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Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64 (A)

 
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Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64 (A) - 7/24/2012 4:23:02 PM   
TheLoneGunman


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Zen and the Art of Waging War
TheLoneGunman (Japan) versus adsoul64 (Allies)


"It is better to conquer yourself than to win a thousand battles. Then the victory is yours. It cannot be taken from you, not by angels or by demons, heaven or hell."
Buddha



Greetings! Having recently found enough time to proceed with a PBEM game, I have decided to start an AAR of my version of the war for everyone to read and participate in. As the titles suggests, I will be quoting heavily from Eastern philosophy in an attempt to both inspire and guide my campaign. Turn progress will be at a relaxed pace and methodical, though it may speed up as the war goes on, I'm in no hurry and want to enjoy this game with no pressure. adsoul64 has been kind enough to work with me to make sure we both had an understanding of what we wanted from a long-term game, so I'm looking forward to matching wits with him. I'll also give adsoul64 a chance to post in here once before banishing him from the thread until our game is concluded. With the introduction complete, let's move on to the game settings and rules shall we?

Game Settings:

DaIronBabes C (Beta MP Version)
- FOW: On
- Advanced Weather: On
- Allied Damage Control: On
- PDU: On
- Historical First Turn: Off
- Dec. 7th Surprise: On
- Reliable USN Torps: Off
- Realistic R&D: On
- No Unit Withdrawals: Off
- Reinforcements:
Allied: +-15 Days
Japan: +-15 Days
- Combat Reports: On
- Auto Sub Ops: Off
- Set All Facilities To Expand At Start: Off
- Automatic Upgrade Ships and Air Groups: Off
- Accept Air and Ground Replacements: Off
- Turn Cycle: 1

House Rules:

- You must pay PP for restricted units crossing national borders
- No 4E bombers below 10K ft (Naval attacks only)
- Invasions only in base/dot hexes
- No invasions with fragmented units
- No new Allied TFs on Day 1, no new orders to A/C and LCUs (Except China)
- Fighters should fly CAPs and Sweeps no higher than their second highest MVR band
- The Soviet military should operate completely independent of the other Allied powers when activated (so no US base forces or bombers attacking Japan from the Soviet Union or Soviet-controlled territory)
- No Turn 1 Mersing Gambit
- No unrealistic manual resizing of air groups (max size: 42)
- We play on if auto-victory is achieved

House rules of course are not set in stone, and myself and adsoul64 reserve the right to discuss, change, remove, or add house rules as the need arises. That being said, we are both interested in having a plausible game, so expect to see us working towards that. The premise is that the Japanese were better prepared for their war against the Allies, and so start the war with some additional forces.

Also, as of this time I believe adsoul64 is not planning on writing an AAR (if you guys would like to try and convince him, feel free!), but just in case he does change his mind, please remember to respect the OpSec of both parties.

I hope everyone enjoys the AAR!

And goodluck adsoul64!

< Message edited by TheLoneGunman -- 7/24/2012 4:25:33 PM >
Post #: 1
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/25/2012 9:40:49 AM   
adsoul64


Posts: 251
Joined: 1/23/2012
From: Milan Italy
Status: offline
Hi everybody,

TheLoneGunman has been so kind to give me the chance of posting on his AAR. I’m really excited to start a game against him. He looks a very competent player and after 2 PBEM started against players who has showed themselves not very dedicated and left after about a month I’m looking forward to a good game. OTOH, I understand he’s planning to slaughter me or at least I can infer from his willing to go on even after an auto-victory!
Anyway I will try and make his life harder and harder. Last months I read a lot of AAR and I’ve some ideas that I hope will be unexpected. I would like to thanks especially GreyJoy v. Q-Ball and Panzerjager Hortlund v. Canoe, I hope I’ve learnt a lot from the four of you. Now, let’s talk guns, and enjoy the reading.

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 2
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/25/2012 9:49:27 AM   
obvert


Posts: 7516
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
Status: offline
I'll be looking forward to the philosophy discussions!

Banzai!

_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to adsoul64)
Post #: 3
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/25/2012 2:56:01 PM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
Status: offline
Ok now that adsoul64 is out of the picture, we can get to the meat and potatoes of my campaign planning.

Our HRs (and lack thereof of certain ones) open up some possibilities.

We have no HR against strat bombing, so I'm free to bomb the pesky Chinese into the stone age and hopefully conquer all of China. A Chinese conquest should make doing an India invasion possible if I want to go that route. This also means I need to be careful with my invasion of certain areas such as Palambang. If I seize the DEI without proper air cover, he'll be able to wipe out all of my oil capacity.

I'm also considering using the Kwantung Army to cross the Sino-Soviet border early due to our HR that the Soviets are to operate independently of the other Allies. One clarification to that HR is that the Allies are allowed to ship convoys of supplies to the Soviets if war starts, since there was historical precedent for that, but there won't be any B-17s bombing the Home Islands from Vladivostok. The Soviets shouldn't get any real reinforcements until 1945 correct? If I can attack and cut off the majority of the Sovet's Far East troops in '42, what chance does he have of mounting an effective counterattack until the war in Europe is over?

I intend to be aggressive. Right out of the gate I have some daring opening moves planned out. The goal of the Japanese Navy will be to draw the Allied carriers out in a decisive battle, and I will focus on stretching the Allied supply lines and means of transportation as close to the map edges as possible. VPs are not important to me and so are not really going to be taken into account, what I want is to fight as successfully as possible against the Allies for the longest possible time. If I'm in a much stronger position by August of '45 than the Japanese were historically, I'll consider that a victory. If no Allied boots have reached Japanese soil by '46 I'll consider granting them some of the Emperor's mercy.

And one last thing from you guys. R&D. We have no HRs limiting R&D of Japanese aircraft and PDU is on, so my goal will be to streamline the units in place for the IJAAF and the IJNAF. What is the best way to handle my R&D factories? I know to expand them to 30 once they're set to the aircraft I want and to stock up on extra engines to get the engine bonus. But I've never fully understood the procedure for rushing aircraft into service. I want to set my R&D to the earliest available model initially so that I can get my factories built up the fastest, correct? Then I want to upgrade my fully built 30/30 factories over to the desired model I wish to accelerate, and I suffer no loss to my factories as long as the model is in the upgrade path, right?

As an example let's use the Ki-44 Tojo. Let's say for the sake of this disucssion that I want to acquire the Ki-44 Ic Tojo earlier than its historical date. To do so, I take my 0/30 R&D factory and have it set to the model of Ki-44 that is initially available the earliest, so we'll set the factory to the "Ki-44" model, which is the prototype model. Once the Ki-44 factories reach 30/30, I can then upgrade the factory directly to the Ki-44 Ic model? Or must I first upgrade the factory to the Ia, then the Ib, and finally the Ic?

I understand if I rush a particular model of aircraft, but not its preceding models, that I will not be able to use existing production without incurring penalties or losses (ie. I'd have to build my factories back up from scratch or convert one of my R&D factories over to production).

Any insight that the R&D gods of the forum could provide would be appreciated. Having seen Rader battle GreyJoy with late model aircraft has me thrilled to think with a little foresight and proper planning I too can field some awesome Japanese planes.

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 4
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/25/2012 3:16:39 PM   
ny59giants


Posts: 7309
Joined: 1/10/2005
Status: online
quote:

I'm also considering using the Kwantung Army to cross the Sino-Soviet border early due to our HR that the Soviets are to operate independently of the other Allies. One clarification to that HR is that the Allies are allowed to ship convoys of supplies to the Soviets if war starts, since there was historical precedent for that, but there won't be any B-17s bombing the Home Islands from Vladivostok. The Soviets shouldn't get any real reinforcements until 1945 correct? If I can attack and cut off the majority of the Sovet's Far East troops in '42, what chance does he have of mounting an effective counterattack until the war in Europe is over?


