Matrix Games Forums

Forums  Register  Login  Photo Gallery  Member List  Search  Calendars  FAQ 

My Profile  Inbox  Address Book  My Subscription  My Forums  Log Out

OT: Brits only please

 
View related threads: (in this forum | in all forums)

Logged in as: Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [New Releases from Matrix Games] >> War in the Pacific: Admiral's Edition >> OT: Brits only please Page: [1] 2 3 4   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
OT: Brits only please - 12/14/2016 10:43:52 PM   
Chickenboy


Posts: 24904
Joined: 6/29/2002
From: San Antonio, TX
Status: offline
Can the outstanding community of Brits playing this game answer a totally OT question I have?

Which is it: "Pudding", "Afters" or "Dessert"? Is there a regional dialect of sorts for this word following a meal?

Thanks in advance.

_____________________________

Post #: 1
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/14/2016 10:50:48 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 39571
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
No idea if there is a regional or class aspect to the usage. I can only go on what I was brought up with. So whilst I've heard all three used, we used to say afters or dessert - of which dessert was probably more common.



_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty. Horatio Nelson October 1805



(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 2
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 3:20:11 AM   
Roger Neilson 3


Posts: 1071
Joined: 4/12/2012
From: Bedlington, Northumberland, UK
Status: offline
Dessert is for them 'posh' ones who live 'dahn sarff' - who maybe at one stage in the past had a Butler.

Afters... eh?

Pudding is some heavy dense material that is very sweet, and if dropped on you could probably do serious damage - often shortened to 'pud' and maybe occasionally offered to the family.

There is also Trifle - an exotic mix of cold cake jelly and other 'stuff' served when entertaining and pretending to be 'better than you are'.

Class and culturally loaded - anthropologists study awaited.

Roger



_____________________________

An unplanned dynasty: Roger Neilson, Roger Neilson 11, previous posts 898+1515.

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 3
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 5:27:13 AM   
BBfanboy


Posts: 12802
Joined: 8/4/2010
From: Winnipeg, MB
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Roger Neilson 3

Dessert is for them 'posh' ones who live 'dahn sarff' - who maybe at one stage in the past had a Butler.

Afters... eh?

Pudding is some heavy dense material that is very sweet, and if dropped on you could probably do serious damage - often shortened to 'pud' and maybe occasionally offered to the family.

There is also Trifle - an exotic mix of cold cake jelly and other 'stuff' served when entertaining and pretending to be 'better than you are'.

Class and culturally loaded - anthropologists study awaited.

Roger



"Pud"? You do know that is the short slang term for "pudenda" ...

_____________________________

No matter how bad a situation is, you can always make it worse. - Chris Hadfield : An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth

(in reply to Roger Neilson 3)
Post #: 4
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 6:03:26 AM   
obvert


Posts: 12732
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
Status: offline
Being a British citizen as of this summer I can answer this now.

In London I've heard a lot of pudding. My friend raised in Ely and who went to Cambridge says pudding. My Australian wife who spent her childhood in London says dessert. We've both heard afters, but not as much.

This from a Daily Mirror post on proper etiquette for the posh.

Pudding v Dessert. The final course of a dinner (and arguably the best one) is the pudding. Note, it is called the pudding, NOT 'dessert'. If you call your lemon posset with spun sugar basket a dessert when dining with the hoity toity, then you might as well prepare for a future dining at a Toby Carvery - where you can help yourself to the dessert buffet for the rest of eternity.

There is a slight aversion to completely French sounding words here. The British either chose to completely butcher their pronunciation, like Filet with a hard T, or choose another word that sounds more British, like pudding.

Posh, by the way, is a nautical term. It comes from the early days of the grand tour when the aristocracy and wealthy industrialists began to travel by ship to see the sights. If you were experienced and wealthy enough, heading through the Mediterranean you'd ask for a cabin on the Port side on the outward journey and the Starboard side coming home, each of which were the shady side of the ship. Port Out Starboard Home.

< Message edited by obvert -- 12/15/2016 6:09:12 AM >


_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to BBfanboy)
Post #: 5
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 6:20:04 AM   
Roger Neilson 3


Posts: 1071
Joined: 4/12/2012
From: Bedlington, Northumberland, UK
Status: offline
Last time I read the word ending in ...enda I was studying Gulliver's Travels, so no cannot say I had made the connection. I am as always enlightened by the erudition displayed on this forum.

Roger

_____________________________

An unplanned dynasty: Roger Neilson, Roger Neilson 11, previous posts 898+1515.

