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OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music

 
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OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 1:09:45 AM   
Canoerebel


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Gents (and Lady),

When I was a youngster back in the 1970s, I listed raptly to country music. At the time, I thought country music was kind of the "soul of every day America." From the 1980s onward, I didn't listen to country. In the last year, through the power of the Internet, I've enjoyed going back to listen to some of the big songs of that era. Bear in mind, this is the first time I've listened to some of these songs in 40 years. Thus, I'm hearing them with "fresh and decidedly older ears."

One thing that is striking is the complete lack of responsibility shown by some of the "protagonists" in the songs. For example, there's a Don Williams hit (the name escapes me) that includes the line "...you know I'm a rake and rambling man, free as an eagle flies. Look at me now and tell me the truth, do I look like a daddy to you?"

Well, no, you don't. At least, not a good one.

Then there's "Delta Dawn," a hugely popular hit from the early '70s. A line in that song notes that "all the folks around Bronwnsville think she's crazy." Well, dang, she is. She's wandering around town with a suitcase in her hand looking for a mysterious brown-eyed man. She's bats.

Then there's the Dolly Parton hit, "Jolie." In this song, the protagonist is a woman begging another woman not to steal her husband. Come on. Either kick the woman's but or kick your husband's but for fooling around. But crawling to the "other woman"? Give me a break.

There was some awfully good and down-to-earth country music "back in the day," but alot of the rest left something to be desired.

Can you gents (and lady) think of other songs that, later in life, struck you in a different way?

Post #: 1
RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 2:06:20 AM   
Bullwinkle58


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Gents (and Lady),

When I was a youngster back in the 1970s, I listed raptly to country music. At the time, I thought country music was kind of the "soul of every day America." From the 1980s onward, I didn't listen to country. In the last year, through the power of the Internet, I've enjoyed going back to listen to some of the big songs of that era. Bear in mind, this is the first time I've listened to some of these songs in 40 years. Thus, I'm hearing them with "fresh and decidedly older ears."

One thing that is striking is the complete lack of responsibility shown by some of the "protagonists" in the songs. For example, there's a Don Williams hit (the name escapes me) that includes the line "...you know I'm a rake and rambling man, free as an eagle flies. Look at me now and tell me the truth, do I look like a daddy to you?"

Well, no, you don't. At least, not a good one.

Then there's "Delta Dawn," a hugely popular hit from the early '70s. A line in that song notes that "all the folks around Bronwnsville think she's crazy." Well, dang, she is. She's wandering around town with a suitcase in her hand looking for a mysterious brown-eyed man. She's bats.

Then there's the Dolly Parton hit, "Jolie." In this song, the protagonist is a woman begging another woman not to steal her husband. Come on. Either kick the woman's but or kick your husband's but for fooling around. But crawling to the "other woman"? Give me a break.

There was some awfully good and down-to-earth country music "back in the day," but alot of the rest left something to be desired.

Can you gents (and lady) think of other songs that, later in life, struck you in a different way?




"My Ding-A-Ling"?

N.B. that "Delta Dawn" was a Helen Reddy song, and she's not Countrytime USA. She's an Ausie and a Woman (Roaring Type, Mk 1972.)

"Jolie" ("Jolee"?) is a great song. It's rivaled by Kenny Rogers' "Ruby (Don't Take Your Love to Town"), and "You Picked A Fine TIme to Leave Me, Lucille." Lots of women in country music looking for a better deal than the starter husband.

My frat liked to sing that old Tom T. Hall classic, "I Love", but after "old pick-up trucks", we inserted a line about "girls who likes to (word which rhymes with truck)", but always finished "and traaaaaiiiiins" with big smiles.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 2:18:59 AM   
JeffK


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Joelene!!!!!!

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 2:27:53 AM   
JeffK


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Odd coincidences?

I became a John Denver fan in the 70's(have all of his "pre-OPS loss" albums) via The Irish Rovers, work out that link!

From there I enjoyed both Country and Western (Is there a difference?) but made another switch into Celtic Music, can sing in Gaelic (I dont have understand do I??)