I would 'strongly' advise against attacking the 'Bear.' There is very little economic gain and once those troops get their full TO&E, you will be in trouble, IMO.

quote:

As an example let's use the Ki-44 Tojo. Let's say for the sake of this disucssion that I want to acquire the Ki-44 Ic Tojo earlier than its historical date. To do so, I take my 0/30 R&D factory and have it set to the model of Ki-44 that is initially available the earliest, so we'll set the factory to the "Ki-44" model, which is the prototype model. Once the Ki-44 factories reach 30/30, I can then upgrade the factory directly to the Ki-44 Ic model? Or must I first upgrade the factory to the Ia, then the Ib, and finally the Ic?


You can R&D the Tojo IIa. Once the factory (size 30) is fully repaired, you can move it to the next model in the series (IIb). You will not want to produce the "B" model, but you cannot skip it in your R&D efforts. What I do is change the "A" model to the "B" for one turn and then move it to the "C" model. Your factories will stay fully repaired. Skip it and many will be damaged. If you want the R&D factory to NOT go into production, the buttons to the right of the airframe need to be set to N-Y-N.

Suggestion - Read my recent posting in GreyJoy's AAR about using your PP differently at start and how the 56th Division can be combined at Babeldoab or on Mindanao (most of it starts pre-loaded at Hiroshima). I convert about 1/3 to 1/2 of my Aden's, all Toho, all Ehime, and all Akasi to carry troops. Use the largest ports to do this as it cuts down on time to do so.

Tracker is a Japanese players best friend!!

_____________________________


(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 5
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/25/2012 3:24:04 PM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
Status: offline
quote:

I would 'strongly' advise against attacking the 'Bear.' There is very little economic gain and once those troops get their full TO&E, you will be in trouble, IMO.


It's merely a consideration at this point, but my premise was that I'd much rather fight the Soviets early on better terms, than in '45 when they have tons of replacements and experience and are right in my own backyard. If an invasion is performed, how long would I be able to beat them back until they are nearly equivalent to their fighting power in a historical Soviet activation?

My goal for fighting the Soviets wouldn't be for any real economic gain, it would be to deny the enemy the chance of hitting me hard in '45 and would be making use of a bunch of troops I'd otherwise have simply sitting by idle.

quote:

You can R&D the Tojo IIa. Once the factory (size 30) is fully repaired, you can move it to the next model in the series (IIb). You will not want to produce the "B" model, but you cannot skip it in your R&D efforts. What I do is change the "A" model to the "B" for one turn and then move it to the "C" model. Your factories will stay fully repaired. Skip it and many will be damaged. If you want the R&D factory to NOT go into production, the buttons to the right of the airframe need to be set to N-Y-N.


Ok, that's about how I understood things to work. Good!

quote:

Suggestion - Read my recent posting in GreyJoy's AAR about using your PP differently at start and how the 56th Division can be combined at Babeldoab or on Mindanao (most of it starts pre-loaded at Hiroshima). I convert about 1/3 to 1/2 of my Aden's, all Toho, all Ehime, and all Akasi to carry troops. Use the largest ports to do this as it cuts down on time to do so.

Tracker is a Japanese players best friend!!


I'll definitely be looking into converting some of my ships to carry troops. Keep in mind that I'm playing the C version of DaIronBabes, so I have to be careful when it comes to my shipping, as supply capacities are reduced for both sides. It also means that if I can sink enough Allied shipping and stretch him thin enough, I can put a hurting on adsoul64's war efforts as well.

(in reply to ny59giants)
Post #: 6
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/26/2012 12:25:15 AM   
obvert


Posts: 7516
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
Status: offline
If you take care of China first, then go over the threshold into Soviet territory, you'll have a good chance to beat them back. If you haven't read it check out radar's 'Taming the Bear' AAR. A somewhat successful Soviet campaign that had problems later due to Allied 4Es being based in Soviet fields. You won't have that problem.



_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 7
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 7/27/2012 12:52:56 AM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: obvert

If you take care of China first, then go over the threshold into Soviet territory, you'll have a good chance to beat them back. If you haven't read it check out radar's 'Taming the Bear' AAR. A somewhat successful Soviet campaign that had problems later due to Allied 4Es being based in Soviet fields. You won't have that problem.




I've checked out Rader's AAR before. It was an interesting take.

I think I'll position my troops for a possible strike, but I won't make up my mind until China is handled first. My only problem would be that I'd be using the IJAAF squadrons that are normally used for pilot training in active combat.

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 8
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/1/2012 12:09:59 AM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
Status: offline
Just a quick update.

The AAR is not dead, I've simply had RL interrupt my plans for December 7th. I spent all week staying late and today I went for an interview for a promotion at my job. I won't know the results for a few weeks, but I've spent the rest of the day plotting like any good JFB should.

Part of my ongoing efforts is determining what aircraft I'd like to produce throughout the war. One of the early major issues is that the A6M2 does not have an updgrade path to any of the other Zero models with the exception of the Sen Baku model, and that particular model is not available until 1944. Obviously, I do not plan on keeping the A6M2 in production any longer than I have to, as the A6M5 is the better aircraft. Am I crazy if I want to try to hold off increasing the A6M2 factories? In my opinion, those factories are nearly useless once the better models are available, and I'll lose half of them if I switch them over to a different model. I've seen some AARs where the player simply halts production and waits for the Sen Baku, but I can't seem to justify not utilizing a factory complex in favor of waiting for a model of aircraft I probably won't need by the time it arrives.

Opinions as always are welcome.

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 9
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/1/2012 12:47:36 AM   
obvert


Posts: 7516
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
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Once the Sen Baku does arrive in 2/44, you can go through it to the A6M5b (6/44), the next in this path, without them being damaged. That puts you back on the main path to the A6M5c and the A6M8.

_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 10
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/1/2012 1:23:53 AM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
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Couldn't I just follow an alternate path and get those models much faster?

...

After re-reading I see what you are saying. I can upgrade the factories without them being damaged if I stick to that path, the only downside is I'd have to wait.

For aircraft like the Zero that have so many different variants, I'm not sure an effective strategy is to focus on bringing a single particular late-model aircraft into service much earlier. I think a better strategy might be to actually follow the upgrade path and expedite each variant by a few months so as to not cause any damage to production. Still makes me want to switch out the A6M2 factory as soon as a better model arrives. It will be damaged that one particular time, but will suffer no further damage and would add to production.

It's still simply a consideration.

Either way, I'd suffer a ton of damage to my factories if I wanted to bring the best models forward ahead of their earlier models. The only way to potentially avoid it would be to organize my R&D as such that I can allow some of the factories to convert once that model is advanced enough, and reserve the rest for future research projects. Then again, if I can get my late-war aircraft significantly earlier, how much extra research do I really need (except for maybe trying to get some jet fighters by 45)?

Edit: I'm rambling now, because I have at least 2 different ideas for how to handle this effectively, and can't make up my mind which route I'd take.

< Message edited by TheLoneGunman -- 8/1/2012 1:24:56 AM >

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 11
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/7/2012 2:47:26 AM   
TheLoneGunman


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Plotting for Turn 1 is nearly complete. I have the next two days off of work and adsoul should be returning home after being away for a few days. His Turn 1 should be much shorter, but I expect his Turn 2 will be much more intensive.

As for Japanese plans, we'll go into further details of them after the turn has been sent away, but I do plan on bold action right off the bat.

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 12
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/7/2012 5:52:27 AM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5925
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With PDU off, and a "no holds barred" situation, you should look at what you want to end up with and research from there.

