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RHS: RHS Design Thread: Map Related Stuff

 
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RHS: RHS Design Thread: Map Related Stuff - 4/5/2012 10:30:27 AM   
el cid again

 

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This thread has been moved to this new location.

By request, the many diverse concepts evolved for the RHS mod will be posted, or reposted, here.
Some of the germane elements of The RHS Manual (compiled by Mifune from items I wrote) will be
posted, along with a couple essays since - and any other ideas that come up along the way.

RHS is a second generation mod, now in development for AE, but originally done for WITP.
In the beginning it was not intended to do a mod at all: it grew out of an effort to rework CHS
plane data. The effort had so much merit that the CHS coordinator suggested releasing it
in the form of a separate mod. Ever since, plane data has been the most significant (if not most
visible) aspect of RHS mods. The relative values of aircraft, including performance, armament,
and durability, are very well balanced. This was done by a typical RHS strategy: define
standards and apply them consistently.

Eventually other ideas got worked into the mod set - there were no less than ten scenarios. The main
one was the war as fought - CVO = Carrier Oriented because both sides built more carriers than
they had planned originally. Its compliment was BBO = Battleship Oriented - the war with forces
as both sides planned to built them. The rest were various degrees of Japan Enhansed Scenarios -
assuming ever more preparation for the war by Japan, and reactions to their building programs by
the Allies - permitting things like the Dutch Battlecruisers be put in the game.

RHS was kept alive, invisibly, by Mifune, who did scenario 100 - translating WITP data on planes, ships
and land units into AE format. When I returned to coordinating the mod, I created scenario 101 -
now called Strategic - based in large part on scenario 100. I have since begun a second variant -
scenario 102 - called Operational - which is a simplified version for those who are afraid to play Japan -
or who want a variant more suitable for computer play. [Most tests are run in 102, which omits features
that confuse the AI - making it work better in AI vs AI testing] I suppose I should mention that I am a
computer test engineer - or was - and that I do more testing than is customary in the Matrix world.

This thread is a collection of ideas related to the current RHS effort - which mostly concerns scenario 101 -
which is in test. Scenario 102 needs to rework aircraft, group and location files before it is ready for test.



< Message edited by el cid again -- 9/19/2014 7:53:26 PM >
Post #: 1
RE: RHS Map Theory - 4/5/2012 10:32:19 AM   
el cid again

 

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RHS map art is stock map art - although probably a set of modified map art should be done for it.

The "real" map is the pwhexe.dat file - in the sense that is the map as the computer sees it.
And RHS uses a set of 19 different pwhexe.dat files - so the map below the one a player can see
changes over time.

There are three kinds of changes to the RHS pwhexe.dat files.

FIRST: each map is associated with a different season of a specific year. So these files are named
by year and season. The game starts using

41Winterpwhexe.dat for the 1941-2 Winter Season - which lasts until the end of February, 1942.

42Springpwhexe.dat is the second season - and is March and April, 1942.

42Monsoonpwhexe.dat is the third season - and is May through August, 1942.

42Fallpwhexe.dat is the fourth season - and is September and November, 1942.

If we just wanted seasonal effects, those four files would be enough, and we could reuse them for following
years. But we also wanted to show construction of railroads and roads - so instead you get four similar files
every year - but differing in respect to roads, rail lines - and trails (something generally not present in
stock or other mods - more on that later). This process continues into 1946 - but stops there - and if you
need 46Monsoonpwhexe.dat - you simply reuse 45Monsoonpwhexe.dat instead. One day I may do such
a file - but right now there are only 19 seasonal files.

SECOND: we show over time how trails evolve into secondary roads and then to railroads,
or how secondary rail lines are upgraded to primary rail lines - over time. The first to appear is a tiny
one hex affair near Noumea - an old narrow gage line put back into service by the US Army RR Service.
Eventually we have the Whitehorse and Yukon RR upgrade to main line. More important still, we have
the Bengal and Assam RR upgrade to main line - which is vital to the defense of NE India. It connects to
the Ledo Road - which connects to the Burma Road - so supplies can flow to China even if Southern Burma
falls. That road begins as a pioneer road = trail in code terms, upgrading to secondary road. Yet another
project in the same area is the Burma Kunming RR - which was begun but not completed - but if the war
lasts into 1946 - it will be. Finally, for the Allies - there is the ALCAN highway. This is similar to the Ledo
Road - starting as pioneer road (= trail) and upgrading to secondary road. If the war lasts into 1946,
it substantially upgrades to primary road.

On the other side, the Japanese get the Burma-Siam RR - a secondary line - as well as The Second Death
Railway on Sumatry (it "opened" on the day the war ended). Other, similar projects could be included, if there
are any.

In RHS, if you want to see the roads or rail lines as they are in the current season, use the R key for roads or
the Y key to show railroads.

Also note that a few rail hexes differ from map art. Since the Japanese were able to link up the rail systems
from Singapore to Shanghai - as a way to move resources that could not be torpedoed - we have the
Chinese rail system connected at two points where it isn't on the map (but should be because it was).
Up in the North, Manchukuo connects to Russia by rail line at all three points - not just one. But in all three cases,
gage change is simulated by a hex (or by two half hexes) of secondary rail line - causing inefficiency in movement
across those gage changes (between standard gage and Russian broad gage). This ties in with a special feature of
RHS: rail units. Units with RR in their name are restricted to rail lines, or at player option, to primary rail lines.
There are armored trains (in Russia and Manchukuo and Canada), and pure RR CD units (in the USA, Hawaii and
Manchukuo - the latter limited to a single heavy gun - the Schnieder Rail gun). The connections mean these units
can theoretically move between countries.

THIRD: RHS has considerable development of rivers, all over the place - with exceptions. The mighty Yangtze admits
ocean ships all the way to Wuhan, and other vessels past Chunking - as well as into the heart of Central China via
connecting rivers. It has most of the surviving ROC Navy on it - including 2 RN and 1 USN gunboats that start at Chunking -
numbers of small transports and tankers, junks as well as modified junks (gunboats and landing craft variants). ROCN
has a HQ at Chunking - and a division of ROC infantry under command which can load and move on the river. Other divisions
can be assigned at a price in political points. For this river, mostly, the concept of a "river boom" has been invented and is
under test. Made of junks and barges, it is a barrier, an armed barrier - to block passage of river craft. While at any given moment
it is static in fact, this peculiar form of "naval vessel" is mobile - slowly - and so is presented in sections. These sections are supposed
to be all together in the same hex - and IF they are - they DO pretty much stop passage of enemy riverine vessels. Like all ships,
they can be sunk, by planes or opposing ships - assuming there is enough firepower (which won't be coming from the average group
of river craft, armed only with machine guns).

