate Tigers presented the characteristics of two periods make difficult their classification.
Tigers were used in in-dependent heavy ("schwere") tank companies and battalions allot-ted as strategic reserves; although the Grossdeutschland had an organic Tiger company (7/43-8/43, and thereafter an entire battalion), as did the SS Leibstandarte, SS Das Reich, and SS Totenkopf divisions (1/43-3/44, 2/43-3/44, 7/43-3/44 respectively). A full-strength Tiger platoon consisted of four such AFV.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 224
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/28/2018 4:58:22 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The final version ("L" represents "late model") of the Tiger I (PzKpfw VIL), with modifications to increase reliability and close-defense. In all, 1,354 Tigers Ausf E were built, with production ceasing 8/44.
Because of the difficulties met by the war industry of Germany and the supply of raw materials or still the more and more urgent need of tanks of replacement, the production of Tiger was rationalized. The most remarkable change was the adoption of new flat road wheels with bandages of steel in an arrangement less complicated with only 16 road wheels by sides. The maintenance of the suspension was largely simplified. Other change, the sight of the gunner which on the previous models was binocular was replaced by a monocular sight with only a single hole on the mantlet.
The latest Maybach HL 210, rated for 650 hp, was envisioned for production. Cooling had to be completely redesigned, and new auxiliary fan drives were added. The engine compartment had to be totally sealed. Air ducts were connected to extraction pipes on the rear of the vehicle, which was ornate by two massive exhaust noise mufflers. Other modifications included the side drive shafts, final drive, brakes, return rollers (abandoned), road wheel arms, torsion bars, disc road wheels, rubber tires, shock absorbers, bump stops, idler axes, and idler wheels, borrowed or copied and adapted from previous designs.
The 100 mm thick turret front plates were angled at 5° from the vertical, but the 80 mm bent side plates were flat, taking the shape of a horseshoe, with the front closed by the upper and lower front plates. The leading edge of the turret roof was a 40 mm thick plate, extending the turret width behind the upper front plate. The cast mantlet thickness was ranging from to 85 to 200 mm depending of the angle.
The eight Tiger I produced in August were sent near Leningrad with Heeresgruppe Nord. They first saw action on September, 16, showing teething problems with their transmission. By December, all these problems were solved, and by early 1943, the monthly delivery rate was reached. With a completely overhauled supply chain, the production rate skyrocketed in January 1944 until May. The orders were reduced by the summer, as the new Tiger II production was set in.
As soon as it arrived on the battlefield in Russia, in the fall of 1942, the Tiger encountered many teething problems. However, once these were cleared by February-March 1943, there was nothing to compare. The Tiger was given the license to kill with impunity, well helped by the clear skies and wide expanses of the steppe. After Leningrad, the first units to receive Tigers were those operating at Kharkov from February to May 1943. After this, the greatest concentration of heavy battalions was prepared for Operation Citadel -the battle of Kursk.
Tactical base units, as defined then, were small independent battalions under army command, the Schwere Panzer-Abteilung (S.Pz-Abt). The first units were organized to comprise 20 Tigers and 25 Pz.Kpfw.IIIs (breakthrough formations). Later, these were re-organized and composed of a battalion commander with three command Tigers, several companies (generally three to four) of three platoons each, each counting four Tigers, and additional support and supply vehicles. An average sPz.Abt. comprised around 45 tanks, and was dispatched for counter-attacks or defending the most difficult spots of the front. Some elite units, favored by the high command, each received a company of Tigers for every regiment.
However, after Kursk (August-September 1943), tactical use changed from breakthrough operations to stopgap defensive actions, intensively moving from the hottest point of the front to another. These units maintained and even far exceeded an astonishing 10:1 kill ratio, until late into the war. Some units were especially successful, like the 13th company, SS-Panzerdivision GrossDeutschland, and the s.SS Abt. 103 and 502. On one occasion, at Kursk on July, 7, 1943, a single Tiger, commanded by SS-Oberscharführer Franz Staudegger (2nd Platoon, 13th Company, 1st SS-LSAH), engaged about 50 T-34s around Psyolknee (south of Kursk salient), used all his ammunition and claimed 22 Soviet tanks, making the rest retreat.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 225
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/29/2018 5:15:03 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
In the autumn of 1943, Henschel proposed to the General Staff the interim solution of installing an add-on curved bow plate on the Tiger I, but the solution was rejected. Henschel’s development plans for the Tiger II were finished before Porsche’s, in February 1943. They presented a stretched-out Tiger hull with an extra pair of roadwheels and sloped front and sides, like the Panther. Commonality of parts with the Panther was also thought of, for better maintenance and cheaper manufacture. The engine was still the same V12 Maybach unit, conventionally rear-mounted. The nine steel-tired overlapping road wheels on each side were sprung by transverse torsion bars, the same system already used for the Tiger I. Maintenance issues from the previous design were fixed based on field reports, most notably that the roadwheels only overlapped, rather than being interleaved like for the Tiger I. Henschel’s mock-up was presented to Hitler on October, 20, 1943 at Orzysz, in East Prussia.
