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RE: Meet the Forumites

 
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RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/28/2012 9:24:29 PM   
Mac Linehan

 

Posts: 1246
Joined: 12/19/2004
From: Denver Colorado
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Treetop64

quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Great story that I loved reading.  Thanks, Mac.


Indeed. Thank you very much, Mac.

Oh, and Semper Fi!

Marine Corps from 1989-1993, MOS - 0151 (Admin Pogue). Was in boot camp at San Diego exactly two weeks after high school graduation. Could not wait to get out of the house...

Relatively unspectacular stint, and kept out of office hours (unfortunately, a very common event where I was stationed). After boot camp and ICT (Infantry Combat Training) I was off to Admin School for three months, then returned to MCRD San Diego for duty at Headquarters Battalion. And there I remained for the remainder of my tour, doing paperwork every day, and dressing up for ceremonial muster every Friday morning. Got dirty going to CRT (Combat Readiness Training, for non-0300 types) at Camp Pendleton every six months, and qualifying at the range, which I absolutely loved. Made Sharpshooter in boot camp (five points shy of expert on a very windy day) and Expert every time since. Ultimately, though an obviously excellent military branch, I found that the Marine culture personally wasn't my cup of tea and I honorably discharged after four years.

> Aha! I knew that there was a reason I liked you, Sir!

I know exactly about the quality of people you worked with. Marines tend to hold themselves to an exceptionally high standard in every aspect.

Had difficulty in the civilian sector after getting out and joined the Coast Guard in 1995. Had a much better experience this time around, especially in boot camp. In fact, (except for the Cape May, NJ winter), I found Coast Guard boot camp rather enjoyable - no doubt a result of being hardened by the experiences in Marine Corps boot camp. I could even out-cadence most of the company commanders and was often called to march the company!

> Well, you are a Jar Head and must meet or exceed all expectations... <grin>

After graduating I was stationed for six months on the USCGC Courageous (MEC 622, a 210' cutter) in Panama City, Florida, while on a wait-list for Avionics Technician A-School. A-School was exactly what I hoped it would be: eight hours a day, five days a week of nothing but Ohms Law, trons, engineers manuals, and tons of math! We were trained to troubleshoot everything electronic on an aircraft down to the component level. My soldering skills were particularly noted by the chief instructor as being "very clean", and of "having a nice touch".

Graduated A-School and was stationed to service and help fly HC-130s at Air Station, Sacramento, CA. The cool thing about Coast Guard aircrews is that they fly as crewmen on missions as well as servicing the aircraft when parked on the ramp, so AVTs also flew as radiomen, navigators, and radar operators. Enjoyed the duty, the prestige of being an aircrewman, and had plenty of time off even with 1-in-4 duty rotation (on emergency call every four days).

> While I am singularly unimformed about the US Coast Guard, I do know that they do a stellar job policing our coast line - in addition to overseeing the enormous amount of maritime trade that is one of the lifelines of our nation.

And: It was patiently explained to me, that when a Coast Guard Cutter intercepts a drug insertion vehicle - be it full sized ship or specially designed high speed motor boat, with millions of dollars worth of drugs onboad, the Bad Guys do not meekly follow instructions. That's why there are 7.62mm and the awesome .50cal weaponry mounted on a cutter...

But I fell in love with California and decided to get out in 2000 and try to make a life here. It's been a roller coaster ride ever since, with more down slopes (and a couple of crashes) than up slopes...

I took the obvious course and got work servicing avionics at a local airport. Eventually I discovered, to my disappointment, that for the job I needed as much metalworking skills as electronic skills, and I had none of the former. It was needed for upgrades and modifications to aircraft avionics. If you installed new, non-standard equipment you also had to fabricate the mounts for them, and the FAA has very strict mandates on how mounts are fabricated and installed in aircraft. Surprisingly, metalworking actually consumed more time than anything else. In C-130s, all the mounting hardware you'll ever need in the avionics and cargo bay is already there. Furthermore, as good as I thought I was with aircraft systems, my competency was nowhere near that of the civilian techs who have been there doing the job for decades. It wasn't going to last, and I admitted as much to my boss, who expressed his appreciation to my critical self-analysis. He offered me a position in the admin section of the office but I turned it down.

