Matrix Games Forums

Come and see us during the Spieltagen in Essen!New Screenshots for Pike & ShotDeal of the Week Command: Modern Air/Naval Operations WOTYCommand: Modern Air/Naval Operations WOTY is now available!Frontline : The Longest Day Announced and in Beta!Command gets Wargame of the Year EditionDeal of the Week: Pandora SeriesPandora: Eclipse of Nashira is now availableDistant Worlds Gets another updateHell is Approaching
Forums  Register  Login  Photo Gallery  Member List  Search  Calendars  FAQ 

My Profile  Inbox  Address Book  My Subscription  My Forums  Log Out

RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment?

 
View related threads: (in this forum | in all forums)

Logged in as: Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [General] >> General Discussion >> RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? Page: <<   < prev  26 27 [28] 29 30   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 4:04:05 AM   
Zorch

 

Posts: 661
Joined: 3/7/2010
Status: offline
Have you any opinion on Judge Crater?

(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 811
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 4:24:44 AM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline
No, but I am convinced that Hunter Thompson, Nancy Schaefer, Phillip Marshall & Aaron Swartz were murdered and the crimes are being covered up as "suicides" by the Illuminati.



_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to Zorch)
Post #: 812
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 3:24:41 PM   
wings7


Posts: 760
Joined: 8/11/2003
From: Santa Ana, CA
Status: offline
I'm currently reading "Indian Nations of North America", published by National Geographic Society. Forward by Herman J. Viola.
Copyright 2010, ISBN: 978-1-4262-0664-1

Being born and raised in the States, I have not read or learned much about Indian Nations history, culture and way of life. This is a excellent book on the subject, with maps, photos and diagrams. I've just started reading it so I will have comments and thoughts in the future.

Patrick

(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 813
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 6:47:40 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 18876
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: SLAAKMAN

No, but I am convinced that Hunter Thompson, Nancy Schaefer, Phillip Marshall & Aaron Swartz were murdered and the crimes are being covered up as "suicides" by the Illuminati.


warspite1

What about Elvis?


_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 814
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 7:18:37 PM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline
quote:

warspite1

What about Elvis?

Elvis is prancing around inside your head Silly W2-Newblette.


_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 815
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 7:23:17 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 18876
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: SLAAKMAN

quote:

warspite1

What about Elvis?

Elvis is prancing around inside your head Silly W2-Newblette.

warspite1

Ladies and Gentlemen, warspite 1 has left the building


_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 816
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 7:29:25 PM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline
quote:

FDR’s 1933 Gold Confiscation was a Bailout of the Federal Reserve Bank

by Daniel Carr, owner/operator of Moonlight Mint and www.DC-Coin.com

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s 1933 executive order outlawing the private ownership of gold in the United States was arguably unconstitutional. But why did he do it ? Many historians and economists point to efforts to get the economy moving again as the reason, the theory being that people were hoarding gold and the velocity of money in circulation needed to be sped up.

But the real reason for the gold confiscation was a bailout of the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank. And the evidence has been printed right in front of our faces.

PAPER REPLACES SPECIE

During the 1800s, paper money was suspect in the eyes of many. Nobody would ever choose a government-issue $20 note over a $20 gold coin. Gradually during the late 1800s and early 1900s, confidence in government paper money increased to the point where it was widely accepted. People accepted the money because they felt confident they could exchange it at the US Treasury or any Federal Reserve Bank for gold at any time – it even said so on the notes. Without the gold exchange clauses printed directly on the notes, the public would have been much less likely to accept them. Silver Certificates and United States Notes circulated alongside Gold Certificates, which were legally interchangeable dollar-for-dollar.

THE “FED” AND EASY MONEY

In 1913 the Federal Reserve Bank was established and it began issuing Federal Reserve Notes the following year.

Once free of the restrictions imposed by the limitations of available physical gold for coinage, the quantity of Dollars in circulation increased dramatically. The increase was mostly in the form of paper money, not specie.