Meaning, A6M series is good until 6/42 and ok until 12/42.  After that it is really dated.  What you need is the A7M series.  When you get the A6M8 is really moot as what you are facing at that point is far more potent.  So, I tend not to worry about researching the A6M series and instead first focus on the A7M Sam.  You could get it in late '43 with effort.  To me, that is far more interesting than whatever A6M plane I might have gotten.  Ditto for all of the other air platforms.

And, there are some choices to make. I haven't seen where there is complete agreement yet on the late war aircraft.  Lot of opinions.

Just my htoughts ....


_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 13
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/7/2012 1:31:42 PM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
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quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo

With PDU off, and a "no holds barred" situation, you should look at what you want to end up with and research from there.

Meaning, A6M series is good until 6/42 and ok until 12/42.  After that it is really dated.  What you need is the A7M series.  When you get the A6M8 is really moot as what you are facing at that point is far more potent.  So, I tend not to worry about researching the A6M series and instead first focus on the A7M Sam.  You could get it in late '43 with effort.  To me, that is far more interesting than whatever A6M plane I might have gotten.  Ditto for all of the other air platforms.

And, there are some choices to make. I haven't seen where there is complete agreement yet on the late war aircraft.  Lot of opinions.

Just my htoughts ....



To get the A7M in 43, I'd have to dedicate most, if not all of my R&D towards advancing that aircraft would I not? I'd need probably a dozen sets of 30(30) R&D factories and a surplus of A7M engines. Having never really seen the Sam much in any AARs, I'm slightly worried that their performance may not be worth the investment. A good example is Rader vs GreyJoy. Rader got the J7W Shinden much earlier than it was supposed to appear, but the aircraft itself faired worse in actual combat against GreyJoy than some of his other fighters.

Doing some quick re-reading, if I'm going to hedge my bets on particular late model fighter aircraft, I'm going to put my efforts into 3. The Ki-83, the Ki-84, and the A7M (I'd much rather invest in the A7M than the J7W so I at least have a decent carrier-capable aircraft in the late war). Once those aircraft are researched, all the excess R&D when they're complete will go towards jet fighters...


Edit: And PDU is On.

< Message edited by TheLoneGunman -- 8/7/2012 1:32:23 PM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 14
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/7/2012 5:18:21 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5925
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: TheLoneGunman

quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo

With PDU off, and a "no holds barred" situation, you should look at what you want to end up with and research from there.

Meaning, A6M series is good until 6/42 and ok until 12/42.  After that it is really dated.  What you need is the A7M series.  When you get the A6M8 is really moot as what you are facing at that point is far more potent.  So, I tend not to worry about researching the A6M series and instead first focus on the A7M Sam.  You could get it in late '43 with effort.  To me, that is far more interesting than whatever A6M plane I might have gotten.  Ditto for all of the other air platforms.

And, there are some choices to make. I haven't seen where there is complete agreement yet on the late war aircraft.  Lot of opinions.

Just my htoughts ....



To get the A7M in 43, I'd have to dedicate most, if not all of my R&D towards advancing that aircraft would I not? I'd need probably a dozen sets of 30(30) R&D factories and a surplus of A7M engines. Having never really seen the Sam much in any AARs, I'm slightly worried that their performance may not be worth the investment. A good example is Rader vs GreyJoy. Rader got the J7W Shinden much earlier than it was supposed to appear, but the aircraft itself faired worse in actual combat against GreyJoy than some of his other fighters.

Doing some quick re-reading, if I'm going to hedge my bets on particular late model fighter aircraft, I'm going to put my efforts into 3. The Ki-83, the Ki-84, and the A7M (I'd much rather invest in the A7M than the J7W so I at least have a decent carrier-capable aircraft in the late war). Once those aircraft are researched, all the excess R&D when they're complete will go towards jet fighters...


Edit: And PDU is On.

Sorry, I meant my comments to be PDU ON as well.

I agree with your thinking for the same reasons. A7M as it is carrier capable. 84 is one of the best, although the "b" model (I think) has much better armament but it is not in the path of the "a" model. (something to think about)

As for how many R&D factories ... if you have 4 fully repaired size 30, they will advance one month for each month you go. let's say you have them repaired by 4/1/42. So by 4/1/43 you will 'pulled' an aircraft in by 12 months. So an aircraft with a start date of 4/1/44 will then be available. by 10/1/43 you will have 18 months, so an aircraft with a start date of 4/1/45 will be available. The key is how fast can you get those factories fully repaired ...moreso than how many you set up for repair. (This is without the engine bonus, which I would definitely attempt to get on the Ha-45)

Last thought: nothing you have in your future will match the 51H or even the last Bolt straight up on specs. That means with evenly skilled pilots you have to have more numbers.

PS: don't forget the other aircraft ... bombers are a big deal ....

_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 15
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/7/2012 5:35:58 PM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo


quote:

ORIGINAL: TheLoneGunman

quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo

With PDU off, and a "no holds barred" situation, you should look at what you want to end up with and research from there.

Meaning, A6M series is good until 6/42 and ok until 12/42.  After that it is really dated.  What you need is the A7M series.  When you get the A6M8 is really moot as what you are facing at that point is far more potent.  So, I tend not to worry about researching the A6M series and instead first focus on the A7M Sam.  You could get it in late '43 with effort.  To me, that is far more interesting than whatever A6M plane I might have gotten.  Ditto for all of the other air platforms.

And, there are some choices to make. I haven't seen where there is complete agreement yet on the late war aircraft.  Lot of opinions.

Just my htoughts ....



To get the A7M in 43, I'd have to dedicate most, if not all of my R&D towards advancing that aircraft would I not? I'd need probably a dozen sets of 30(30) R&D factories and a surplus of A7M engines. Having never really seen the Sam much in any AARs, I'm slightly worried that their performance may not be worth the investment. A good example is Rader vs GreyJoy. Rader got the J7W Shinden much earlier than it was supposed to appear, but the aircraft itself faired worse in actual combat against GreyJoy than some of his other fighters.

Doing some quick re-reading, if I'm going to hedge my bets on particular late model fighter aircraft, I'm going to put my efforts into 3. The Ki-83, the Ki-84, and the A7M (I'd much rather invest in the A7M than the J7W so I at least have a decent carrier-capable aircraft in the late war). Once those aircraft are researched, all the excess R&D when they're complete will go towards jet fighters...


Edit: And PDU is On.

Sorry, I meant my comments to be PDU ON as well.

I agree with your thinking for the same reasons. A7M as it is carrier capable. 84 is one of the best, although the "b" model (I think) has much better armament but it is not in the path of the "a" model. (something to think about)

As for how many R&D factories ... if you have 4 fully repaired size 30, they will advance one month for each month you go. let's say you have them repaired by 4/1/42. So by 4/1/43 you will 'pulled' an aircraft in by 12 months. So an aircraft with a start date of 4/1/44 will then be available. by 10/1/43 you will have 18 months, so an aircraft with a start date of 4/1/45 will be available. The key is how fast can you get those factories fully repaired ...moreso than how many you set up for repair. (This is without the engine bonus, which I would definitely attempt to get on the Ha-45)

Last thought: nothing you have in your future will match the 51H or even the last Bolt straight up on specs. That means with evenly skilled pilots you have to have more numbers.

PS: don't forget the other aircraft ... bombers are a big deal ....


I'll take R&D away from all non-critical aircraft. Aircraft I intend to actually produce will retain at least one set of R&D factories so that they may upgrade directly to production. Bombers won't be neglected, I just won't be trying to advance them far ahead of schedule like I will the Sam and Frank. I'm also going to try to advance the Ki-44 IIc model to get it a little earlier since the IIb is almost worthless.

