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RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J)

 
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RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/12/2013 12:09:00 PM   
obvert


Posts: 6957
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
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Yeah, until he gets about 3:1 raw AV against those troops he won't get a positive result. Nice that your supply is working again.

_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 631
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/12/2013 3:44:06 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: offline
January 17th 1943

Supply flow


Nothing really happened today. The supplies that were in Hengyang yesterday flowed back to Hankow, stuff moved between Nanking and Hangchow, but that was all. Nothing moved north, and nothing moved south.

I am trying to draw supplies south tomorrow, Kunming, Nanning, and Hanoi are my targets, but we’re not there yet.

In the air

P38-G swept Dobo, and met my Tonies. We shot down 10 P38 and lost four planes. Overall, 45 P38-G are reported lost (in Tracker, the in game statistics are much higher) so far, and the Allies should have produced 70 by mid January.

B24-D visited Ambon, and managed to destroy a couple of Sallies on the ground. I am using those planes on ASW duty, and am getting a good number of hit reports every day. One B24 was lost, which is always nice.

Over Dobo, my opponent finally noticed I am supplying my troops from the air. A couple of Betties were shot down by the CAP. 4E transports seem to fare better, I will continue using them, and will try sweeping the base at some point.

More Imphal

Another deliberate attack today. After yesterday’s results I would have expected the allies to be too disrupted to act, but they seem to have fared better than yesterday, and my supplies were low.

I still doubt they can keep up with this for very long, and once Kalemyo falls, Imphal will be reinforced, heavily…


Allied Deliberate attack
Attacking force 23732 troops, 305 guns, 894 vehicles, Assault Value = 954
Defending force 21328 troops, 165 guns, 41 vehicles, Assault Value = 748
Allied assault odds: 1 to 2

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), preparation(-), supply(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
795 casualties reported
Squads: 5 destroyed, 91 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 4 disabled
Engineers: 2 destroyed, 6 disabled
Guns lost 12 (1 destroyed, 11 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
739 casualties reported
Squads: 7 destroyed, 70 disabled
Non Combat: 2 destroyed, 35 disabled
Engineers: 2 destroyed, 16 disabled
Guns lost 10 (3 destroyed, 7 disabled)
Vehicles lost 37 (4 destroyed, 33 disabled)


(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 632
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/12/2013 4:05:12 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: offline
January 18th 1943

Supply movement


Something strange happened today. Fusan went, in a day, down one million tons of supplies, from 1037k to 143k. Most of those went to Port Arthur, but China took about 100 000, and Indochina (Hanoi) went up by 20 000.

Kunming and Nanning drew supplies too. Tomorrow, I am trying to send those to Lashio (the railhead for Burma), Hanoi and Saigon. It seems I can pump supplies south, let’s see now if the game does it automatically once the pump is primed.

Aerial mining

Today was the first time the Allies dropped mines from the air. B24-D dropped mines on Boela and Kendari, and lost one B24-D. I am moving coastal sweepers towards the front, but I am not too worried: apparently, I can see those mines when they are dropped.

In Imphal, the Allies bombarded my troops, for little effect.


(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 633
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 8:00:23 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: offline
January 19th 1943

A bad day in Chittagong


A tank division had advanced into Chittagong yesterday, and was joined today by two infantry divisions. I thought this would be enough, but I was wrong, the enemy attacked and my troops were trashed in one of those incredibly one sided results this game is famous for.

Ground combat at Chittagong (55,41)
Allied Deliberate attack
Attacking force 51780 troops, 902 guns, 1085 vehicles, Assault Value = 1698
Defending force 31431 troops, 380 guns, 580 vehicles, Assault Value = 1236
Allied adjusted assault: 986
Japanese adjusted defense: 482
Allied assault odds: 2 to 1

Combat modifiers
Defender: op mode(-), disruption(-), preparation(-), supply(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
13007 casualties reported
Squads: 265 destroyed, 222 disabled
Non Combat: 256 destroyed, 121 disabled
Engineers: 43 destroyed, 95 disabled
Guns lost 116 (27 destroyed, 89 disabled)
Vehicles lost 168 (57 destroyed, 111 disabled)
Units retreated 3

Allied ground losses:
1328 casualties reported
Squads: 6 destroyed, 235 disabled
Non Combat: 2 destroyed, 14 disabled
Engineers: 3 destroyed, 50 disabled
Guns lost 37 (1 destroyed, 36 disabled)
Units pursuing 1


I was a bit puzzled by the “unit pursuing”. The replay said it was the hundred and something wing, which is an engineer unit, and it didn’t advance into the hex. I thought only tanks would do that? Would engineers mounted on bulldozers do it too? Or aviation support troops in jeeps?

Anyway, I am back into the jungle, where I have a lot of infantry, and field forts. The losses are not as bad as it seems. One guard division is trashed, the rest is ok, and I think I still can defend the road to Cox.

But this heavily suggests that there is nothing I can to in India. The lack of supplies is probably the main reason for my defeat today, and supplies hardly flow into Burma, and NOTHING ever flows on the road north of Akyab. Akyab has been at zero supplies, and Cox at twenty (why twenty?) for weeks, except when I land some by sea. Elsewhere in Burma, I will eventually take Kalemyo, after months of siege, because I can only attack two or three times a month, supplies again.

I’m afraid this shows that there is no hope Japan can mount any kind of land offensive in 1943, save in China (but I’m done with China). I will most probably retreat south of Akyab pretty soon. There is no point risking troops so far West, with so little supplies ever flowing.

In the air

We had a relatively good day. Sweeps over Chittagong and Dobo cost me about 30 Oscars and Tojo but shot down an equal number of enemy fighters. 1:1 seems to be the best result I can achieve these days.