The result was an economic “boom”, also known as “The Roaring Twenties” (1923-1929). But like all artificially-induced stimulus, it came to a crash in the fall of 1929. The burden of over-extended credit was the culprit. Prior to the formation of the Federal Reserve, money in circulation consisted of copper, silver, and gold coins, United States Notes, Silver Certificates, and Gold Certificates. All of these were non-interest-bearing, were issued directly by the US Treasury, and did not have any debt associated with their issuance.

Notes issued by the Federal Reserve, however, were generally lent out, with interest due. So for every Federal Reserve dollar in circulation, somebody needed that dollar to pay off a debt. During the Roaring Twenties, a lot of people took on debt, resulting in a great credit expansion. When only physical gold and silver was used as money, institutions were very cautious about lending it out because if the debtor defaulted, the creditor would be out some serious (sound) money.

But with the advent of Federal Reserve Notes, the bank was more willing to lend. And with easier qualification terms, people stepped up to the window. The increased willingness to lend was due to the fact that the item being lent out was just a piece of replaceable paper, not a hard-to-get piece of gold. Sure, the notes said “redeemable in gold” (otherwise they might have been refused in commerce). But few members of the public actually exchanged such notes for actual gold. And thus, the Federal Reserve was free to lend almost at will, with little regard for loan losses. When the interest burden of all that new credit began to weigh more-heavily on the general economy, the inevitable credit contraction led to the Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression. Everyone was suddenly reluctant to borrow, banks were reluctant to lend, and the velocity of money in circulation slowed to a crawl.

A GOLD RUN ?

The financial footing of the United States became shaky. European countries which were holding substantial quantities of US gold-clause notes began presenting them to exchange for physical gold. The US Government’s fixed price of gold at $20.67 per troy ounce had been in effect for some time. But as the Great Depression deepened, the free-market price of gold started creeping up above that. This was an indication that confidence in gold-clause notes was starting to wane. A gold run on the Federal Reserve bank was imminent. And that was something that couldn’t be tolerated.

And the reason that a gold run couldn’t be tolerated, is that neither the Federal Reserve nor the US Treasury held anywhere near enough gold to back all the Gold Certificates and Federal Reserve Notes that were in circulation. And printing more of these notes would only erode confidence in them even further. The gold fractional-reserve system was at the end of the road.

GOLD-CLAUSE NOTES
This is a typical gold-exchange clause found on Gold Certificates issued by the US Treasury from about 1905 to 1922.

And the clause on series 1928 US Treasury Gold Certificates looked like this:

Series 1914 Federal Reserve Notes carried this gold-clause:

1928 series Federal Reserve Notes were printed with this:


HOW MANY IN CIRCULATION ?

Proof that the Federal Reserve Bank and the US Treasury were in serious trouble, that they didn’t have nearly enough gold to back the notes issued, can be found in the tables in the appendix to this article.


The total numbers of various notes issued are available from a number of sources. The appendix shows data reported in two books: “The Standard Handbook of United States Paper Money”, 6th edition (1977), by Chuck O’Donnell; and “The Comprehensive Catalog of U.S. Paper Money”, 1981 edition, by Gene Hessler.

To calculate the total face value of all gold-clause notes in circulation, it is necessary to know how many were issued, and how many may have still been around in 1933. The appendix tables do not include US Treasury Gold Certificates issued prior to 1905. Quantities of pre-1905 Gold Certificates were relatively small, and most would have been redeemed (and replaced with new notes) before 1933. The number of notes issued is known. The number surviving in 1933 can only be estimated.

