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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent

 
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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 4:35:23 PM   
bradfordkay

 

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"Oz: Reinforcement TFs have stacked up around NZ and the south map edge awaiting the all-clear to head to Oz. Each is now positioning itself for the run to Melbourne or Adelaide. "


Dan, if his carriers are playing around Perth, why don't you send the reinforcements to Sydney instead of Melbourne/Adelaide? You can get them there more quickly and it only adds a couple of days of rail time to their trip west. It appears that there is less danger to them if you send them to Sydney at this time.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 4:50:08 PM   
crsutton


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

I think you can all imagine that it's no fun being on the "driven" and "whipped" end of this leash.  It's even more difficult to pen for public reading the results of my failure to establish adequate security.

Nevertheless, no matter what happens as this KB raid winds down, it's not going to have a real impact on the Allies, barring only a carrier defeat.  John is doing some whipping at sea, but on the land he's done nothing substantial in months.  Long terms, that's the true tale of how the game is going (but I sure do hope Shokaku and friends are heading north....I may know next turn; if not then definitely the day after, at which time my carriers will sit astride the route through the northern Tasman Sea.



You know, Hannibal, how to gain a victory; you do not know how to use it." -Livy quoting Mahabal.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 4:59:34 PM   
Canoerebel


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On several occasions, I have utilized the forums to help organize my thoughts for stories that I want to write.  I've posted several thoughts about last week's tornado.  I drew from these to write a story.  This is still only a draft, but it's reasonably close to final.  So I share it with those of you interested: 

In the Heart of an EF-3 Tornado
Daniel M. Roper


When 51-year-old Anthony Raines died at 11:30 a.m. on January 30, 2013, his killer was racing through a tawny field of broom sedge, bearing down on a small frame building on a slight rise overlooking Ga. Highway 140.

Inside that building, 52-year-old Dan Roper, the publisher of Georgia Backroads, dropped to his knees, crawled under a stout wood table, and locked his right arm around the table's crossbeam.  As utter chaos engulfed the place, he thought:  “The building is coming apart.  We may not make it through this.”

***

This is my account of the deadly tornado that hit Adairsville in late January.  To invoke a trite but accurate saying, my two teenaged sons and I had a date with destiny that morning.  Our home is in Armuchee, 17 miles west of Adairsville, but on occasion we enjoyed patronizing Owens Biscuits, owned by family friend Kregg Owens.  (Kregg’s 26-year-old son, Josh, is no stranger to readers of the magazine.  He accompanies the Roper men on Appalachian Trail backpacking trips that sometimes become the subject of articles for the magazine.)  When the tornado hit the restaurant located just west of Interstate 75 at Exit 306, no members of the Owens family were present.  It was just me, John (18) and Jackson (15), and two female employees who are mother and daughter.

Northwest Georgia was under a tornado watch that morning, but those of us in the restaurant were unaware that severe weather was imminent.  Unknown to the five of us, a tornado warning had been issued for Adairsville.  Residents of the three houses next door heard the warning and were already seeking refuge in a storm shelter built into the side of a hill.  But those of us in the restaurant were relaxed and ignorant of the menace.

Like most southerners, I am accustomed to severe weather.  I have experienced a half century of powerful thunderstorms.  I have seen the sky turn a sickly green before spitting lightning bolts and hail.  Two years ago, I trembled in my office as straight-line winds in excess of 80 miles an hour hit the building during an outbreak of violent storms that spawned an EF5 tornado in Tuscaloosa, an EF4 in Ringgold, and a variety of EF1 and EF2 tornadoes around Rome.  And as a youngster growing up in Miami many years ago, I was on the outskirts of a number of hurricanes.

That’s how Mother Nature fooled me on that morning in January.  The weather conditions were not alarming.  The sky was routinely gray rather than bearing the black or greenish cast that I’ve come to associate with squall lines.  Light rain was falling.  The wind was gusty but not violent.  A few flashes of lightning had resulted in distant thunder.  There was no ominous stillness.  I didn’t hear anything that sounded like a freight train.  (Later, Jackson would say that’s exactly what it sounded like; that or standing beside a roller coaster as the cars roar by.)