I tried to use Oscars to skip bomb troops in Kalemyo, having had some success against Chinese divisions near Imphal yesterday. It was a bad idea, the british apparently have good enough flak, and I lost a dozen Oscars for nothing.

The minelaying campaign is continuing, Akyab and Kendari were targeted today. In Boela, Allied mines didn’t manage to prevent a tanker from loading. I suspect the mines come in relatively small numbers.

We shot down a Liberator II (our eighth, those are very difficult to kill, fortunately, they are produced in very small numbers), and a B24D (our 59th)

Three years, maybe more, and this AAR

I have to say I am increasingly bored with the game. The strategic situation is dull, my options are very limited. I can of course achieve limited tactical victories, or punish my opponent if he moves too fast, but I’m bound to play the “plastron” (those pretend enemies we get in exercises) for the rest of the war, and it is not very interesting.

Worse still, there are lots of details that need attention, and really shouldn’t. I noticed yesterday that, despite the Home Islands having 1.3 million tons of supplies, only two bases (Tokyo and Yokohama) have more than 10 000. This means my factories are not repairing, unless I play with the draw parameters. For some reason, I’ve also noticed most reinforcements for my front line squadrons arrive in Takao,, and would fly back to their units … if they had pilots. I am supposed to fill them. Note also that if you want convoys to work correctly, you are supposed to check, every turn, that they have docked, no they don’t do it by themselves, this is something the high command has to do. And don’t get me started on pilots…

I have to say I am more than a little bit disappointed with the game, because the more it goes, the less I find it a thought provoking activity. Every turn just looks like a long laundry list of meaningless things that have to be done, or can be skipped but will make you pay for it eventually, but then even if you do them, the situation will make you pay anyway, so… The strategic situation is pretty obvious, a lot of the outcomes are hardcoded (meaning, the OOB and reinforcement schedules make most of the future inevitable), and there are at least three more years to go (we’re playing five turns a week, I can’t do more than this, which means we will need 3 years of real time to reach 1945, at which time I hope to mercifully surrender).

I do understand why some like those long campaigns. AE is one of those activities you end up learning by doing, and there is a lot of details, options, bolts and nuts, for those who like military hardware. And of course, there is some merit in going through such a long endeavor and not giving up, and staying on the top the myriad things. I just suspect it is just not for me. These days, while playing my turns, I was thinking of the things I could do on my AE time (play more piano, translate one of those big Chinese novels I wanted to work on for years, learn some decent maths at last, … ), and, more importantly, I was realizing that a five year investment (such as a campaign of AE) should bring one more than the satisfaction of “having lived through the frustration”.

I’m still playing, though. Right now, my opinion is that this AAR is what makes the experience interesting for me: having to think about what happens, write about it, and try to make sense out of it.

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 634
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 8:24:43 AM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14615
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online
Re the pursuit: When no enemy is in hex the option is 'Rest'. When enemy is in hex the option is (IIRC) 'Reserve (Pursuit)'. AFAIK it means that on defense the unit is in reserve and most of the time shielded from combat. When attacking it means the unit will pursue the enemy if the enemy is forced to retreat.

It's unfortunate that the Reserve (Pursuit) options are combined instead of being separate options. If it really is some support unit in pursuit of your defeated troops then I presume he did not intend that. Rather, that he put the support unit in 'Reserve' to protect it from combat, and when his force attacked he did not realize that 'Reserve' became 'Pursuit'!

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(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 635
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 8:40:34 AM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5660
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: online
Francois,

Really sorry to hear this is no fun for you.

Supply: Alfred has done a couple of really good posts on this. Search for them, they will help you. I've been able to draw supply from Burma into India until I own Chittagong and then it is more efficient to bring it in via transport. You have to really understand the supply model, but once you do it can/does work. I'm not the real guru on supply; Damian and Alfred are far better.

However, you are probably correct. It is almost time to start pulling in your perimeter. You've got about 4 months or so breathing room and then you will really be on the defensive. I hate Burma. Erik's AAR is just one of many examples why. It is SO easy to get trapped there and lose a lot of forces; some of your best forces at that. So, over the next 3 - 4 months of game time you need to get your MLR's setup with appropriate trigger points.

Me? I only fight in Burma until Jan 44 latest and then I run. Basically, I set my next MLR on a line LangSon to Kunming. And then the PI and Formosa. The rest, I don't waste any troops of value. Once the allies are back in Darwin and Rangoon and they have B-29's there just isn't any reason to stay in the DEI and for that matter SE Asia. The oil production is dead in a few days. I draw my lines at where the B24 can hit the HI. I do not want them that close for as long as I can prevent it. And if I don't lose all my good troops in Burma, I can make Luzon really hard to take. There are enough RR connected bases that can have AF8/9 for me to keep my fighters alive and to send my kami's out. Sure I will lose eventually, but I can delay for a long time and make the butchers bill pretty high.

So, yes, in some ways you are at a pretty boring point of the game. OTOH, this idle time is when you need to be setting your defenses and prepping your traps. I beleive the game is won or lost for the IJ in '43. If you prep well, you should be able to hold until '46. While you do, the allied player will get very frustrated, and that's when you can make him pay. Look at GJ's game with Qball who is a good player. Still GJ has been able to frustrate him a couple of time and cause him to get a little too reckless and BOOM.

_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 636
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 9:35:58 AM   
Yaab


Posts: 794
Joined: 11/8/2011
From: Poznan, Poland
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Re the pursuit: When no enemy is in hex the option is 'Rest'. When enemy is in hex the option is (IIRC) 'Reserve (Pursuit)'. AFAIK it means that on defense the unit is in reserve and most of the time shielded from combat. When attacking it means the unit will pursue the enemy if the enemy is forced to retreat.