Henschel was awarded the contract for the successor of the Tiger, officially known as the Panzerkampfwagen Tiger Ausf.B (PzKpfw VIBh Tu 88LL HT). Preparations were made for production, and three production prototypes (V1, V2, V3) were built in November 1943. Serial production started in December 1943 at the Kassel plant, an order for 1,500 Tiger IIs being placed. The turret of Krupp was in short simpler and thus easier to produce in mass than that of Wegmann. This significant point coupled with impossibility to produce in mass the electric drive (because of the copper shortages) of Porsche precipitated the choice of the German decision makers in favor of the model of Henschel
The first recorded combat use was registered by Kings Tigers from the 1st Company, 503rd Heavy Panzer Battalion, pitted against British Forces between Troarn and Demouville, on 18 July 1944. On 12 August 1944, the 501st Heavy Panzer Battalion (formerly in Tunisia, but reconstructed in July 1944 at Ohrdruf) participated in defensive actions alongside Army Group North Ukraine, during Operation Bagration. It later took part in the Lvov–Sandomierz Offensive, attached to the 16th Panzer Division, and attacked the Soviet bridgehead over the Vistula River, near Baranów Sandomiersk. On 15 October 1944, the 503rd Heavy Panzer Battalion tanks supported Otto Skorzeny’s troops in taking Budapest (Operation Panzerfaust), to ensure the country stayed with the Axis until the end of the war. Later on, the unit took part in the Battle of Debrecen and stayed on the Hungarian front for 166 days, claiming 121 Soviet tanks, 244 anti-tank guns and artillery pieces, five aircraft and a train for the loss of 25 Tiger IIs. In December 1944, the Tiger II participated in the Soviet Vistula–Oder defense, and in the East Prussian defense in January 1945. Several units also participated in the Battle of the Seelow Heights in April 1945, and the Battle of Berlin thereafter. Most amazing was the deployment in December 1944 for operation Wacht am Rhein (Guard on the Rhine), Hitler’s last gamble to cut the Allied armies in half and throw them into the sea. For this major and totally surprising counter-offensive, Army Group B, under command of Generalfeldmarschall Walter Model, totaled 90 Tiger IIs mobilized with the 501st SS Heavy Panzer Battalion, attached to the 1st SS Panzerdivision, the 506th Heavy Panzer Battalion (sixth Panzer Army), reinforced by the 301st Heavy Panzer Battalion (9th Panzerdivision). One of the more important kampfgruppe commanders was Joachim Peiper, Himmler’s protégé, decorated with the Knight’s Cross. The 503rd was also famous for the world’s top tank ace, Kurt Knispel, that destroyed 162 enemy AFVs and was killed in action on 29 April 1945. Also in Hungary, Tiger IIs participated in the battle of Lake Balaton in March 1945. In total, King Tigers of the 103rd SS Heavy Panzer Battalion claimed approximately 500 kills from January to April 1945 for the loss of all their tanks, abandoned, destroyed after mechanical breakdowns or just for the lack of fuel and spare parts.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 226
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 6/30/2018 5:47:42 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
As the successor to the Tiger the Koenigstiger (PzKpfw VIB) or Tiger II (also known to the Allies as the Royal or King Tiger) was used in the same manner that the Tiger I, but its even greater weight reduced its mobility and reliability to the point where it was effective only on the defense. Its use in the Ardennes offensive was not impressive; its ponderousness impeded the speed of advance across the hilly countryside, and even a minor breakdown could cause its loss through the inability of the recovery vehicles to tow it. The PzKpfw VIB was without question the most powerful tank put on line during the Second World War. This frightening armored monster was equipped with its excellent gun of 88 of a formidable weapon able to destroy any allied tank met on the battle fields of the end of the conflict.
It is from August 1942, at the request of Waffenamt, that a more modern version of the heavy tank Tiger is studied. Indeed the original Tiger was considered design point of view like exceeded with the sight of the new concepts of armored vehicles. The design and the completion of Tiger is finished before the appearance of Soviet T-34/76 on the Eastern front. The use of tilted walls was ballistic point of view a great improvement compared to the vertical walls used hitherto by the Germans, in particular on Tiger. It was thus also decided to develop a heavy tank equipped with these inclined walls to replace Tiger in the battalions of heavy tanks. This new machine was to be able to ensure supremacy for a good period of time on all the existing and future allied models.
Porsche and Henschel were once more put in competition on this project. Very trustful in him and his success, Porsche immediately undertook the construction of a series of 50 turrets (PzKpfw VIBp) developed by Wegmann for his model VK 4502(P). It was hardly careful with the sight of hard realities of the war on the level of provisioning of raw materials. Indeed, Germany at that time was already cut of all and the shortages was frequent. Copper necessary to any electric component did not escape this reality, make impossible the mass production of the model of Porsche. When Porsche was abandoned to the profit of the model of Henschel, the 50 turrets were sent at Henschel to be mounted on the hulls of the model of this last.
This turret had a very rounded front creating a chip trap that could be very dangerous for the front compartment the box welcoming the pilot and his assistant. Another striking feature, the projection produced on the left side by a cupola of commander mounted very left. At the rear the hinged access hatch was embedded in a thick bolted frame. Most Porsche turrets were equipped with a 88-piece tube. Some, however, had a tube in two parts which one or the other was replaced according to wear. Ultimately, this turret was too complicated because of these roundnesses, to produce in mass.
The Pz.Kpfw VI Ausf.B was ordered for July 1943, but the first specimen did not leave the lines of assembly of Henschel before the end of the year. This delay was caused by collaboration with the firm MAN, in charge of the production of the Panther for a maximum standardization of the hardware which was to be interchangeable between Tiger II and Panther II. The production began really only in February 1944 with the first 8 Tigers II (produced with 95 Tigers I). The score desired for the production had been estimated at 145 specimens per month. But because of the degradation of the German industry of war, the shortages, the delays and the hours of machining necessary to the manufacture of a so complex tank, this not very reasonable figure was never reached. If in September 1944, the manufacture of Tiger I were stopped to put all the means at the profit of Tiger II, the best performance never passed the 84 tanks (peak reached in August 44) and fell famously to 25 units in March 1945. Not astonishing that only 489 specimens could be built. Henschel was the only manufacturer responsible for the production of Tiger II. Let us note that the first 50 specimens were equipped with the turrets pre-produced by Porsche. The first Tiger II unit to see action against the Western Allies (the British to be specific) was the 1st Company of Schwerc Panzerabteilung 503.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 227
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/1/2018 4:56:03 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The GSW 3911(f) was a 105mm Howitzer mounted on a modified French Hotchkiss H39 chassis. This Geschutzwagen was armed with one of either the 10.5cm 1eFH18 or the older 10.5cm leFH16. For game purposes, these are identical. Forty-eight of these conversions were produced and were still in action during 1944.
The 10.5 cm leFH 16 gun was a German light howitzer used in World War I. It had a shorter range than the WW2 10.5 cm leFH 18 gun. Its maximum firing range was 9,225m. As the same caliber weapon was used, it could fire the same ammunition. Its muzzle velocity was 395 m/s.
There were a few disadvantages of an open topped vehicle. The crew was exposed to the elements and were also at risk of injury from enemy thrown hand grenades, mortars and shrapnel from air burst enemy shells. Rain covers were produced. They covered both the crew compartment and the gun. The canvas was attached to the upper protective armor using the small D shaped rings welded to the upper part of the structure.
Because the French Hotchkiss H39 tank chassis was small, there was limited space for the storage of ammunition. Only thirty six 10.5 cm HE two part shells could be carried. The propellant charges were kept on the left of the vehicle whilst the projectile shells were stored on the right.
Shells were carried in the crew compartment via the rear of the vehicle. There were two large hinged armored doors with a small protruding metal step ladder underneath them at the back.
When the ammunition supply lorries reached each battery they would unload two different types of packing boxes. The propellant charges, that looked like giant tin cans, were transported in protective wooden hinged boxes. The front projectile part of the shell was wrapped in its own individual open wooden crate
A MG 34 machine gun was attached to top right side of the armor casement, on a swivel mount. Spare ammunition 50 round drums were stored underneath the mount. It fired 7.96 mm bullets.
Putting the 10.5cm leFH 18 howitzer on top of the Hotchkiss tank chassis was a more efficient use of manpower from the traditional form of German artillery battery transportation. Even in WW2, horse power was still widely used although tracked vehicles were also used when available.