Another river in China is very different. The Yellow River is the most important LOC in Inner Mongolia - the only practical way to move
supplies, units or resources to some locations. The river is isolated from the sea in terms of being navigable - below Kaifeng the dykes are broken
and the water is too spread out to navigate. [Japanese air boats could navigate it, but I have not found a way to represent that] Japan essentially holds only Kaifeng on this river (and one other point that is useless unless something changes). Both ROCN and the RED Chinese have small flotillas on this river as well - and they control most of its length - so it is useful to them logistically.

The third river in China is the Pearl - down South - by Canton. A standard river in most respects, it has a tiny ROCN presence - which also has vessels at Hong Kong - and Japanese vessels may enter and leave as well. In one test game, Allied river craft moved many elements of the Hong Kong garrison upriver - not without losses - and those elements survived the fall of the city!

Other rivers exist as well - the Indus-Bhramaputra being probably the largest. The main rivers of Burma, Thailand, Manchuria and Amur Province of Russia are all navigable. So are six rivers that empty into the Arctic Ocean (three each in Siberia and North America) - but ONLY for the two month fall season!
Two others - one in Siberia and one in Alaska - open onto the Bering Sea in Summer and Fall. [The Yukon allows one to move all the way to and beyond Whitehorse - it is two miles wide at Whitehorse!] There are minor river navies on the Amur river system, including gunboats with armor and six inch guns in the Soviet Navy at Khabarovsk. The Lena River - NE of Lake Baikal (known as The North Sea in Chinese) - is useful in summer even though you cannot sail out its mouth into the Arctic ocean - and in a different sense - with ice roads - it is useful in winter as well. Mainly a logistic asset, it might matter in a campaign fought far enough North. But is main job is to move resources out of Siberia. There two rivers in Northern Australia - with only minor port development - but they might matter if the area is invaded. And the Grand Canal connects the Yangtze with the tiny segment of the lower Yellow River open to the sea. [It is the only section of the Grand Canal not in disrepair.]

Rivers matter because they give players more control over where supplies, resources and units move - and when they move. Movement is usually faster by naval vessel than overland. Combined with hex controls on where to build up supplies, rivers offer more control to a player. At the cost of more risk - you can be "invaded" and "flanked" via river. That is why Canada has an armored train - just in case a langind is attempted on the river near Prince Rupert.

FOURTH: RHS uses the generally not used trail code of AE. We use trails to show preferred routes in the jungle - say between Burma and India - and to permit some supply movement along them. Also between Port Moresby and Buna - and simlar points. We also use trails to prevent isolation of units in the Visayas (Philippines) or NEI - they represent "low capacity ferries" and small craft - and permit land units to "walk between islands." Along with some supplies. In winter, there are ice trails on some rivers - represented by trails. And in some places, notably the Upper Mekong, trails simulate movement in places where it would not be possible for most river craft. The Indus River is not shown as a navigable river - although it is to the very smallest craft - but trails permit its use anyway.




(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 2
RE: RHS China Theory - 4/5/2012 10:34:33 AM   
el cid again

 

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China in RHS is at the core of the game. It is what the War in the Pacific is about. It is the opposite of a "quiet China" scenario - which I presume is for players who love an oceanic naval game without regard for the strategic rationale for the war. The proximate cause of the war was the embargo by the US, UK and NEI of oil, iron ore and rubber UNLESS it changed its policy in China. This in the broader context that Japan, more than any other nation, depends on imports. It cannot feed itself - something understood when Commodore Perry said so, advocating Japan open up to trade "so you don't have to drown girl babies in years of famine." Japan would become addicted to that trade, to feed its ever growing population. Japanese policy was different from European or US colonial policy mainly in that it started later in time and was successfully taking over colonial domination of China, to the detriment of Western interests. ROC archives indicate the ROC formally attempted to maneuver the USA into war with Japan, and believes it succeeded in that object. [See Origins of the Pacific War, Stansford University Press, Youli Sun, a Chinese academic given access to the KMT archives.]

For this reason, RHS has made a consistent effort to better model China, its economy, its geography, and its armed forces. In strategic terms, China is to Japan as the USSR is to Germany - a country invaded which is essentially too big to digest - a country it is desired to extract raw materials from and exploit industry in - and a country it hopes to divide and dominate. The number of locations in China has been increased by upwards of 100%. Locations were added mainly so the economic assets of the area could be modeled, but also so the Allies gain the ability to fortify that location and order supplies (resources, etc) to stockpile there, the ability to base aircraft there, and to explain why there is a road or rail line (or several) to that place (getting rid of the many "roads to nowhere" in stock). The sheer impact of these new locations, plus additional economic assets in existing locations, greatly increases the strategic and economic strength of China, and slows down any attempt to conquer the country - as there are more places to fight over where the fight can be difficult (because the place can be fortified).

There are several flavors of Chinese military forces. Since they operate under a nominal unified command, all except the RED faction operate under ROC command, with the technical exception of the tiny ROC Navy Command - a special creation to permit mainly riverine operations - requiring unrestricted units in order to load. A number of ROC and RED divisions can conduct amphibious operations, or make strategic movement by naval or merchant vessels - which is not the general case for Chinese units. All Chinese units operate within a semi-unified designation system - the numbers for each unit are part of a national scheme - and are historical. In spite of this, there are real differences between the different families of units. As well - some units retain traditional, pre reform names, as they really were better known by their old name than by the official name. Thus - every case of a "route army" is a case where that is what the unit was called, popularly, because of its fame with its no longer official name - which always is "corps."

Type 1: ROC: The biggest family of Chinese units is ROC government units. These are always prefixed by ROC and do NOT include the name of a province. Note that the group army HQ has been entirely removed from the OB: a group army is another name for a corps - and it is not a higher command echelon. On the other hand, War Areas, which serve as Army commands, are more rationally and historically located, permitting supporting line units except in the most remote areas of China. They are subdivided into sub groups:

Type 1A: Regular ROC: These are units with weapons and organizations nominally standardized in China. A "heavy corps" has three divisions in it - and was formerly known as a "route army." A "light corps" is a glorified division, treated as such - its name has "corps" in quotes and ends in the formal formation div. A heavy corps is a three division formation, formerly (and occaisionally still) known as a group army. A normal corps has two divisions and was formerly called (and occasionally still called) a field army. [If a unit was so famous under its older name it was still called that, I use that vice its formal official name]

Type 1B: US Equipped ROC: These are units using US weapons instead of ROC standard weapons. They often also are stronger units. There are two kinds of these: those organized before the Pacific War, and those organized BY the USA in India. These latter have more modern US weapons and standard US Army organization. These later divisions can divide like US divisions can.