Tried returning to school and have been in and out of college a few times. Got good grades and did particularly well in math and trig, even tutored on the subject, but for some reason I just couldn't stick it out for the duration. It's been a very troubling thing; I don't understand it.

> Because you have more than the 3 Megs of Ram that I have...

Landed a good job at Centex Homes in San Ramon as an assistant project manager (this position recommended the applicant be a college grad, but I impressed well enough to get the position even though I hadn't finished college). Eventually however, the internal politics, egos and personality conflicts, as well as some open racism (I'm mixed race) made the job unbearably difficult and I resigned after little over one year. Centex itself was acquired not long after.

> God does not see a particular color, only his beloved child.

On the side, I started my own little business of consulting and building PCs and workstations. It was a bit informal as I built gaming PCs as a hobby, but it began to take on a life of it's own, growing by word-of-mouth more than anything else. I received some pretty nice checks while doing that, at times more than my salary at Centex, but things started getting complex with licencing and legal issues and as I was the only guy in the enterprise it became overwhelming. It eventually petered out.

The last good job I had was at Sony in Foster City. That wasn't to last, either: my department closed shop and moved to San Diego, and there was no option to tag along.

That was two years ago and I've been unemployed ever since. I've been subsisting mostly on my own savings but that will disappear soon. My problem is that I tend to be extremely hard on myself, and I tend to avoid personal relationships and social situations. I have no family, no siblings, and both parents died many years ago, so I rely on myself for counsel - not always the best of situations, admittedly. I had a nervous breakdown after Centex ("friends" suddenly disappeared, the girlfriend at the time left abruptly the day I quit, the "business" was dying, and I had difficulty finding new work) and admitted myself to a hospital because I was becoming suicidal, and I remained there for several months for treatment.

Everyone experiences difficulties, but my attitude and outlook has the effect of magnifying things way beyond their reasonable bounds. I'm able to say that looking back in hindsight, but it's very difficult for me to adjust that perspective in the present time. Your post went a long way in making me feel better, and I really appreciate you taking the time to post it.

> Your identity is based solely on God - and you are always secure, regardless of the human claims and challenges. I normally take care not so speak so frankly on this forum - there are folks of a wide range of beliefs who post and read this forum; but it is important that you know who you really are - the full, complete expression of God. And that expression includes right income, housing and companionship.

Ok, sorry. I've hijacked this thread enough!

> Nothing to apologize for; I recognize that it took a great deal of courage to tell us more about yourself. The folks here are a very divergent group, but all have an exceptionally high standard of ethical behavior and are, in my view, trustworthy.

EDIT: P.S. @ JWE - Thanks for that. Noted your comments after I posted.


Mac

_____________________________

LAV-25 2147

(in reply to Treetop64)
Post #: 271
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 12:19:47 AM   
Lifer

 

Posts: 382
Joined: 6/8/2003
From: Caprica
Status: offline
After being called out and complimented by Mac, I guess it is time to post my info. Thanks for the kind words Mac. FSMAO - Field Supply and Maintenance Analysis Office. Words that struck fear into many a Maintenance Officer and Chief.

Job: General Manager for a fleet maintenance company servicing and maintaining a county fleet. Yep, still a maintenance chief.
Age: 52
Residence: Columbia, SC.
Family: Wife of 32 years, two great kids who have both just become home owners, 8 cats, a dog, 2 grand cats (my daughters) and a grand dog (my sons).
Education: Eldorado HS, Albuquerque, NM and some college picked up in the Marines.
Favorite Quote: Alcohol, because no great story ever started with, "There I was, eating a salad..."
Reading: Deep Economy by Bill McKibben. I was talking with my Brother-in-Law about how a conservative view of the US was so much better than his liberal view. He challenged me to read a book espousing his view and he would read a book with mine. Just finished reading Six Days of War by Michael Oren.