It's unfortunate that the Reserve (Pursuit) options are combined instead of being separate options. If it really is some support unit in pursuit of your defeated troops then I presume he did not intend that. Rather, that he put the support unit in 'Reserve' to protect it from combat, and when his force attacked he did not realize that 'Reserve' became 'Pursuit'!


The "Pursuit" text is in yellow. Click it and it should change to "No Pursuit". You can alternate between "Pursuit" and "No Pursuit" for units in "Reserve" mode.

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 637
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 9:42:31 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs
Re the pursuit: When no enemy is in hex the option is 'Rest'. When enemy is in hex the option is (IIRC) 'Reserve (Pursuit)'. AFAIK it means that on defense the unit is in reserve and most of the time shielded from combat. When attacking it means the unit will pursue the enemy if the enemy is forced to retreat.


I agree this must be the reason why it could pursue. Also, the fact that it was a support unit (besides being indicated in the replay) was confirmed by the fact the pursuing unit didn't show up in the hex I retreated to.

What worries me is that I have noticed, on several occasions, that pursuit, especially in open terrain, causes additional losses, and I believe it was the case here. This is historical, and a legitimate use of armor as reserves (but then you don't get them to participate in the main action), but if support units can pursue, this becomes a problem, no?

Francois


< Message edited by fcharton -- 10/13/2013 9:51:11 AM >

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 638
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 10:10:29 AM   
Yaab


Posts: 794
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From: Poznan, Poland
Status: offline
I think part of the problem is that "Reserve (Pursuit)" is the default option in WITP:AE. When there is a battle in a hex I put i.e Base Force units (no assault value or little assault value) in Reserve to shield them from combat. By default the game sets the BF to "Pursuit". I have to manually click it to change to "No Pursuit".

I guess many players move their support units to "Reserve" and end up with a group of BFs pursuing the enemy after the victorious battle.

I think the default setting should be changed to "No Pursuit".

< Message edited by Yaab -- 10/13/2013 10:11:37 AM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 639
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 4:46:17 PM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14615
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online

quote:

ORIGINAL: Yaab


quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Re the pursuit: When no enemy is in hex the option is 'Rest'. When enemy is in hex the option is (IIRC) 'Reserve (Pursuit)'. AFAIK it means that on defense the unit is in reserve and most of the time shielded from combat. When attacking it means the unit will pursue the enemy if the enemy is forced to retreat.

It's unfortunate that the Reserve (Pursuit) options are combined instead of being separate options. If it really is some support unit in pursuit of your defeated troops then I presume he did not intend that. Rather, that he put the support unit in 'Reserve' to protect it from combat, and when his force attacked he did not realize that 'Reserve' became 'Pursuit'!


The "Pursuit" text is in yellow. Click it and it should change to "No Pursuit". You can alternate between "Pursuit" and "No Pursuit" for units in "Reserve" mode.


I had no idea at all that was changeable. Thank you!

_____________________________

Intel Monkey: https://sites.google.com/site/staffmonkeys/

(in reply to Yaab)
Post #: 640
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 4:48:45 PM   
obvert


Posts: 6957
Joined: 1/17/2011
From: PDX (and now) London, UK
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs


quote:

ORIGINAL: Yaab


quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Re the pursuit: When no enemy is in hex the option is 'Rest'. When enemy is in hex the option is (IIRC) 'Reserve (Pursuit)'. AFAIK it means that on defense the unit is in reserve and most of the time shielded from combat. When attacking it means the unit will pursue the enemy if the enemy is forced to retreat.

It's unfortunate that the Reserve (Pursuit) options are combined instead of being separate options. If it really is some support unit in pursuit of your defeated troops then I presume he did not intend that. Rather, that he put the support unit in 'Reserve' to protect it from combat, and when his force attacked he did not realize that 'Reserve' became 'Pursuit'!


The "Pursuit" text is in yellow. Click it and it should change to "No Pursuit". You can alternate between "Pursuit" and "No Pursuit" for units in "Reserve" mode.


I had no idea at all that was changeable. Thank you!


+1

Wow. Still learning!


_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 641
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 7:16:34 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: offline
January 20st 1943

More supply


Manchuria and Korea lost 100 000 tons of supplies today, China was stable, and Indochina, Thailand and Burma went up. It is a trickle, still, but supply seems to be moving at last.

Interestingly, this happens on the day when my frontline units are supplied. I am attacking tomorrow in Kalemyo, and if my opponent tries a deliberate attack in Imphal, he might be in for a surprise.

As I mentioned yesterday, I discovered that the cluttering of supplies in one base is not specific to the Continent, I get the same in Japan. All cities except Tokyo and Yokohama have supply levels below 10k, and thus nothing repairs… I set stockpile parameters, which I hope will help, and moved some draw levels up.

Skip bombing in the beta

AA seems to work a little better in the beta than in stock. In the previous version, low altitude bombing (Beaufighters at 100 feet, say) was very difficult to counter. Most of the time, my fighters were too high, and targeted units never seemed to shoot back. I was told yesterday that it wasn’t the case anymore (and lost 12 Oscars so that I remember the lesson). My opponent discovered it today, and lost seven Beaufighters Vic over Chittagong. We have shot down 21 of the 32 Beaufighters the British produced so far.

I am curious to see whether this applies to low altitude night bombing, as my opponent does it a lot.

In the air

As usual, the second day of sweeps over Chittagong went fine, the enemy had only a few P40-K, which were all shot down. Over Prome, Blenheim IV arriving unescorted met my old Zeroes, which shot four of them.

Overall, the Allies lost 17 planes to 2 ours

More thoughts about Burma

I am attacking in Kalemyo tomorrow. I hope the base falls, but wouldn’t bet on it. If I can supply Burma better, I should be able to attack more often, and finish Kalemyo. In Imphal, I am pretty sure my opponent came in with too little, and has little reserves, as most of his units are in Chittagong. The plan is to finish Kalemyo, and then let the enemy suffer a bit in Imphal.