As we wrapped up our late breakfast of cathead southern biscuits, we noticed that a mountain ridge several miles to the west was nearly grayed out by rain.  I suggested that we finish up and exit to our pickup truck before the storm arrived.  As we walked up to the counter to get drink refills and to say farewell to the two employees, the lights flickered off and on several times and the wind picked up.  All five of us looked out the west-facing window and the south-facing door, which had been propped open due to the unseasonal warmth. 

In a panic-stricken voice, the younger of the two Owens Biscuits employees abruptly yelled, “It’s a tornado! It’s a tornado!”

I was looking in the same direction she was.  I was seeing the same weather conditions.  I had no doubt whatsoever that she was mistaken, for the storm did not seem extraordinary.  It looked like a squall line typical of a strong cold front, but nothing to be overly alarmed about.  I was dead wrong. 

When the young lady yelled her warning, all of us moved toward the open door and the west window to get a better look outside.  The older of the two employees intended to shut the door.  John was close by (he told me later that he had tried to shut the door when she couldn’t).  Both of them were behind me as I approached the southwest corner of the dining room and looked out the window.  Looking out the door, I saw the wind rapidly increasing in intensity, driving the rain horizontally.

It was at that moment that things began to happen quickly – much faster than it will take you to read this and much more jumbled and frenzied than orderly writing can convey.

As we looked out the door and into the storm, the wind strengthened dramatically to a velocity I had never before witnessed.  The horizontally-blowing wall of rain had an ominous convexity to it, bowed outward as though we were looking at the workings of a stupendous vortex.  Blowing objects and debris were carried by the vortex.  The meaning was both obvious and stunning:  this was a tornado…and it was already upon us. 

Glass windows at both ends of the dining room simultaneously shattered.  The lights went out.  Solid objects, including the door, crashed inside the room.  Stunned by glass breaking right beside my right cheek and somewhere to my rear, I dropped to my knees and scrambled under the table we had been peacefully dining at just two minutes before.  I thought I saw one or both of the boys huddled against the nearby wall.  I called frantically to them to join me.  There was no reply. Desperately, I called again; still no response.  As for the two employees, there was no sign of either.

It was at that moment, when the tornado began dismantling Owens Biscuits, that I thought, “The building is coming apart.  We may not make it through this.”

Huddled helplessly under that table, there was nothing I could do.  I was at the mercy of a storm that didn’t seem likely to grant mercy.  But then there was a perceptible decrease in the chaotic conditions.  A second later, it was apparent that the tornado, though still close, had passed.  The entire event – from dropping to my knees to the realization that the tornado was moving away – took four or five seconds.

The dining room was in shambles.  The door had been blown off its hinges and lay canted on the floor over debris.  The floor was littered with broken glass, a wicked-looking shard from a broken mirror, decorative but potentially deadly items like three rusty saw blades with painted landscape scenes, insulation, pieces of wood and roofing.  (I didn’t know until later that there were dozens of pieces of glass in my hair and pockets). 

As I called again to the boys, I heard them yelling for me.  They had taken refuge in the bathroom with the two employees, who were both hysterical.  All four of them were safe and unharmed except for minor cuts and abrasions that didn’t even require band aids.  The bathroom was remarkably undamaged, including pieces of porcelain pottery still in place on shelves.  (The next day, we saw that the tornado had propelled a six-foot length of 2” x 6” lumber through the exterior wall on the east side of the bathroom, but an inner brick wall had stopped the lethal projectile.)

Stunned and shaken, we exited the building to a nightmarish scene.  The older employee’s car had vanished from the lot.  A large, eastern white pine beside which I had parked my truck lay flat on the ground.  To our right, the three houses next door had been destroyed.  To our left, a one-story brick commercial building had been flattened.  Eighteen-wheelers were overturned on Highway 140 and in nearby parking lots.  Cars were upside down in the highway and on the grass, shockingly crumpled, like stomped-on soft drink cans.  To our rear, across the highway, the east one-third of the sprawling, modern Daiki factory was a tangled mass of twisted metal.  Amidst that wreckage, a broken water main or hydrant shot forth a towering geyser of water.