At least twenty four 10,5 cm LeFH 16 and 10,5 cm leFH 18 (Sf.) auf Geschutzwagen 39H(f) self-propelled guns went into action in Normandy in June 1944. They were part of the German Army assault gun battalion Sturmgeschuetz-Abteilung 200, of the 21.Panzer-Division. The last ones were knocked out when they were caught in the Falaise Pocket and subjected to intense bombing, shelling and gun fire in August 1944.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 228
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/2/2018 5:50:39 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Wespe was officially called “10.5 cm Leichte Feldhaubitze 18 auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II” by the Wehrmacht, but known by every foot soldier as the “Wespe” (“Wasp”). This self-propelled artillery was the most famous and durable in service in the German Army throughout the war, but not the most produced. The Wespe (PzA II) consisted of a field howitzer on a much-modified PzKpfw IIF chassis.
The withdrawal of Panzer II as of 1942 of the units of combat of Panzerdivisions represented an excellent advisability to provide to all kinds of anti-tank weapons or other pieces of artillery a mobility which was missing to them. Moreover the chassis of Panzer II was produced in very great number, more than the real number of completed tanks. Wespe based on the chassis of Panzer II is included in this category of weapons, more precisely in that of mobile armoured artillery or Panzerartillerie. The German field artillery was primarily made up of the light howitzer of 105 mm and of the heavy howitzer of 150 mm. The last will be assembled on a hybrid chassis of Panzer III/IV (GW III/IV) to give rise to Hummel. For the light howitzer of 105 mm, the chassis of Panzer II was thus selected since it was abundantly available and very powerful. Alkett carried out the design of this motorized howitzer towards the semione. It was thus armed with the leichte Feldhaubitze 18/2 of 105 mm and was indicated officially leichte Feldhaubitze 18/2 auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II (Sf) Wespe (Wasp) and accepted the material number of Sd.Kfz.124. It was equipped with piercing projectiles in the event of bad meetings.
Wespe was equipped with 300 mm broad trakcs (108 links per track). The power plant was standard model assembled on Panzer II Ausf.F made up of the six-cylinder (gasoline) Maybach HL 62TR developing 140 hp and of the gear box ZF Aphon SSG46 (forward: 6 speeds - reverse: 1 speed). Like Panzer II Ausf.F, Wespe embarked 170 gasoline L in two tanks what allowed it an autonomy of 220 km. Wespe could reach on road the 40 km/h.
Wespe was produced by FAMO with 676 specimens although an initial order envisaged 1000 machines of this type, between February 1943 and July 1944. The first specimens realized will be versed in the motorized artillery batteries of Panzerdivisions as of spring 1943. A battery was made up in theory of 6 Wespe and 2 Ammunition Wespe. Two batteries of six Wespe each were usually allotted to a Panzer division.
The biggest part of the Wespe production went on the Eastern Front and the first Panzerartillerie Abteilung equipped with this vehicle appeared in March 1943. They saw extensive service alongside the Hummel. A great number was used in particular at the time of the battle of Kursk during July 1943, his first and major action, and then in all three Eastern fronts groups. They were so successful that, after reading reports, Hitler ordered all other conversions based on the Panzer II chassis to be stopped and all work to go on the Wespe. By the summer of 1944, some Abteilungen were sent to Normandy as reinforcements. They fought in Italy as well, taking part in the pounding of Allied forces in the Anzio pocket and defending the Caesar and Gustav lines. No less than 36 Panzer divisions, including SS and special units, received Wespes, seeing active service on all fronts after 1943.
The authorised establishment of the Panzer Artillery Regiment of the Heer Panzer Division that took part in the Battle of the Bulge, Ardennes Offensive in December 1944 had three Abteilungs (Battalions). By March 1945, 307 were still in service. The crews praised its reliability and mobility, but despised the lack of protection, both in thickness and height. The fighting compartment was also very cramped. The loaders working at the back end of the superstructure were the most exposed.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 229
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/3/2018 5:26:05 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The PzA III/IV or Hummel (German: "bumblebee") used the same PzKpfw III/IV chassis as the Nashorn, but mounted a heavy field howitzer. The full name was Panzerfeldhaubitze 18M auf Geschützwagen III/IV (Sf) Hummel, Sd.Kfz. 165. On February 27, 1944, Hitler ordered the name Hummel to be dropped as it was deemed inappropriate for a fighting vehicle. It was used by the German Wehrmacht during the Second World War from early 1943 until the end of the war.
Towards the end of 1941, the need for support vehicles of artillery was felt. It was a question to provide the front units, with a mobile vehicle of artillery. In July of 1942, a powerful howitzer, the 150 mm sFH 18 L/30 (without muzzle break) was assembled on a special chassis produced by Alkett, Geschützwagen III/IV. This chassis combined components of PzKpfw III (Ausf J - engine, pump of gasoline and steering mechanism) and PzKpfw IV (Ausf.F - suspension). The chassis of Panzer IV was slightly lengthened, to provide a vaster compartment of combat to the back and the engine was placed in the center. One of the defects of Hummel was its low storage capacity of ammunition (18 rounds). To compensate, a carrier of ammunition on the basis of Hummel was built (roughly 157). It was about disarmed Hummel provided with additional ammunition boxes and whose station of combat was covered with an armor-plate of 10 mm. Munitionsträger Hummel could still be reconverted in Hummel so necessary. At the beginning of 1944, the front compartment of pilot was reorganized and increased. The exhaust was also modified.
In the beginning, Hummel (bumblebee) was to be only one temporary solution while waiting for that a more specific chassis is developed. Hummel with its open superstructure offered only little protection to its crew against the bad weather and fire of enemy. Another defect Hummel did not have a machine-gun of hull, thus a traditional MG34 or MG42 was transported inside of the compartment of combat for local defense. Hummel had in more one high silhouette which made an easy target of it.
First Hummels were produced towards the end of 1942 by Alkett and Deutsche Eisenwerke. Their production finished in 1944 with a total of 714 specimens produced like 150 Munisionsträger Hummel (produced by Deutsche Eisenwerke, 1943-1944). February 27, 1944, Hitler ordered the abandonment of Hummel which it considered inadequate like fighting vehicle.
First Hummels (8) entered in service in March of 1943 follow-ups by 46 other specimens in April. They will know their baptism of fire at the time of the operation "Zitadelle" (Citadel), in Russia, during the summer 1943, with 100 specimens. A Pz. Division was usually allotted one battery of six. Hummels were versed in Panzerartillerie Abteilungen of Panzerdivisions of Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS. Each battery consisted of six Hummels and a Munitionsträger Hummel. Hummels will remain in service until the end of the war. Although being a temporary solution, Hummel proved to be a very useful weapon but numbers some too restricted to be really effective.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 230
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/4/2018 6:11:31 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
There were two main types of self-propelled guns in the German Army during WW2. One was fitted with an anti-tank gun and the other with an artillery howitzer, like the 15cm s.FH 13/1 (Sf) auf Geschützwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f) Sd.Kfz.135/1. The vehicle fitted with the artillery howitzer was called a ‘Geschützwagen’, which is literally translated as a ‘gun vehicle’. The letters ‘SF’ stand for ‘Selbstfahrlafette’ – self-propelled carriage. The letter (f) indicates that the chassis was of French origin. The PzA LrS(f) was a World War I German howitzer mounted on the French Lorraine Schlepper. It was first issued to the Afrika Korp's 21st Pz. Division. 94 were built. Its normal ammo stowage was only eight rounds.