Imphal is level six forts, I don’t think I can take it easily. I could surround it, though.

Near Chittagong, I am in no position to attack now, and doubt I can make the supplies flow. This means I should probably retreat. I wonder whether I should keep Cox Bazaar and Akyab. As both bases can’t be supplied, garrisoning them look like a bad idea. On the other hand, Akyab is a level 6 airfield, which I would rather deny my opponent.

I am undecided. Should I retreat behind Akyab, in those areas where I know my supplies flow? Or should I try to hold Cox, or just Akyab?

I am interested in suggestions…

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 642
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 7:54:20 PM   
Quixote


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Joined: 8/14/2008
From: Maryland
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quote:

Imphal is level six forts, I don’t think I can take it easily. I could surround it, though.

Near Chittagong, I am in no position to attack now, and doubt I can make the supplies flow. This means I should probably retreat. I wonder whether I should keep Cox Bazaar and Akyab. As both bases can’t be supplied, garrisoning them look like a bad idea. On the other hand, Akyab is a level 6 airfield, which I would rather deny my opponent.

I am undecided. Should I retreat behind Akyab, in those areas where I know my supplies flow? Or should I try to hold Cox, or just Akyab?

I am interested in suggestions…






Could we see a current map of the area please, Francois?

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 643
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 8:22:23 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
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From: Nemours, France
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Here is the map.






Attachment (1)

(in reply to Quixote)
Post #: 644
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/13/2013 8:54:43 PM   
Quixote


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From: Maryland
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Since you asked for it, two small suggestions.

1. Don't bother with Imphal. Behind those forts, you may never take it at this stage of the game, nor do you really need to.
2. Hang on to at least Akyab. (I'd hang on to both Akyab and Cox's right now.) You have enough here that even with supply difficulties, he should have a very hard time moving you. (Watch for amphibious landings behind you when he figures this out, though.)

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 645
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/19/2013 8:36:06 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
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From: Nemours, France
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I am trying to keep the daily reports on this AAR, but have difficulty updating it except on week ends. So, updates will arrive in batches.
January 21st 1943

The road to Imphal


We attacked Kalemyo today, and the base fell at last. The Allies suffered heavy losses, about 750 squads, 130 guns and 600 vehicles.

Ground combat at Kalemyo (59,42)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 92944 troops, 835 guns, 222 vehicles, Assault Value = 2987
Defending force 19365 troops, 311 guns, 631 vehicles, Assault Value = 424
Japanese engineers reduce fortifications to 1
Japanese adjusted assault: 2136
Allied adjusted defense: 535
Japanese assault odds: 3 to 1 (fort level 1)
Japanese forces CAPTURE Kalemyo !!!

Japanese ground losses:
2999 casualties reported
Squads: 9 destroyed, 181 disabled
Non Combat: 1 destroyed, 23 disabled
Engineers: 1 destroyed, 18 disabled
Vehicles lost 3 (1 destroyed, 2 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
5914 casualties reported
Squads: 223 destroyed, 4 disabled
Non Combat: 362 destroyed, 13 disabled
Engineers: 166 destroyed, 0 disabled
Guns lost 136 (133 destroyed, 3 disabled)
Vehicles lost 605 (605 destroyed, 0 disabled)
Units retreated 7
Units destroyed 1


Such heavy losses mirror those in Chittagong a few days ago. I wonder whether the beta is responsible for this. Anyway, that’s a lot fo depleted Brits, and this is good news.

Several divisions will now march on Imphal, to relieve the two divisions I have there, some will keep Kalemyo, and the rest will move across the jungle, and try to pursue the defenders and turn Imphal. I need about a week to move from Kalemyo to Imphal, if my guys there can hold, we’ve delayed the Allied offensive in Burma by several months.

My opponent is obviously aware of this, and attacked in Imphal today. It didn’t quite succeed.

Ground combat at Imphal (60,40)
Allied Deliberate attack
Attacking force 23398 troops, 308 guns, 898 vehicles, Assault Value = 894
Defending force 20957 troops, 164 guns, 41 vehicles, Assault Value = 720
Allied assault odds: 1 to 3

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), preparation(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
743 casualties reported
Squads: 3 destroyed, 55 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Guns lost 9 (1 destroyed, 8 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
487 casualties reported
Squads: 5 destroyed, 33 disabled
Non Combat: 9 destroyed, 101 disabled
Engineers: 5 destroyed, 6 disabled
Guns lost 21 (16 destroyed, 5 disabled)
Vehicles lost 78 (4 destroyed, 74 disabled)


Both divisions have low disruption and decent fatigue, and are behind level two and three forts. Unless a lot of new troops arrive soon, it seems that we will hold Imphal until it is reinforced.

The goal, here, is to let the enemy hurt himself.

Air War

We had a pretty good day, 28 enemy planes downed for six ours. Most of the enemy lost were over Lae. My opponent had taken into the habit of bombing daily, without good coordination (he’s probably flying from different bases), and today several squadrons from Madang ambushed them.

The first bombing raid was 16 unescorted B-26 Marauders. It wasn’t fair, and 15 were shot down. The next raids were escorted 4E, and we did shoot down a few escorts, but none of the bombers.

I am expecting sweeps tomorrow, and my fighters will remain in Madang.

(in reply to Quixote)
Post #: 646
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/20/2013 12:42:05 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
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From: Nemours, France
Status: offline
January 22nd 1943

Imphal again


My opponent did something strange today. He shock attacked in Imphal. Unfortunately, my troops were supplied, rested and behind field fortifications, and so it was pretty ugly.