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 6
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 6:26:26 AM   
Roger Neilson 3


Posts: 1071
Joined: 4/12/2012
From: Bedlington, Northumberland, UK
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: obvert

There is a slight aversion to completely French sounding words here. The British either chose to completely butcher their pronunciation, like Filet with a hard T, or choose another word that sounds more British, like pudding.


Butcher.... Butcher........

You want a word to sound French then spell it Fillay or Filly, Fillet is a combination of Fill and Let. Fillet. Simple,

Lol

Roger

_____________________________

An unplanned dynasty: Roger Neilson, Roger Neilson 11, previous posts 898+1515.

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 7
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 7:02:08 AM   
n01487477


Posts: 4773
Joined: 2/21/2006
Status: offline
In my house - "Afters" is anything after the main meal. Pudding is as Roger alluded to, although I disagree that dessert is posh ...

_____________________________


(in reply to Roger Neilson 3)
Post #: 8
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 7:04:56 AM   
Chris21wen

 

Posts: 5549
Joined: 1/17/2002
From: Bexhill-on-Sea, E Sussex
Status: offline
Many theories here but pudding is generally associated with the northern areas. It is also derived from Anglo Saxon while dessert is from French. The use therefore depended on weather or not you spoke French which was usually spoken by the hierarchy (posh). Further the term 'pudding' often refers to dishes created in Britain such as spotted dick, treacle duff, bread and butter, etc. Desserts are anything created abroad, cheesecake, tiramisu, creme brulee.

Take or pick

(in reply to Roger Neilson 3)
Post #: 9
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 7:28:59 AM   
Encircled


Posts: 1740
Joined: 12/30/2010
From: Northern England
Status: offline
Up in my neck of the woods its "afters", or "sweet". We do use pudding and dessert as well.

I'm sorry for complicating it even more than it is already.

The only pudding worth eating is a Hollands Steak and Kidney Pudding, but you wouldn't have that for dessert

_____________________________


(in reply to Chris21wen)
Post #: 10
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 8:04:12 AM   
Jellicoe


Posts: 137
Joined: 9/26/2012
From: Kent, UK
Status: offline
Pudding should be a fairly weighty affair involving sponge, raisins, jam or treacle with lashings of custard. Pretty much the sort of grub that we subsisted on at school

Attached link may help

HTTPS://pocketbook.com/2015/07/28/u-or-non-u/




< Message edited by Jellicoe -- 12/15/2016 8:08:04 AM >

(in reply to Encircled)
Post #: 11
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 11:30:00 AM   
obvert


Posts: 12732
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Roger Neilson 3


quote:

ORIGINAL: obvert

There is a slight aversion to completely French sounding words here. The British either chose to completely butcher their pronunciation, like Filet with a hard T, or choose another word that sounds more British, like pudding.


Butcher.... Butcher........

You want a word to sound French then spell it Fillay or Filly, Fillet is a combination of Fill and Let. Fillet. Simple,

Lol

Roger


Yet we're happy to say bouquet and ballet without the hard T.

How about British spelling then?

How to you pronounce Leicester? Or Island? Or Wednesday?




_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to Roger Neilson 3)
Post #: 12
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 11:55:08 AM   
Encircled


Posts: 1740
Joined: 12/30/2010
From: Northern England
Status: offline
I get called "Posh" when I go to watch my football team play because my northern accent is slightly less strong than it is over there.

The big test is how you pronounce "Scone".

Is it "Scone" or "Scone"

_____________________________


(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 13
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 12:20:48 PM   
stuart3

 

Posts: 158
Joined: 9/4/2014
Status: offline
Pudding is what I grew up with in Scotland, but let's not even get into steak and kidney pudding.

It is going too far to describe dessert as posh, but restaurants always have a dessert menu, even if some of their desserts may include dishes such as bread and butter pudding.

Afters is just an alternative name for both and can include alternatives to puddings/desserts such as cheeseboards.


(in reply to Encircled)
Post #: 14
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 2:28:44 PM   
Roger Neilson 3


Posts: 1071
Joined: 4/12/2012
From: Bedlington, Northumberland, UK
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: obvert


quote:

ORIGINAL: Roger Neilson 3


quote:

ORIGINAL: obvert

There is a slight aversion to completely French sounding words here. The British either chose to completely butcher their pronunciation, like Filet with a hard T, or choose another word that sounds more British, like pudding.


Butcher.... Butcher........