Greg

_____________________________

Man does not enter battle to fight, but for victory. He does everything that he can to avoid the first and obtain the second.
Ardant du Picq

(in reply to Onime No Kyo)
Post #: 272
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 4:30:27 AM   
Mac Linehan

 

Posts: 1246
Joined: 12/19/2004
From: Denver Colorado
Status: offline
Greg!

FSMAO - such an innocuous name (kinda like IRS), that, when casually bandied about, could cause the meanest of the toughest (or a wanna be like me) to pucker on the spot - I know cause it worked on me... <grin>

And the Humor is:

Deploying from 29 Palms, we thought we were escaping a scheduled California FSMAO by boxing and banding all the gear left behind (to prevent theft and, more importantly, to frustrate the FSMAO Inquisitors) then cleverly skying out of the country for an all expenses paid trip to Asia. That illusion lasted about 24 hours after deplaning at Naha (IIRC).

Great to hear from you, Sir!

Mac

_____________________________

LAV-25 2147

(in reply to Lifer)
Post #: 273
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 12:50:39 PM   
Skyros


Posts: 1275
Joined: 9/29/2000
From: Columbia SC
Status: offline
Some one else from SC, now I don't feel so all alone.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Lifer

After being called out and complimented by Mac, I guess it is time to post my info. Thanks for the kind words Mac. FSMAO - Field Supply and Maintenance Analysis Office. Words that struck fear into many a Maintenance Officer and Chief.

Job: General Manager for a fleet maintenance company servicing and maintaining a county fleet. Yep, still a maintenance chief.
Age: 52
Residence: Columbia, SC.
Family: Wife of 32 years, two great kids who have both just become home owners, 8 cats, a dog, 2 grand cats (my daughters) and a grand dog (my sons).
Education: Eldorado HS, Albuquerque, NM and some college picked up in the Marines.
Favorite Quote: Alcohol, because no great story ever started with, "There I was, eating a salad..."
Reading: Deep Economy by Bill McKibben. I was talking with my Brother-in-Law about how a conservative view of the US was so much better than his liberal view. He challenged me to read a book espousing his view and he would read a book with mine. Just finished reading Six Days of War by Michael Oren.

Greg



_____________________________


(in reply to Lifer)
Post #: 274
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 5:23:11 PM   
geofflambert


Posts: 4759
Joined: 12/23/2010
From: St. Louis
Status: online
ORIGINAL: Treetop
Indeed. Thank you very much, Mac.

Oh, and Semper Fi!

Marine Corps from 1989-1993, MOS - 0151 (Admin Pogue). Was in boot camp at San Diego exactly two weeks after high school graduation. Could not wait to get out of the house...

Relatively unspectacular stint, and kept out of office hours (unfortunately, a very common event where I was stationed). After boot camp and ICT (Infantry Combat Training) I was off to Admin School for three months, then returned to MCRD San Diego for duty at Headquarters Battalion. And there I remained for the remainder of my tour, doing paperwork every day, and dressing up for ceremonial muster every Friday morning. Got dirty going to CRT (Combat Readiness Training, for non-0300 types) at Camp Pendleton every six months, and qualifying at the range, which I absolutely loved. Made Sharpshooter in boot camp (five points shy of expert on a very windy day) and Expert every time since. Ultimately, though an obviously excellent military branch, I found that the Marine culture personally wasn't my cup of tea and I honorably discharged after four years.

I know exactly about the quality of people you worked with. Marines tend to hold themselves to an exceptionally high standard in every aspect.