Still like good country music, but there is very little around of what I class as good. Also like good classical music, totally scrambled brain.

OZ has a big Country music scene, lots of artists succeed in the USA.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 2:56:44 AM   
TOMLABEL


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Not country, but I still like this one: Son of a Preacher Man by Dusty Springfield.

< Message edited by TOMLABEL -- 11/1/2012 3:00:04 AM >


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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 3:11:20 AM   
Cribtop


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Country is the sound of Tennessee, originating in rural gospel sounds.

Western is more Texas and points West, epitomized by Bob Wills, who is still the King.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 3:44:26 AM   
Justus2


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I've always loved the song "The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia", but lets face it, the 'moral of the story' basically justifies the sister murdering the cheating girlfriend ("that's one body that'll never be found...")

Come to think of it, I don't think I will be able to hear the the line "Don't trust your soul to no backwoods Southern Lawyer" anymore without picturing Canoerebel... ;)

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 4:40:26 AM   
danlongman

 

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Around here there are a lot of cows, goofy hats and pick up trux and while
I never go to church without wearing my best cowboy boots ... C&W music
left me after "Wildwood Flower". I picture a mighty holocaust with rappers
and C&W musicians (?) battling to the death and the fallout raining on
all the glam and alt rock and disco types and anybody else who line danced
to "Achy, Breaky Heart" or listened to Journey or Michael Jackson. After that
all the "Hair" bands especially Bon Jovi get thrown into a lake of lava.
Is there a game in there somewhere?

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 4:44:44 AM   
jcjordan

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: TOMLABEL

Not country, but I still like this one: Son of a Preacher Man by Dusty Springfield.


Auburn or Alabama fan??? If you're one of those fans, you'll understand the joke on that

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Post #: 9
RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 5:39:26 AM   
ChezDaJez


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quote:

Come to think of it, I don't think I will be able to hear the the line "Don't trust your soul to no backwoods Southern Lawyer" anymore without picturing Canoerebel... ;)


Now, that's funny right there folks!

Chez

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 5:48:33 AM   
ChezDaJez


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Don't forget Loretta Lynn's early hit, "You ain't woman enough to take my man" That was based on her catching her husband Doolittle fooling around with some hussy.

And like B.J. Thomas sang about, country music back then was all about playing another "somebody done somebody wrong" song.

Look at the lyrics:

"Hey, wontcha play another somebody done somebody wrong song
And make me feel at home while I miss my baby, while I miss my baby

So please play for me a sad melody
So sad that it makes everybody cry-y-y-y
A real hurtin' song about a love that's gone wrong
'cause I don't want to cry all alone"


Chez

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 7:24:07 AM   
Canoerebel


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The Gatlin Brothers sang "I Just Wish You Were Someone I Loved," a popular but unbelievable song that includes these lines by a man talking to a woman who he's just bedded:

"I thought I had fallen forever in love
the minute your red gingham dress hit the floor.
But after I'd taken of all of your pleasures,
the hungry inside of me cried out there's more.
Don't misunderstand me it's not that you're lacking,
the fact is your beauty's what dreams are made of...."

Really? You would say that to a woman? Right!

This reminds me of a movie based on one of the John Grisham novels (perhaps it's "A Time to Kill"?) in which the protagonist, a successful lawyer, is married to an extraordinarily pretty and sweet wife played by Ashley Judd. Then - get this! - he cheats on her! Ashley Judd!

Okay, how about "Heaven's Just a Sin Away" by the Kendalls. This is a song about sex sung by as father and daughter duo. Yikes!

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 1:11:08 PM   
zuluhour


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Sorry to say, the closest I get to southern music, country, or western is the influence on the stones in Exile on Main Street, The Allman Bros. Band, and some Dead. I do however enjoy a little blue grass here and there.

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Post #: 13
RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 2:44:15 PM   
jeffk3510


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I'm a big 80/90s guy myself. However, it depends what mood I am in for the music I listen to.