According to the US Treasury, the average life span of a current $100 bill in circulation is about 7.5 years. Adjusted for inflation, one-hundred 2011 Dollars is equal to roughly five 1933 Dollars. Five Dollars in 1933 was a fair amount of money. The velocity of money in circulation was much lower then as well, especially during the Great Depression. A person receiving a $5 bill in change in 1933 would be unlikely to wad it up and casually stuff it in their pocket. They would more likely carefully squirrel it away for some other “rainy day”. So in 1933, a typical $5 bill would not get worn out as fast as a 2011 $100 bill. And larger-denomination notes would circulate even less often. Gold-clause notes would likely be the most tightly-held (and least circulated) of all types of notes, followed by Silver Certificates and US Notes (in that order). So it is probably a fair assumption that, on average, the “half-life” of gold-clause notes in circulation would be at least 20 years – meaning that after every 20 years or so, half the notes remaining in circulation would have to be replaced due to being worn out. The majority of gold-clause notes were issued shortly before 1933 during the 1928-1933 period, so they would still be in relatively new condition in 1933.

All this doesn’t account for gold-clause notes that were turned in for physical gold, even though they may have still been in good condition. But if Federal Reserve Notes were turned in while still in good condition, the notes would have simply been placed back into circulation by the Federal Reserve Bank or US Treasury. Many US Treasury Gold Certificates turned in for redemption may have actually been cancelled and not re-released into circulation.

GOLD SHORTFALL

Records indicate that the total gold reserves of the country in 1933 were 4 Billion dollars worth. And at $20.67 per troy ounce, that equates to about 6,000 metric tons of gold.

The total face value of US Treasury Gold Certificates issued from 1905 to 1928 equates to more than 16,000 metric tons of gold. Taking the generous assumption that the US Treasury did not issue more Gold Certificates than they had gold to back them, would mean that only 37.5% of all 1905-1928 Gold Certificates were still outstanding in 1933. In other words, if 37.5% of all Gold Certificates were still outstanding in 1933, the US Treasury would have just enough gold to back them.

Now the real problem is the gold-clause Federal Reserve Notes. Since these were generally re-released upon redemption (if in good condition), the only attrition in the quantity of notes outstanding would be due to replacement of worn-out notes. A conservative estimate of the total number of Federal Reserve Notes still in circulation in 1933 would be at least 75%.

The total face value of gold-clause Federal Reserve Notes issued prior to 1933 was equivalent to nearly 54,000 metric tons of gold. If 75% of them were outstanding in 1933, that would still be 40,500 metric tons of gold that the Federal Reserve Bank (and the US Treasury) didn’t have. Even taking the extremely low estimate of only 37.5% of the Federal Reserve Notes remaining, that would still be over 20,000 metric tons of gold. With US gold reserves at 6,000 tons, this would be a shortfall of 14,000 tons. But those 6,000 tons were needed to cover the US Treasury Gold Certificates. So at the very minimum, Federal Reserve Notes to the tune of 20,000 metric tons of gold were “circulating naked” in 1933.

THE BAILOUT

So along comes FDR. One of the very first things he did was issue an executive order basically outlawing the private ownership of gold bullion. US Treasury Gold Certificates were no longer legal tender when held by the general public, unless exchanged at the US Treasury or Federal Reserve Bank for other non-gold paper. The US Treasury could then transfer 6,000 metric tons of gold to the Federal Reserve as a token backing for the “full faith and credit of the United States”. Reportedly, the US Treasury sent gold certificates to the Federal Reserve in exchange for Federal Reserve Notes. So the net result of this exchange was that the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank held US Treasury Gold Certificates backed by US Treasury gold, while the US Treasury held Federal Reserve Notes backed by “credit”. These actions bailed out the privately-controlled Federal Reserve bank, which as of 1933 would no longer be in danger of collapsing due to a sort-fall of 20,000 or more metric tons of gold.

During a “Fireside Chat” on 07 May 1933, Roosevelt basically admitted that gold-clause obligations far exceeded the amount of gold held by the US Treasury and Federal Reserve. In fact, the total gold obligations far exceeded the amount of gold in the entire world, not even counting corporate gold obligations.