Ground combat at Imphal (60,40)
Allied Shock attack
Attacking force 22621 troops, 297 guns, 896 vehicles, Assault Value = 813
Defending force 20430 troops, 163 guns, 41 vehicles, Assault Value = 668
Allied adjusted assault: 409
Japanese adjusted defense: 2848

Allied assault odds: 1 to 6

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), leaders(+), preparation(-)
Attacker: shock(+)

Japanese ground losses:
733 casualties reported
Squads: 2 destroyed, 66 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 7 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 4 disabled

Allied ground losses:
2596 casualties reported
Squads: 28 destroyed, 247 disabled
Non Combat: 19 destroyed, 87 disabled
Engineers: 18 destroyed, 28 disabled
Guns lost 55 (16 destroyed, 39 disabled)
Vehicles lost 56 (5 destroyed, 51 disabled)
Units destroyed 1


I am now pretty sure Imphal will hold until the relief column from Kalemyo arrives.

Kalemyo was even stranger, as some paras (Chindits) attacked the Japanese garrison.

Ground combat at Kalemyo (59,42)
Allied Shock attack
Attacking force 42 troops, 2 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 2
Defending force 97882 troops, 835 guns, 420 vehicles, Assault Value = 2792
Allied assault odds: 1 to 99 (fort level 0)

Japanese ground losses:
12 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Allied ground losses:
54 casualties reported
Squads: 1 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 4 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Allied Unit(s) Wiped Out at Kalemyo by attrition!!!!!!


I suspect the Chindits were air transported to Kalemyo unitl yesterday, and my opponent forgot to cancel the order, which resulted in a couple of platoons dropped over Kalemyo today. I feel sorry for those guys.

The end of Dobo

Dobo has not fallen yet, but I am getting more and more difficulty supplying my troops there, as enemy CAP is shooting my transports down. The two Australian brigades were also heavily reinforced, and the last deliberate attack achieved 9:1 odds. It is probably just a matter of days.

In the air

Not a very good day. We lost 16 planes to 7 enemies. On the bright side, 4 B24-D were shot down, together with a pair of Beaufighter Vic. Low altitude bombing is murder in the beta.

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 647
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/20/2013 10:16:45 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
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January 23rd 1943

Today was a very calm day. My opponent is still mining ports from the air, Koepang and Akyab were visited during the night. I had CAP in Akayb, but this doesn’t seem to prevent anything. So far, none of those mines had any effect. I am still using those ports, and sweepers are on their way.

In Dobo, another attack resulted in 10:1 odds, I’m still holding, but barely. KB is closing in, and will try to attack tomorrow or the day after.

Over Imphal, we shot down two Liberator II. That is ten of them, or about a third of what he gets by the end of January (12 built, and 20 entering as reinforcements).

Finally, supplies seem to move south. Burma went from 30 000 to 47 000 tons today, drawing either from Bangkok or Kunming, and even Singapore is beginning to draw supplies. The inflow of supplies in Burma is good, as it will keep my front line units supplied for longer periods, and maybe even allow for some drive on Chittagong at some point.

January 24th 1943

For once, KB squadrons flew, and attacked Dobo, where they found a cargo task force apparently unloading. We put two torpedoes in an xAK (Titan), and lost a score of planes, with good pilots. Somehow, those raids are not worth the bother. It was not totally useless, though, as the victory point tally shows unaccounted for LCU losses of about 15 points, or 45 devices.

Overall, we lost 45 planes (and 35 pilots) to 25 enemies. I still believe this hurts the Allies, but it is getting costly.

In Dobo, another deliberate attack achieved 28:1 odds, and two units were wiped away by attrition. Tomorrow, or the day after…

Burma was calm. And allied unit showed up in the hex near Chittagong where my troops retreated a few days ago. By the reports, it looks like the base force unit that tried to pursue three days ago actually did pursue, and just took a few days to arrive. My troops are unsupplied, I will wait a few days and attack.


(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 648
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/20/2013 1:52:26 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5660
Joined: 6/6/2008
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Good to hear that supply is now moving for you.

Your KB losses were to CAP or flak?

EDIT: Oh and I don't think anyone has found a defense against aerial mining. My research into it suggests that allied losses were very minimal. I'm guessing that since these were generally small formations that radar wouldn't pick them up, they weren't targetting any areas that had flak, also away from normal CAP area (40 mile hex is a big area, you don't CAP a hex, but rather the base in the hex, that leaves a large area out of view). Anyway, don't look to be able to stop aerial mining, just get your AMc and AM units in place. I generally have 3 - 6 at all bases in B-29 range and then station a few at strategic choke points where my convoys run where they look like surface ASW TF's when spotted. Biggest issue for me is the fuel use for all of these AM's.

< Message edited by PaxMondo -- 10/20/2013 2:02:08 PM >


_____________________________

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(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 649
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 10/20/2013 5:50:09 PM   
fcharton

 

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January 25th 1943

Allied fighters were spottted over Truk today, US carriers are in the area. I didn’t detect them, which proves my air search patterns are not very good. This is the second time US carriers move forth after KB is detected. This seems to prove my opponent believes he can win a carrier engagement, and this is an opportunity to be exploited.

I don’t want to fight now, and KB has been ordered north (I don’t think the US carriers will dare chase at flank speed). Truk was reinforced just in case, as was Guam. I have Betties in both bases, and lots of fighters in Truk (and two cargo task forces to serve as baits, if he moves too close).

Elsewhere in the air, we traded 28 planes for 25, which is a pretty good rate these days. Over Dobo, we traded 10 Oscars for seven F4F Wildcats, which seem to be the main US fighter. Dili was raided by B24-D, and our Tonies shot three down, and six P-38G. The Allies have now lost 50 P-38G out of 80 produced by the end of January. Four Beaufort VIII were also shot down over Dili.