Had difficulty in the civilian sector after getting out and joined the Coast Guard in 1995. Had a much better experience this time around, especially in boot camp. In fact, (except for the Cape May, NJ winter), I found Coast Guard boot camp rather enjoyable - no doubt a result of being hardened by the experiences in Marine Corps boot camp. I could even out-cadence most of the company commanders and was often called to march the company! After graduating I was stationed for six months on the USCGC Courageous (MEC 622, a 210' cutter) in Panama City, Florida, while on a wait-list for Avionics Technician A-School. A-School was exactly what I hoped it would be: eight hours a day, five days a week of nothing but Ohms Law, trons, engineers manuals, and tons of math! We were trained to troubleshoot everything electronic on an aircraft down to the component level. My soldering skills were particularly noted by the chief instructor as being "very clean", and of "having a nice touch".

Graduated A-School and was stationed to service and help fly HC-130s at Air Station, Sacramento, CA. The cool thing about Coast Guard aircrews is that they fly as crewmen on missions as well as servicing the aircraft when parked on the ramp, so AVTs also flew as radiomen, navigators, and radar operators. Enjoyed the duty, the prestige of being an aircrewman, and had plenty of time off even with 1-in-4 duty rotation (on emergency call every four days). But I fell in love with California and decided to get out in 2000 and try to make a life here. It's been a roller coaster ride ever since, with more down slopes (and a couple of crashes) than up slopes...

I took the obvious course and got work servicing avionics at a local airport. Eventually I discovered, to my disappointment, that for the job I needed as much metalworking skills as electronic skills, and I had none of the former. It was needed for upgrades and modifications to aircraft avionics. If you installed new, non-standard equipment you also had to fabricate the mounts for them, and the FAA has very strict mandates on how mounts are fabricated and installed in aircraft. Surprisingly, metalworking actually consumed more time than anything else. In C-130s, all the mounting hardware you'll ever need in the avionics and cargo bay is already there. Furthermore, as good as I thought I was with aircraft systems, my competency was nowhere near that of the civilian techs who have been there doing the job for decades. It wasn't going to last, and I admitted as much to my boss, who expressed his appreciation to my critical self-analysis. He offered me a position in the admin section of the office but I turned it down.

Tried returning to school and have been in and out of college a few times. Got good grades and did particularly well in math and trig, even tutored on the subject, but for some reason I just couldn't stick it out for the duration. It's been a very troubling thing; I don't understand it.

Landed a good job at Centex Homes in San Ramon as an assistant project manager (this position recommended the applicant be a college grad, but I impressed well enough to get the position even though I hadn't finished college). Eventually however, the internal politics, egos and personality conflicts, as well as some open racism (I'm mixed race) made the job unbearably difficult and I resigned after little over one year. Centex itself was acquired not long after.

On the side, I started my own little business of consulting and building PCs and workstations. It was a bit informal as I built gaming PCs as a hobby, but it began to take on a life of it's own, growing by word-of-mouth more than anything else. I received some pretty nice checks while doing that, at times more than my salary at Centex, but things started getting complex with licencing and legal issues and as I was the only guy in the enterprise it became overwhelming. It eventually petered out.

The last good job I had was at Sony in Foster City. That wasn't to last, either: my department closed shop and moved to San Diego, and there was no option to tag along.
quote:


That was two years ago and I've been unemployed ever since. I've been subsisting mostly on my own savings but that will disappear soon. My problem is that I tend to be extremely hard on myself, and I tend to avoid personal relationships and social situations. I have no family, no siblings, and both parents died many years ago, so I rely on myself for counsel - not always the best of situations, admittedly. I had a nervous breakdown after Centex ("friends" suddenly disappeared, the girlfriend at the time left abruptly the day I quit, the "business" was dying, and I had difficulty finding new work) and admitted myself to a hospital because I was becoming suicidal, and I remained there for several months for treatment.

Everyone experiences difficulties, but my attitude and outlook has the effect of magnifying things way beyond their reasonable bounds. I'm able to say that looking back in hindsight, but it's very difficult for me to adjust that perspective in the present time. Your post went a long way in making me feel better, and I really appreciate you taking the time to post it.