Improvised self-propelled artillery guns were developed to enable fast moving attacks to have artillery support that could keep up with the speed of advancing Panzer Divisions. They could use direct fire mode at targets they could see or, more commonly, use indirect fire at targets plotted on a map. They were not designed to be in the front line or engage in combat with tanks. They were motorized artillery guns that could fire high explosive HE shells over the heads of friendly troops. Most targets would have been given to the crew as map grid references by forward observation officers or infantry units under attack.
Putting the 15cm. FH 13/1 howitzer on top of captured French Army Lorraine 37L tracked armored transporter chassis was a more efficient use of manpower from the traditional form of German artillery battery transportation. Even in WW2, horse power was still widely used although tracked vehicles were also used when available.
On the 23rd of May 1942, Hitler attended a demonstration of newly constructed, self-propelled guns, where captured enemy vehicles had been converted to carry artillery howitzers and anti-tank guns. A decision was made to build 160 Selbstfahrlafette (self-propelled guns) based on the Lorraine 37L Schlepper tractor. Sixty would carry the 10.5cm leFH howitzer, forty would carry the 15 cm sFH 13 howitzer and sixty would be armed with the 7.5 cm Pak 40 anti-tank gun. This conversion was intended for North Africa. In July 78 chassis approximately were available and Keitel held 30 of them to be equipped with 15 cm sFH whereas the remainder were to be useful for Panzerjäger Marder I. The mounting of this weapon was very heavy and overloaded the chassis somewhat but the machine generally was very appreciated and effective.
These machines were versed in Panzerartillerie Abteilung of the 21st Pz-Division in North Africa. The initial batch of thirty Alkett built 15 cm s.FH 13/1 (Sf) auf GW Lorraine Schlepper(f) sent to North Africa was divided up between three different Panzer Divisions. Twelve were going to be sent to the 21st Panzer Division. Another twelve were going to be sent to the 15th Panzer Division and the remaining six were to be issued to the 90th Leicht Division. After the German withdrawal of Africa, they were still 54 in service at the beginning of 1944 on western front. A new batch of sixty 15 cm s.FH 13/1 (Sf) auf GW Lorraine Schlepper(f) was built in France in the summer of 1942 by Baukommando Becker for the “Schnelle (quick) Brigade West”. By June 1944, only had twelve 15 cm s.FH 13/1 SPGs it was issued with in 1942. They went into action in Normandy in June 1944. Six were issued to the 6th Battery, 2nd Battalion (II. Abteilung (sf)) and six were issued to the 9th Battery, 3rd Battalion (III. Abteilung (sf)). The Panzer-Grenadier-Regiment 125 had six 15 cm s.FH 13/1 SPGs and the Panzer-Grenadier-Regiment 192 also had six. The last ones were knocked out when they were caught in the Falaise Pocket and subjected to intense bombing, shelling and gun fire in August 1944.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 231
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/5/2018 6:29:30 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The StuG 75/18(i) was the Italian Semovente M42 75/18 (the assault gun version of the M15/42 tank). The Semovente 75/18 was an Italian self-propelled gun of the Second World War. It was built by mounting the 75 mm Obice da 75/18 modello 34 mountain gun on the chassis of a M13/40, M14/41 or M15/42 tank. The first 60 were built using the M13/40 chassis and a subsequent 162 were built on the M14/41 chassis from 1941 to 1943, when the M15/43 chassis were introduced. The Semovente 75/18 was intended to be an interim vehicle until the heavier P40 tank could be available.
After the Italian surrender in 1943, some 131 Semovente 75/18 were seized by the Germans and the production of another 55 was authorized. They were, in combination with other Semovente models, issued to 12 divisions (9 infantry, one mountain, one Jäger and one Grenadier) and 3 assault-gun brigades as well as to the 12th SS Polizei Panzer Company. All units were intended for service in Italy or the Balkans. They were designated StuG M42 mit 7,5 KwK L 18(850)(i). In the aftermath of the Italian surrender in November 1943, the Semovente 75/18 replaced the much-needed StuGs in the same role. The most heavily equipped unit being the Austrian 22nd SS Volunteer Cavalry Division Maria Theresa and one Gebirgsdivision soldiering in Northern Italy and the Balkans. The last Semoventes saw action until the capitulation of all German forces in Italy.
With the StuG, the Germans had devised a way to assist infantry with motorized artillery fire at divisional level, mostly due to General Guderian’s ideas before the war. Following the French campaign, an artillery colonel of the Regio Esercito was impressed by the StuG and lobbied for the production of a similar vehicle, based on an existing chassis. This man was Sergio Berlese, who had designed the successful Obice da 75/18 mod.34. Under his supervision, a prototype was quickly built at FIAT, and delivered for trials in February 1941. It was based on the latest M13/40 chassis. After successful trials, the Army ordered a first batch of 60 Semovente da 75/18s, to be delivered before mid-1941. However, it was not before January 1942 that these machines saw action in North Africa.
Despite its limitations (namely its cramped interior and the insufficiently powerful engine in the M40 and M41 variants), the Semovente 75/18 proved successful both in the direct support role and in anti-tank fighting; its main advantages, other than their sheer firepower, was in its thicker armour (relative to the medium tanks) and lower silhouette that made it more difficult to hit. Due to these features, the Semovente 75/18 has been regarded as the only Italian armored fighting vehicle to be seriously feared by Allied tank crews, and despite the fact that it was originally conceived for a totally different role, the 75/18 often ended up replacing the standard M13/40. However, it was never employed en masse, and the low number of Semoventi on the field (no more than 30 at the time of the Second Battle of El Alamein) was not enough to turn the tide in Italy's favor. In 1943, production shifted to the M42 variant, with the M15/42 tank chassis and engine. It was also decided to address the shortcomings of the M14/41 tank by bolstering each unit with some Semoventi, even outside the three armored divisions fielded, even though very few Italian divisions actually received any. The necessity for a longer and more powerful gun led to the development of the 75/34, 75/46 and 105/25 self-propelled guns.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 232
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/6/2018 5:29:59 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
In September 1943 the Italians signed an armistice with the Allies, ending hostilities and bringing to end their alliance with the Germans. The Germans quickly took control of northern Italy and the Italian arms industry. Many captured vehicles and we quickly put into service fighting in Italy, as well as in the Balkans against Tito’s Partisans. The Germans quickly assessed the state of Italian vehicle production and soon put the choice fighting vehicles back into production, including some new designs that had not yet seen service in the war. The Semovente 75/34 was an improved vehicle armed with the new 75/34 gun and based on the M15/42 hull with the more powerful petrol engine. The StuG 75/34(i) was the same vehicle as the StuG 75/18(i), but using the same gun as the PzKpfw P26/40(i). It was an Italian design that had not yet become operational when the Germans seized control of Italy. The Germans continued its manufacture, with 116 eventually being built, plus another 11 using the chassis of the StuG105/25(i). The StuG 75/18(i) and StuG 74/34(i) were the most common Italian AFV in German service in both Italy and the Balkans. In December 1943 they were in service with six infantry divisions, two panzer divisions, three Panzergrenadier divisions and one Gebirgsdivision in Italy and the Balkans. By 1944 most were supporting Infantry, Gebirgs, Jäger or Fallschirmjäger Divisions.