You want a word to sound French then spell it Fillay or Filly, Fillet is a combination of Fill and Let. Fillet. Simple,

Lol

Roger


Yet we're happy to say bouquet and ballet without the hard T.

How about British spelling then?

How to you pronounce Leicester? Or Island? Or Wednesday?





Even further OT.... British spelling originates in the first use of printing which was by Dutch printers, so they heard the sounds the Londoners of the time were making (close to Midlands accent now) and then decided how this would be done as spelling, but obviously with their Dutch brains. It has no logic whatsoever and although our cousins across the pond have attempted to 'logicalise' the spelling at times we just think they are too lazy to learn the 'right spelling'.

Add to this mix that English is probably the most bastardised language on the globe and each set of words we have brought in from elsewhere has its own rules of spelling.

And you may be happy to say ballay and bookay, but that just shows you don't speak proper like we do oop north....

Anyway us Geordies have wer own language like so haddaway and taak lyke ye shud....

And on the subject of how to say Scone......

Roger

(Did teach English for a number of decades)







Attachment (1)

_____________________________

An unplanned dynasty: Roger Neilson, Roger Neilson 11, previous posts 898+1515.

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 15
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 2:53:07 PM   
mind_messing

 

Posts: 2269
Joined: 10/28/2013
From: Glasgow, Scotland
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: stuart3

Pudding is what I grew up with in Scotland, but let's not even get into steak and kidney pudding.

It is going too far to describe dessert as posh, but restaurants always have a dessert menu, even if some of their desserts may include dishes such as bread and butter pudding.

Afters is just an alternative name for both and can include alternatives to puddings/desserts such as cheeseboards.




I'm north of the border as well. Colloquially, it was always "pudding" for any after dinner desserts that you were eating anywhere other than a restaurant.

Let's not get in to what the difference between gutties and plimsolls are.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

I get called "Posh" when I go to watch my football team play because my northern accent is slightly less strong than it is over there.

The big test is how you pronounce "Scone".

Is it "Scone" or "Scone"


It's pronounced "skawn", and don't let anyone tell you different!

Except if it's the place you go to get crowned, in which case its "Skoon"!

(in reply to stuart3)
Post #: 16
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 3:12:44 PM   
zakblood


Posts: 21576
Joined: 10/4/2012
Status: offline
quote:

Which is it: "Pudding", "Afters" or "Dessert"?


well that's a hard one, as pudding can be all 3, so depends on time, and of course what it is your eating.

apple tart is pudding if maybe eaten at dinner time, where as it maybe classed as afters at tea time, and also dessert at tea time.

so for me, it's all depends on how posh you are, and what your eating and when and where your eating it, and in some respect with what also, as most can be called puddings if on there own, and in something else and the same food is dessert no matter what the time is.

we have pasty forks, pudding bowls, pudding dishes, but no set time for any, as 12 is dinner time for some, but not everyone, 4 to 6 is tea time, and supper is when ever you like after 6.

i'm from Nottingham, born and bred, well made there, so we tend to do as we like when we like

(in reply to mind_messing)
Post #: 17
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 3:13:05 PM   
witpqs


Posts: 24230
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: offline
Double OT, since I'm not a Brit (sorry, Chickenboy, crashing your thread! ):

If I was on a date and she asked me if I wanted afters...

_____________________________


(in reply to mind_messing)
Post #: 18
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 3:25:04 PM   
MakeeLearn


Posts: 3356
Joined: 9/11/2016
Status: offline
Ive heard that "If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding! How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?"

A missing "b"?

< Message edited by MakeeLearn -- 12/15/2016 3:29:44 PM >

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 19
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 4:25:26 PM   
Chickenboy


Posts: 24904
Joined: 6/29/2002
From: San Antonio, TX
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Double OT, since I'm not a Brit (sorry, Chickenboy, crashing your thread! ):

If I was on a date and she asked me if I wanted afters...


Why must we explain your tertiary or quaternary queries. The odds of you finding a date? Slim to none. "Her"? Asking you if you wanted afters? The likelihood that 'afters' meant something other than spotted dick? I mean, come on mate.

_____________________________


(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 20
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 4:46:29 PM   
witpqs


Posts: 24230
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy


quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Double OT, since I'm not a Brit (sorry, Chickenboy, crashing your thread! ):

If I was on a date and she asked me if I wanted afters...


Why must we explain your tertiary or quaternary queries. The odds of you finding a date? Slim to none. "Her"? Asking you if you wanted afters? The likelihood that 'afters' meant something other than spotted dick? I mean, come on mate.