“Behind government currency we have, in addition to the promise to pay, a reserve of gold and a small reserve of silver, neither of them anything like the total amount of the currency.” – FDR, 07 May 1933.

In the same speech, Roosevelt outlined that the total US gold reserves amounted to between 3 and 4 billion dollars worth (4,500-6,000 metric tons), and that all the gold in all the world was valued at 11 billion dollars (16,500 metric tons). At the same time, Roosevelt admits that US Government (and Federal Reserve) gold obligations were at least 30 billion dollars worth (45,000 metric tons), and that private US corporations had promised another 60 billion dollars worth (90,000 metric tons).

Roosevelt’s 07 May 1933 Fireside Chat (the important part of the audio starts at 15:30). NOTE: I have searched the internet and all posted transcripts of the speech are missing the key phrase “neither of them anything like the total amount of the currency”. But that statement is clearly heard in the audio.

As citizens complied with the new ”law” by turning in gold, the gold reserves of the US Treasury and Federal Reserve increased. After most of the public’s gold was turned in, FDR raised the official price from $20.67 to $35.00 per troy ounce. How “convenient”. Gold-clause Federal Reserve notes were not recalled and remained in circulation. But they could no longer be exchanged for gold, except by certain foreign central banks. Those with connections were able to buy valuable assets with mere paper. Wealth was concentrated in fewer hands.

The new series of 1934 Federal Reserve notes no longer had any gold clause, they were only redeemable for “lawful money”, whatever that was.


THE FALLOUT

FDR’s actions in bailing out the Federal Reserve Bank set in motion the ultimate debt-enslavement of the US Government and its citizens.

(CONT)
http://www.moonlightmint.com/bailout.htm

_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to Zorch)
Post #: 817
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/9/2013 8:18:07 PM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline
Lerner and Shulman need to be in prison~
quote:

The IRS is still targeting Tea Party groups

The IRS scandal is still growing. House Oversight chairman Darrell Issa has begun investigating the Federal Election Commission about "the prospect of inappropriate coordination between the IRS and the FEC about tax-exempt entities."

Key IRS scandal figure Lois Lerner used to work for the FEC, where she was the subject of complaints disturbingly similar to the abuse-of-power scandal that would consume the IRS. It's hard to escape the conclusion that she was brought over to the IRS because of her experience at using political power to crack down on enemies of the ruling party.

She apparently still has a great working relationship with her old FEC colleagues, because when they made an inappropriate - in fact, illegal - request for confidential IRS data about a conservative group, Lerner responded in nine minutes flat.

We've also learned that the IRS persecution of Tea Party groups never actually stopped. Three months into a scandal that calls the legitimacy of the 2012 election, and of the federal government itself, into serious question, IRS agents are still following the old protocols. They were officially rescinded, according to testimony from the new IRS commissioner to Congress... but new procedures were never put into place, so the agents of the Tax Exempt Organization division are still subjecting conservative groups to extra scrutiny. That's not the fault of the low-level IRS employees... but then again, none of this ever was, contrary to the Administration's frantic damage-control efforts.

http://www.humanevents.com/2013/08/09/the-irs-is-still-targeting-tea-party-groups/

_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 818
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/11/2013 6:00:25 AM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline
Welcome to 1984 America. Privacy?? What privacy?

Stop sign camera spotted in the District

http://www.myfoxdc.com/story/23093497/stop-sign-camera-spotted-in-the-district#axzz2bbXnHhJn

_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 819
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/15/2013 7:13:10 AM   
berto


Posts: 4621
Joined: 3/13/2002
From: metro Chicago, Illinois, USA
Status: online

On to the next volume in the series:

The Story of Civilization: The Reformation [volume 6], by Will Durant

11 volumes, nearly 10,000 pages, about four million words -- almost at the half-way point!