Because of delayed production, lack of manpower and training time, only a few were used by Italian troops in Italy before the 8th September Armistice.After armistice of September 8, 1943, the Germans captured 36 Semoventi 75/34 M42M. However the production continued on behalf of Wehrmacht and 80 specimens of StuG M42 M 851 (i) were still produced between on September 9 and on December 31, 1944. Still let us note that the Ansaldo firm equipped 29 M43 (or M42T) hulls with a gun da 75/34 which was used by the Germans under the name of StuG M43 mit 75/34 851 (i). Only one specimen of Semoventi 75/34 M42M was used by the RSI (gruppo squadroni corazzati San Giusto). They also ordered a second production run, which lasted until 1944, with 80 more SPGs being turned over. In German service these were called Sturmgeschütz M42 mit 75/34 851(i).
The Italians were in major part very satisfied with the anti-tank behavior of Semovente 75/18 M40 or M41 but made the decision however to improve it by replacing the gun da 75/18 by the gun da 75/34 in June 1941. However this gun not being yet operational, it was decided to install on the prototype based on the chassis of Semovente M41 the gun da 75/32 modello 37. Esercito was hardly filled with enthusiasm by this temporary solution and in October 1942 ordered to Ansaldo to mount the gun da 75/34 on the hull of Semovente M42 (similar to Semovente da 75/18 M40 or M41 but based on the chassis of the medium tank M15/42). Semovente da 75/34 M42M (M for Modificato) was accepted on April 29, 1943 and an order of 280 specimens had placed. The first vehicles left the lines of assembly in May 1943. In July 1943,93 specimens had been produced and 60 already delivered to their units. The gun of 75 mm L/34 had a muzzle velocity of 557 m/sec and a maximum range of 12500 m.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 233
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/7/2018 5:27:43 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Ansaldo 105/25 M43, also known as Semovente 105/25, was an Italian self-propelled gun used during World War II and designed by Fiat-Ansaldo. It was the most powerful self-propelled gun built by Italy during World War II.
The StuG 105/25(i) was the Italian Semovente M43 105/25, of which 26 were confiscated from the Italian Army in Sept. 1943. The Germans subsequently continued its manufacture, with 91 more being built in 1943-44. They were used only in Italy and the Balkans. It was designated StuG M43 mit 75/34 (851) (i) by the Germans.
Designed by Ansaldo, the version mounted the 75/34 Mod. S.F. gun used on the semovente 75/34 M42M. It was only employed by the German army. The armistice came after only 30 of these vehicles were built.
Only 5 gruppi (DC, DCIst, DCIInd, DCIVth and DCVth gruppi) of 12 Semoventi could be formed before armistice of September 8, 1943. Only DCIst and DCIInd based at Nettunia had their complete equipment. The first took part in the defence of Rome on September 9, 1943 within the 235th Reggimento Artiglieria Corazzata Ariete II.
The days following the armistice, these Italian SPGs saw action with the 135ª Armored Division “Ariete II”, against German troops near Rome. However, the factory and all vehicles were later taken over by German forces, and the Semovente 105/25 was renamed Sturmgeschütz M43 mit 105/25 853(i). The production line was reactivated and 60 more of these were delivered until 1944, for the German forces. Most were used for the defence of the Gothic line and some were passed on to the Italian forces of the puppet republic of Salo, and stayed in service until May 1945 in northern Italy. The Semovente 105/25 was nicknamed “Bassotto”, and the crews generally liked it. It was the most heavily armed SPG in Italian service, presented a low silhouette, and was well protected and reliable. Surviving German vehicles ended stripped of their main guns, which were recycled into the Alpine Valley bunkers. Bassotto will also furnish strength of Squadrone Comando of the gruppo corazzato Leoncello between February and April 1945 in Polpenazze but was never used in the combat.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 234
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/8/2018 5:24:27 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Sturmpanzer IV ( StuPz IV), dubbed the Grizzly Bear or Brummbaer, was designed in light of experiences at Stalingrad, where the smaller-caliber assault guns had been only marginally effective against well-fortified buildings.
At the beginning of 1942, Alkett with Krupp was commissioned to carry out new Sturmpanzer. Alkett was to design a tilted superstructure armed with the assault howitzer of 150 mm StuH 43 L/12 (developed by Skoda for the assault gun sIG 33). This superstructure was to be assembled on standard chassis of Panzerkampfwagen IV modified by Krupp. The vehicle was officially designed (Sd.Kfz.166- Sturmgeschütz IV put 15 cm StuH 43).
In March 1943, the first six specimens were carried out and towards the end April, 40 others were produced. The 14 last will be carried out in May 1943, to satisfy the initial order. The mass production was to begin in May 1943, but the first vehicles were delivered only as from November of 1943 because of a delay of delivery of chassis. From December 1943, a new version of the 150 mm, lighter, StuH 43/1 L/12 will be installed and the superstructure reduced to gain weight. The same month the production of the second series began and 80 specimens were built. The position of the pilot had been worked over again but the big problem of Sturmpanzer IV, the weight had not been truly corrected. In January 1944, Sturmpanzer IV was officially baptized Sturmpanzer IV Brummbär (Grizzly). The production continued until March 1945 and one third and fourth series were produced with a total of 166 specimens. The last models or Abschlusserie were equipped with a MG 34 of hull assembled on ball (Kugelblende 80 mount for shielding of 80 mm) mounted on a bulge in the left higher corner of the frontal plate of the superstructure. The collar of the gun was also modified, a cupola coming from StuG III Ausf G (with support for anti-aircraft MG 34 ) and Schürzen will be also installed and the antimagnetic paste Zimmerit used. These vehicles was smaller than the models of origin.