Oh what fowl comments!

_____________________________


(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 21
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 5:15:15 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 39571
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNXO0qdxJkg

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty. Horatio Nelson October 1805



(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 22
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 6:01:26 PM   
GetAssista

 

Posts: 1840
Joined: 9/19/2009
Status: online
Sorry, no Brit, just checking in to say I greatly enjoyed this thread.
Reminded me on some lovely anthropologist musings about Brits I have read before

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 23
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/15/2016 10:11:15 PM   
rustysi


Posts: 5739
Joined: 2/21/2012
From: LI, NY
Status: offline
quote:

Which is it: "Pudding", "Afters" or "Dessert"?


Of course I'm more confused now than before, but the thread was both interesting and amusing.

_____________________________

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Hume

In every party there is one member who by his all-too-devout pronouncement of the party principles provokes the others to apostasy. Nietzsche

Cave ab homine unius libri. Ltn Prvb

(in reply to GetAssista)
Post #: 24
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/16/2016 3:15:13 AM   
rogueusmc


Posts: 4539
Joined: 2/8/2004
From: Texas...what country are YOU from?
Status: offline
Now ask Chickenboy if he calls a Pepsi a 'coke' or a 'soda'...

_____________________________

There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.

Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army


(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 25
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/16/2016 3:51:30 AM   
Big B

 

Posts: 4830
Joined: 6/1/2005
From: Old Los Angeles pre-1960
Status: offline
Ok, temporarily derailing this thread (and my apologies),
But I understand that there is a generational/regional dialect difference on what we call 'soft drinks'.
As a Californian with parents from the Mid-West & East Coast, we always referred to soft drinks as: Soda, or Soda-pop, Coke was always specific to Coca-Cola....?

B

quote:

ORIGINAL: rogueusmc

Now ask Chickenboy if he calls a Pepsi a 'coke' or a 'soda'...



_____________________________


(in reply to rogueusmc)
Post #: 26
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/16/2016 3:54:29 AM   
witpqs


Posts: 24230
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Big B

Ok, temporarily derailing this thread (and my apologies),
But I understand that there is a generational/regional dialect difference on what we call 'soft drinks'.
As a Californian with parents from the Mid-West & East Coast, we always referred to soft drinks as: Soda, or Soda-pop, Coke was always specific to Coca-Cola....?

B

quote:

ORIGINAL: rogueusmc

Now ask Chickenboy if he calls a Pepsi a 'coke' or a 'soda'...



I knew someone from Ohio who always called it "pop".

_____________________________


(in reply to Big B)
Post #: 27
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/16/2016 3:58:03 AM   
Big B

 

Posts: 4830
Joined: 6/1/2005
From: Old Los Angeles pre-1960
Status: offline
Yep, again my apologies - we referred to it as Pop also...just for short


quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs


quote:

ORIGINAL: Big B

Ok, temporarily derailing this thread (and my apologies),
But I understand that there is a generational/regional dialect difference on what we call 'soft drinks'.
As a Californian with parents from the Mid-West & East Coast, we always referred to soft drinks as: Soda, or Soda-pop, Coke was always specific to Coca-Cola....?

B

quote:

ORIGINAL: rogueusmc

Now ask Chickenboy if he calls a Pepsi a 'coke' or a 'soda'...



I knew someone from Ohio who always called it "pop".



_____________________________


(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 28
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/16/2016 4:34:34 AM   
Chickenboy


Posts: 24904
Joined: 6/29/2002
From: San Antonio, TX
Status: offline
Oi! Brits only please.

_____________________________


(in reply to Big B)
Post #: 29
RE: OT: Brits only please - 12/16/2016 4:49:33 AM   
witpqs


Posts: 24230
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy

Oi! Brits only please.

Right, sorry for the hijack! No more, I promise.

Oh wait, one more. When I was a kid in Massachusetts we didn't call it soda-pop, or soda, or pop: we called it "tonic". My father told me when he was in the army in WWII after basic training he was sent to a base in Georgia (IIRC) for training. On a pass one day in town he went to a local drugstore (where they had "soda fountains") and asked for a glass of tonic. The proprietor looked at him very strangely! After discussing if that was what he really wanted, he was served a glass - filled with hair tonic!

_____________________________


(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 30
Page:   [1] 2 3 4   next >   >>
All Forums >> [New Releases from Matrix Games] >> War in the Pacific: Admiral's Edition >> OT: Brits only please Page: [1] 2 3 4   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.164