_____________________________

Early MusiChicago, http://earlymusichicago.org
PIKT, http://pikt.org
Campaign Series Lead Programmer, http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tt.asp?forumid=226
AGElint debugging toolkit, http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tm.asp?m=2978333

(in reply to berto)
Post #: 820
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/15/2013 10:57:13 AM   
altipueri

 

Posts: 168
Joined: 11/14/2009
Status: offline
Young Folk's History of the War for the Union.

By John Denison Champlin

(in reply to berto)
Post #: 821
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/15/2013 6:51:10 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 18876
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
One Hundred Days - Admiral Sandy Woodward RIP

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to altipueri)
Post #: 822
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/15/2013 9:12:59 PM   
Kineas


Posts: 98
Joined: 4/19/2008
From: EU
Status: offline
Panzer Leader from Guderian :]

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 823
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/22/2013 5:17:01 PM   
fodder


Posts: 1853
Joined: 4/11/2010
From: Daytona Beach
Status: offline
The Flying Tigers, by John Toland.

_____________________________


(in reply to Kineas)
Post #: 824
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/22/2013 6:20:52 PM   
Jevhaddah


Posts: 569
Joined: 11/24/2005
From: Scotland
Status: online
Sharpe's Trafalgar.

I am reading Bernard Cornwells Sharpe series of book in chronological order.

Cheers

Jev

_____________________________

I am really quite mad yoo know!

(in reply to fodder)
Post #: 825
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/24/2013 7:25:12 AM   
Orm


Posts: 6197
Joined: 5/3/2008
From: Sweden
Status: online
I am also reading the Sharpe series in chronological order.

But I just begun on Sharpe's Devil.

_____________________________

Ladies and Gentlemen, this is your Captain speaking. We have a small problem. All four engines have stopped. We are doing our damnedest to get them going again. I trust you are not in too much distress. - Captain Eric Moody

(in reply to Jevhaddah)
Post #: 826
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 8/24/2013 1:55:09 PM   
Jevhaddah


Posts: 569
Joined: 11/24/2005
From: Scotland
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: Orm

I am also reading the Sharpe series in chronological order.

But I just begun on Sharpe's Devil.


I started out with Sharpes Tiger and now nearly finished Sharpe's Trafalgar.. sooo Sharpes Prey next

Cheers

Jev

_____________________________

I am really quite mad yoo know!

(in reply to Orm)
Post #: 827
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/16/2013 11:06:19 PM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline


_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to Zorch)
Post #: 828
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/17/2013 12:11:47 AM   
Aurelian

 

Posts: 2210
Joined: 2/26/2007
Status: offline
http://annistonstar.com/view/full_story/7674673/article-Harvey-H--Jackson--%E2%80%98They%E2%80%99-are-out-there?instance=opinion_lead

and

Norman Stone: The Eastern Front 1914-1917. No illuminuti involved.

(in reply to SLAAKMAN)
Post #: 829
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/17/2013 6:22:57 AM   
Boomer78


Posts: 339
Joined: 9/6/2013
Status: offline
I just got done reading my bathroom wallpaper. Goddamn boring sh*t. The flowers never have anything interesting to say to the butterflies. They just sit there... flowering.

_____________________________

"Fly, god dammit it fly! God damn cheap Japanese flying packs!"

(in reply to Aurelian)
Post #: 830
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/17/2013 6:48:01 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 18876
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Boomer78

I just got done reading my bathroom wallpaper. Goddamn boring sh*t. The flowers never have anything interesting to say to the butterflies. They just sit there... flowering.
warspite1

You have flowers and butterfly wallpaper? Er....okay.......


_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Boomer78)
Post #: 831
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/17/2013 7:50:28 AM   
Boomer78


Posts: 339
Joined: 9/6/2013
Status: offline
Had to settle for it. They were out of the mauve colored Stukas dive bombing furry rabbits wallpaper. That palette would have looked lovely on my man-cave walls.

_____________________________

"Fly, god dammit it fly! God damn cheap Japanese flying packs!"