Sturmpanzers were versed in Sturmpanzerabteilungen composed with 45 Sturmpanzers accompanied by 85 other vehicles and 611 officers and soldiers. The first unit was formed in April 1943. Sturmpanzerabteilung 216 was transferred in the area from Amiens in France to ensure the training of the crews. The unit was sent on June 10, 1943 on the Eastern front and known its baptism of fire within the 656th sPanzerjäger as an element of the group of army Mitte (center) at Kursk (summer 1943). The majority of Sturmpanzer IV of early production will be lost at the time of the battle of Kursk salient like in Kharkov and Dneprstroy. After Kursk, the unit will be reconstituted and returned to the combat in September 1943. Sturmpanzerabteilung 216 fought in Russia until mid December 1943, and will again be returned to Germany to be reconstituted. In February 1944, the unit will be transferred in Italy, in the area of Anzio and Nettuno. The 216 remained Italy until April 1945, when the last Brummbärs were destroyed by their crews close to Lake Garda.
Sturmpanzerabteilung 217 was formed from April to June 1944 in Grafenwohr. In July 1944, it was sent in Normandy to the south-east of Caen. A part was destroyed in Falaise, and survivors withdrew in Holland and took part in the defense of Aachen. Sturmpanzerabteilung 217 also took part in the offensive in the Ardennes (winter 44-45). The 217 made finally rendering in Rhür in April 1945.
In August 1944, two independent companies were formed, Sturmpanzer-Kompanie z.b.V. 218 and Sturmpanzer-Kompanie z.b.V. 2/218. These two companies were equipped with 10 Brummbärs each one. The 218 was sent in Warsaw on August 13 within the combat group of Reinefarth and was opposed to the revolt of the city. The unit remained in Poland and was to again form in theory part of Sturmpanzerabteilung 218 from which the constitution had begun in January 1945. However a new Soviet offensive put at evil the company and the remainders of the unit were versed in Kampfgruppe Grossdeutschland.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 235
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/9/2018 5:33:56 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Sturmtiger, known as the Sturmmorser (assault mortar), Sturmpanzer VI (assault tank VI), Sturintiger or Sturmmörser (assault mortar), owed its existence to Hitler's requirement of August 1943 that the 38cm naval anti-submarine rocket launcher Gerrit 652 be mounted on the Tiger I chassis. At the beginning the gun of 210mm was chosen, but there was not model which can be appropriate for such a conversion. Its complete denomination is 380mm Mörser RW 61 auf Sturmtiger (mortar of 380mm Type 61 on assault chassis of Tiger). The idea was to create a more potent version of the Sturmpanzer IV, which had just entered service. It was intended to provide for the needs of Wehrmacht seriously abused in the streets of Stalingrad and other Russian cities transformed into fortresses. The huge mortar required a special crane fitted on the vehicle roof for loading the rounds that weighed 726 lbs. each; only 13-14 were carried. A. special shape-charged round was available for use against fortifications.
October 20, 1943, the first model of Sturmtiger was presented to Hitler and in August 1944, the mass production could begin. Alkett used the chassis of 10 Tigers of late production to carry out the first models in Berlin-Spandau, the superstructures were manufactured by Brandenburger Eisenwerke. For its use against fortified positions and gatherings of troops, Sturmtiger was strong armored. If the suspension, the transmission, the engine and the hull into general were those of the Tiger, an imposing armored superstructure was assembled to the front one. This one consisted of welded rolled armor-plates. The side plates (80mm) were encased with that of front (150mm) and that of behind (also 80mm). A thick tape still reinforced the outside of the joint between the frontal plates and the glacis.
The crew of Sturmtiger was composed of 5 men: the commander, the pilot, the gunner and two chargers. The projectiles used by Sturmtiger were with hollow-charge and explosive with great power. The R Sprenggranät 4581, gauges 380 had a total length of 1.42m and weighed 345kg. The maximum range of shooting of Sturmtiger was of 5670m. The armament of Sturmtiger was supplemented by a MG34 assembled on ball being on the frontal plate to the right of the rocket launcher. To evacuate the smoke at the interior of the station of combat a ventilator was laid out on the roof.
Sixteen to eighteen Sturmtiger were completed between August and December 1944. Two were used in the Warsaw Uprising during August 1944, but most entered service long after the need for siege vehicles had ended. Sturmtigers were versed in three Panzer Sturmmörser Kompanien (PzStuMrKp)-1000, 1001 and 1002 were especially used on the Western front. With the origin each company was to be equipped with 14 Sturmtigers, but because of the very limited production the number was limited to four per company (two by group). The first company, PzStuMrKp 1000, was formed on August 13, 1944, was followed of PzStuMrKp 1001 in September and PzStuMrKp 1002 in October-November. Sturmtigers will be used for the first time in Warsaw, August 19, 1944, where two vehicles were used during the revolt of the city in street battles. PzStuMrKp 1000 and PzStuMrKp 1001, had a total of seven Sturmtigers, and were sent to the West to take part in the ultimate German offensive in the Belgian Ardennes. These units went into action west of the Rhine in March 1945 against U.S. and British troops, later retreating across the river into the Ruhr area. They took part in the battle on the German territory in 1945, and were used for the final defense of the Reich.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 236
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/10/2018 5:21:49 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The Ferdinand (PzJg Tiger), also known as the Elephant, was a conversion of the 90 Porsche I Tigers—which had not been accepted for production. The Ferdinand (his name was in homage to its designer Ferdinand Porsche) was one of the most imposing realization of the German war industry. Its complete appellation was Panzerjäger Tiger(P) Ferdinand mit 8.8cm Pak 43/2 then Jagdpanzer Tiger(P) Ferdinand mit 8.8cm Pak 43/2 L/71 (Sd.Kfz.184). When the Tiger of Henschel was selected to the detriment of the Tiger of Porsche (VK 4501(P)) or Tiger(P), the famous German industrialist found himself with 90 hulls of Tiger(P) already manufactured. Such a waste of materiel and working hours were unacceptable. It was thus decided to use these hulls as bases for a new heavy hunter of tank armed with the anti-tank gun of 88mm Pak 43.
The Ferdinand preserved of Tiger (Porsche) only the bottom of hull, the suspension and the frontal plate of the lower hull. Indeed it was practically a new vehicle. The petrol-electric traction of Tiger(P) was preserved but modified partly. The old engines with air cooling " Porsche " were replaced by two Maybach HL 120 of 300 hp with liquid cooling. Those were placed in the medium to allow the installation of a vast compartment of combat to the back. The drive of the tracks was done by means of back sprocket-wheels. The pilot and the radio-machine gunner were installed in front of the engines. The pilot had at his disposal a hydro pneumatic direction. The fuel tanks were laid out on each sides of the engine compartment. The combat compartment to the back were protected by an imposing superstructure with tilted walls and accommodated the commander, the gunner like two loaders. The Pak 43/2 L/71 of 88mm (anti-tank version of Flak 36) got for Ferdinand a formidable fire power. The first specimens only have that this only weapon. Thereafter the machine-gun of 7.92mm MG34 of hull will be reinstalled to ensure a brought closer defense. The shielding was largely reinforced by bolted plates of 100mm and reached the 200mm on the nose of the machine.
