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RE: Thanks - 11/14/2012 9:21:39 PM   
Lützow


Posts: 1488
Joined: 7/22/2008
From: Germany
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C'mon guys, let's share some more pics and stories. Guess we never had that kind of history thread here.

(in reply to radic202)
Post #: 31
RE: Thanks - 11/15/2012 10:02:57 AM   
british exil


Posts: 1524
Joined: 5/4/2006
From: Lower Saxony Germany
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Radic thanks for your post.

I know what you meant. I think most of us do not glorify the Wars in the past, but are more interested in the strategy, weapons, men etc.

The horrors of war are too well known and esp in the age of colour Tv can be seen in our own homes.
Or as I read recently since US Cival War photografers took pics of the wounded and dead, did the people at home realize what a battle meant.
The campaigns of earlier centuries mostly show only the victors side (Romans vs Barabarians), or the dashy uniforms from the Napolionic era.

I think this might be a reason why the German schools do not dwell on the Wars, as the teachers had experienced the horrors. The school corriculum was more or less established after 1950's, so either the teachers were veterans of the war or were the survivors of the bombings in the Reich. The pupils would have had similar experiences too. I guess it was try to forget the past and press on forward. The 3rd Reich was something they wanted to forget fast.


Mat


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(in reply to Lützow)
Post #: 32
RE: Thanks - 11/15/2012 11:49:24 AM   
Charly G


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Joined: 9/25/2004
From: France
Status: offline
2 different stories in my family:

- From the side of my mother: I have no information for WWI. For WW2, my uncle was wounded during the Campaign of France (1940). During the Occupation, he refused the defeat and he committed suicide. My mother was very affected by this event (she found his brother dead at home). I don't know why he prefered to commit suicide instead of doing the Resistance.

- From the side of my father: My grandfather was lucky during WWI, he was one of the marechal Petain driver's and didn't see not many action. For my grandmother, it was a tragedy. In her family, they were 13 children, all the boys were killed in action during the war.
During WW2, my father began the fight against Hitler with the Resistance and joined the French 1st Army of general De Lattre de Tassigny in 1944. He fighted in Alsace and Germany.
After the War, he joined the French Foreign Legion and fighted in the French Colonial Wars. Many of his friends during this period were old German soldiers of WW2 (one of his best friend was a soldier who has fighted in the 12th SS Pz Division "Hitlerjugend". This one was seriously wounded in the Indochina War and became blind). My father was seriously wounded in 1960 during the Algerian War. This wound allowed him to meet my mother. They married in 1961 and I was born in 1962.

Now in France, all French soldiers of WWI are passed on. After the death of the last "poilu" soldier, the 11th November became the day of all the soldiers killed in action for France.

(in reply to british exil)
Post #: 33
RE: Thanks - 11/18/2012 11:53:10 AM   
radic202


Posts: 349
Joined: 6/7/2012
From: Ontario, Canada
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British Exile:

Merci mon ami d'avoir partagé ton histoire. Grandement apprécié!

Hey Gang:

Please by all means share your stories, this is so awesome for some of us to read. I mean I have been to many and I mean many countries in the world on Business, Have some dandies from my stay in Rwanda just before and at the beginning of the genocide plus some others my time helping refugees from Kosovo into Albania to feeding the injured an hungry in Haiti after the earthquake, to helping Water deprived people in Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala, Belize, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Madagascar, Reunion Island, Helping peeps in Eire (Ireland) strategize on fighting the government for better laws and of course Human Rights on that issue on instituting legalizing of Abortion (in the news lately), on a supply ship delivering vital supplies to Palestinian off the Gaza strip (unsuccessful though), even here in Canada protecting the Great Lakes from polluting industries and exporting it outside Canada, fighting the dirty Tar Sands in Alberta (or at least making sure their disposal is non-toxic (don't believe the pro-corporate TV Commercials), Ensuring the poor in the world have safe drinking water, Attended the UN in New-York and Geneva, (as a listener/observer only on about 4 times)Completely against Water Fracking worlk hard with many Unions, work hard on ensuring Gay and LGTB rights to marriage, huge protector of French-Canadian rights in Canada outside Québec, Have run for candidacy to be a Liberal Candidate as an MP in Ontario's Legislator at Queens Park in Toronto (lost by a mere 1% last time), and many other countries in the world but some way too emotionally or way to hard or too sad for me to even share or rekindle those memories. Yep as many of you know I am a die-hard left leaning person. Run and Manage (with co-Leaders)my own Gaming Guild with just over 140 Members (for over 9 years) with mostly play RPG and MMOs (heck why I love this place as no one in my Guild play the type of Games available here). Huge Foreign Film Fanatic, Stamp Collector and love Canadian High End Rye and Chablis wine. Speak 3 almost 4 languages and can read another 2. Id you have any personal stories please by all means share no matter how trivial you think they are, I as well as many others am sure would love to read.