Type 1C: Provincial ROC: These are units raised and often (but not always) maintained by Provinces. [Some such units, from provinces which are enemy controlled, retreated outside their original Province, and are now fed by national resources instead of local ones. They generally recruit men from the same Province, not merely for patriotic reasons, but also so they speak the right language. There are 634 dialects in China, and several command languages in use in this period.] These units are most often "light corps" - but occasionally semi-elite, larger and stronger "heavy corps." Provincial ROC also has cavalry formations, identified by the name of their Province in the unit name.

Type 1D: Warlord ROC: These are units of local warlordy's who have a loose arrangement - and nominal national unit designation - but are wholly controlled by an independent Warlord who runs an area. As such, these units are generally static, tied to the place the Warlord controls, gets men and supplies from, and is politically safe in. That static nature is not hard and fast - similar to guerilla units - under pressure - these units will become mobile. If they do, and if later they get well fed by supplies, they will "plant" and become static again. Old habits die hard: Warlords will tend to become warlords where ever you put them. EXCEPTION: Warlord cavalry units - the weakest of all Chinese units - pretty much pure horsemen with few heavy weapons - often hire as mercenaries - and they are always mobile.

Type 2: RED: Communist units are similar to ROC units but differ in several respects. They use Russian weapons instead of the national ROC weapons. They also have a separate command, nominally subordinate to the ROC command, and in important respects, similar to a war area command - it is a de facto Army HQ - of higher than usual quality and attributes than is normal in China. There is also a small RED riverine naval force, all based at Yenan, the locus of Red political power. This "micro navy" only has motor junks and a variation that function as landing craft. The transport junks may be converted into landing craft junks at a tiny shipyard at Yenan. The RED HQ and subordinate formations all have there real wartime commanders.

Type 3: Guerillas: Both ROC and RED guerilla "regiments" (which are actually battalions and stack as such) exist in RHS. These are not merely small land combat units, but quasi supply independent ones. ROC units have one static device in the formation they point at - so if well fed they will become (and many start out as) static. This because they tend to have ties to a local area, which they feed off of. RHS units are "self feeding" to some extent - enough that if not subject to combat - ROC units will tend to stay at 70% of their nominal full size and RED ones will tend to stay at full strength. IF partly fed by a LOC with a supply source, both will get supply heavy to a small degree and both will rebuild to full strength if below it. These units may undertake "missions" deep into enemy territory - because they will survive without supplies - where they can jump on LOC and be a source of constant irritation to the enemy. Under attack, they almost always retreat rather than surrender - even of most devices are lost. They can be killed however. In which case they will regenerate at Chunking, as all Chinese units do. This usually takes odds of high hundreds to one, although with a shock attack after air attack attrition, only dozens to one may work.

ROCAF is considerably larger than in stock, with more kinds of planes, and more base forces. These are distributed so there are no isolated places with short range fighters unable to move to other parts of China. It is generally possible to move from any part of China to any other - even the most remote areas - and from distant Sinkiang to or from the USSR - for most plane types. ROC also has a functional aviation factory working up (it was turning out reworked P-40s when the war began, and nearly got the CAF CW-21 Demon into production. As in the real war, the Japanese must take upper Burma to threaten this plant. [The CW-21 - also in service and even made in NEI - is a radical, high performance, light interceptor - US in origin but differing from USAAF preferences in design. It was successful re Japanese fighters - but overwhelmed by numbers.] ROC also nominally has the CNAC - a US owned airline with three kinds of equipment - DC-3s, DC-2s and Lockheed Model 18s - the former pressed into US service out of India early in 1942, before the US had lots of air transport in theater. These planes ought to be transferred to safer locations - as IRL - and used for air mobility and supply - as IRL - although many RHS players ignore them altogether.

ROC Navy is also present - never mind it was wiped out as a fighting force on the sea before the Pacific War began. [The two ROCN "cruisers" both eventually appear in IJN service - as escorts.] Nevertheless, ROC Navy HQ relocated to Chunking when the government (and most universities and other institutions) did - after the fall of Nanking. It is there and controls a significant river fleet - including two RN and one USN gunboats (formerly subject to ROC command from Feb 1942 IRL). This fleet consists of small transports and tankers, numbers of junks, a peculiar, Chinese form of landing craft modified from junks, and a few modestly armed gunboat junks. ROCN
motor junks may be converted to gunboat junks at any ROC shipyard, of which there are many distributed along the rivers and coasts of China. Other elements of ROCN are in isolated pockets along the coasts (these being assigned to UK SE Asia command) or on the Yellow River - which is isolated from the sea by flooding of its lower section - and which has three different "micro navies" on it - one RED, one ROC and one IJ Army!

Geography: In RHS, the Yangtze river gorge is modeled by "cliffs" - blocked hex sides - above Wuhan. Also, the Yellow, Yangtze, and Pearl rivers are fully navigable - including tributories of the Yangtze in Central China. This creates opportunities and vulnerabilities - and it appears the game system works well with riverine elements. The many ports along these rivers have small shipyards where naval vessels can be repaired or converted - and where a few junks appear regularly. Consideration is being given to how to model the "flooded region" of the lower Yangtze? And the one functional part of the Grand Canal during the war connects the Yangtze from the Lower Yellow River - which is navigable for a few hexes below the flooded region. The Upper Yellow River offers the only good LOC in Outer Mongolia. The Yangtze is navigable to ocean ships all the way to Wuhan - where ocean ships have been built since the 19th century - and by shallow draft vessels to (and beyond) CHunking.



(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 3
RE: RHS Airlift Theory - 4/5/2012 10:36:22 AM   
el cid again

 

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RHS has added many types of air transport aircraft to both sides.
Some of these are very esoteric and rare planes - including even
a one off - Mac's personal B-17 - although I made it identical to
the later B-17 transport version - which was very limited production.
But Mac's plane starts the game in a 1 plane unit!