Assigned to Panzerjaegerabteilungen 653 and 654 (at the origin equipped with 45 Ferdinands), they were first used in the northern pincer of the Kursk offensive on the salient of Kursk (Operation " Citadel "), in July of 1943. These two units formed part of Panzerjäger regiment 656 also equipped with Brummbärs attached to the 41st Panzer corps of the General Harpe forming part of the Central group of army. But instead of being employed as long range TDs, they were put in the forefront of the attack as super heavy assault guns. Their thick armor allowed them to drive deep into the Russian defenses where, without infantry support and lacking MGs, they were overwhelmed by Russian tank-hunter teams using FT and DC. 39 were lost during the Kursk fighting, and the remainder fought on for the rest of the year but, finally, being pulled out from the Nikopol area in late 1943. Ferdinands from sPzJagAbt 653 destroyed approximately 320 Soviet tanks at the price of 13 Ferdinands. On the whole, Panzerjäger Regiment 656 destroyed approximately 502 tanks and 100 other vehicles.
The 48 Ferdinands survivors were modernized and modified by the addition of a BMG and a re-designed superstructure roof. Then were grouped in the schwere Heeres Panzerjager Abteilung 653 of which a part was transferred in Italy in February of 1944. In Italy, it took part in the combat of Nettuno, Anzio and Cisterna from March 1, 1944. The sPzJagAbt 654 was redeployed in France at end of 1943 and was rearmed with Jagdpanthers. In April 1944, elements of the sPzJagAbt 653 were again retransferred in Russia.
The last Ferdinands were incorporated in new schwere Heeres Panzerjager Kompanie 614, and the sPzJagAbt 653 reequipped with Jagdtigers. The sPzJagAbt 614 having at the beginning 13-14 vehicles fought on the Eastern front late 1944-early 1945. They also fought in 12/44 south of Bastogne against the U.S. 4th Armored Division. The last survivors were seen in service within Kampfgruppe "Ritter" in Zossen area (southern Berlin) about mid April 1945.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 237
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/11/2018 5:52:08 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The JgdPz 38(t) or Hetzer (Agitator) was a light SP AT gun on the proven chassis of the PzKpfw 38(t), and was used to replace the many makeshift conversions (Marders, etc.) of earlier years. In March 1943, Heinz Guderian suggested the replacement of all the old models of Panzerjägers with open superstructure and light shielding by a very new race of tank destroyers better protected by a thicker shielding and especially a structure completely armoured.
The chassis of Pz.Kpfw 38(t) was initially selected to carry out the first model of this series called Jagdpanzer. This machine was initially known under the name of Leichtes Sturmgeschüte 38(t) then like Jagdpanzer 38(t) für 7.5 cm Pak 39 L/48, then finally Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer (Troublemaker) and receives its Sd.Kfz.138/2 number. The production directly begins April 1944 at BMM and 5 months later at Skoda. A total of 2584 specimens was produced in three series until the end of the war.
The new engine was the 6 cylinders Praga AC/2 developing 160 HP coupled to a gear box Praga-Wilson (5 forward speeds and a reverse speed). The chassis itself was modified to accomodate a gun of large gauge and a more consequent shielding. Two fuel tanks of a total capacity of 320 liters allowed it an autonomy of 177 km on its characteristic carburizing. The total weight was approximately 16 tons, which did not limit thanks to the new more powerful engine, the maximum speed on road which was always of 42 km/h. The tracks of Hetzer were made up each of 96 links of 350 mm for a contact on the ground of 2.72 m. The silhouette of Hetzer was really low thanks to a superstructure with the very tilted walls (welded). The shielding was in front of 60 mm, on the roof and on the back of 8 mm and 20 mm on the sides. Short armoured skirts of 5 mm will be also installed on the sides. The principal armament was consisted of the anti-tank 75 mm Pak 39 L/48 which was equipped with a limited traverse of 5° on the left and 11° on the right. The gun was assembled on the right part of the glacis (38 cm of the center). This provision was hardly happy, considering canon was designed to be loaded by the right side, which strongly reduced the rate of shooting. The Hetzer transported a MG 34/42 mounted on the roof, and rare fact, controlled from the interior of the compartment of combat.
Hetzers were to equip the units with tank destroyers (Panzerjäger Abteilung) of divisions of infantry, Panzergrenadier and various independent units. Hetzers will be used thereafter for the replacement of Marders and other Jagdpanzers in all kinds of units of tank destroyers. In the last months they will fill even the role of battle tank because the increasingly significant holes in strenght of (true) tanks of battle. They will be also versed in the famous heteroclite groups of combat (Kampfgruppen) assembled of all parts at the end of the war. Hetzers equipped all the types of units of Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS within a total of 10 divisions.
The first 45 entered service with the Heeres Panzerjäger-Abteilung 731 on 4-13 July 1944 (Army Group North, Eastern Front, later Mitte). One of the first engagement occurred in Warsaw in August 1944, during the famous uprising. They will be used during the offensive in the Belgian Ardennes during the winter 1944-1945. The first units equipped with Hetzers were the 731st and 743rd Heeres Panzerjäger Abteilungen in May-June 1944 with an identical strenght of 45 unit, on the Eastern front. By after they equipped 3 independent units, the 741st, 561st and 744th Heeres Panzerjäger Abteilungen in 1945. First unit SS equipped with this Jagdpanzer was the 3rd Division SS of Cavalry "Florian Geyer" in September 1944. A total of 200 specimens maximum will be allocated with units SS, especially units of Panzergrenadier. By March 1945, only 359 Hetzers were reported operational, out of 529 still in the registry. From 1944 and until the end of the war, it became the most current German tank hunter, not counting the heavier StuG III.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 238
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/12/2018 5:21:24 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
With its gun, armor, and speed, the Jagdpanther was one of the most potent TD of the war. Its greatest drawback was its rarity; only about 425 were built.
August 3, 1942, the committee of Panzers, Waffenamt, decided that the chassis of the Panther would be used to conceive a new hunter of tank which can combine the excellent mobility and shielding of the Panther, to very effective 88 mm Pak 43 anti-tank gun. This weapon had already assembled on Jagdpanzer Tiger(P) Elefant but it was hardly a result, too heavy, not very mobile and not very reliable. Nashorn (Rhinoceros), on hybrid chassis of Pz.Kpfw III/IV, was also equipped with Pak 43 but its open and light superstructure offered only little protection to its crew, Nashorn being however more mobile than Elefant which known rout at Koursk (Russia) in July 1943 as of its launching.