Near Chittagong, the unit that advanced into the hex occupied by my main stack is confirmed to be the base force that pursued after the battle last week. I will attack tomorrow.

Dobo held another day.



< Message edited by fcharton -- 10/20/2013 6:14:03 PM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 650
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/3/2013 9:56:42 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
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From: Nemours, France
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January 26th 1943

Sorry about the long interruption. Work was a bit crazy over the last two weeks. A large audience survey (this is what my day job is about) was due to be published next week. The person who usually checks and processes the data (and compensates for the lacks of the pollsters and survey designers) had been on sick leave for several months. And unfortunatelly, he does all his processing in APL, a marvelous language, really, but quite hard to read if you’re not very good in maths and data processing (it was once derided as a “write only language”).

So, after months of procrastinating and mellow excuses (“oh we’re just a few days late”, “right, I think I understand the process now”, “everything is under control”,” it is going to be all right”, “I’m confident”), the wheels began to come off three weeks ago, when it was noticed that one statistical routine (something that performs a discriminant analysis, as part of a data fusion process) didn’t work this year, for reasons no one understood. And so I wrote a new routine to process the data. So far, it was fun…

Then, after a few nights spent trying to figure out why an apparently very simple process didn’t work as advertised, it became clear that we didn’t understand the APL programs we were supposed to use, and that the myriad details no one had deemed necessary to check hadn’t taken care of themselves. And of course, this meant every thing had to be programmed from scratch. And checked too, because it now was clear most of the people involved, pollsters and designers, had thought someone would do their dirty jobs for them (young university graduates, fat resumes over empty heads…)

And so we did it the old way, with spreadsheets checked line after line for errors, and ugly C programs that do the job, and do it quick. And it took two weeks, days, nights and weekends. And yesterday evening, the files were ready at last, and I opened a bottle of Rioja, and sent back my first AE turn in almost two weeks.

Now, I do like data processing and I think it is something I do well, but this will probably be my last survey processing. It is very hard work, but way too underappreciated, and you often end up the scapegoat for every one else in the project. And the funny thing is, the better you do your job, the more tempting it becomes for others not to do theirs. This is what happened to this survey. Since my colleague was there to check and correct everyone’s errors, the data got worse and worse over the years.

Why am I telling you all that? First, because it makes me feel good (hey, that’s MY AAR!), and anyway I have little to say about the turn today, which I played fast, just to give my opponent a sign of life (btw, Spence really is a nice opponent, I’ve seen he advertised for an opponent, go for him if you want a good game…), but also because I thought a lot of AE, and my misgivings about the game, during those two crazy weeks.

First, the way my survey data got wrong has a lot in common with the way AE games can turn bad. There are lots of unimportant details in the game that can easily be left aside, and will eventually accumulate. I have not been taking care of my empire for months, and it is beginning to show. This happens on several levels. There are, of course, basic tasks that get delayed, units staying in the rear, tankers not moving, bases not being built. But more importantly, I lack a method on many aspects of the game. I have not thought yet about pilot training, or search areas, or AA, or kill zones for my LBA. There are just too many aspects in the game.

This brings another similarity with data processing. You easily get lost in details, and fail to see the general picture. In AE terms, this might be described as focusing on the tactics instead of the strategy, or on the war instead of the logistics. In data processing, you usually know you’re on the right track when you are able to write down the process as a list of a few meaningful tasks (which you can then refine into subtasks, and so on). This is what you learn in humanities, when they teach you to write essays, and especially to write plans (the old fashioned ones, with three parts, not the bullet list stuff we get nowadays). This is something I need to do in AE.

Finally, one point AE and data processing have in common is that you pretty much learn everything through practice. I know some players like to believe their historical reading, or their military experience, or both, give them an edge, or turn them into “naturals”. I don’t think so. You need a special set of mind to get interesting in AE, obviously, but apart from that, you become a good player because you play a lot, and because you pay attention. Data processing (most computer programming in fact) works exactly the same, in the word of one of my former directors: “when you have made as many errors as me, you will be the boss”.


So, I’m back into the game, this short work craze made me realize I wanted to go on with it, and I realize I need a plan. I’m in the end of January 43, and have reached my 1942 objectives month ago, but I’m clueless about what to do. The Allies are not on the offensive yet, and I can probably make a difference now. Let’s be about it, then.



Near Chittagong, it turned out that an air support unit actually pursued my retreating troops. We attacked it today, and destroyed it.

Ground combat at 56,42 (near Chittagong)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 63900 troops, 981 guns, 1527 vehicles, Assault Value = 2232
Defending force 850 troops, 0 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 1
Japanese assault odds: 1456 to 1

Allied ground losses:
1054 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 113 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Units destroyed 1

Defending units:
172 Wing


I believe this is a bug in the code. Pursuit, involving movement, should be limited to combat units, and most probably motorized ones. It is not quite the detail, as pursuit entails heavier casualties for the defeated side.

In the air, over Dobo, we traded seven Oscars for three Kittihawk III and a Spitfire Vc. Over Rabaul, it was four Nicks for a B-17E, at night. Night battles against 4E are extremely bloody for the Japanese, and I probably need to commit cheaper planes (A6M2) to it.

Singapore now has 40k tons of supplies. We’re getting there.

And Dobo held another day.

This is all for today. I was tired yesterday, and not too confident on my ability to make the correct decisions after the Rioja (Alcorta 2008, a pretty good wine, I really like Spanish wines). But I’ll be back tomorrow, with a plan, or at least the premises of one.

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 651
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/3/2013 10:57:09 AM   
obvert


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When units are in reserve you can click on or off on the pursuit. So he most likely didn't know this or forgot to hit 'do not pursue.'

Good to see you back.

