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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Falklands

 
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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 10:18:23 AM   
ilovestrategy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

Yes there is such a thing as a shared carrier.

How it works though is beyond me!



I tried googling it, not too much information. So it will be basically a timeshare? I'm just wondering how the skills of each crew will be maintained while the other country has the carrier.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 12:29:57 PM   
tocaff


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Somehow the concept of a "shared carrier" leaves me thinking that as long as nobody really needs it the plan works, otherwise....

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Post #: 122
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 1:16:50 PM   
Historiker


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quote:

ORIGINAL: tocaff

Somehow the concept of a "shared carrier" leaves me thinking that as long as nobody really needs it the plan works, otherwise....

There are some who advocate EU-Carriers. This is just beyond reality.
Just look at Libya. Even there, Europe wasn't united. So how should a EU-Carrier work? German machine personal gets the order not to cooperate in an "offensive" mission?
Nuts!

Cooperaiton between France and GB might work to some extend, though. Both are declining powers with the claim to be a great power. So there might actually be the understanding that working together is the only way to keep some influence in the world.

< Message edited by Historiker -- 4/6/2012 2:42:16 PM >


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Post #: 123
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 3:43:57 PM   
mike scholl 1

 

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I've always assumed that the reason Great Britian backs up all the US "plays" in the last 30 years is that there is a secred reciprical agreement that the US will provide a couple of carrier groups to back Britian if there is another attack on the Falklands or some other last remnant of the Empire.

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Post #: 124
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 4:48:41 PM   
Buckrock

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: ilovestrategy
I tried googling it, not too much information. So it will be basically a timeshare? I'm just wondering how the skills of each crew will be maintained while the other country has the carrier.


I notice the plans for the new Brit CV design has two separate control centre islands on the top deck.

Perhaps when sharing, each nationality has its own island and gets to steer on alternating days.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 5:12:12 PM   
Historiker


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Buckrock

quote:

ORIGINAL: ilovestrategy
I tried googling it, not too much information. So it will be basically a timeshare? I'm just wondering how the skills of each crew will be maintained while the other country has the carrier.


I notice the plans for the new Brit CV design has two separate control centre islands on the top deck.

Perhaps when sharing, each nationality has its own island and gets to steer on alternating days.


Reminds me of the three-headed knight...

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Post #: 126
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 5:36:06 PM   
tocaff


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The UK and France, hmm.  France and the UK, hmm.  Nah, each one of them has a different agenda and that alone is enough to cause problems.  The only country I can think of that doesn't need a military of it's own is Canada because the US would never allow any foreign incursion there.

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Post #: 127
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 6:33:40 PM   
janh

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: ilovestrategy
quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

Yes there is such a thing as a shared carrier.

How it works though is beyond me!


I tried googling it, not too much information. So it will be basically a timeshare? I'm just wondering how the skills of each crew will be maintained while the other country has the carrier.


I can't find the original article anymore. On wiki you can find stuff on the "Future French aircraft carrier" the new British "Queen Elizabeth" class, but it only say that the close collaboration with design and building was canceled in 2008. There is also an overwhelming amount of information here,
http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/design-preparations-continue-for-britains-new-cvf-future-carrier-updated-01630/
It actually contains some interesting new infos.

What I recall about the "shared carrier" idea was that around 2007 there were some sizable funding cuts for military in GB and France, which messed up the ordering schedule for the two CV both nations planned to purchase. Then there was a proposal to delay also one of the first two ships, at that time still binational projects, and to initially share the other CV. At that time it seem to be a serious proposition, but it seems fortunately they didn't follow through with this. Fortunately? Perhaps not, maybe it really would be time to develop a common service for Europe?

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Post #: 128
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 9:42:51 PM   
RCH


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Since the discussion has turned to carriers I'd like to see how many people here on the forum thinks that carriers are obsolete? With the current anti ship weaponry, I think it will be to easy to lose a carrier and way to hard to replace one. You can look at the current challenges that the US Navy now has concerning the Chinese Pacific threat. China is working towards weapons system that directly targets the US Navy with an emphasis on anti ship missiles that are a threat to our carriers.

I think navies will be making smaller ships and not larger ones once it is realized the truly destructive and effective anti ship missiles that are in development. We are going to a push button military world. It only takes one missile to get through and you have a lost ship.