Transport flying boats are (with two exceptions, both Allied) simply
transport planes defined as float capable - which works - and makes them
honor the same rules as other transports. The exceptions - the Empire
Flying Boat and the Boeing 314 Clipper - are defined as patrol planes -
so they can fly patrol missions - because both did that - never mind they did
so with their peacetime, commercial crews. Fortunately, code treats a
patrol plane on a transport mission as if it were a transport - and all the usual
meanings of "normal range" and "extended range" no longer apply. So
when used as transports, they work the same. By not defining other flying boats
transport variants - notably Mavis and Emily - in this way, they can not be used
for patrol missions - which they were not.

Previously, in WITP days, RHS redefined the transfer range of transport aircraft downward, so the code fraction of extended range ended up correct. In AE, I have altered that in the opposite direction - defining range in terms of normal range. Since code thinks normal range is 33% of transfer range, and 50% of extended range, I define both in terms of normal range. Normal range is easier to determine and more stable than other ranges. You can always increase the transfer range by carrying more fuel - even more than the tanks will hold. Often special "ferry tanks" were installed only for that purpose, and if not - extra fuel in drums or cans was used when required. For extended range - there is a very slippery set of variables - trading payload for fuel - and there is no one hard and fast way to get a distance value. It all depends on how much payload you give up? The crude code algorithm is not horrible. Besides that, normal range is the ONLY one that matters for airborne assault. So getting it right really matters, and it got priority.

This is my second pass in AE. At first I did not understand the old transport code had not been changed. And all other kinds of planes work differently now in terms of ranges. The data entry person has control over what is normal range, and what is extended range, and the code honors the values it is given. Thus, when stock fails to use standard fractions as appropriate for different kinds of planes, we can plug in the standard values - and they work just fine. The way drop tanks work also is different. Technically drop tanks didn't exist in WITP days - the devices were not used. So the way I used them - based on the way they really work - included assigning them weight. In AE they are "weightless" - and although alarmed by that - I find it works fine. The basic algorithm - effect = added range in minutes at cruising speed - is crude - and not right either - but for most planes it is close and it surely is simple. I have learned how to deal with the exceptions (use the wrong size drop tank so everything works out right anyway). But transports didn't really change - except that now we have transports with "drop tanks" - or their RHS cousins - "bomb bay tanks" which are internal drop tanks.

Only the very smallest air transports are missing. Otherwise, air transports are present - even if small, obsolete or limited in performance. And they seem to matter, particularly for air minded players. You can move units without heavy devices - or the light elements of other units - faster than by land or sea. You can move supplies as well. Both these are the real key to airlift power. Just as maritime power is the ability to move cargo across the sea, so airlift power is the ability to move critical things very fast between friendly airports. This works to extended range. But here one needs to grasp a key difference between airmobile operations and airborne assault:
airmobile operations are ONE WAY flights - and get the FULL range of the plane (normal or extended) - and code IGNORES the limits programmed on the screen. Airborne assault, on the other hand, is a there and back again flight without landing - so you only get half of NORMAL range - exactly as printed on the screen. I define normal and extended range as 33% and 67% of transfer range. [Technically I define extended range as 200% of normal, and transfer as 300%, but it is the same thing expressed in a different way.] But the screen reports the FULL transfer range, and only half the normal and extended range - as that is what most planes really can fly. For non-transport missions, those are also hard limits - you cannot fly a mission other than transfer beyond extended range; you cannot fly a mission with full payload beyond the normal range reported on the screen. Transports will fly airlift missions to twice those ranges. But, as noted above, airborne assault only uses normal range, and it is as reported, not doubled.

Early in the war, the Allies scraped the bottom of the barrel to get all sorts of planes - and pressed many civil types into service. The CNAC DC-3, the Empire Flying Boat and the Boeing 314 Clippers are all examples, as well as many smaller types like the Lockheed Model 18. As well, LB-30s were converted to transport duties - and in the end most LB-30s were transports. These had a unique modification in the form of tanks for the bomb bays permitting truly astronomical ranges with payloads. By midwar the Allies get true four engine transports built as such (the C-54, the transport version of the B-24, and even a handful of transport B-17s, one of which starts the game). Yet none of these have the range of the LB-30 - lacking its special tanks - which are not ferry tanks - but regular tanks used when cargo is hauled. So if you use long range airlift, you may find you keep the LB-30 in service as long as possible, and wishing there were still more of them you could get. By late in the war, a tiny number of spectacular four engine transports appear - the Martin Mars. These occur at a very low rate of production - cut off by the end of the war. I let you get one every month - so if the war goes on - you get more. They are almost unbelievable planes with fantastic range and passenger counts like small battalions. There is a similar situation in Japan. There are only four G5Ms - all failed bomber conversions into transports - G5M2-L. These could be put into production if you wanted too - although it is doubtful they can be cost justified - requiring as many engines as 2 normal transports planes. There were upwards of 30 (minus attrition) early, failed gunship versions of a two engine bomber - turned into rather fabulous long range transports (which, like the LB-30, you will wish there were more of - but unlike the Allies - you can put it back into production if you wish). It has the unlikely designation of G6M-L2 - never mind the parent design was not a G6M!

In spite of this focus on long range planes above, the real value of air transports lies in the more numerous medium and short range kinds. Even a plane wholly unsuitable for air combat is useful to move cargo - if you put it in the right place. So you find even the obsolete Dragon in New Zealand and Australia is useful - flying only 89 knots! At least it does so for a very long time!

In offensive operations, a key concept, first evolved by the Japanese in the NEI, but probably taught in theory by their German instructors, is to use tiny packets of airborne to take distant airfields. Then follow up with airlanded other units - for example ground support units for aircraft and basic infantry security units. Now you have a port your ships can sail to with heavy stuff. Almost all the publicity is about the few opposed airlandings. But the real value of airmobile capabilities is using undefended points to cut enemy lines of communication, and the rapid acquisition of forward operating bases - anywhere the enemy is unwise enough to leave uncovered. This adds a new dimension to warfare - and it is rare one can defend everywhere. IN addition, airlift provides for rapid emergency supply, and for transfer of key (light) units between different places. Because of interior lines, the Japanese have a much better chance if they use the efficiency gains offered by airlift.

There is also a technical toy present - the Glider and tug combination. Lacking art on the Allied versions, and anyway they not being popular in the theater, only the Japanese one is present. It is fairly impressive in terms of lift - permitting even a sort of "airborne armor" in game terms. But it is very slow - and so prone to being lost it likely will never succeed except moving between friendly airbases - just as IRL. I prefer to build more, faster two engine planes - although in sheer cargo per engine terms - they are more efficient. And if you don't buy them, you probably cannot lift the only airborne armor unit that might fly in the game. [It mainly has tankettes - so it isn't much of an armored unit - but even its "real light tanks" are smaller than modern armored cars! They are, however, light enough to airlift.]