John, Jackson and I gingerly worked our way across wreckage and downed power lines to check one of the destroyed houses.  As we did, sirens wailed in the distance.  (Just a minute after the tornado passed, emergency responders arrived on the scene – a remarkable instance of preparation and effectiveness.)  We did not find anybody in the wreckage of the house. We soon encountered them in their storm shelter, where all of them were safe but dazed.

Next, we walked to the highway to check damaged cars for occupants.  Already, the police and other emergency responders had arrived in numbers.  There was also a young woman in casual clothes jogging down the highway, yelling to us and everybody she saw, “Is anybody hurt?  I’m a nurse!”

Matters were out of our hands at this point.  The professionals were taking charge.  I asked the two Owens Biscuits employees if they needed anything.  Then my boys and I cleared debris from the restaurant parking lot.  I wanted to get to a working phone to call my wife, who I feared would be frantic.  As we made our way to my pickup truck, dark clouds poured out heavy rain.

***

Later that day, someone asked me if I had been afraid during the tornado.  I truthfully replied that I wasn’t, but only because the event did not last long enough for us to feel fear – nor had we received the kind of forewarning that might have given fear time to develop.  Indeed, it wasn’t until late that night, while snug at home, that thoughts of what might have been prompted feelings of dismay.

While Owens Biscuits had been badly damaged, the structure was more or less intact – the only building left standing in the immediate path of the storm at that location.  Constructed of simple, weather-beaten pine planking, the structure had started to come apart at the height of the storm.  Had the tornado been stronger, or had it more time to do its work, Owens would have been destroyed as completely as its neighbors.  Of this, I have no doubt.

The Weather Service assigned an EF3 rating to the Adairsville tornado.  The characteristics of an EF3 are:  “Severe damage.  Entire stories of well-constructed houses destroyed; severe damage to large buildings such as shopping malls; trains overturned; trees debarked; heavy cars lifted off the ground and thrown; structures with weak foundations blown away some distance.”     
With winds of 160 miles an hour, the storm was just five miles an hour below an EF4 rating.  It was a close thing.  How close?  According to Texas Tech’s Wind Science and Engineering Center, a tornado with winds of 152 miles an hour will result in “most walls collapsed in bottom floor, except small interior rooms.”  At 170 miles an hour:  “All walls collapsed.”

One of the oddities of the tornado was that my 1999 Ford F-150 pickup truck, which was parked next to the large white pine that had been knocked flat, and just thirty feet from the employee's car that had blown away, was intact and nearly undamaged.  It suffered a few cosmetic dents - one of which was coated in sap – that don’t justify repair, given the vehicle’s age.  Several bags of trash and my favorite hiking stick were still in the bed, unmolested. 

Surprised that the truck had survived and astonished at what we had just experienced, John, Jackson, and I climbed in, pulled out of the parking lot, and began the trip home.  We were most relieved and grateful, but our thoughts also were with those who didn’t have the luxury of simply driving away; who had lost homes or businesses or vehicles; who had lost a loved one, like the family and friends of Anthony Raines.

And I vowed to listen the next time a frantic young lady yells, “It’s a tornado!”    


< Message edited by Canoerebel -- 2/5/2013 5:00:00 PM >

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 5:29:58 PM   
witpqs

 

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Well done!

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 7:02:14 PM   
Bullwinkle58


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Good stuff.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 8:49:24 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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quote:

JEB is going to complete his circuit around the Yankee army, but his long-term prospects don't seem very favorable.


Heh -- good comment. Pity you didn't have a Gettysburg to invade while JEB was busy.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 9:48:32 PM   
CaptDave

 

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Great tornado story. I have a meteorology degree, am a certified storm spotter, and went through four typhoons in my 2 years on Guam, but still the only thing that terrifies me more than a tornado is a wildfire (especially an urban one -- I got to watch the Oakland fire in the early 1990s from across the bay).