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 16
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/8/2012 9:25:19 PM   
TheLoneGunman


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Another question for the readership.

There are two infantry divisions in the Japanese Home Islands that are not restricted. I'd like to have them planned out for some nice juicy objective in the far off future. Any suggestions?

Also, there are a number of restricted infantry groups on the Home Islands, if I plan on using the Kwantung Army to fight the Bear, I'll be paying PPs for these units instead to use in my other campaigns, therefore I'd like to start planning where to use them now, since I won't be buying them out until I really need to utilize them. I'm guessing India or Ceylon would be the best place to start prepping them.

adsoul returned on Monday, only to inform me that he has more family events for the rest of the week, so now I no longer have a real solid deadline to finish my turn. I've got all of my Turn 1 naval invasions finalized, and most of my aircraft orders are now completed too. The attack on Pearl is also planned to as close to perfection as I can get it from my point of view. I'm sending a convoy of 15k supplies from the Home Islands to the Chinese Theater as well.

I fiddled slightly with production, but I didn't jump to any huge number of upgrades, factories only repair one per turn anyway, so I simply selected the factories I desired to upgrade and bumped them up by 1. I'm upgrading port size in any Japanese base that has room for expansion available and engineers present, and ordered any major airfields to expand if there was room. A few areas in the Home Islands also got orders to fortify.

I still haven't touched R&D yet. If I upgrade the factories to 0(30) do I pay for the expansion up front? Or do I only pay as they are repaired?

< Message edited by TheLoneGunman -- 8/8/2012 9:26:16 PM >

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 17
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/8/2012 11:50:05 PM   
PaxMondo


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I think one of the things every IJ player has to decide is what, if any, second level targets they will go after.  Your first level is the DEI and Burma.  After that, what do you intend to do?  China, OZ, India, the Bear?

Right now, I like China followed by India.  China completely secures your western flank until Soviet activation and even then reduces that threat as you have so many more div's to deal with the Bear.  India just gives you so many more HI mid-game that it allows you to have a very strong bank of HI for mid-game.  The other reason I like these two is that they do not depend upon any IJN outcomes.  I can play conservative with my KB and as long as it is a real threat, the USN can't start island hopping until late '43 .... maybe later if I get lucky and chew up their a/c and a few div's in India.

Just my thoughts .. plenty of other opinions on this.  Not sure any are better or worse, just player preference.

_____________________________

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Post #: 18
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/9/2012 12:18:20 AM   
TheLoneGunman


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quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo

I think one of the things every IJ player has to decide is what, if any, second level targets they will go after.  Your first level is the DEI and Burma.  After that, what do you intend to do?  China, OZ, India, the Bear?

Right now, I like China followed by India.  China completely secures your western flank until Soviet activation and even then reduces that threat as you have so many more div's to deal with the Bear.  India just gives you so many more HI mid-game that it allows you to have a very strong bank of HI for mid-game.  The other reason I like these two is that they do not depend upon any IJN outcomes.  I can play conservative with my KB and as long as it is a real threat, the USN can't start island hopping until late '43 .... maybe later if I get lucky and chew up their a/c and a few div's in India.

Just my thoughts .. plenty of other opinions on this.  Not sure any are better or worse, just player preference.


I'd like to be fairly ambitious. Phase 1 is the Southwest Pacific, to include the DEI, Philippines, Malaya, and New Guinea. Phase 2 should focus on Northern Oz, Ceylon, and Burma. Depending on how adsoul plays, I have options for a possible Phase 3 after this time. Phase 3 would consist of India proper, and Western Oz. During all of those phases, China will also be a priority. I'd like to take most of China without having to divert from my other objectives. If the Chinese theater needs a temporary shot in the arm to keep the offensive going, I have no problem moving troops from the Philippines over to assist once the Manila-Clark-Bataan trifecta is seized. I've got plans to put an early end to his defense of Luzon, so we'll see how that goes.

I believe that my success will hinge upon my ability to quickly wrap up the fighting in Luzon and Singers, so that those forces can be freed for the next set of objectives. My restricted units at home will be used for the later phases of the war, giving them ample time to prep (in anticipation of actions after the invasion bonus has gone away) as well as ample time for me to save up the required PPs.

Regarding the Bear. I've done some peeking around the Turn 1 Allied side of things (aside from my earlier games as the Allies) and I see that the Soviet Union has (correct me if I'm wrong) 1600 Light Industry, but no resources other than what are stockpiled to supply all of that industry. The only route for the Soviets to get resources if I cut the railways to the Far East is via China. Would a successful push in China combined with the cutting of the Trans-Siberian railway result in the Soviets slowly starving for supplies? Or would they receive some off-map resource convoys that I am unaware of? Successfully dealing with the Soviets is predicated on my ability to cut off the majority of his forces on the Pacific Coast, and destroy them there. The Soviet replacement rate is such, that I need to pocket and destroy his units, in rather the exact opposite fashion of dealing with the Chinese, who because they respawn in Chunking if destroyed with free replacements are better left to retreat as worthless shells. I believe I will need to come to a decision on whether or not to commit to an invasion of Russia by Jaunuary of 1942. The invading Kwantung Army must be capable of handling the fight by itself, the only exception being supply shipments to keep them fighting. I don't want to pull forces from other theaters to deal with the Soviets (unless it's 1944 and they're attempting some massive counteroffensive).

I believe due to our HRs, we could expect a rather realistic campaign against the Soviets, with the other Allies attempting to support Uncle Joe via supply convoys and trying to open up second fronts, instead of the highly implausible campaigns I've seen thus far where B-17s and US Army Divisions are fighting side-by-side with Russian Il-2s and T-34s.

Edit: I got so caught up in the final part of my post that I forgot to add something else. In regards to how you like the China-India style of invasions, I am in 100% agreement. A successful land-based campaign against the Allies opens up a ton of possibilities that the actual Japanese military never had a chance with. It allows for Japan to maintain a stronger presence even after the Japanese Navy loses naval supremacy. It also frees the carriers to go out and do more damage. One big goal of mine is force the US carriers to commit before they are truly ready. I have a few targets in mind to try and lure them out to play, but we'll need to see how aggressive adsoul is in the initial month of conflict.

< Message edited by TheLoneGunman -- 8/9/2012 12:22:39 AM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 19
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/13/2012 4:02:03 AM   
TheLoneGunman


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While I'm waiting for adsoul to get back from his family getaway, I took the liberty to do most of my ship converisons.

I converted several xAKLs over to ACMs, and the rest over to PBs. I also converted many of the CMcs I started off with over to PBs and other craft (I've got plenty of large mine layers more suited to the task after all). Then I took some of my faster xAKs and converted them to hold additional troops in order to supplement my xAPs and help me transport my armies in the early going. The slower vessels can move supplies for me. Also, all of the Ansyu-C's I had at a proper shipyard are now converting to PB as well. The 14 kt speed is great and they pack some larger guns than the rest of the patrol boats.

I also converted a bunch of TKs to AOs. I realize that the AOs hold less fuel, but I like having the extra refueling capacity for my naval forces while underway, and they get a nice boost to their AA suite when they make the change as well, which to me is an added bonus. I'll take survivability over max capacity any day.

What ships would make good tenders and repair vessels?

On the R&D side of things, I've begun to consolidate around my key future models. I've looked at taking the R&D facilities away from aircraft I have no intention of ever building. Next, I may take away some of the redundant R&D from other aircraft that I plan on building, but not on advancing. All research for A6M Zero models has been focused on the closest available variant, which is the Rufe float fighter, once the Rufe comes on line, the A6M5 is next in line. Current focus has been on the A7M, the Ki-83, and the Ki-84. I would also like to include a few additional facilities for the Ki-44 so I can progress to the Ki-44 IIc model quickly. If I have room to spare, I'll try to accelerate a better dive bomber for my carriers as well. Everything else will simply be waiting for the default date so I can switch to production.