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 4
RE: The Prime Directive (aka House Rule) - 4/5/2012 10:38:27 AM   
el cid again

 

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Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline
There is a primary house rule meant to simultaneously do away with
the need for a lot of house rules and at the same time create some
uncertainty about what the other side might be up to? This rule is:

Rule#1: If you don't think the historical commander whose decision
you are simulating would do it, don't do it

There is a special case for this rule in my view as well
if it is not physically possible to do IRL, don't do it (because clearly the
historical commander would not do what could not be done)

Many of the house rules used by many players are based on confusion
about history. A clear example of this is the "don't upgrade to four
engine bombers" rule: that was the rule rather than the exception IRL
- so the house rule prohibition is a mistake.

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 5
RE: Other House Rules - 4/5/2012 10:39:48 AM   
el cid again

 

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In spite of the above: (1) a rule meant to substitute for most house
rules and (2) an opinion that a lot of house rules are a bad idea,
nevertheless there are some RHS house rules which are mandatory:


a) Armored trains must move on a rail line (duh). If they retreat off a
rail line, they may only move directly back to the rail line, not some
other direction, or not move at all. Variation: armored trains could
be restricted to a main line - to primary RR in game terminology.
An armored train is a unit with RR or Armored Train in its name. Some
are really CD units - 2 US - 1 Canadian - 3 Japanese (plus the tiny
First Independent Gun Company) - and upwards of 20 Russian.

b) Amsterdam Island serves as the Axis entry point. [With the exception
of two small raiders, these are always submarines.] It is Amsterdam
Island. It should not be built up by either side. It should not be
captured by the Allies. It has no resources, no supplies, no fuel - no port
and no airfield. IRL it is unsuitable for development - conveniently - a sheer
volcanic cone rising from the sea - and uninhabited most of the time.
It also isn't my design intent to have an Allied task force "sit on" that area -
let the Germans enter the map - and decide to go to Aus, NZ, Java, the
Bay of Bengal, or the Arabian Sea - and engage them when they get there -
or in the mid Indian Ocean.


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Post #: 6
RE: RHS Baguio City Theory - 4/5/2012 10:41:06 AM   
el cid again

 

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In Northern Luzon there is a hex with nothing in it (in stock and all mods but RHS) -
the location of Baguio City. It is one of the center four squares of the chessboard,
along with Clark/Subic hex, Manila Hex and Bataan hex. It is vital - a position from
which Yamashita was able to refuse surrender when the war ended. [Since it was
illegal for him to surrender, and since it was way too expensive to force him out,
we got him orders from Hirohito himself]

Baguio is malaria free, a resource hex, a manufacturing center that makes supplies,
and its back is food producing mountains with still more resources in them. It is also
an airfield at start.

AND it has over a thousand US and PA troops. The locus of the newborn Philippine
Military Academy, and an R&R center for US troops who like the climate (and malaria
free environment) - they formed into a mobile column under Col John P Moran -
and moved down the Naguilian Road on the flank of the invading Japanese. Finding
everything from San Fernando to Linguyan City under control of combined arms RCT
supported by tank regiments, he wisely fell back (although earning the nickname among
macho Filipinos as "the colonel who ran away") - destroyed the heavy assets - and
went into the mountains - as Yamashita did two years later. This column is heavy
with support assets - and includes a few USAAF aircraft support squads. It is rather
stronger than the independent PA battalions that defend various locations, and only the
one at Balinta Pass (also a location in RHS) also has mountains to defend. I hope this
encourages Allied players to consider a better strategy than Mac used.

FYI Fort Drum ALONE closes Manila Bay - and a hundred thousand men sacrificed on
Bataan do not prolong the agony for the Japanese - just for the hundred thousand men --
100% of which will catch both dengue fever and malaria. To the extend the War Plan
Orange had merit, Mac ruined it by abandoning it years before - and ending the stockpiling
of food supplies - so when he reversed and went there anyway - there were too few
supplies for the force.


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Post #: 7
RE: RHS JAAF HQ Theory - 4/5/2012 11:10:07 AM   
el cid again

 

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AE presents, correctly at the lower levels, a JAAF organized (when the Pacific War begins)
into Sentais (more or less groups, typically of 3 squadrons) plus independent Chutais (or companies)
and occasionally Shotai's (detachments). [A Sentai is a short version of Hiko Sentai - more or
less 'air group']

It also partially presents higher organization. The next higher organization is the Air Division
[Hikodan] or, if combined with ground and support elements, the Air Corps [Hiko Shudan].
In 1942 the Air Corps is renamed something else again - ALSO translated as Air Division -
which it should not be - since it is a different term for a higher echelon from the Hikodan.
This is the Hiko-Shidan. Since AE presents these names in English (except for the Sentai and
Chutai) - it is hard to know what is meant by Air Division? Finally - the highest level is the
Air Army - or Koku gun. It might be better to use either all Japanese names, or to use English
terms like Wing. To make matters worse, the different usages at different times seem to
be somewhat mixed up in the data set.

In 1942, when Air Division first is used as a term, there are only five. These correspond to
major areas of air operations, as one might logically expect. The Home Islands were the
First Air Division - HQ at Tokyo - also as one might expect. The Second Air Division is at that
time the air force of Kwangtung Army. Third and Fifth Air Divisions are pretty accurately
assigned - as is the Second. But for raeasons unclear the First is not. It appears in 1943
and is restricted to the Northern Area - which indeed became its zone in 1943. In 1941
its components are instead assigned to the 51st Air Division - which I cannot explain at all.
It appears that 51st substantially should be substituted for 1st in terms of date of appearance,
although the HQ location changes - but all units assigned after Jan 1943 still belong to it.
It is all the start and 1942 units that belong to 1st Air Division.

Later nuances I have not yet worked out. However, there is this: the airborne command is missing
altogether. Germany had a training mission in Japan re airborne (110 strong). They recommended
something the Germans never put in to practice themselves. Although airborne theorists say they
were right, WE never did it either. It is to assign the aircraft units and the airborne ground units to
a single operational command. Since Japan did it - and since its the dedicated transport and glicer
air units were assigned to it - it might be good to put it in. This command was called Tieshin Shudan
or "raiding group." Note this was a JAAF creature - so it did not control Navy (or some call em "marine")
airborne units.

For this reason I have reorganized RHS so that at least the starting air division HQ is correct -
not a mixture of air divisions, china command, southern command, etc. And I added a small airborne
HQ - where it was - at the airborne main base on Kyushu.