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/5/2013 10:56:11 PM   
Canoerebel


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John and I had incompatible schedules today, so no turns were exchanged.  Drat!

Me and my boys are heading south tomorrow for a five day camping and canoeing trip.  So next report early next week if all goes as planned.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/6/2013 12:12:01 AM   
JeffK


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Try and explain what an EF3,4 or 5 is.

The 2 female employees dont have names, makes them very impersonal, after this experience I would imagine everyone gets close.
(Doesnt even have to be their real names)

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/6/2013 12:14:33 AM   
Wuffer

 

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Regarding your Tonardo-experience, CR, it is a very vivid firsthand account (true) and leaving a much bigger mark on the audience as the so called objective/abstrac journalism (true). Before going deeper in communication and narratology (or semiotik) I would just advocate to condense the very first paragraph just that little bit - no need for a paranthesis for example, when a subordinate clause is enough. :-)

Happy hollidays!

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/6/2013 12:16:41 AM   
Wuffer

 

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@ Jeff - that would be mainstream... a show or an experience?

edit: what I mean - there IS a lot of personality :-)

< Message edited by Wuffer -- 2/6/2013 12:20:13 AM >

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/8/2013 6:43:34 PM   
Chickenboy


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Page 2 purgatory?  I think not!  Bump...

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/10/2013 5:46:51 PM   
Canoerebel


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3/21/42
 
Battle of SW Cape:  A very quiet day.  The Japanese finished of stricken CA Exeter, but Prince of Wales has separation and the KB seems about out of sorties.  (There's a chance John has the recent Bay of Bengal Branch of the KB highfooting it here on an intercept course, but that's the only chance for him at this point, I think.)  New Orleans is at Perth and Allied aircraft are arriving in numbers.  So, should the KB retire, re-arm, and return, a different reception will be awaiting.

Too Good to be True:  The Sydney Branch of the KB is in the same hex as the IJN replenishment convoy, south of Hobart.  My carriers are 41 hexes distant.  They will continue on an intercept course on the off chance that John's ships might dally or even remain in the vicinity as the anvil of a future blocking force (but if he doesn't know where my carriers are, he's much more likely to move west and fast).

Oz:  John's appetite and lust for blood has been whetted.  I wonder if the lack of opposition in Oz will persuade him to have ambitions here?  Some of the US reinforcements that have been held up are now moving towards Sydney, for reasons Bradford Kay noted.

India:  I am very close to declaring an "all-clear" here.  In game terms it is drawing late for a major move on India and I indeed believe John's lust will fix on Oz.  Formidable just reached Capetown.  She will join Indomitable and Hermes, which can later join the Americans, should an invasion of Cocos take place.

China:  The Chinese far right flank at Nanning and vicinity is toast, but the MLR is intact and looks good.  John can penetrate into the interior from Nanning and vicinity, but doing so will be very slow.  The Chinese have good interior lines. 

NoPac:  Mutsu and Nagato bombard Cold Bay.  Yamato is still around too.  I still get reports of enemy "carrier planes," but that may be an artifact or error.

Pacific:  Quiet.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/10/2013 8:48:21 PM   
paullus99


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Don't know what he hopes to accomplish having his BB's up north when he's exposed almost his entire carrier arm around Australia.....

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/10/2013 9:15:18 PM   
Canoerebel


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3/22/42
 
Too Good to be True:  Dang if the Sydney Branch of the KB didn't move NE today, ending up two hexes due south (true) of Hobart.  The carriers even wasted some sorties in  sinking AM Warramwood.  My carriers are just 25 hexest NE (true).  If John moves NE tomorrow, we're going to be very close indeed.  What in the world is the lad thinking?  (I could have moved my carrier aircraft to Hobart in hopes of a surprise, but I think that might be ineffective and spook John, so I'm rolling the dice here on a full carrier engagement.)

Battle of the SW Cape:  No action at all today.  PoW is about 12 hexes from the map edge.