One assembled on upper hull a superstructure covering all the roof except the back deck. The frontal part of this superstructure prolonged simply the glacis. Idem for the side parts. This assembly will provided to the new tank a broad space of combat well protected by a consequent shielding. The main armament of this new tank was the 88 mm Pak 43/3 L/71 (able to destroy any enemy tank from 3000 m) installed in "pig nose" mantlet or saukopf. A coaxial MG34 was mounted on ball mount on the right of the gun supplemented the armament. To acquire a target the gunner had a binocular periscope "SflZF5" on the roof of the superstructure. The crew of Jagdpanther was composed of the driver sitting on the left-front of the hull, the radio-machine gunner sitting on the right-front of the hull, the gunner sitting behind and to the top of the pilot in the superstructure, the loader sitting behind and to the top of the radio-machine gunner in the superstructure and the commander sitting in the corner back-left of the superstructure.
The production of Jagdpanther began officialy in December 1943, but really did not start that at the beginning of January 1944 on the assembly lines of MIAG. In November 1944 a second production unit was established at MNH in Hanover and thereafter a third was created at MBA at Potsdam. An objective of 150 specimens per month was initially specified but was never reached. The peak of production was carried out in January 1945 with only 72 tanks. It is thus normal that only 392 Jagdpanthers were built between December 1943 and March 1945.
Jagdpanthers were versed in independent heavy anti-tank battalions , the schwere Panzerjäger Abteilungens which were composed as follows: 3 companies of 14 Jagdpanthers + 3 Jagdpanthers attached to the HQ. First Jagdpanthers will be versed in two battalions, the 559 and the 654 which will battle on the Western front. Use of the Jagdpanther in Normandy was limited to the 12-14 vehicles of 2nd Company, schwere Panzerjaegerabteilung 654. Only the 654 had its complete strenght whereas the 559 does not have that 10 to 14 specimens in all. Many Jagdpanthers were sent to the east but the most significant use of Jagdpanther was during the offensive of the Ardennes in December 1944 when 51 specimens distributed in 6 battalions were used in the combat. Jagdpanthers were used little by the SS, and only within 2nd SS-Pz.Divisions " Das Reich ", 9th SS-Pz.Divisions " Hohenstaufent " and 10th SS-Pz.Divisions " Frundsberg " at a rate of a company of 14 specimens per division, 42 Jagdpanthers in all. They will be especially used to counter the revolt of Budapest in January 1945. Some took part (?) in the defense of Vienna. The produced Jagdpanthers last will be versed as a tank of replacement in Pz.Abteilungens of 7th Pz.Division, the Grenadier Regiment of Führer and in a special armored brigade.





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 239
RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 7/13/2018 7:57:50 PM   
asl3d


Posts: 589
Joined: 2/6/2017
Status: offline
The JgdPz IV was the intended replacement for the StuG III. Designed specifically as a TD, it used the PzKpfw IV chassis and had well-sloped armor. In December 1942, a new hunter of tank having a frontal shielding of 100 mm, armed with the 75 mm Pak 42 L/70 (based on the gun of the Panther) and was based on PzKpfw IV was required by German army. A low silhouette and a superstructure with tilted walls were required for this machine initially baptized StuG auf Fahrgestell PzKpfw IV (Sd.Kfz.162) mit 7.5 cm PaK L/48 or Jagdpanzer IV Its design begin at 1943 and the first vehicle of production was produced in January of 1944, on modified chassis of PzKpfw IV Ausf.F under the designation of (leichter) Jagdpanzer IV Ausf.F (Sd.Kfz.162). It was armed with the 75 mm Pak 39 L/48 (with muzzle brake with double deflector) and with two machine-guns MG42 of 7.92 mm.
The lower hull of Panzer IV had been maintained, only front had been modified by the adoption of oblique walls forming a very pointed nose. The shielding of the higher part of the nose was 60 mm whereas that of the lower part was of 50 mm. A the interior the fuel tanks, the boxes of ammunition were changed place, the hatch of help of the floor and the engine of rotation of the turret was removed. Moreover one new system of heating and ventilation was installed. The superstructure was composed of tilted walls. All the walls of the superstructure were made up of large armor plates being encased and welded between them, which facilitated the manufacturing process. The side shielding of the superstructure was thick 30 mm and the frontal of 60 mm. The tilted walls got a good protection (proportioned) to the four members of the crew: the commander, the gunner, the loader and the pilot. Moreover its low silhouette (1.85m) made of it a not easy target. Many specimens were provided with Schürzen and covered with Zimmerit paste from the factory (until September 1944). On road Jagdpanzer IV could reach the 40 km/h in spite of its weight of 24.5 tons. As for Panzer IV the engine was the Maybach HL 120 TRM.
A total of 769 specimens will be produced. The first batch was produced in January 1944, with 30 vehicles. In October 1944, the early production run ended and, in November, a new batch was produced, severely hampered by Allied air raids on Vomag AG and suppliers like Zahnradfabrik AG in Friedrichshafen.
The Jagdpanzer IV was versed in Panzerjäger Abteilungen of Panzerdivisions and Panzer Grenadier Divisions as from March 1944. A 1944 TD battalion often contained a mixture of StuG III and JgdPz IV. Each division included two combat companies of 14 vehicles, with three command vehicles for the headquarters company of the division, for a total of 31 Jagdpanzer IVs. Each company of a Panzer Division had only 10 Jagdpanzer IVs (three platoons of three vehicles plus a command tank), for a total of 22 vehicles. Jagdpanzer IV was especially employed like support vehicle with the groups of infantry and like tank destroyer.
In April 1944, the 3rd Battalion of the Parachute Panzer Division «Hermann Goring» were reformed in line with 21 Jagdpanzer IVs from the Army Reserve Division in Italy. In May 1944, the 49th Division, 4th Armored Division and 5th Panzer Division on the Eastern Front received Abteilungens of Jagdpanzers IVs. The 21th SS Panzerdivision was formed in France on 26 April of the same year, with an initial batch of 10 Jagdpanzer IVs, but then another batch of 11 joined in, which saw action in July 1944 after the Allied landings in Normandy. On June 6, 1944, there were only 62 Jagdpanzer IVs available, 31 for the Panzer-Lehr-Division, 21 for the 2nd Armored Division and 10 in the 21th Division SS «Hitlerjugend» (which receipt 10 at mid the 1944).





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Semper fidelis

(in reply to asl3d)
Post #: 240
Page:   <<   < prev  6 7 [8] 9 10   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Current Games From Matrix.] >> [World War II] >> Lock ‘n Load: Heroes of Stalingrad >> Mods and Scenarios >> RE: Heroes and Leaders mod Page: <<   < prev  6 7 [8] 9 10   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.199