I still see a need for smaller carriers that mainly carry helicopters that would provide support for certain land operations.

It can also be argued that manned fighter planes will soon be a thing of the past.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 10:13:22 PM   
Canoerebel


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I don't know how aircraft carriers would do in a conflict beteen major seapowers, but they certainly aren't obsolute under the current "peacetime" conditions.  They serve an important role in the projection of power.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 10:30:49 PM   
Sredni

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: tocaff

The UK and France, hmm.  France and the UK, hmm.  Nah, each one of them has a different agenda and that alone is enough to cause problems.  The only country I can think of that doesn't need a military of it's own is Canada because the US would never allow any foreign incursion there.


I think the US was very glad we have a military of our own in recent years. The inclusion of canada and other countries in recent military ventures I think lent a much needed air of legitimacy to the war in afghanistan internationally.

There was certainly a lot of grousing from the states about our lack of military and how underfunded it was and how we depended too much on america and how lucky we were to have america to "protect" us in the years before the recent war we took part in (from the news, from talk shows, from politicians, from comedians). That kind of talk is gone now of course but I expect it will pick back up once memory fades.

There are also our own national interests. As global warming continues and the northwest territories become more open to habitation and exploitation (mineral wise), and the northwest passage becomes a viable shipping route, we are going to see disputes over authority in those area's from all over the world. Just policing and controlling the NW passage is I think going to be a major issue with the rest of the world. And the only times we'll be able to count on america to "protect" us is when it coincides with their own interests.

So for the purposes of protecting our national interests I think a military is required by canada for the foreseeable future. Even with america there to "protect" us.

< Message edited by Sredni -- 4/6/2012 10:31:48 PM >

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/6/2012 11:34:03 PM   
vettim89


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quote:

ORIGINAL: RCH

Since the discussion has turned to carriers I'd like to see how many people here on the forum thinks that carriers are obsolete? With the current anti ship weaponry, I think it will be to easy to lose a carrier and way to hard to replace one. You can look at the current challenges that the US Navy now has concerning the Chinese Pacific threat. China is working towards weapons system that directly targets the US Navy with an emphasis on anti ship missiles that are a threat to our carriers.

I think navies will be making smaller ships and not larger ones once it is realized the truly destructive and effective anti ship missiles that are in development. We are going to a push button military world. It only takes one missile to get through and you have a lost ship.

I still see a need for smaller carriers that mainly carry helicopters that would provide support for certain land operations.

It can also be argued that manned fighter planes will soon be a thing of the past.


I think the WWII experience showed that the two best ways to sink a carrier are submarines and another carrier. Recent use of the USn CVNs has largely been in an environment where they quite frankly don't belong. The lack of a threat from a developed power allows them to conduct ops in confined spaces that would never had been contemplated during the Cold War. One of the biggest dangers to the USN is that they have been neglecting ASW for some time now. With the Sov fleet mostly now rusting away, the money has gone towards attack aircraft (namely F/A-18E). Still the Iranians could easily pop one with either a Kilo class SS or a sea skimming missile in the Persian Gulf quite easily. However if the carriers moved out even into the Arabian Sea, it would be much harder for the Iranians to get close enough to launch be it a TT or an ASM.

In a true open ocean contst, there is no navy in the world that can contest the USN at this time. For all the rumblings about the Chinese, they still lack the logistical system to support off-shore operations. As to the Ballistic ASM: there are a lot of technical hurdles that would need to be overcome to bring such a weapon to operational status. As the ChiComs move forward on this, the USN is coming up with counter measures. Already a high altitude Chaff rocket version of the SM-2 is being developed that could play havoc with such a weapons terminal guidance. Sea Skimming missiles cause the USN to develop the Mk15 Phalanx, RAM, and ESSM. Nothing happens in a vacuum. I am sure the USN will do its best to keep ahead of the Chinese.

A USN CVBG off the Falklands would have eliminated the Argentine Air Force in a matter of days. AWACS would have picked them up as the lifted off and the TomCats would have had them pegged before they could even sniff firing range. The one weapon the Argentines didn't use more of that could have been a game changer was the Truck Mounted Exocet. That would have been a problem for any amphibious force in 1982

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 12:52:52 AM   
Chickenboy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Sredni

quote:

ORIGINAL: tocaff

The UK and France, hmm.  France and the UK, hmm.  Nah, each one of them has a different agenda and that alone is enough to cause problems.  The only country I can think of that doesn't need a military of it's own is Canada because the US would never allow any foreign incursion there.