DEI:  The Allies still hold Singers, meaning my previous report was incorrect, meaning we have a SYNC problem here.  But holding Singers to March 23 is a good thing.

China:  An IJA division has interdicted the orad between Kweilin and Hengyang.  That's bad for my ability to reinforce between the two sectors, but John's forces are pretty dispersed right now.  The Chinese have pushed back a few IJ units, so John's got probably as many problems here as he does opportunities.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/10/2013 9:38:38 PM   
obvert


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Oh my.

If the P of W gets away, and he moves his CVs into range ...

wow.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 2:52:57 PM   
Canoerebel


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3/23/42
 
Too Good to be True:  Augh!  So close.  So tantalizing.  So elusive!  The Sydney Branch of the KB moved NW to a point just seven hexes SW of Melbourne (had I foreseen that and loaded up Melbourne's airfield with my carrier divebombers, I would have had a free crack at them!).  My carriers are just 20 hexes to the east.  They are badly in need of refueling and will have to stop at Melbourne.  The Japanese are loitering like John wants to remain in this vicinity in order to control the SE tip of Oz, but this really does seem "too good to be true."  He's going to just barely and blindly manage to elude my carriers, but I'll keep trying. (QE is two day's due east of Sydney - she's got the all-clear since the American carriers are between her and the S-Branch KB.)

Battle of the SW Cape:  No action today.  PoW continues its steady march to the map edge.  I think she's so far out there now that there's no longer any real risk of an intercept.  The other enemy carrier TFs have retired past Carnavon and may be refueling and rearming at Soerabaja or Babeldaob.  New Orleans is in port at Perth.  I'd like to move her, so I'm recalling a destroyer to act as an escort.  She has low FLT and ENG damage, but very high SYS damage.

DEI:  Singers is still in Allied hands.

Luzon:  Clark is still in Allied hands. 

India: Very quiet.  Diego Garcia is at 3/3 port/airfield.  7th Aussie Div. is 55% prepared for Cocos Island, though the KB will have to go somewhere far, far away before I'd consider such a move.  Yamashiro and Fuso bombard Port Blair.

China:  The Japanese take very lightly held Nanning.  The Chinese mess up the remnants of another tank unit.  Despite the recent incursions by dispersed and relatively small Japanese armies here and there, the MLR is intact.  I think the Chinese can handle what's happened thus far.  Based on troop movements, John is bringing more forward into the Nanning sector and may try another gambit at Changsha, but the Chinese, while outnumbered, aren't at a decided disadvantage and are holding in very good terrain. Unless I'm missing something, the Chinese can slow or stop any major Japanese moves for a long time.

NoPac:  Nothing happened today.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 2:58:35 PM   
Bullwinkle58


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It might be worth it for you guys to do a very structured proper-order update to the newest beta. That's a nasty synch bug and were I John I'd be livid that I had taken Singers but I didn't take Singers. This is now several days, right?

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 3:03:10 PM   
Canoerebel


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I think my replay showed the fall of Singers four or five days ago.  If John knew that, he'd probably order a shock attack, knowing that my forces were so weak that the slightest push would topple them.

That's a good suggestion about re-installing.  I'll suggest it as soon as Singers falls, as I don't want to broach the topic and give John any ideas beforehand.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 3:37:25 PM   
Bullwinkle58


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

I think my replay showed the fall of Singers four or five days ago.  If John knew that, he'd probably order a shock attack, knowing that my forces were so weak that the slightest push would topple them.

That's a good suggestion about re-installing.  I'll suggest it as soon as Singers falls, as I don't want to broach the topic and give John any ideas beforehand.


I don't have any personal experience with synch bugs, so I'm on thin ice. But what is "truth" now from the game's POV? Singers is major. If John's side shows him owning it he might be moving aircraft there, sweeping mines, have run TFs past the CD, and have sent some LCUs off to do other things. Given how many tries he took to "take" it if he finds out he really doesn't have it, and he needs more time to move LCUs back again, he might blow a gasket.