All said and done, my favorite band is still Collective Soul.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 4:11:50 PM   
warspite1


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Gents (and Lady),

When I was a youngster back in the 1970s, I listed raptly to country music. At the time, I thought country music was kind of the "soul of every day America." From the 1980s onward, I didn't listen to country. In the last year, through the power of the Internet, I've enjoyed going back to listen to some of the big songs of that era. Bear in mind, this is the first time I've listened to some of these songs in 40 years. Thus, I'm hearing them with "fresh and decidedly older ears."

One thing that is striking is the complete lack of responsibility shown by some of the "protagonists" in the songs. For example, there's a Don Williams hit (the name escapes me) that includes the line "...you know I'm a rake and rambling man, free as an eagle flies. Look at me now and tell me the truth, do I look like a daddy to you?"

Well, no, you don't. At least, not a good one.

Then there's "Delta Dawn," a hugely popular hit from the early '70s. A line in that song notes that "all the folks around Bronwnsville think she's crazy." Well, dang, she is. She's wandering around town with a suitcase in her hand looking for a mysterious brown-eyed man. She's bats.

Then there's the Dolly Parton hit, "Jolie." In this song, the protagonist is a woman begging another woman not to steal her husband. Come on. Either kick the woman's but or kick your husband's but for fooling around. But crawling to the "other woman"? Give me a break.

There was some awfully good and down-to-earth country music "back in the day," but alot of the rest left something to be desired.

Can you gents (and lady) think of other songs that, later in life, struck you in a different way?


warspite1

Not sure what you are getting at here (apologies if I am being slow on the uptake). In the case of the Don Williams song, how are you seeing this in a different way? i.e. how did you see it to begin with? Same for the other two. When you listened to Jolene originally what did you think, compared to now?

I must admit I cannot recall many (if any) songs that have come to mean something different years later.

Recently I did however get the point of a particular track completely confused. I listened to Asleep (sung by Emily Browning) and thought it was a love song "Sing me to sleep" ........ "I don't want to wake up on my own anymore".
It was a while, and a few listens properly to the lyrics, before I realised that this may have a different meaning i.e. the girl wants to kill herself. I found out that this track was originally done by The Smiths which kind of proved beyond doubt which was the right meaning.

Ball-bouncingly beautiful, haunting song anyway (when sung by Browning)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IiLS1JtnRY

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 4:21:55 PM   
witpqs


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quote:

ORIGINAL: warspite1

I must admit I cannot recall many (if any) songs that have come to mean something different years later.


I recently heard someone on a podcast telling how he was talking some years ago with the members of the band America. At one point talk turned to bands having to do things like play weddings to make ends meet before they make the big time. But sometimes after they get big, bands are hired by very wealthy people for private affairs. They told him the story of being paid a large sum to do a wedding. The newlyweds asked them to make certain they did their song (which was somehow related to them getting engaged or when they first got together), Chair on a Highway. Being nice people - and well paid - during the reception they sang Venture a Highway as Chair on a Highway!

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 6:46:04 PM   
Cribtop


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CR, please consider the following old joke:

If you play Rock n' Roll music backwards, you hear devil worship. What happens if you play country music backwards?

You get your girl, your dog and your pickup truck back.

That said, your point is well taken. Many classic country songs concern drinkin', cheatin' and killin'. An interesting counterpoint to the supposedly prevailing culture of the Bible Belt.

Final point. I liked the joke I told above in middle and high school because my folks wouldn't let me listen to "the Devil's music" but were ok with country songs regardless of their wanton lyrics.

< Message edited by Cribtop -- 11/1/2012 7:59:59 PM >


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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 7:26:28 PM   
Canoerebel


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In college, I remember putting an ELO record on a turn-table, then using my finger to turn the record backwards. When you did so, you would hear, "This record is reversible, but time is not. Turn back! Turn back! Turn back!"

Cribtop captures the essence of what I was trying to say. Country music had sort of an "aura" of innocense and wholesomness of "back roads America," but when you actually listen to the lyrics, they often leave something to be desired.

To answer Warspite's question, the Don Williams song I refer to is about a man celebrating his desire to be "free." He doesn't have a job and gets a woman pregnant and now he's in a tizzy about being a daddy. (That kind of thing happens, of course, but starting families this way usually doesn't end up very good for the parents or the kids.)