I'm excited to think that monster Turn 1 is just about done, and I've run several test runs throughout the process. I'm also debating on what to do with my Vals when I strike Pearl Harbor. Their 250kg bombs don't penetrate the large battleships, but they do at times seem to knock out weaponry on top of them, and also sometimes hit a DD or CA in port as well. The other alternative is of course to strike the airfield with them.

Further advice, questions, or words of encouragement are always welcome!

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 20
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/13/2012 5:50:04 AM   
PaxMondo


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TheLoneGunman

Regarding the Bear. I've done some peeking around the Turn 1 Allied side of things (aside from my earlier games as the Allies) and I see that the Soviet Union has (correct me if I'm wrong) 1600 Light Industry, but no resources other than what are stockpiled to supply all of that industry. The only route for the Soviets to get resources if I cut the railways to the Far East is via China. Would a successful push in China combined with the cutting of the Trans-Siberian railway result in the Soviets slowly starving for supplies? Or would they receive some off-map resource convoys that I am unaware of? Successfully dealing with the Soviets is predicated on my ability to cut off the majority of his forces on the Pacific Coast, and destroy them there. The Soviet replacement rate is such, that I need to pocket and destroy his units, in rather the exact opposite fashion of dealing with the Chinese, who because they respawn in Chunking if destroyed with free replacements are better left to retreat as worthless shells. I believe I will need to come to a decision on whether or not to commit to an invasion of Russia by Jaunuary of 1942. The invading Kwantung Army must be capable of handling the fight by itself, the only exception being supply shipments to keep them fighting. I don't want to pull forces from other theaters to deal with the Soviets (unless it's 1944 and they're attempting some massive counteroffensive).

I believe due to our HRs, we could expect a rather realistic campaign against the Soviets, with the other Allies attempting to support Uncle Joe via supply convoys and trying to open up second fronts, instead of the highly implausible campaigns I've seen thus far where B-17s and US Army Divisions are fighting side-by-side with Russian Il-2s and T-34s.

I don't think the forces in theatre for IJ can take on both China and the SOV simultaneously. To be effective in China, I've had to use some of the Manchurian forces arrayed against the SOV. However, I will certainly be watching this with great interest if you decide to go after the SOV.

BANZAI!!!!


_____________________________

Pax

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Post #: 21
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/13/2012 3:26:24 PM   
TheLoneGunman


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I've given myself a month's time to consider such a move. So we'll see how China is looking by January, as well as our other prime objectives. If things are looking good, we'll invade. If not, we'll hold fast, and I'll probably start buying out Kwantung units to help my war effort.

Another R&D update. I've done a tally of the aircraft I'm focusing on accelerating thus far (I believe there are still a few R&D facilities researching aircraft I have no intention of ever using, so I still have some wiggle room). Here is what I come up with:

A6M2-N Rufe - 4 R&D Facilities
A7M2 Sam - 11 R&D Facilities
DY41 Judy - 6 R&D Facilities
Ki-44-IIa Tojo - 8 R&D Facilities
Ki-83 - 11 R&D Facilities
Ki-84a Frank - 12 R&D Facilities

At present levels would this be enough to significantly advance the 3 late war fighters I want to focus on? Or do they need closer to 15+ facilities to see a large advancement?

Some facilities will be rededicated to other late war research if they've reached their developmental endpoint. So to use the Ki-83 as an example, as soon as it goes into production, I can take all of the excess R&D facilities that I'm not converting to production and shift them (I'm willing to take the damage) to a new aircraft, say the Ki-201 and try to push that out before I have Allied troops swarming the Home Islands.

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 22
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/14/2012 4:29:36 AM   
PaxMondo


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TheLoneGunman

I believe I will need to come to a decision on whether or not to commit to an invasion of Russia by Jaunuary of 1942.


I absolutely agree. I think IJ needs a rather complete plan to start. Then of course, you need the flexibility to adapt to your opponent after hostilities are initiated. However, IJ can maintain the initiative through mid-43 if they play/plan well.

_____________________________

Pax

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Post #: 23
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/14/2012 4:47:47 AM   
PaxMondo


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TheLoneGunman

I've given myself a month's time to consider such a move. So we'll see how China is looking by January, as well as our other prime objectives. If things are looking good, we'll invade. If not, we'll hold fast, and I'll probably start buying out Kwantung units to help my war effort.

Another R&D update. I've done a tally of the aircraft I'm focusing on accelerating thus far (I believe there are still a few R&D facilities researching aircraft I have no intention of ever using, so I still have some wiggle room). Here is what I come up with:

A6M2-N Rufe - 4 R&D Facilities
A7M2 Sam - 11 R&D Facilities
DY41 Judy - 6 R&D Facilities
Ki-44-IIa Tojo - 8 R&D Facilities
Ki-83 - 11 R&D Facilities
Ki-84a Frank - 12 R&D Facilities

At present levels would this be enough to significantly advance the 3 late war fighters I want to focus on? Or do they need closer to 15+ facilities to see a large advancement?

Some facilities will be rededicated to other late war research if they've reached their developmental endpoint. So to use the Ki-83 as an example, as soon as it goes into production, I can take all of the excess R&D facilities that I'm not converting to production and shift them (I'm willing to take the damage) to a new aircraft, say the Ki-201 and try to push that out before I have Allied troops swarming the Home Islands.

First, you're committing 1,716,000 supply here to R&D. The issue isn't whether you can afford it, it is when can you afford it. I haven't played DBB C yet, but in terms of supply it is closer to Scen 1 than 2 AFAIK. In Scen 1, I wouldn't have 1716K of spare supply until about Apr/May 42 dependent upon how much I capture in the early conquests. YMMV. (Obviously you can start the R&D factory buiild earlier, but ...)

Next, I gave you the estimates above for the pull for 4 factories, so you should be able to extrapolate to see if your commitments will work. Once the factories are repaired, the start date will move forward very quickly. The question is how fast will they repair? A lot of different answers to that.

< Message edited by PaxMondo -- 8/15/2012 4:20:08 AM >


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Post #: 24
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/14/2012 2:41:06 PM   
TheLoneGunman


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I know that the closer to the original design date you are, the faster the R&D factories will repair. So in order not to completely burn myself out of supply in the early going, I will start my R&D efforts with the earlier aircraft as that is more likely to generate initial gains. For the first few months of the war, I'll gradually increase the rest, similar to what I'm doing with production at this time (I'm planning on adjusting production on a turn-by-turn basis initially).

After loading up the game to do a quick double-check, in DaIronBabes (which is DBB but with Scenario 2 changes), I presently have a grand total of slightly more than 3 million supply. My HI and LI generate about 19k and 9k of supplies respectively. Refineries generate 0 supply.

Even though I could afford the conversion right away, I'll go down the slow expansion route.

It's almost time to get this war started!

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 25
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/14/2012 9:33:12 PM   
TheLoneGunman


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I've sent adsoul an e-mail letting him know that I'm pretty much finished with Turn 1. Will continue to adjust and make preparations for my plans in the meantime until I hear back from him. I've determined which Kwantung units will gather along the Soviet border in anticipation for a green light to open hostilities. I've also assigned restricted Home Island units new prep targets so that if I buy them out sometime in 42 or 43 they will be ready to engage in either the Indian or the Australian theater.

I'm going to run a few test turns to make sure everything looks good.