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Post #: 8
RE: Fort MacMurray and Shale Oil - 4/8/2012 2:13:48 AM   
el cid again

 

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There is, in stock and presumably virtually every non-RHS mod,
a "railroad to nowhere" in Northern Canada, not far from Great Slave Lake
and Lake Winnipeg.

This railroad ends in hex 208, 28 and is the location of Fort MacMurray,
a town of very interesting economic import. It is the location of the first
and oldest shale oil industry in the Western world (the only similar place
I am aware of is in Manchukuo - developed about the same time by Japan).

This location has a successful (but low volume) "oil refinery" which "cooks"
shale oil and separates the oil from water and other things which make it otherwise
unsuitable for use. The process was not able to be scaled up for decades, but it did
produce a useful amount of oil which, in game terms, can be "exported" automatically down the rail line. I estimate the place should have 10 oil wells and an amount of refinery capacity able to perfectly process them (which, in RHS terms, is 5 oil refineries). I also rate it as having 5 resource centers (RHS ones are smaller than stock) and 1 light industry plant (which processes 40% of the resources, leaving 60% for export down the rail line).

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Post #: 9
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/8/2012 3:08:36 AM   
el cid again

 

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In RHS, there is an "evolution" of road and RR infrastructures over time.
As well, RHS uses trails as they were used in WITP, both stock and RHS
variants, with several functions. On top of that, in RHS, during the Monsoon
Season (i.e. summer), secondary roads turn into trails, while trails may
disappear, in the Monsoon area of the map. For all these reasons, players
should use the R key (Reveal Codes re roads) and the Y key (Reveal Codes
re RR) to see the "real" routes the computer can use in this particular season.

In addition, players should play with 'hexside details ON' because that permits
you to see the ice effects. Ice at sea is represented mainly by using blocked
hexsides. In Winter these extend down to the Aleutians, and ports (as well
as rivers) in the North are "frozen" = not available to ship navigation. These effects
change seasonally - but are identical in all identical seasons. Only roads, trails
and railroads change over time - IF there is construction going on.

In the Winter [November through February], all rivers that empty into the Arctic Ocean (in Siberia and Canada) are frozen. In addition, the Yukon River and a River near Anadyr at the Eastern end of Siberia, are also both frozen - as is the Bering Sea they empty into. So is the important Amur River System that opens into the Sea of Othosk. Lake Baikal is frozen over (but has secondary roads = ice roads across it - at one time they laid a RR track over it every Winter as well) and so are two major rivers (= wide art) that open into it.

In the Spring [March and April], the ice recedes but the rivers in the North remain either frozen, or are in "break up" - a condition WORSE than frozen - permitting neither river navigation NOR ice roads or ice trails (which exist at several places).

In the Monsoon season [May through August], the RHS map system is closest to stock, with ice in the same places it is on the stock map. The rivers that empty into the Bering Sea and into Lake Baikal are navigable. [There are actual ships on Lake Baikal, all Russian, including landing ships, and small shipyards to repair them] So is MOST of the peculiar Lena River NE of Lake Baikal (but not connected to the Arctic Ocean in this season). The Lena is still a useful logistical tool in the Monsoon Season. And the Irrawaddy becomes NOT navigable in the far North.

In the Fall [September and October] we have the best ship navigation in the North. The entire Arctic Ocean coast is like a wide river - there is ship passage between the land and the still frozen pack ice. All the rivers in the North are fully usable, while the Lena is open to the sea only during this two month period. There are small lake vessels on Great Bear Lake and on Great Slave Lake - and shallow draft ocean going vessels could sail all the way to Pine Point on Great Slave Lake. In Siberia, the Lena River opens the option to sail from (or to) Ust Kut - on a spur of the Trans Siberial RR - all the way to (or from) the North Pacific. Usually of economic significance for the Allies only, these river systems also pose a theoretical invasion risk. The US Army built a radar station at Barrow to detect such an adventure. The Yukon River is probably even more a potential invasion risk - insofar as it is a major river far inland, and one could land at Whitehorse - an airfield with some industry - at which point the river is still more than two miles wide! There is also a river four times larger than the Mississippi (in terms of water flow) permitting landing at the river port North of Magadan. [It probably should be rated for ocean ships - but it isn't - lacking enough data I restrict it to shallow draft vessels]

Along the Eastern Map edge you will find "gaps" in the "barrier" through which there are rail lines and, usually, primary roads. These are mainly for use by AI to move resources, oil, supplies and fuel - and they help it considerably - making the economy of North America more functional. Some of these also work for land unit movement - others do not - for reasons related to code not fully understood at this time.

Along the Northern Map Edge you will find a similar situation. There is a row of formerly "blocked" hexes all the way to Abadan - which in RHS is a dual location Abadan and Khorramchar. After about one season - the rail line to that location is completed. Even at start - there is secondary road to that location. This "Southern end" of the rail/road system is ONLY for logistical purposes at this time - land units refuse to move along it. To the right, at the "Northern end" of this system, land units move perfectly fine between several locations - both in stock and added. The changes here represent the US Army Railroad Service efforts in Iran, which moved more cargo than went to Murmansk. It solves the oil supply issue for the USSR automatically - as Abadan is an oil source - and it permits supplies and/or fuel to be sent to Russia - as IRL - if needed.

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 10
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/11/2012 3:28:34 AM   
bigred


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Sid can u recap all the bases you have added shipyards?







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Post #: 11
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/11/2012 3:30:18 AM   
bigred


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This seems to be a very experienced chinese fighter sqn.







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Post #: 12
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/11/2012 3:36:23 AM   
bigred


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Sid, I cant understand why this unit when ordered SW is headed ne to get to sw hex. Can u check the hexsides?





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< Message edited by bigred -- 4/11/2012 3:43:15 AM >

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Post #: 13
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/11/2012 3:50:46 AM   
bigred


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If I move this unit what do i lose?




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Post #: 14
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/11/2012 4:58:39 AM   
bigred


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can u check this unit hq?




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Post #: 15
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/11/2012 5:08:04 AM   
bigred


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The Anson?




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Post #: 16
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 4:13:38 AM   
ggm


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Longtime fan el cid,

any chance i could get a copy of yours RHS files to poke about?

ggm

ps I pm you with my email

_____________________________

Alas, poor Yorick!--I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy: he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it.
William Shakespeare Hamlet

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Post #: 17
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 9:16:50 PM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

If I move this unit what do i lose?