I think the US was very glad we have a military of our own in recent years. The inclusion of canada and other countries in recent military ventures I think lent a much needed air of legitimacy to the war in afghanistan internationally.

There was certainly a lot of grousing from the states about our lack of military and how underfunded it was and how we depended too much on america and how lucky we were to have america to "protect" us in the years before the recent war we took part in (from the news, from talk shows, from politicians, from comedians). That kind of talk is gone now of course but I expect it will pick back up once memory fades.

There are also our own national interests. As global warming continues and the northwest territories become more open to habitation and exploitation (mineral wise), and the northwest passage becomes a viable shipping route, we are going to see disputes over authority in those area's from all over the world. Just policing and controlling the NW passage is I think going to be a major issue with the rest of the world. And the only times we'll be able to count on america to "protect" us is when it coincides with their own interests.

So for the purposes of protecting our national interests I think a military is required by canada for the foreseeable future. Even with america there to "protect" us.


Since you used "protect" in quotes several times, I infer your insincerity about the use of the term...

I recall reading the minutes of Canadian parliament just a couple of years ago when they were debating the military budget. It was "illuminating" to see where the military ranks in the collective mindset of the Canadians, based on budget expenditures. Something like 0.8% of GDP, isn't it? One of the conservative MPs had an "illuminating" quote-something to the effect that "we should either give the military what they need or stay home and stop pretending that we're a world power." Probably a bit harsh, but only a bit.

In my opinion, perhaps we (the US) spend too much of our budget / GDP on defense. However, I'd rather be where we are now than the years of poor morale and a 'hollowed-out' military. We've been there several times historically (was it Peru or Ecuador that had a larger standing army than we did at the onset of WWII?) and it's ugly trying to come back.

For our European Allies that spend <1% of their GDPs on the military, I bid you well and hope that your minesweepers, hospital ships and battalion-sized peacekeeper forces can carry the day for you in your moment of need.

I agree that the Canadians will have "issues" with the Northwest Territories and the grab for the Northern resources as they open up with climatologic change. I fail to see how that will be an American issue, anymore than a foreign power infringing on one of our protectorates or territories would be a Canadian or a European issue.

As we have our own sovereign rows to hoe, we'll need our own respective military competencies and capabilities. Woe unto those leaders outside of the United States that assume American blood and treasure will bear their cross. "Beware entangling alliances" indeed, Mr. Washington.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 3:35:03 AM   
USS America


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quote:

In my opinion, perhaps we (the US) spend too much of our budget / GDP on defense. However, I'd rather be where we are now than the years of poor morale and a 'hollowed-out' military. We've been there several times historically (was it Peru or Ecuador that had a larger standing army than we did at the onset of WWII?) and it's ugly trying to come back.


It was Poland that had a larger army than the US. Yes, the army that lasted 5 weeks was larger than the US Army in 1939.

< Message edited by USS America -- 4/7/2012 3:37:23 AM >


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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 10:00:21 AM   
Historiker


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quote:

ORIGINAL: USS America

quote:

In my opinion, perhaps we (the US) spend too much of our budget / GDP on defense. However, I'd rather be where we are now than the years of poor morale and a 'hollowed-out' military. We've been there several times historically (was it Peru or Ecuador that had a larger standing army than we did at the onset of WWII?) and it's ugly trying to come back.


It was Poland that had a larger army than the US. Yes, the army that lasted 5 weeks was larger than the US Army in 1939.

Almost everone had a larger army than you, Poland's army was rather big

The nation mentioned often was Romania, IIRC.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 11:17:12 AM   
HansBolter


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quote:

ORIGINAL: crsutton


quote:

ORIGINAL: Chris H


quote:

ORIGINAL: crsutton

The US did not get involved in the first Falkland war because it in no way served our strategic interest. I like our British allies but that was a wise policy decision then and it is now.




You mean just like we did in Afganistan and Iraq. Oops sorry, we did get involved even though it in now way served our strategic interests. Not a wise decision on behalf of our government.



Agreed, and for the most part not a wise decision on anybody's part.