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 26
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/15/2012 3:36:29 AM   
TheLoneGunman


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Ok Turn 1 is complete. The turn is now off to adsoul. Soon we'll see if all of my planning has paid off!

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Post #: 27
NIITAKA-YAMA NOBORE - 8/18/2012 3:19:01 AM   
TheLoneGunman


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NIITAKA-YAMA NOBORE

"The Way of the Samurai is one of immediacy, and it is best to dash in headlong."
Yamamoto Tsunetomo


December 7th, 1941

It is important when one seeks the Way, to reflect upon bold and decisive action. The philosophers of war across all ages have exclaimed that war is not merely won by battles alone. It is easy for one to lose a war in fact without one ever fighting a single battle. The great Empire of Japan, intentionally starved of resources by the United States and British Empire was now at risk of losing such a war. There was only one alternative. Attack. A single devestating blow to the United States would render it helpless long enough for Imperial troops to conquer great swathes of territory. This would allow Japan to gain access to the resources it needs to continue to sustain itself, and lead to its ultimate victory.

Word of war would reach Admiral Chûichi Nagumo this morning. A coded message dispatched by Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto read, "Niitaka-Yama Nobore" - Climb Mount Niitaka. The message gave Admiral Nagumo permission to unleash the greatest assembled fleet of aircraft carriers in history upon the US Pacific Fleet. Within hours, over 350 aircraft from the Kido Butai would descend upon Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Yet, this attack would only be the beginning, all across the Pacific there were Japanese forces preparing strikes by air and landings by sea. The forces of Japan were poised to dash in headlong.

The attack on Pearl Harbor is carried out by 6 fleet carriers of the Imperial Japanese Navy, the Akagi, Kaga, Sôryû, Hiryû, Shôkaku, and Zuikaku. In addition to the fleet carriers, the light carrier Ryûjô was also dispatched to support the attack, as well as the fast battleships Hiei and Kirishima providing cover. The A5M4 Claudes from the Ryûjô were ordered to provide escort for the rest of the aircraft in the case that enemy CAP was airborn at the time the attack was launched. As the aircraft approached their target, no Allied fighters were sighted. The A6M2 Zeroes were outfitted for the attack with 60kg bombs and ordered to strike the Hawaiian airfields, they would fly in and drop their ordnance at 10k feet. The D3A1 Val dive bombers would use their heavier 250kg bombs to do further damage to the airfields and any aircraft on the ground. Meanwhile, the B5N1 and B5N2 Kates would use their torpedoes and larger 800kg AP bombs to attack the ships in the harbor.

quote:

Morning Air attack on Pearl Harbor , at 180,107

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid detected at 98 NM, estimated altitude 13,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 32 minutes

Japanese aircraft
A5M4 Claude x 6
A6M2 Zero x 108
B5N1 Kate x 12
B5N2 Kate x 144
D3A1 Val x 135



Allied aircraft
no flights

Japanese aircraft losses
B5N2 Kate: 2 damaged
B5N2 Kate: 1 destroyed by flak
D3A1 Val: 8 damaged
D3A1 Val: 1 destroyed by flak

Allied aircraft losses
P-40B Warhawk: 1 destroyed, 73 damaged
P-40B Warhawk: 8 destroyed on ground
B-17D Fortress: 55 damaged
R3D-2: 1 destroyed on ground
B-18A Bolo: 43 damaged
B-18A Bolo: 2 destroyed on ground
PBY-5 Catalina: 137 damaged
PBY-5 Catalina: 4 destroyed on ground
SBD-1 Dauntless: 39 damaged
SBD-1 Dauntless: 3 destroyed on ground
B-17E Fortress: 9 damaged
B-17E Fortress: 1 destroyed on ground
P-36A Mohawk: 20 damaged
P-36A Mohawk: 1 destroyed on ground
F4F-3 Wildcat: 11 damaged
F4F-3 Wildcat: 1 destroyed on ground
A-20A Havoc: 31 damaged
A-20A Havoc: 1 destroyed on ground
O-47A: 11 damaged
O-47A: 1 destroyed on ground
C-33: 4 damaged

Allied Ships
BB Arizona, Bomb hits 5, Torpedo hits 2, on fire, heavy damage
BB Pennsylvania, Bomb hits 2, Torpedo hits 1, on fire
BB Maryland, Bomb hits 3, Torpedo hits 3, on fire
BB California, Bomb hits 6, Torpedo hits 3, on fire
BB Nevada, Bomb hits 1, Torpedo hits 2
DD Selfridge, Torpedo hits 1, on fire
BB West Virginia, Bomb hits 6, Torpedo hits 3, on fire, heavy damage
BB Tennessee, Bomb hits 1
CL Detroit, Bomb hits 1, on fire
BB Oklahoma, Bomb hits 3, Torpedo hits 2, on fire
SS Cachalot, Bomb hits 1
DM Pruitt, Bomb hits 1, on fire
CL Helena, Bomb hits 1, on fire


Allied ground losses:
10 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled


Repair Shipyard hits 1
Airbase hits 75
Airbase supply hits 4
Runway hits 132
Port hits 21
Port fuel hits 1
Port supply hits 1


When the attack was complete, Admiral Nagumo transmitted the coded message "Tora Tora Tora" - Tiger Tiger Tiger, to indicate that complete surprise had been achieved. Sadly, none of the US carriers were present at Pearl Harbor when the attack occurred. Combat reports also indicated the battleships Tennessee and Nevada were only minimally damaged, and that none of the battleships were sunk outright. The airfields were another matter entirely, hundreds of aircraft had been damaged, several destroyed outright, and the runways had been thoroughly cratered from the bombing. Such damage would leave Pearl Harbor vulnerable from the air to a second day of attacks if Admiral Nagumo was willing to commit to a follow-up strike. Losses were exceedingly light, 1 Kate and 1 Val were lost to enemy flak, the only two pilots to be killed in combat operations for the entire day for Japan. A few of the other bombers were damaged, but all managed to make it back to the carriers.

Meanwhile, the Japanese Embassy attempts to deliver a 14-page letter to the United States before the attacks commence, but the letters are delivered only after the US government receives word of the Pearl Harbor attack. In Japan, newspapers publish the official declaration of war against the United States of America and the British Empire.

quote:

Imperial Rescript

We, by grace of heaven, Emperor of Japan, seated on the Throne of a line unbroken for ages eternal, enjoin upon ye, Our loyal and brave subjects:

We hereby declare war on the United States of America and the British Empire. The men and officers of Our army and navy shall do their utmost in prosecuting the war, Our public servants of various departments shall perform faithfully and diligently their appointed tasks, and all other subjects of Ours shall pursue their respective duties; the entire nation with a united will shall mobilize their total strength so that nothing will miscarry in the attainment of our war aims.

To insure the stability of East Asia and to contribute to world peace is the far-sighted policy which was formulated by Our Great Illustrious Imperial Grandsire and our Great Imperial Sire succeeding Him, and which We lay constantly to heart. To cultivate friendship among nation and to enjoy prosperity in common with all nations has always been the guiding principle of Our Empire's foreign policy. It has been truly unavoidable and far from Our wishes that Our Empire has now been brought to cross swords with America and Britain. More than four years have passed since China, failing to comprehend the true intentions of Our Empire, and recklessly courting trouble, disturbed the peace of East Asia and compelled Our Empire to take up arms. Although there has been re-established the National Government of China, with which Japan has effected neighbourly intercourse and cooperation, the regime which has survived at Chungking, relying upon American and British protection, still continues its fratricidal opposition. Eager for the realization of their inordinate ambition to dominate the Orient, both America and Britain, giving support to the Chungking regime in the name of peace, have aggravated the disturbances in East Asia. Moreover, these two Powers, inducing other countries to follow suit, increased military preparations on all sides of Our Empire to challenge us. They have obstructed by every means our peaceful commerce, and finally resorted to a direct severance of economic relations, menacing gravely the existence of Our Empire. Patiently have We waited and long have We endured, in the hope that Our Government might retrieve the situation in peace. But our adversaries, showing not the least spirit of conciliation, have unduly delayed a settlement; and in the meantime, they have intensified economic and military pressure to compel thereby Our Empire to submission. This trend of affairs would, if left unchecked, not only nullify Our Empire's efforts of many years for the sake of the stabilization of East Asia, but also endanger the very existence of Our nation. The situation being such as it is, Our Empire for its existence and self-defense has no other recourse but to appeal to arms and to crush every obstacle in its path.