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 3:39:41 PM   
obvert


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Bullwinkle58


quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

I think my replay showed the fall of Singers four or five days ago.  If John knew that, he'd probably order a shock attack, knowing that my forces were so weak that the slightest push would topple them.

That's a good suggestion about re-installing.  I'll suggest it as soon as Singers falls, as I don't want to broach the topic and give John any ideas beforehand.


I don't have any personal experience with synch bugs, so I'm on thin ice. But what is "truth" now from the game's POV? Singers is major. If John's side shows him owning it he might be moving aircraft there, sweeping mines, have run TFs past the CD, and have sent some LCUs off to do other things. Given how many tries he took to "take" it if he finds out he really doesn't have it, and he needs more time to move LCUs back again, he might blow a gasket.


The open turn shows what is real even if there has been a sync bug. So you might see different replays, (I think the Allied is the 'false replay, while the Japanese is the correct one), but once in the turn the truth is what is on the map, and is the same for both players.


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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 3:40:19 PM   
Canoerebel


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[Edited to Note: This is in reply to Bullwinkle's post] I don't think that's how the sync bug works (at least from prior experience).  I still have it and he's still bombing it every day.  So he knows the true state of things.  The only misleading thing was that his last attack reported "unsuccessful" for him, while it showed "successful" for me.  Then, when I opened the file for the next turn, I discovered that Singers actually hadn't fallen.

< Message edited by Canoerebel -- 2/11/2013 4:10:46 PM >

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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 3:46:08 PM   
kjnoel

 

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I've encountered the sync bug a couple of times - without any sort of update or anything changes, it just "seems" to happen occasionally.

I know about it because my opponent sends me his combat report while I'm at work so I spot major differences when I run my (allied) replay at home. The simple constant seems to be that the reality is always what the Japanese player sees (this makes sense because the replay sent to the Allied player is a separate file to the processed turn), the Allied player seems to see an alternative reality that never happened. I get the impression it happens a fair amount but most times the differences are so minor nobody ever realises.

(in reply to Bullwinkle58)
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RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 4:16:28 PM   
Bullwinkle58


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

[Edited to Note: This is in reply to Bullwinkle's post] I don't think that's how the sync bug works (at least from prior experience).  I still have it and he's still bombing it every day.  So he knows the true state of things.  The only misleading thing was that his last attack reported "unsuccessful" for him, while it showed "successful" for me.  Then, when I opened the file for the next turn, I discovered that Singers actually hadn't fallen.


OK.

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The Moose

(in reply to Canoerebel)
Post #: 624
RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 7:31:21 PM   
Canoerebel


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3/24/42
 
Battle of the SW Cape:  One of the KB Branches caught and dispatched PoW, one of the saddest moments I've experienced.  The rest of the Allies ships have already passed map's edge, with the exception of several moderately damaged CLs that were accompanying PoW.  This largely brings the battle to an end.  Overall, Japan scored a big victory in this battle.  Drat!

Too Good to be True:  The S-Branch of the KB moves west.  Drat!  She's now 21 hexes from my carriers, which have to stop at Melbourne...but not yet.  I can't risk them being caught in port if the S-Branch reverses course.  If the IJN carriers continue moving west tomorrow, I'll offload my aircraft and send them to Perth, where they'll join 70 fighters and 45 Banshees.

Oz:  The stacked up reinforcement convoys are moving again.  Some will head to Sydney, some to Melbourne.  Alot of fighters and bombers are coming, plus most of two US Army divisions, some tanks, and some engineers.  I need about ten days to get them all into port.

Pacific:  A cruiser TF led by CA Indianapolis tangles with an IJ transport convoy up near Lunga, dispatching a handful of PBs and perhaps some xAKL and xAK.

DEI:  Singers finally falls.  John will likely shift his air power to Clark Field and will probably invade Port Blair.  With air transports of supply obviated, I've spread out the Dutch patroal aicraft between Batavia, Manado and Djakarta to see if I can pick up any reports of sexy ships.