I'm afraid I can't go down the path of classifying it in such simplistic terms. Can anyone truly say that the Arab spring would have happened without it? I know that democracy is a messy business and that what is happening can't truly be classifed as democracy yet and that there are more decided cons than pros to handing the popular vote to a populous that may well vote to unleash it's Jihad against the world, but I have to remain steadfast in the belief that spreading democracy to the world will always be in our strategic interest.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 11:20:57 AM   
tocaff


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My comment about the US protecting Canada was and is based on the assumption that a foreign military presence in Canada would never be tolerated.  Strategically it would be held akin to foreign forces in the US itself.  It serves the USA's interests to have a peaceful border and trading partner that is mineral rich.

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I never thought that doing an AAR would be so time consuming and difficult.
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Post #: 137
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 11:40:59 AM   
Cannonfodder


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy


In my opinion, perhaps we (the US) spend too much of our budget / GDP on defense.

For our European Allies that spend <1% of their GDPs on the military, I bid you well and hope that your minesweepers, hospital ships and battalion-sized peacekeeper forces can carry the day for you in your moment of need.



US military power... You never wonder where the money to maintain it comes from? Battalion sized forces might not impress you but at least it is affordable...

On the other hand, economic depression and cutting defense budgets somehow leads to war... Humans... bluh

< Message edited by Cannonfodder -- 4/7/2012 12:08:46 PM >


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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 3:59:25 PM   
Dobey

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: mike scholl 1

I've always assumed that the reason Great Britian backs up all the US "plays" in the last 30 years is that there is a secred reciprical agreement that the US will provide a couple of carrier groups to back Britian if there is another attack on the Falklands or some other last remnant of the Empire.


From a political point of view it would be imperative for Britain NOT to involve the US or anyone else in a Falklands conflict. Britain claims the Falklands a sovereign territory, so they need to be able to demonstrate that they can defend it with their own resources.
Britain calling the US to defend the Falklands would be about as realistic as the US calling Britain to defend Puerto Rico. (ie a humiliation.)

As an example Britain could easily have asked her Empire to help in 1982 (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, etc) but to ask for help to defend your own sovereign soil would only prove Argentina correct when it says that geographically Britain does not have the ability to defend the Falklands.

That's why the UK Never asked the US to assist in 1982. It was imperative that the UK prove they could defend the Falklands WITHOUT outside assistance.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 4:09:21 PM   
witpqs

 

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Better, yes. Imperative? How about Kuwait? France? And so on.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 6:42:52 PM   
Dobey

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Better, yes. Imperative? How about Kuwait? France? And so on.


I assume you're referring to Kuwait in 1990\1991 and France 1940?

I don't see how either one of those is comparable. In neither case was the conflict about Britain defending what it considered its own territory and in neither case was the UK the major combatant. Also the caliber of the enemy in 1982 was vastly different to, say 1940 Germany.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 7:25:52 PM   
Sredni

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: tocaff

My comment about the US protecting Canada was and is based on the assumption that a foreign military presence in Canada would never be tolerated.  Strategically it would be held akin to foreign forces in the US itself.  It serves the USA's interests to have a peaceful border and trading partner that is mineral rich.


yeah, I probably went off a little more then I should have heh, apologies. You're right of course in that physically canada is immune to anything short of full out world war simply because the states wouldn't tolerate a foreign country threatening a country so tied into their sphere of influence. I wonder if mexico would merit the same attention... certainly they're safe from an oversea's power (I would imagine), but I wonder if central america united and decided to menace mexico if the US would intervene. who knows. kinda pointless speculation I guess since I can't imagine central america uniting heh.

I was simply emphasizing that while there's no real chance of a random country deciding to annex and occupy british columbia or newfoundland without the US intervening, there are many other factors involved that demand we maintain our own military presence. That america's protection only coincides with america's self interest. Which doesn't necessarily coincide with canada's self interest. And also I guess that despite perception, canada maintains today a decent sized and effective military. In spite of shots about our relatively low GDP% spent on the military.

Realistically any country in the world today is only really threatened in any real way by it's neighbors or by the worlds super powers, and canada's only neighbor is the superpower heh.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy

I fail to see how that will be an American issue, anymore than a foreign power infringing on one of our protectorates or territories would be a Canadian or a European issue.