Not here to toot my horn (just giving you some background) but just saying that I have many and various stories to share and would love to hear yours.

Thanks in advance.

< Message edited by radic202 -- 11/18/2012 12:17:43 PM >


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Post #: 34
RE: Thanks - 11/18/2012 12:10:09 PM   
radic202


Posts: 349
Joined: 6/7/2012
From: Ontario, Canada
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: Empire101

Thanks for sharing radic202.

A lovely story.
Do you have any contact with the German officer?



Empire1:

Sorry for the delay but I checked with my Dad this morning while at the Royal Canadian legion during breakfast before his card tournament and he said that last he heard about the Colonel is that he retired near Lahr Germany more then 20 years ago but has not kept in touch. Maybe I will try myself, I would do anything to have that flag back, at least for a little while. Would donate it to "the Canadian War Museum" after a certain amount of time. I did donate to the museum a while back all (about 90% of my collection though) most of my my bullet fragments/shells and a couple of helmet pieces that I collected when living in the Ardennes while combing the ex-battlefields with my dad on our excursions an with permission from the local farmers of course.

BTW: my dad said the village with the King Tiger was Bastogne but he said he was not 100% sure. Just to see that trophy tanks again would send shivers down my spine as a memory!

Sorry I can't give you anything more, my dad says he thinks his last name Boot, Bathe or Bothe or something close to that but was not exactly sure.

< Message edited by radic202 -- 11/18/2012 12:18:38 PM >


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It is much harder to think about doing something than actually doing it!

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Post #: 35
RE: Thanks - 11/21/2012 9:22:43 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 17598
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Lützow

C'mon guys, let's share some more pics and stories. Guess we never had that kind of history thread here.
warspite1

Okay. Here is my Uncle Warspite (my dad's younger brother). The bravest man I ever knew. He joined up in the army at the time of the Munich crisis. Placed in the Infantry he was in the 4th Battalion Wltshire Regiment, part of the 43rd Wessex Division.

He spent most of the war training for the 2nd Front - the 43rd never went overseas - until a month after D-Day. The 43rd took part in may famous battles and engagements between then and the end of the war including the battle for hill 122. My Uncle was promoted in the field. He was injured twice, the first time when he took shrapnel to the head and was invalided back to the UK. He returned and was involved in the Rhineland campaign. Right at the end of the war he trod on a land mine near Hamburg that took his leg off, but he thankfully survived.

Exhibiting his extraordinary bravery, after the war he made the front page of the London Evening Standard. A thug tried to take his brief case from him. Despite the breifcase containing nothing of value, and having an artificial leg to contend with, he fought off the attacker (it was the principal!).

He collected a British Empire Medal from the Queen in the early 80's.

To Uncle Warspite RIP




Attachment (1)

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(in reply to Lützow)
Post #: 36
RE: Thanks - 11/21/2012 10:51:10 PM   
Lützow


Posts: 1488
Joined: 7/22/2008
From: Germany
Status: offline
quote:

Right at the end of the war he trod on a land mine near Hamburg that took his leg off


That's sad. On the picture he looks like a nice 18-years-old guy who joined forces right after school and didn't see much from life before he got marked by life.

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 37
RE: Thanks - 11/22/2012 12:55:53 AM   
radic202


Posts: 349
Joined: 6/7/2012
From: Ontario, Canada
Status: offline
Thanks Warspite1 for sharing, I love reading these stories as they are so personal and so unholywoodying! Please others as Ludzow mentioned "share some of your family historical stories.

_____________________________

It is much harder to think about doing something than actually doing it!

(in reply to Lützow)
Post #: 38
RE: Thanks - 11/22/2012 7:13:53 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 17598
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Lützow

quote:

Right at the end of the war he trod on a land mine near Hamburg that took his leg off


That's sad. On the picture he looks like a nice 18-years-old guy who joined forces right after school and didn't see much from life before he got marked by life.
warspite1

Correct! He was indeed 18-years old at the time of Munich.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Lützow)
Post #: 39
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