India:  Quiet.

China:  MLR intact, with various manuevers ongoing in the Nanning to Liuchow sector.

NoPac:  Quiet.

(in reply to Bullwinkle58)
Post #: 625
RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 8:29:40 PM   
Capt. Harlock


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quote:

Battle of the SW Cape: One of the KB Branches caught and dispatched PoW, one of the saddest moments I've experienced. The rest of the Allies ships have already passed map's edge, with the exception of several moderately damaged CLs that were accompanying PoW. This largely brings the battle to an end. Overall, Japan scored a big victory in this battle. Drat!

Too Good to be True: The S-Branch of the KB moves west. Drat! She's now 21 hexes from my carriers, which have to stop at Melbourne...but not yet. I can't risk them being caught in port if the S-Branch reverses course.

[ ... ]

DEI: Singers finally falls.


Ouch, a grim turn. I wouldn't have thought the loss of northern Oz could be played into a naval victory like that...

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(in reply to Canoerebel)
Post #: 626
RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 9:03:11 PM   
Canoerebel


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3/25/42
 
Battle of SW Cape:  Okay, now the battle is officially over, only because the last two lingering ships - CL Glasgow and CL Durban - were finished off.  I"m going to prepare a tally sheet of all the ships sunk and post that in a little while.  That will not be pretty viewing!

Oz:  The S-Branch of the KB retired further west and disappeared from my patrol network, which is pretty good along the south coast.  Accordingly, I've ordered the American CVs to Melbourne.  Each carrier is sending an SBD squadron to Perth (via Alice Springs, of all places, only because it's a good halfway point.)  I've also off loaded the fighter squadrons to Melbourne to try to get those critters upgraded.  Right now, at Perth, I have two Kittyhawk and two P-40E squadrons (the latter with experience of 60 is darn good).  I also have 47 Banshees with 72 SBDs on the way.  QE is unloading 27th/C Div. at Sydney.  The transports carrying 27th/B Div. to Sydney are about four days out, due east.

DEI:  I'm basically down to Batavia and Manado.

India:  Quiet.

China:  MLR intact.

Pacific:  Quiet.

< Message edited by Canoerebel -- 2/11/2013 9:04:19 PM >

(in reply to Capt. Harlock)
Post #: 627
RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 9:24:19 PM   
Canoerebel


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Here's the Butcher's Bill - all Allied ships lost in the Great Australian Chase during middle and late March.  You decide - is this a brutal number, or is the number deceptive?  I think the latter, but the loss of Prince of Wales was very tough.

BB - 1 (Prince of Wales)
CA - 1 (Exeter)
CL - 5 (Glasgow, Dragon, DeRuyter, Danae and Tromp)
DD - 5 (only Electra and Welke are worth more than 5 points)
AM - 8
xAK - 13 (four worth more than 5 points)
xAKL - 24
xAP - 1 (worth 12 points)
AO - 6 (one - Karumba - worth more than 5 points)
AG - 1
AS - 1 (Platypus is worth more than 5 points)
TK - 4 (Augustana, Francol and Gulfdawn worth more than 5 points)
AMc - 4
PC - 2
AVD - 1
CM - 3
PT - 2

In total, 19 ships worth more than 5 points were sunk.

On the flip side, I think the Allies claimed CA Suzuya, possibly one CL, and probably one to three DDs.  A meager tally.

(in reply to Canoerebel)
Post #: 628
RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 9:44:14 PM   
Cap Mandrake

 

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Canoe;

I really liked the tornado story. Darn close call!

I did find myself wondering if the waitress was attractive. If you can't say, I understand.


As for John splitting his carriers. He does that all the time and sometimes something really bad happens to them.

(in reply to bradfordkay)
Post #: 629
RE: The Good The Bad & The Indifferent - 2/11/2013 9:52:01 PM   
Canoerebel


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Cap, on the possibility - the one in a trillion possibility - that I someday may become famous enough that the press will scour the most obscure sources for samples of my writing and opinions, I decline to answer your question.

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
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