There is theory and there is practice

In THEORY (if you believe the manual, which is wrong)
The mere presence of this unit creates an enemy unit - Vichy Militia -
[That part of the manual is right - the presence of this unit and the Provisional Government
of Northern Tonkin both caused VM units to appear]

but ALSO - if this unit moves (the other one cannot because it is static, tied to the place it governs)
there is supposed to be a unit created every time it moves one hex.

Further - the hexes that are said to matter are BORDER hexes.

That isn't the case. Apparently the fact this unit exists is treated as if it were moving -
and so a third VM unit showed up at Hue. But there is yet another - and it MIGHT show up
if this unit moved.

OK - so much for code effects.

This unit is experimental. In the past, it did not appear until the Japanese violate the deal with Vichy,
murdered almost every officer in country (at dinner no less "shortly after the first course") -
but this peculiar unit was on an exercise, not at dinner, and it managed to walk out to China (an epic
trip these words do not do justice to). This time, I was working with a retired French pilot officer,
and I decided that it would be better to leave the unit at its base - where it feeds - and DEFENDS both
that hex and the provisional government up country behind it.

The political situation is we are "allies" - but Indochina is messy. That alliance breaks down eventually.
This ONE unit changes sides - but only when it had no choice. [Kwangchowwan is wierd - it changed sides
up front - a Vicy location that went over to the Allies because everything around was ROC I guess]
It is more or less a house rule in RHS one is supposed to honor the political situation - as long as it is germane.
This unit needs some excuse to change sides.

Forget that though: the ECONOMIC impact of moving it is that the location will become Japanese - automatically
in a few days - or faster if they attack it. It feeds the industry of Hanoi and opens the road North to engage
the provisional (communist) government several hexes North of it. It means Japan can unify Indochina in an
economic and LOC sense. Do you want that?

There is also this "secret" impact: late in the way the VC strart to form up guerilla regiments. These are identical
to RED Chinese guerilla formations, which is to say they have enough internal supply to stay (or rebuild to) full
strength if not in combat. But they will not appear in Indochina if you lose the up country locations - notably
Dien Bien Phu and the one the provisional government is in. [Instead they will appear in China, at Chunking,
I think - we will see - but "Chinese" units should appear there if their hex of appearance is occupied]
Do you want the VC to not start in Indochina?

As IRL, there are no guarantees what the enemy will do. I put this unit in so YOU have the OPTION to react to Japanese
aggression. For example, I took over the Aramis - and AP renamed Teia Maru - as IJN did IRL. But I have the option
of taking over Lamotte Piquette - a CL - sunk in 1945 by the US for fear they would do that. I might take it over much sooner.
That or other actions - taking Dien Bien Phu for example - might be grounds to activate this unit. Then too, I might attack it,
in which case moving it might be wise. But in Test 3A the French player did NOT move it - and it HELD Viet Tri for months
inflicting terrible losses on the aggressive Japanese.! So maybe you might be better off staying there?

RHS is rich in trade off options for the Allied player. But, quoting the French player, "Indochina is messy" -
the trade offs are not all on one side. Note the country starts with both Allied and Axis locations - so the LOC do not work
well until it is unified - IF it is unified. That process ties up Japanese units - and to do it fast means they must commit
ships or aircraft or both - not just land units. I consider that better (more realistic) than letting Japan start with the full
colony (grand extended colony - five territories - Tonkin, Annam, Cochin China, Cambodia and Laos) feeding them as they
wish. Also, unlike almost every other territory in the game, I do not put in local shipping traffic or patrol vessels,
nor the nice mini air force. [On which side should they serve???]

(in reply to bigred)
Post #: 18
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 9:22:13 PM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

The Anson?





Click on the ship itself. It will turn out to be "Centurian Class"
because it is HMS Centurian. It REPORTS as Anson, and its ART is KGV art -
this is a deception ship IRL. Centurian is a WWII Battleship with engines still in
good shape. So she was built with plywood on top to look like a KGV battleship!
Later she gets more AAA in an upgrade. IRL she was eventually expended as a
self propelled breakwater at Normandy. In RHS, the Allies have control over almost
all vessels in theater - YOU may send any ship outside if YOU think that is "historical"
AND IF it is not a decision that would change in your game situation. But if not - you
are almost never forced to send a ship off map. The Japanese are not so lucky.
Their Thai and German allies defect on certain dates - they vaporize. This for technical
reasons is the easiest way to address the politics involved.

(in reply to bigred)
Post #: 19
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 9:25:48 PM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

can u check this unit hq?






6732 is marked without an X = not in the game
it has no HQ assigned -

I have no idea how you get this display? It is some kind of item from stock we do not use -
and apparently neither does stock.

REVISED: On further review, while the unit is indeed without an X in stock, and in RHS 102,
it somehow got one in RHS 101. It should be assigned to command slot 185 Indian Army Eastern Command.
And I think it belongs in the game - so I will put an X by it in 102. It has too many trucks and motorized
support squads by 12 - but that would automatically be corrected eventually from the formation data.
I have fixed the start data as well. It will start new games properly.

< Message edited by el cid again -- 4/13/2012 2:12:13 AM >

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Post #: 20
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 9:28:01 PM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

Sid, I cant understand why this unit when ordered SW is headed ne to get to sw hex. Can u check the hexsides?







This is a common situation. It has to do with one of two things:

1) The existence of a path that costs less movement points - if we can say there are movement points -
will cause a unit to take a non-direct route

2) The existence of hexes owned by the other player will do the same thing - you may only enter ONE
hex not yours - and that ONLY IF there is no enemy in your hex. Otherwise - the route will be via
hexes you DO own.

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Post #: 21
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 9:29:11 PM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

This seems to be a very experienced chinese fighter sqn.









These are indeed experienced FRENCH volunteers - some would say mercenaries - in China.
It is called a squadron but really is a flight.

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Post #: 22
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 11:41:55 PM   
bigred


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quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again


quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

can u check this unit hq?






6732 is marked without an X = not in the game
it has no HQ assigned -

I have no idea how you get this display? It is some kind of item from stock we do not use -
and apparently neither does stock.

well, I do have this division in india ready for deployment and I sould assign it to an HQ.

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Post #: 23
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/12/2012 11:43:40 PM   
bigred


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quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again


quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

Sid, I cant understand why this unit when ordered SW is headed ne to get to sw hex. Can u check the hexsides?







This is a common situation. It has to do with one of two things:

1) The existence of a path that costs less movement points - if we can say there are movement points -
will cause a unit to take a non-direct route

2) The existence of hexes owned by the other player will do the same thing - you may only enter ONE
hex not yours - and that ONLY IF there is no enemy in your hex. Otherwise - the route will be via
hexes you DO own.