That was precisely my point it's not. Canada needs a military to protect it's interests since american protection only extends to american interests. And I'm not casting blame or assigning anything negative to this fact (I had protect in quotes because I see it as folly to expect one nation to protect another for anything but self interest). It's simply the way nations operate. And also that canada's military (contrary to perception) is effective enough to suit current national needs, and even to support allies in wars that have absolutely nothing to do with us.


------------------------

And I guess I should comment on the threads topic some more heh, enough derailing! I find myself a little shocked that the EU doesn't have binding and effective mutual support clauses. That was just a throw away comment from me about germany and france getting involved in a new falklands dispute, I was honestly assuming it was a given that they would. How odd. Is it just because it's a "foreign" property held far away from the UK's real borders? Or would it be the same if say turkey decided to invade greece or something?

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 7:28:13 PM   
witpqs

 

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The point is about any country defending what it considers to be its territory. The assertion being called into question is, basically, (in my own words) "if you can't defend it then it's not yours". That is no different in the case of the Falklands than for any place else in the world. "I have it" versus "I want it" is what it boils down to. The argument that the UK "had" to retake the territories on its own because they are so far away does not hold water. Plenty of countries have failed to hold or re-take plenty of territories on their own, including their very heartlands. That does not make their claim to those territories any less valid. Singling out UK and the Falklands for such a burden is wrong.

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RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 8:46:54 PM   
Chickenboy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Sredni


quote:

ORIGINAL: tocaff

My comment about the US protecting Canada was and is based on the assumption that a foreign military presence in Canada would never be tolerated.  Strategically it would be held akin to foreign forces in the US itself.  It serves the USA's interests to have a peaceful border and trading partner that is mineral rich.


yeah, I probably went off a little more then I should have heh, apologies. You're right of course in that physically canada is immune to anything short of full out world war simply because the states wouldn't tolerate a foreign country threatening a country so tied into their sphere of influence. I wonder if mexico would merit the same attention... certainly they're safe from an oversea's power (I would imagine), but I wonder if central america united and decided to menace mexico if the US would intervene. who knows. kinda pointless speculation I guess since I can't imagine central america uniting heh.

I was simply emphasizing that while there's no real chance of a random country deciding to annex and occupy british columbia or newfoundland without the US intervening, there are many other factors involved that demand we maintain our own military presence. That america's protection only coincides with america's self interest. Which doesn't necessarily coincide with canada's self interest. And also I guess that despite perception, canada maintains today a decent sized and effective military. In spite of shots about our relatively low GDP% spent on the military.

Realistically any country in the world today is only really threatened in any real way by it's neighbors or by the worlds super powers, and canada's only neighbor is the superpower heh.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Chickenboy

I fail to see how that will be an American issue, anymore than a foreign power infringing on one of our protectorates or territories would be a Canadian or a European issue.


That was precisely my point it's not. Canada needs a military to protect it's interests since american protection only extends to american interests. And I'm not casting blame or assigning anything negative to this fact (I had protect in quotes because I see it as folly to expect one nation to protect another for anything but self interest). It's simply the way nations operate. And also that canada's military (contrary to perception) is effective enough to suit current national needs, and even to support allies in wars that have absolutely nothing to do with us.


------------------------

And I guess I should comment on the threads topic some more heh, enough derailing! I find myself a little shocked that the EU doesn't have binding and effective mutual support clauses. That was just a throw away comment from me about germany and france getting involved in a new falklands dispute, I was honestly assuming it was a given that they would. How odd. Is it just because it's a "foreign" property held far away from the UK's real borders? Or would it be the same if say turkey decided to invade greece or something?


OK. Good post.

Watching the Europeans go through their efforts to have a euro-zone RDF is alternatively painful and humorous. How long has this been bandied about now to no effect? I think our European friends on the forum are right. Europe has shown zero aptitude in putting together a common European defense force. It's 'every country for themselves' with the crossed fingers that NATO (particularly the US) will be there if things really go to hell. There's no significant military threat to the continent (yet), so this approach-hope for the best, cut defense spending, rely on others-is the path of least political resistance, particularly in a period of fiscal austerity.