Ok, sorry. I've hijacked this thread enough!

EDIT: P.S. @ JWE - Thanks for that. Noted your comments after I posted.


Treetop64 seems to have some friends and social situations here.

(in reply to Treetop64)
Post #: 275
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 10:15:27 PM   
Cap Mandrake

 

Posts: 16610
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: USS America


quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Awfully good to see Q-Ball posting in the AE forums today.  Seems like he's trying to get re-download the game onto his current computer.  Having a player of his caliber back will be very nice.  :)



I agree, but this does sound a little bit like a man crush.



Hory crap! That is funny haha

(in reply to USS America)
Post #: 276
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 10:20:10 PM   
Cap Mandrake

 

Posts: 16610
Joined: 11/15/2002
From: Southern California
Status: offline
Wow, Mac...great story!

(in reply to Mac Linehan)
Post #: 277
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/29/2012 10:30:29 PM   
Misconduct


Posts: 1841
Joined: 2/18/2009
From: Cape Canaveral, Florida
Status: offline
Sorry I've been gone for so long, I bought myself a new PC after my laptop crashed, finally back to return to my PBEM.


_____________________________

ASUS Maximus IV Extreme-Z Intel Core I7 2800k Corsair Hydro Heatsink Corsair Vengeance DD3 24GB EVGA GTX 580 Western Digital 1.5TB Raid 0 Windows 7

(in reply to Cap Mandrake)
Post #: 278
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/30/2012 2:47:51 AM   
Alfred

 

Posts: 3650
Joined: 9/28/2006
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Blackhorse

Congratulations! You are the second person -- after me -- to admit trying to read the Franco-Prussian War.

Well researched, I thought, but very, very dry reading.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Blacksheep

Job: Retired from Veterans Admin.
Age: 62
Residence: Ellicott City, MD
Education: BA Political Science, MA Military History
Family: Wife, son, daughter, daughter in law and Bailey (a small and evil dog)
WorK: Volunteering with the National Park Service
Quote: In War Resolution, In Defeat Defiance, In Victory Magnaminity, In Peace Goodwill -- WSC
Reading: The Franco Prussian War




Is that the Howard book of the 1960s or the Geoffrey Wawro book of 2003. I found the latter to be quite an easy and interesting read. A very good follow up to his earlier book on the Austro-Prussian war of 1866.

Alfred

(in reply to Blackhorse)
Post #: 279
RE: Meet the Forumites - 4/30/2012 11:41:32 AM   
Blackhorse


Posts: 1926
Joined: 8/20/2000
From: Eastern US
Status: offline
Wawro's. Meticulously detailed, but too dry for my taste. I have not read Howard.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Alfred


quote:

ORIGINAL: Blackhorse

Congratulations! You are the second person -- after me -- to admit trying to read the Franco-Prussian War.

Well researched, I thought, but very, very dry reading.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Blacksheep

Job: Retired from Veterans Admin.
Age: 62
Residence: Ellicott City, MD
Education: BA Political Science, MA Military History
Family: Wife, son, daughter, daughter in law and Bailey (a small and evil dog)
WorK: Volunteering with the National Park Service
Quote: In War Resolution, In Defeat Defiance, In Victory Magnaminity, In Peace Goodwill -- WSC
Reading: The Franco Prussian War




Is that the Howard book of the 1960s or the Geoffrey Wawro book of 2003. I found the latter to be quite an easy and interesting read. A very good follow up to his earlier book on the Austro-Prussian war of 1866.

Alfred



_____________________________

WitP-AE -- US LCU & AI Stuff

Oddball: Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
Moriarty: Crap!

(in reply to Alfred)
Post #: 280
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/1/2012 12:33:16 AM   
RevRick


Posts: 2539
Joined: 9/16/2000
From: Dontblinkyoullmissit, GA
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nikademus

I'll go with whichever author can get to the point faster.....