I think there is a pwhexe side issue ..Direct route to the se is the cost effective route.

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Post #: 24
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/13/2012 2:15:17 AM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred


quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again


quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

can u check this unit hq?






6732 is marked without an X = not in the game
it has no HQ assigned -

I have no idea how you get this display? It is some kind of item from stock we do not use -
and apparently neither does stock.

well, I do have this division in india ready for deployment and I sould assign it to an HQ.



See above. Yes - it was (by error) in India - in that I did not intend to modify stock data.
But I think the 'error' was right - and have now added it. The command is 185 - and data for the
unit is almost right - and will correct because the formation it points at is perfect. The unit
had no command, so code somehow filled in the blank - that is the default for a ship command -
and apparently land units do the same thing. Its location is its "command" if you get the idea.
It can be assigned to any command - at the price of PP.

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Post #: 25
RE: RHS Maps, Reveal Codes and Off Map Matters - 4/13/2012 2:18:18 AM   
el cid again

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred


quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again


quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

Sid, I cant understand why this unit when ordered SW is headed ne to get to sw hex. Can u check the hexsides?







This is a common situation. It has to do with one of two things:

1) The existence of a path that costs less movement points - if we can say there are movement points -
will cause a unit to take a non-direct route

2) The existence of hexes owned by the other player will do the same thing - you may only enter ONE
hex not yours - and that ONLY IF there is no enemy in your hex. Otherwise - the route will be via
hexes you DO own.

I think there is a pwhexe side issue ..Direct route to the se is the cost effective route.


Turn reveal hexsides on - if there was a blocked hexside - you could see it.

I looked - and my reveal hexsides ARE on.

With them off you can't see the blocked hexsides - which indeed ARE present - but for cause.

This is the Yangtze River Gorge - which is like the Grand Canyon of China. The whole area
has blocked hexsides - and this hex is the very worst of the lot - four of six sides are impassable
to anything but airplanes. The routing routine is working properly. From here NW the whole
course of the Yangtze until the great bend to the west has at least two blocked hexsides for every
hex on BOTH sides of the river. It is an RHS feature from WITP days - an attempt to make
the map of China more like IRL - and to make the Yangtze as a river route more important.

Press the R key - Reveal Codes re Roads - and you will see a zig zag trail down the river.
This represents small river craft, including rafts and sampans and all manner of boats,
and is an RHS mechanism used to make rivers do two things: somewhat faster for land units
to move along, and move supplies (slowly). Riverine trails (called 'low capacity ferries') are
not always present - it depends on the development of the area and the presence of numbers
of commercial small craft used to move things as well as people.

With hexside details on you also can see the "ice" in the North easily - and you can see
other features of RHS. Here you can see visually the Yangtze Gorge - a major barrier -
although it is "too wide" - it creates the right effect.

< Message edited by el cid again -- 4/13/2012 2:34:46 AM >

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Post #: 26
RE: RHS Design Theory - 4/17/2012 5:52:45 PM   
el cid again

 

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FYI - not for this game - but future tests will include the Asano Unit and USN UDTs -
and all games will get some new ship art shortly:

First - this update sets up the revised ship art

In the process of investigating about 60 new classes
starting with the Imperial Manchukuo Navy - but including
many new minor Axis and Allied vessels related to riverine
and coastal operations

I made many technical changes
for cosmetic, historical or technical reasons

Most of this will update into existing games - changes in type of vessel
and type of weapon are instant updates

but some things won't
names won't change
new vessels won't add (two new Manchurian patrol craft, 24 new US Army
Corps of Engineers "tank lighters" = USN LCMs)

Booms were redefined so they will permit loading troops to make em tougher in a fight - meaning "river booms" or blockade vessels

Ferries were redefines so they can be amphibs - they are superb amphibs

certain patrol craft redefined so they are more consistent with other craft

SECOND - I added the Asano Unit (or Asano Brigade) - of the IJA Nakano School in conception - this is a Manchurian unit of Russians - complete with a cossock commander - two companies of infantry, a recon element, a demolition engineer element, a machine gun company and a mortar company
The MG company is 4 MMG by our standards, and the mortar company 8 8cm mortars - better than the usual 7cm in Manchukuo service - there are 4 squads of cavalry, 4 of demolition engineers. It is based near where the Sungari River meets the Amur - at the SE tip of Manchuria.

THIRD - I added USN UDTs - which surprisingly come in teams of 96 men -
so I created a new combat engineer squad (called of course UDT Team) -
of only 6 (vice the usual 12 men) - which when combined with a 10 man support squad = 16 men - and you get 6 per UDT TEAM

I added every OPERATIONAL UDT Team in theater

including the first (OSS) Team 10 at Santa Catalina Island
All the rest start on Maui
Teams 5, 15, 7, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 11 (in order of creation)
from early 1944 (Team 10) to early 1945.



(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 27
RE: RHS Design Theory - 4/19/2012 3:55:57 PM   
bigred


Posts: 2892
Joined: 12/27/2007
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size 10 fort?




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< Message edited by bigred -- 4/19/2012 3:57:13 PM >

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 28
RE: RHS Design Theory - 4/19/2012 3:56:40 PM   
bigred


Posts: 2892
Joined: 12/27/2007
Status: offline
and this




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< Message edited by bigred -- 4/19/2012 3:58:20 PM >

(in reply to bigred)
Post #: 29
RE: RHS Design Theory - 4/20/2012 7:43:01 PM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 15012
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: bigred

and this






IA is my own prefix - so it means it is a unit I have modified - and either is on the map,
is a reinforcement, or was lost for some reason. But it should exist in some sense -
else the name could not appear in your image. I don't know how you got this display?
Try to pull it up with a new game load.

EDIT: I have found your display and every unit in it -
the IA 13th brigade is slot 6694 and would appear if its component units were to combine.
The division would appear if its component units were to combine. I have not found the 27th
artillery yet - but it must be in the data set or it could not be listed. It is "not in play" which
should mean it isn't yet arrived in theater.

EDIT AGAIN: Found it - slot 6302. It is 9999ed out in RHS, not in stock. Not sure why?
But either it should be 0 as in stock, or the unit should not have the field associating it with a higher
command - preventing the higher unit from ever appearing. Will determine which?

< Message edited by el cid again -- 4/20/2012 8:15:33 PM >

(in reply to bigred)
Post #: 30
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