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(in reply to Sredni)
Post #: 144
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 9:05:00 PM   
Historiker


Posts: 4738
Joined: 7/4/2007
From: Deutschland
Status: offline
quote:

Watching the Europeans go through their efforts to have a euro-zone RDF is alternatively painful and humorous. How long has this been bandied about now to no effect? I think our European friends on the forum are right. Europe has shown zero aptitude in putting together a common European defense force. It's 'every country for themselves' with the crossed fingers that NATO (particularly the US) will be there if things really go to hell. There's no significant military threat to the continent (yet), so this approach-hope for the best, cut defense spending, rely on others-is the path of least political resistance, particularly in a period of fiscal austerity.

To have a united force, you need to be united.
Europe is vastly divided, and a EU doesn't change **** about that.

France and UK live off old glory, and as security council members and nuclear powers, they still see themselves as world powers - even though reality doesn't really match with that.
Germany might have more possibilities, but is extremly pacifistic. Consequently, we won't invest more in our military. Even if we had more military power, it won't see any use. When a french president was able to order military strikes all by himself, we have an extremly tight control of the military by the parliament. Being a mostly leftist country with an even more pacifistic culture, you can guess youreself where that's heading.
Poland instead embraces its freedom, has a proud military history and is thus willing both to commit money to its forces and to let the forces play with their tools as well.
Greece is more interested in preparing for war against Turkey than anything else, while Romania is willing to commit its forces but has no money...

Now you can guess what that means, should those nations work together in military means. The best case is, that Europe defends itself in coordination and that Germany or another country doesn't say "if we don#t help poland, we won't get attacked" (which is quite possible).
But offensive action? Combined, with a military that is dependend on capacities by another nation because it doesn't have those material itself any longer?
Forget it, no chance!

There are some dreamers about that, but should that ever happen, the only result would be an even more incapable Europe!

I can only advise the Americans to put their trust into Poland, UK, and propably Romania, France, Spain and the Netherlands. But better don't put your bets on Germany the next time you need us!

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(in reply to Chickenboy)
Post #: 145
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 9:24:57 PM   
Encircled


Posts: 913
Joined: 12/30/2010
From: Northern England
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quote:

As an example Britain could easily have asked her Empire to help in 1982 (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, etc)


I think even the most wildly optimistic Brit wouldn't claim we had an "empire" in 1982!


(in reply to Historiker)
Post #: 146
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 9:36:13 PM   
Historiker


Posts: 4738
Joined: 7/4/2007
From: Deutschland
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

quote:

As an example Britain could easily have asked her Empire to help in 1982 (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, etc)


I think even the most wildly optimistic Brit wouldn't claim we had an "empire" in 1982!



How much do those three feel bound to the UK anyways? Is it a real possibility that those three might join a next war of the UK, expecially a local and restricted war like 1982?

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Without any doubt: I am the spawn of evil - and the Bavarian Beer Monster (BBM)!

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(in reply to Encircled)
Post #: 147
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 9:49:30 PM   
Encircled


Posts: 913
Joined: 12/30/2010
From: Northern England
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No idea to be honest.

I can't see anybody but us fighting for the Falklands.


(in reply to Historiker)
Post #: 148
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 9:59:53 PM   
Empire101


Posts: 1956
Joined: 5/20/2008
From: Coruscant
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dobey
As an example Britain could easily have asked her Empire to help in 1982 (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, etc)



Empire!!!??
You are a little behind the times me old China, the Empire as a construct is long dead, both physically and metaphorically, with rampant greed, avarice, and consumerism taking the place of pride in one's country unfortunately (in most peoples minds).



I think this thread has run its course.....





< Message edited by Empire101 -- 4/7/2012 10:00:44 PM >


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(in reply to Dobey)
Post #: 149
RE: OT: 30 years since the Argentines attacked the Fal... - 4/7/2012 10:06:40 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 16006
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Historiker


quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

quote:

As an example Britain could easily have asked her Empire to help in 1982 (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, etc)


I think even the most wildly optimistic Brit wouldn't claim we had an "empire" in 1982!



How much do those three feel bound to the UK anyways? Is it a real possibility that those three might join a next war of the UK, expecially a local and restricted war like 1982?
Warspite1

I recall the Kiwi's offering to assist the Royal Navy with a frigate - Robert Muldoon(?) was the Prime Minister at the time and he kicked the Argentinian ambassador out of New Zealand in a show of solidarity iirc

Typical of the Kiwi's

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Post #: 150
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