A great point about errors and their usefulness. It works in art as well. It's the best training ground for using mistakes productively that I've encountered, although I've done very little programming. In art when something goes wrong, you redo it it. Over and over and over. It's great for over-pressured and slightly insecure teens for whom success is supposed to be a given to have to work through this process in our classes. We don't make artists much, but we do try to produce some resiliency, some creative problem solving, some critical thinking skills that are transferrable to anything. A lot of businesses are starting to think in the same way, and are recruiting art school graduates into creative teams doing very diverse work in completely unrelated fields.

The people who learn most effectively through this process are usually those for whom the mistakes happen sooner, who have to deal with them earlier and thus don't get the false benefit of a few successes to make them even more fearful of things going wonky. I encourage the mistakes, I encourage the next efforts and try to put it in some perspective from real experiences. Things like my sig-line below. Churchill went through the wringer, made a lot of errors that didn't just ruin an artwork or a statistical evaluation, they cost thousands of lives. That's quite a severe teacher, but he fought through it all and came back. Interestingly enough, he was also a painter.

_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 652
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/3/2013 11:21:21 AM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5660
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: online
Francois,

Welcome back!! I almost spit up my latte reading your post. TOO funny! And almost exactly how my summer was. I mean it wasn't Jerry Lewis funny, but funny how similar things appear to you and I.

Can't wait to hear how you plan to deal with the transition phase of the game. It is the most difficult phase and one that I agonize over the most. When to riposte and where. When to parry and retreat. How far to pull back. Where is the best place for my MLR? Countless questions.

_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to obvert)
Post #: 653
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/4/2013 9:48:19 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
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January 27th 1943

Yet another small turn. Dobo held, but barely. The SNLF was wiped out by attrition, and the remnants of the mixed brigade will probably surrender tomorrow.

Over Rabaul, we lost two Nicks for against B17-E, night combat, again. Over Dili, our Tonies shot a B24 down, every little bit helps.

Getting 1943 in order

As I mentioned yesterday, I need a strategy for Japan. My long term goals are obvious. I need to keep Japan in the war for as long as I can, against odds which are will be getting worse and worse as months go by. The prize would be to reach 1946, May 46 even, and this is done by preventing the allies from gaining enough points to force me into surrender (like it or not, this is the way the game end is decided).

There are two ways the Allies can force Japan into submission, invading the home islands (because all bases there provide huge amounts of VP), and strat bombing the industry, which seems to provide enough points to force a victory. This means Japan must be built, but most importantly that airbases allowing strategic bombing should be denied for as long as I can.

In practice, this means preventing the allies from holding any level seven airbase within 35 hexes of Japan in April 44 (when the first model of B29 arrives), 38 in November, and 40 in march 45. This means most of China (south to Hanoi and Hainan, west to Chungking and Lanchow), Luzon, the Southern Marianas and the Kuriles. So long I hold those, strategic bombing of Japan is impossible.

Once the Allies reach this perimeter, they can bomb the home islands, but only with unescorted bombers. I need flak, and fighters, especially night fighters, and radars, and then, I must prevent them from getting within fighter range (which should be 20 hexes in March 45, 19 in November 44 and 16 before). This means the Chinese coast, Manchuria and Korea, the Bonins, Okinawa, Hokkaido, and to a lesser extent Formosa and the Kuriles.

This already suggests a strategy. The Marianas and Kuriles are the easiest points: they must be built, reinforced, and turned into very unsavory targets for the Allies. The Bonins and Okinawa must be reinforced as part of the defense of the Home Islands, but I have more time for them. China must be held. The main line of resistance there is obvious: it is the southern border, from Hanoi to Paoshan. This is good terrain, and a relatively small area. Once the Allies break through, things become very complicated (I am not dealing with the Soviet invasion now).

In this setting, all the East Indies are expendable, Mindanao should be defended only as it provides a jump base for Luzon, but Luzon is the place that must be held. So there you have the “real MLR”: a line from Paoshan to Haiphong (maybe south of it to defend in the jungle), Hainan, Luzon, the Marianas, and the Kuriles. The rest, and in particular all the East Indies, is expendable.

Ideally, this line should be protected by several forward buffers, where I can fight and delay enemy advance. It is not always possible. For instance, the Kuriles have no such buffer. The only thing I can do there is build, and look strong enough (by having a lot of CAP to shoot his recon down) to discourage my opponent, and keep a strong reaction force in Hokkaido.

For the rest, I believe successive lines of defenses must be built, the front one looking fearsome enough to force the enemy to prepare, and muster large forces, and therefore delay his advance, but each must be easy to evacuate once it is doomed.

Burma is the easiest one, so I will address it first. I think I have a good defensive position in the jungles between Burma and India. I have good airfields in Rangoon and Magwe, and possible in Akyab if I can make supplies flow there. My goal is to hold this area throughout 1943, and then fall back south of Burma, as there is little point fighting in clear terrain. While doing so, I need to prevent him from turning the front, and landing in Ramree, or Moulmein. So far, I think it is a bit too far inland for him to succeed, but some defensive preparation should be done anyway.

In the South Pacific, I am evacuating Guadalcanal right now, leaving token forces on most islands. Rabaul and the area between Wau and Madang are strongly held, and I doubt my opponent would try an overland assault there. Here has been bombing Gasmata for a while, so I believe this is his next target, this or Lae. My goal is to let him have the Solomons, but make his progress over the Bismarck sea a long and bloody affair. I will reinforce the northern coast of New Guinea for this purpose.

So far, nothing happened in the Central Pacific, I obviously need to reinforce the Marianas, I was thinking a regiment per northern island, and a division in every southern island, with coast guns and base forces (and maybe two air flotillas so as to cover all islands). I have a nice surprise waiting for him in Tarawa, should he try. Other atolls must be defended as well.