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 832
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/17/2013 4:49:22 PM   
Wiking SS


Posts: 8
Joined: 9/1/2013
From: Nashville
Status: offline
Tigers in the Mud.
Viking Panzers - The German 5th SS Tank Regiment in the East in WWII.
The Combat History of German Tiger Tank Battalion 503 in WWII.
A History of the Vikings.

(in reply to Boomer78)
Post #: 833
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/19/2013 1:01:00 PM   
fodder


Posts: 1853
Joined: 4/11/2010
From: Daytona Beach
Status: offline
"RAIDER WOLF" The voyage of Captain Nerger, 1916-1918. by Edwin P. Hoyt.

_____________________________


(in reply to Wiking SS)
Post #: 834
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/20/2013 10:56:58 AM   
Hotschi

 

Posts: 339
Joined: 1/18/2010
From: Austria
Status: offline
Books I've read lately;

Hirohito And The Making Of Modern Japan - by Herbert P. Bix

- an eye-opener, busting the myth of Hirohito being a "powerless puppet" of the military, and of the myth that Hirohito "benevolently ended" the war. He was rather right in the center of the decision-making process beginning from the "Manchurian incident" right until the end of the war - which he delayed. Also interesting is the occupation period, the manoeuvering of both Japanese and Americans to keep Hirohito uncharged by the Tokyo War Crime Tribunal and to appear being free of any responsibilty for any of the Japanese aggressions. Covers the whole life of this man, from childhood to death, including inthronement of his successor Akihito.

War in the Pacific: End of the Asiatic Fleet and the Classified Report of Admiral Thomas C. Hart - by Thomas C. Hart and Charles Culbertson

- a short report of the actions of the US Asiatic Fleet in the Philippines and during the ABDACOM period.

Currently I am reading The Battle for Singapore by Peter Thompson - the other thread here about Percival and Singapore woke my interest and desire to dig deeper and get some more knowledge about this disaster.

_____________________________

"One day, Tom, you'll be standing on a box on your bridge, and your ship will be smashed to pieces by bombers and torpedo aircraft; as she sinks, your last words will be "That was a f**ing great mine!""
- Air Marshal Arthur Harris to Adm Tom Phillips

(in reply to fodder)
Post #: 835
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/24/2013 1:15:12 AM   
nate25


Posts: 1379
Joined: 9/20/2011
From: Fishers Indiana
Status: offline
The Burma Campaign - Disaster Into Triumph 1942-45
Frank McLynn - Yale Press

_____________________________

I have a subtle and cunning plan.

(in reply to Hotschi)
Post #: 836
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/24/2013 1:28:21 AM   
Pika

 

Posts: 38
Joined: 10/19/2007
From: Michigan
Status: offline
Ostkrieg by Stephen G. Fritz and Defiance of Eagles by William W. Johnstone wit J.A. Johnstone.

(in reply to nate25)
Post #: 837
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/28/2013 9:53:22 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 18876
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pika

Ostkrieg by Stephen G. Fritz

warspite1

Excellent book - if a little hard going at times.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Pika)
Post #: 838
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/28/2013 9:54:52 PM   
nate25


Posts: 1379
Joined: 9/20/2011
From: Fishers Indiana
Status: offline
The Prepper's Pocket Guide - Carr

_____________________________

I have a subtle and cunning plan.

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 839
RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? - 9/29/2013 2:23:33 PM   
SLAAKMAN


Posts: 2808
Joined: 7/24/2002
Status: offline
Blood Lines of the Illuminati


_____________________________

Germany's unforgivable crime before the Second World War was her attempt to extricate her economy from the world's trading system and to create her own exchange mechanism which would deny world finance its opportunity to profit.
— Winston Churchill

(in reply to nate25)
Post #: 840
Page:   <<   < prev  26 27 [28] 29 30   next >   >>
All Forums >> [General] >> General Discussion >> RE: What Book Are You Reading at the moment? Page: <<   < prev  26 27 [28] 29 30   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.201