You must have read one too many by Isaac, or you heard about him early and shied away!!!

_____________________________

"Action springs not from thought, but from a readiness for responsibility.” ― Dietrich Bonhoeffer

(in reply to Nikademus)
Post #: 281
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/1/2012 2:00:13 AM   
Jorge_Stanbury


Posts: 743
Joined: 2/29/2012
From: Lima and Toronto
Status: offline
New to the forum, not nonetheless:

Job: Business Consultant in Demand Planning (Supply Chain Management)  
Age: 35
Residence: Toronto, ON, Canada
Education: MBA 
Family: Mother, sister and brother, many cousings and nephews, no significant other... yet
Work: At McCain Food in a SAP implementation
Quote: so many, I like any from Cormac McCarthy, but to keep it appropriate to a wargamer's forum:
"It makes no difference what men think of war, said the judge. War endures. As well ask men what they think of stone. War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him. The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner. That is the way it was and will be....
War is the ultimate game because war is at last a forcing of the unity of existence. War is god." Blood Meridian
Reading: "Pacific Crucible" ... I am just recently getting very interested in the Pacific War. I have "Battle of Midway" and "The Cruel Sea" in queu for when I am done with it
Also "The Rise and Fall of Great Powers" from Paul Kennedy, this one I had already read twice, but I like to keep it close to review from time to time... just to always remember that the concept of "decisive battles" is really overarrated and just a cheap source of income for the History Channel


< Message edited by Jorge_Stanbury -- 5/1/2012 2:25:38 AM >

(in reply to RevRick)
Post #: 282
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/1/2012 6:06:53 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 18042
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jorge_Stanbury

New to the forum, not nonetheless:

Job: Business Consultant in Demand Planning (Supply Chain Management)  
Age: 35
Residence: Toronto, ON, Canada
Education: MBA 
Family: Mother, sister and brother, many cousings and nephews, no significant other... yet
Work: At McCain Food in a SAP implementation
Quote: so many, I like any from Cormac McCarthy, but to keep it appropriate to a wargamer's forum:
"It makes no difference what men think of war, said the judge. War endures. As well ask men what they think of stone. War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him. The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner. That is the way it was and will be....
War is the ultimate game because war is at last a forcing of the unity of existence. War is god." Blood Meridian
Reading: "Pacific Crucible" ... I am just recently getting very interested in the Pacific War. I have "Battle of Midway" and "The Cruel Sea" in queu for when I am done with it
Also "The Rise and Fall of Great Powers" from Paul Kennedy, this one I had already read twice, but I like to keep it close to review from time to time... just to always remember that the concept of "decisive battles" is really overarrated and just a cheap source of income for the History Channel

Warspite1

Me too - read it at least twice though and will definitely return again in the near future - excellent book.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Jorge_Stanbury)
Post #: 283
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/1/2012 2:01:15 PM   
Jorge_Stanbury


Posts: 743
Joined: 2/29/2012
From: Lima and Toronto
Status: offline
Great book, so well researched, so full of facts

They don't write books like this anymore

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 284
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/2/2012 5:26:27 AM   
steamboateng


Posts: 353
Joined: 3/21/2010
From: somewhere in Massachusetts
Status: offline
Gentlemen,
After a sevaral month hiatus pusuing the pleasures of the Carribbean and the intricacies of computer graphics, (while pursuing my other favorite digital pastime; railroads) it is a pleasure to be back amungst you.
I had just downloaded and installed the latest WitP-AE update this afternoon and tried it out. Later, I jumped on the forums to find out what was happening in the game, and it was just great to see your familiar monikers again.
I actually had missed your banter, openess and humor. (No, WitP folks aren't the nerdiest bunch...............Trainzers are!)
I bumped into this thread and have spent the last hour or so getting to know you.........again?
Since I expect I will be entertaining you with a few dumb questions and comments, in the future, as I familiarize myself with game mechanics (again) allow me to post my bit:

Job: Marine Engineer (quite retired!)
Age: 68 (now that's probably gonna put a bump in your stats curve, CR)
Residence: Massachusetts (north shore)
Education: B.S. Marine Engineering; Massachusetts Maritime Academy
Family:'Been sailing with the same Cheif Mate for well over 30 years, somehow managing to lay the keels of a he and a she between trips; two fine vessels, christened, commisioned and sailing their own course, now.
Work: Presently self-educating myself in the mysteries of computer graghics; mapping, texturing and model building. The general idea being to keep the wheels turning (and lubricated with a generous bath of the local spirits).
Quote: If it works, don't fix it! (annon.)
Reading: 'Founding Brothers', By Joseph J. Ellis; just completed 'Logging Railroads of the White Mountains' by C. Francis Belcher, representing the Appalacian Mountain Club and the State of New Hampsire. Heck!......I'll read just about any kind of history!

Regards to all and good to see you again

(in reply to Jorge_Stanbury)
Post #: 285
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/2/2012 5:33:12 AM   
geofflambert


Posts: 4759
Joined: 12/23/2010
From: St. Louis
Status: online
steamboateng - very cool avatar, I see it's not set to stop!  However, it is set to astern.  Do you actually believe you can pull that off?

(in reply to steamboateng)
Post #: 286
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/2/2012 5:40:52 AM   
Canoerebel


Posts: 9770
Joined: 12/14/2002
From: Northwestern Georgia, USA
Status: offline
I don't believe you!  You aren't actually an engineer.  You are somebody that John Grisham based one of his lead characters on.  He always has some lucky son-of-a-gun do something cool and then retire into the Caribbean to remain incognito and pleasantly inebriated. 

_____________________________

"Rats set fire to Mr. Cooper’s store in Fort Valley. No damage done." Columbus (Ga) Enquirer-Sun, October 2, 1880.

(in reply to steamboateng)
Post #: 287
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/2/2012 12:37:20 PM   
steamboateng


Posts: 353
Joined: 3/21/2010
From: somewhere in Massachusetts
Status: offline
geofflambert;
quite observant of you! This antique engine order telegragh (one ringy, dingy.......two ringy, dingy........etc.) is actually displaying a quite legal and common situation.......stopping a vessels ahead motion.......with the engine in (manuevering?) Full ahead, the wheelhouse guy (generally an officer or pilot) has ordered a Slow Astern to brake the vessel's momentum........ Anyone who has bumped their 27 footer's bow into the quay, or their 900 footers port side into an iceberg knows how that works! (Next order.....Full Emergency Astern and panic.............Ooooooooooooops!)

Well, Canoerebel, it's my pleasure to once more make your (sesech.....!) aquaintance. I always enjoy your commentaries and AAR's.
Actually it was a late summer trip to the Caribbean as the Cheif Mate had to rejoin her gaggle of kindergarteners in September..........and as much as I enjoy a John Grisham novel, no high-powered-hi-jinx here! Spent the winter in the burbs,.........waitin' on Spring! Although we did recently spend a week in the New Hampshire White Mountains, tracking down old railraod roadbed while avoiding the occasionally (groggy and hungry) black bear and the ocassionaly (groggy and sober) gounded snowboarder!
You got most of the last sentence right though......
Regards and looking forward to reading more.....

steamboat....

(in reply to Canoerebel)
Post #: 288
RE: Meet the Forumites - 5/3/2012 4:42:42 PM   
Yank


Posts: 170
Joined: 5/19/2004
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Age: 49
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Education: M.S. Public Policy
Work: Developing software for corporate lawyers
Favorite Quote: "Half the lies they tell about me aren't true" - Yogi Berra
Reading: Rise and Fall of the Thrd Reich - Shirer (should be finished by Christmas!)

(in reply to steamboateng)
Post #: 289
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