The hallowed spirits of Our Imperial Ancestors guarding Us from above, We rely upon the loyalty and courage of Our Subjects in Our confident expectation that the task bequeathed by Our Forefathers will be carried forward, and that the sources of evil will be speedily eradicated and an enduring peace immutably established in East Asia, preserving thereby the glory of Our Empire.

The 8th day of the 12th month of the 16th year of Showa.


Admiral Nagumo is left with a difficult decision. Have the Kido Butai remain near the Hawaiian Islands to launch a second strike on the 8th of December, or withdraw as planned and refuel for new operations. There is a risk that the US Pacific Fleet may attempt to sortie with its large number of relatively undamaged warships and seek a naval battle with Nagumo's carriers. Such an event could sink one or more of Japan's precious aircraft carriers, a loss that would be difficult to recover from.

Alternately, Nagumo could anticipate an Allied sortie and make preparations for an ambush. Such a plan could successfully deplete the US Navy of vital destroyers, cruisers, and even possibly one of the less damaged battleships. The downside is that the enemy may not even seek a naval battle, which would result in an entire day wasted when the Kido Butai could either be attacking or moving on.

The last option is to attempt to move away from a naval engagement while remaining close enough to Hawaii to launch a second strike. It is likely that aircraft losses would be much higher now that the element of surprise has been lost, but plans to reduce losses are also prepared. Bombers would be instructed to bomb from higher altitudes to avoid enemy flak, dive bombers would use either glide bombing or level bombing and torpedo bombers would use level bombing exclusively.

A hybrid option could involve setting the Kido Butai's entire contingent of dive bombers on "Naval Attack" orders while the torpedo bombers attempt to finish off any battleships languishing at Pearl Harbor. There is a risk that such an operation will leave one of the groups of bombers without an escort however, and this must be taken into account.



I look forward to discussing philosophy and war with you on this and many other subjects.

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 28
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/18/2012 2:56:09 PM   
TheLoneGunman


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Malaya

Japanese efforts in the region rely on the swift conquest of Singapore from the enemy. Initial landings were conducted at Kota Baru with Ki-27 Nates and Ki-43 Oscars providing CAP over the landing sites with several of the Nates also outfitted with small 50kg bombs to strike the enemy airfield. Ki-21 Sally bombers were also dispatched to provide ground support for the invasion. Oscars were ordered to sweep the surrounding areas, and more Sallies and Lily bombers were to strike Alor Star.

quote:

Morning Air attack on Kota Bharu , at 51,75

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 17 NM, estimated altitude 12,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-21-IIa Sally x 31
Ki-27b Nate x 40



Allied aircraft
Buffalo I x 1


No Japanese losses

No Allied losses


Allied ground losses:
102 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 5 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 5 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled


Airbase hits 7
Airbase supply hits 3
Runway hits 31

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Morning Air attack on Georgetown , at 49,74

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 15 NM, estimated altitude 16,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-43-Ia Oscar x 24



Allied aircraft
Blenheim IF x 2


No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
Blenheim IF: 1 destroyed



Aircraft Attacking:
23 x Ki-43-Ia Oscar sweeping at 15000 feet

CAP engaged:
No.27 Sqn RAF with Blenheim IF (2 airborne, 0 on standby, 0 scrambling)
2 plane(s) intercepting now.
Group patrol altitude is 6000
Raid is overhead

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Morning Air attack on Alor Star , at 49,73

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 27 NM, estimated altitude 12,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 7 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-21-IIa Sally x 48
Ki-27b Nate x 19
Ki-43-Ib Oscar x 13
Ki-48-Ib Lily x 55



Allied aircraft
no flights

No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
Blenheim I: 19 damaged
Blenheim I: 1 destroyed on ground



Airbase hits 28
Airbase supply hits 10
Runway hits 90

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Afternoon Air attack on Singora , at 51,72

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 17 NM, estimated altitude 8,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 5 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-27b Nate x 20



Allied aircraft
Blenheim IF x 3
Buffalo I x 13


No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
Blenheim IF: 1 destroyed



CAP engaged:
11th Sentai with Ki-27b Nate (4 airborne, 12 on standby, 0 scrambling)
4 plane(s) intercepting now.
Group patrol altitude is 10000 , scrambling fighters to 10000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 8 minutes
1st Sentai with Ki-27b Nate (0 airborne, 4 on standby, 0 scrambling)
Group patrol altitude is 10000 , scrambling fighters to 10000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 8 minutes

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Afternoon Air attack on Singora , at 51,72

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 10 NM, estimated altitude 7,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 3 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-27b Nate x 18



Allied aircraft
Hudson I x 3


No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
Hudson I: 1 destroyed



CAP engaged:
11th Sentai with Ki-27b Nate (0 airborne, 4 on standby, 0 scrambling)
10 plane(s) not yet engaged, 0 being recalled, 0 out of immediate contact.
Group patrol altitude is 10000 , scrambling fighters between 6000 and 10000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 68 minutes
1st Sentai with Ki-27b Nate (0 airborne, 0 on standby, 0 scrambling)
4 plane(s) not yet engaged, 0 being recalled, 0 out of immediate contact.
Group patrol altitude is 10000 , scrambling fighters to 12000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 40 minutes


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Afternoon Air attack on TF, near Kota Bharu at 51,75

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 19 NM, estimated altitude 15,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 6 minutes

Japanese aircraft
Ki-27b Nate x 21
Ki-43-Ib Oscar x 7



Allied aircraft
Blenheim IV x 6


No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
Blenheim IV: 1 destroyed
Blenheim IV: 1 destroyed by flak



CAP engaged:
11th Sentai with Ki-27b Nate (8 airborne, 0 on standby, 0 scrambling)
(7 plane(s) diverted to support CAP in hex.)
8 plane(s) intercepting now.
2 plane(s) not yet engaged, 0 being recalled, 0 out of immediate contact.
Group patrol altitude is 10000 , scrambling fighters between 6000 and 11000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 11 minutes
1st Sentai with Ki-27b Nate (4 airborne, 0 on standby, 0 scrambling)
(4 plane(s) diverted to support CAP in hex.)
4 plane(s) intercepting now.
4 plane(s) not yet engaged, 0 being recalled, 0 out of immediate contact.
Group patrol altitude is 10000 , scrambling fighters to 12000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 23 minutes
64th Sentai with Ki-43-Ib Oscar (0 airborne, 0 on standby, 0 scrambling)
7 plane(s) not yet engaged, 0 being recalled, 0 out of immediate contact.
Group patrol altitude is 15000 , scrambling fighters to 12000.
Time for all group planes to reach interception is 13 minutes
77th Sentai Det A with Ki-27b Nate (3 airborne, 0 on standby, 0 scrambling)
3 plane(s) intercepting now.
Group patrol altitude is 10000
Raid is overhead


British bombers attempted to disrupt the invasion at Kota Baru and the landings at Singora and Patani, but were shot down or driven away. No Japanese shipping was lost or even damaged during the operations. Securing Kota Baru alone will not be enough to cut off and capture Singapore. What is needed is to capture a large enough airfield that can house naval bombers for an interdiction campaign across Southern Malaya and portions of the Dutch East Indies.