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 9:24:19 PM   
warspite1


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

There was some awfully good and down-to-earth country music "back in the day," but alot of the rest left something to be desired.
warspite1

I maybe a little off base here, but I'm guessing you're not big into Eminem then Canoerebel?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GX-PA_0C5go

< Message edited by warspite1 -- 11/1/2012 9:30:08 PM >


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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 9:52:25 PM   
Canoerebel


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I think M&M is a rapper from the '90s? To the best of my knowledge, I've never heard one of his songs. I don't know anything about him personally, though I think I heard he's pretty profane. That's the sum of my M&M knowledge. On my Q Scale, he'd rate about 0.01 (well, I think that's a proper use of the Q Scale, but I'm fuzzy on that too).

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 9:56:19 PM   
warspite1


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

I think M&M is a rapper from the '90s? To the best of my knowledge, I've never heard one of his songs. I don't know anything about him personally, though I think I heard he's pretty profane. That's the sum of my M&M knowledge. On my Q Scale, he'd rate about 0.01 (well, I think that's a proper use of the Q Scale, but I'm fuzzy on that too).
warspite1

Yes it was supposed to be a light-hearted comment [hence the ] given Eminem's lyrics and the examples you quoted......

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 10:01:10 PM   
Canoerebel


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You're right. I'm not a big fan of profanity. Not only was the generation that came of age in the '30s and '40s the "greatest generation," it also was the "most tasteful generation." We've really gone downhill, though in some ways I think we've improved on the '70s. :)

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 10:23:54 PM   
crsutton


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Gram Parsons.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 11:13:06 PM   
zuluhour


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A little OT but I listen to 40's swing and big band when I spin some turns. It seems to go well with the romanticism of the sea and the war. I never would have guessed a couple of years ago I would buy some Benny Goodman and Dianna Krall on I tunes.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 11:23:50 PM   
ctangus


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quote:

ORIGINAL: JeffK

From there I enjoyed both Country and Western (Is there a difference?)



Link

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/1/2012 11:35:41 PM   
oldman45


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I liked the country ballads of the 60's and 70's. Marty Robbins comes to mind.

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/2/2012 12:47:05 AM   
The Gnome


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Favorite country song title: "How can I miss you when you won't go away?"

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/2/2012 1:51:17 AM   
ChezDaJez


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quote:

ORIGINAL: oldman45

I liked the country ballads of the 60's and 70's. Marty Robbins comes to mind.



I grew up listening to him and Johnny Horton. My mother loved them both. Marty Robbins was definitely the epitome of the Western balladeer. I always loved his album, "Gunfighter Ballads" and his song, "El Paso" was my favorite. I especially enjoyed the sequel "El Paso City".

As far as Johnny Horton goes, my mom loved "Sink the Bismarck" being English and all. She was somewhat less thrilled with his "Battle of New Orleans".

Chez

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RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/2/2012 2:03:03 AM   
ChezDaJez


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quote:

Cribtop captures the essence of what I was trying to say. Country music had sort of an "aura" of innocense and wholesomness of "back roads America," but when you actually listen to the lyrics, they often leave something to be desired.


There is one famous modern day country singer who I believe personifies that "aura of innocence and wholesomeness of back roads America" you seek and he is Alan Jackson. His songs always seem to be about family and the simple things in life. He seems to always to highlight the goodness in people. Even his song about 9/11, "Where were you when the world stopped turning?" is about real people's reactions to tragedy.

Chez

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Post #: 29
RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music - 11/2/2012 2:14:29 PM   
Canoerebel


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And there were lots of C&W singers and songs in the '70s that were wholesome or otherwise "innocent and good." Everyone in here that listened to C&W then could come up with scores of examples. Just a very few off the top of my head:

1. Ronnie Milsap ("Smoky Mountain Rain" and "Any Day Now")
2. The Judds ("Momma He's Crazy" and "Grandpa")
3. Charlie Pride ("Kiss and Angel Good Morning")
4. Tom T. Hall ("Old Dogs")
5. C.W. McCall ("Wolf Creek Pass")

The possibilities are endless.

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