Borneo

Luckily for the Japanese, such an airfield already exists at Singkawang. Pre-war intelligence indicated that the area was only lightly defended, but was close enough to Singapore and Johore Bahru that it was vulnerable to enemy air attacks. This made an invasion risky, but the rewards of a successful landing would be far greater, especially if surprise was achieved. In an attempt to supress British bombers from striking the invasion force, the Imperial Japanese Navy launched an airstrike on the airfields located at Johore Bahru. A large surface action group being led by the battleships Kongo and Haruna would provide cover for the operation to dissuade the Prince of Wales and Repulse from intervening. On their way to Singkawang, the battleships score the first confirmed ship sinking of the war by destroying the XAKL Dai Tung with only two hits.

quote:

Day Time Surface Combat, near Kuantan at 53,78, Range 20,000 Yards

Japanese Ships
BB Kongo
BB Haruna
CA Takao
CA Atago
CL Jintsu
DD Asashio
DD Oshio
DD Michishio
DD Arashio
DD Akatsuki
DD Hibiki

Allied Ships
xAKL Dai Tung, Shell hits 2, and is sunk

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Morning Air attack on Johore Bahru , at 50,83

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 18 NM, estimated altitude 13,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 6 minutes

Japanese aircraft
A6M2 Zero x 18
G3M2 Nell x 72
G4M1 Betty x 27



Allied aircraft
no flights

Japanese aircraft losses
G3M2 Nell: 1 damaged

Allied aircraft losses
Wirraway: 9 damaged


Allied ground losses:
8 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled


Airbase hits 27
Airbase supply hits 15
Runway hits 95


No enemy bombers ever attempt to attack the Singkawang invasion force, the results are credited to the successful bombing of Johore Bahru and a lack of fighter escorts with enough range to reach the area. As a result, none of the ships are sunk or damaged during landing operations.

Philippines

The invasion of the Philippine Islands is another important early objective for the Japanese Army. It is essential that the bulk of Philippine and American ground forces be routed early on so that operations elsewhere may continue unabated. To accomplish this, Japanese military planners have called for a bold invasion of Luzon in close proximity to Clark Field and the US Asiatic Fleet. A spearhead landing at Iba would place Japanese troops close enough to Clark field to capture it within days, while Iba itself was expected to fall on December 8th. By seizing Clark Field, the Japanese will have successfully driven a wedge between the largest concentrations of Allied troops on the island, dividing Bataan and Subic Bay from Manila. Then, Japanese troops would proceed toward Manila, and only after seizing the city would operations against the remnants in Bataan need to take place.

Weary of American airstrikes, the Japanese would attack Clark Field in the morning with over 100 bombers from both the Army and Navy. Several squadrons of cruisers and destroyers would also be included in the operations to ward off enemy surface forces as well as submarines. In addition, it was deemed critical that the forces located in Northern Luzon not be allowed a direct route toward Manila, so the Yokosuka 1st SNLF would conduct a paratroop landing of Cabanatuan. It was determined that any attempt by the enemy to dislodge the forces at Cabanatuan would cost them in terms of defense to Manila, and that if the main invasion force at Iba could move quickly enough that the paratroops would be able to link up within a week's time.

quote:

Morning Air attack on Clark Field , at 79,76

Weather in hex: Clear sky

Raid spotted at 34 NM, estimated altitude 13,000 feet.
Estimated time to target is 11 minutes

Japanese aircraft
A6M2 Zero x 90
G3M2 Nell x 36
G4M1 Betty x 54
Ki-21-IIa Sally x 18
Ki-48-Ib Lily x 27



Allied aircraft
P-26A x 4


No Japanese losses

Allied aircraft losses
P-26A: 2 destroyed
P-35A: 1 destroyed on ground



Airbase hits 28
Airbase supply hits 3
Runway hits 74

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ground combat at Cabanatuan (80,76)

Japanese Shock attack

Attacking force 369 troops, 6 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 24

Defending force 0 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 0

Japanese adjusted assault: 18

Allied adjusted defense: 1

Japanese assault odds: 18 to 1 (fort level 0)

Japanese forces CAPTURE Cabanatuan !!!

Allied aircraft
no flights

Allied aircraft losses
B-10B: 1 destroyed

Combat modifiers
Attacker: shock(+), leaders(-)



Assaulting units:
Yokosuka 1st SNLF /1


With Clark Field reduced to smoldering ruins, the invasion of Iba occurs without incident. No Allied bombers attempt an attack on the invasion force, and the Yokosuka 1st SNLF successfully seizes Cabanatuan from the enemy, also reporting that it discovered and destroyed an enemy bomber in the area.

Moluccas and Celebes

Landing operations begin at Ambon and Kendari. A small contingent of Dutch bombers attacks the task forces at Kendari but fails to score any hits. Neither invasion suffers any ship losses. Both bases are expected to fall on the 8th.

Rabaul

The highlight of our bold and aggressive strategy. Rabaul is bombarded by Japanese cruisers and destroyers covering an invasion of the area. It is essential that the base fall quickly, or the troops landed there could easily become isolated by Allied air and sea power. The light cruiser Nagara and the destroyers Umikaze, Kawakaze, and Yukikaze will remain on station to protect the landing force from Allied warships. There are no ships lost on day one of operations, the British are taken by complete surprise and offer no resistance from the air.

China

Chinese forces seem to be preparing for an attempted push into Ichang. Efforts to reinfoce the area are underway while Army High Command considers a withdrawal from the area. Forces progress towards Hong Kong and bombers strike the Hong Kong airfields damaging several British bombers.

Overall

It is critical to the pace of Japanese operations that the Imperial Japanese Military strike deep into enemy territory. Airfields, ports, and any areas capable of producing indigenous supply will be prioritzed first. All other areas can be starved and conquered in follow-up operations so as not to slow the rate of expansion. Ambon, Kendari, Iba, Singkawang, and Kota Baru are all expected to fall on December 8th. Rabaul may hold out for more than one day, but barring any unforseen circumstances should be seized by the Japanese within a week's time.

This will put major pressure on Allied shipping in several regions, denying them the ability to organize an effective retreat from areas such as Singapore and the Philippines. Hopefully, Allied naval losses will increase sharply as a result of these actions, and Japan will be able to deny transfer of supply throughout the region. Follow-up invasions are also being planned or are underway, with a task force already en route to Kuantan in Malaya, and a force steaming towards Palambang that can easily be diverted to Mersing if needed.



Only 5 Japanese aircraft are lost in the entire day's worth of operations. The only two pilots killed were the pilots of two bombers shot down over Pearl Harbor during the attack. Meanwhile, the destruction to the Allied air forces is great, and does not include damage inflicted to hundreds of other airframes that must now be repaired.

The Japanese report no ships lost, and the only ship to be confirmed sunk from the Allies is the Dai Tung.

All of our planning and efforts have bore fruit. It is a glorious day for the Empire.

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 29
RE: Zen and the Art of Waging War - TLG (J) vs adsoul64... - 8/29/2012 10:33:28 PM   
TheLoneGunman


Posts: 312
Joined: 1/12/2010
Status: offline
Turn 2 has been in adsoul's inbox for over a week. He's out of town with family, so I've been suffering withdrawal, and a game against the AI won't cut it.

While I wait, the AAR will be on hold and I have posted a message seeking a second opponent.

In the meantime, I have planned a few traps for adsoul's forces!

(in reply to TheLoneGunman)
Post #: 30
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