The southern DEI is the complicated one. So far, it took him a month to eat and digest Taberfane. This is good, but at this rate, he will be in Davao by next autumn, and this will be very bad. I don’t think I can do much around Ambon now, too close from enemy bases. So I want to concentrate on Ternate, Sorong, Kendari and Manado. The best would be to dissuade him from moving north, and turning around towards Java instead. This would cost me some oilfields (but I have oil, this is scenario 2), but it would delay his advance towards Luzon.

I hope this makes some sense. I believe the general idea is that I want to delay his advance towards the Marianas, China and Luzon, and do so by showing road blocks he might want to turn.

Right, this is nowhere close to a 1943 strategy, but that’s all I can produce today. I'm THIS clueless...



< Message edited by fcharton -- 11/4/2013 10:10:39 AM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 654
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/4/2013 11:00:15 AM   
JocMeister

 

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Joined: 7/29/2009
From: Sweden
Status: online
EDIT:

Whoops! Wrong AAR!

< Message edited by JocMeister -- 11/4/2013 11:01:06 AM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 655
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/4/2013 7:55:31 PM   
SqzMyLemon


Posts: 2862
Joined: 10/30/2009
From: Alberta, Canada
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Glad to see you posting again Francois.

Planning the defence of the Empire is the hardest part of the game for me. So many avenues of approach and always the threat of strongpoints being bypassed. You'll get it figured out.

_____________________________

Luck is the residue of design - John Milton

Don't mistake lack of talent for genius - Peter Steele (Type O Negative)

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 656
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/6/2013 8:12:22 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 950
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
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January 28th – 29th 1943

Fast turns, playing cat and mouse in the air. I had a good day over Gasmata on the 28th, catching half a dozen B25-C Mitchell over Gasmata, and three Beaufort VIII over Tulagi. Unfortunately, I forgot to stand my CAP down the next day, and quickly lost a dozen planes to enemy sweeps over those bases.

My air losses are mounting, even against frames I used to defeat a few months ago. I suspect my opponent is better managing his pilots. I haven’t really looked at my pilots, and their training, so far, and need to change that.

More ideas about 1943

I am late preparing my defenses, and if my opponent pushes forward now in the DEI, he will advance fast, and the game might be over soon. This can’t really be helped, and the best I can do is try to put a brave and strong face over those weakly held bases, try to win as many small victories as I can, and devise and implement a strategy that allows for the possibility of a quick Allied advance, but also works if my opponent keeps being his prudent self.

If I play this game again, I will do things differently, but there is no point crying over spilt milk.

So while we trade turns, a general strategy is taking form. My MLR is now obvious: I am defending the Kuriles, the Marianas, the southern border of China (from Paoshan to Haiphong), Hainan and Luzon. The rest is expendable, and will serve as a buffer to delay enemy advance, and make is as costly as I can, thus saving time to build the centre. The goal would be to have this MLR ready by early 1944, and try to hold it until early 1945.

In 1945, with the heavy allied reinforcements and the soviet invasion, there is no chance I can hold the line. China becomes a buffer zone (where I can probably make the Allies suffer), and the focus turns to the inner perimeter (Bonin, Okinawa, Hokkaido, Formosa) and the air defense of Japan (and God help us!).

So, in 1943, I will be waging a fighting retreat in the DEI, Burma, maybe New Guinea and the Marshalls too, while building the Marianas, Luzon, the Kuriles and the Chinese border, and trying to scavenge all the resources I can find, and send them to my inner perimeter. In practice, this means choosing paths of retreat, strong points I want to hold for a while, commiting troops (knowing most of them are doomed), while sending the rest of my units to build the MLR (or the next fallback line).

Now, defense takes different shapes depending on the terrain. On the continent, the same units can fight as they retreat, so long I can guard my flanks and prevent them from being cut off. In the Pacific and the DEI islands, most of the units I put to defend islands will die in the process. I can hope to evacuate a few units on large islands (Java, Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes, Mindanao), and perhaps some of the garrisons that have been skipped once the front has moved past them, if the Allies are not watching closely, but again, most of the troops commited to forward defense in the Pacific and East Indies will be destroyed.

The means I need to strike a balance between the troops I order to delay the Allies, and those I want to use on my MLR. I believe I need to make a list of all units, and all reinforcements, and begin making decisions. More about that later.


As for defensive preparations, I am realizing I made a number of mistakes when planning my defenses. First, I used to think there was no point building too many airfields, because those would eventually fall into Allied hands and help them. I now believe this is wrong. Allied engineers work very fast. Taberfane was a level one airfield when it was captured a month ago. It is now level 4 and will probably reach five in a few days. Dobo had no airfield, became level one in ten days, and will probably get a level a week now. In other words, any base captured by the Allies will turn into an operational SPS-sized airfield (which often means level 4 or 5 in this area) in about a month. There is no point, then, not building the airfields (or ports, for that matter).

How high should I build? It seems clear that forts need to be at least level four to be usable. Level six is best, but it takes a while to achieve, over that, it gets very costly. A level one airfield is good to have everywhere it is possible, as it allows for easier troop transport, and CAP when the area is under attack. Level two is a minimum to carry out offensive missions, but level three and four are probably the best compromise between investment and efficiency (if you build the airfield, you don’t build the forts). Port building is generally useless: you need pretty large ports to make any difference.


So here we are, the MLR is set, I now need to review the units I have, and assign troops, engineers, base forces, HQ and flak.

(in reply to SqzMyLemon)
Post #: 657
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/6/2013 8:27:16 PM   
SqzMyLemon


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From: Alberta, Canada
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quote:

ORIGINAL: fcharton

If I play this game again, I will do things differently, but there is no point crying over spilt milk.


I feel this way often with Japan. I always catch myself thinking if only I'd thought of that 6 months ago or done this or that rather than what I chose to do. That's the problem with Japan and a 2-3 year time commitment, you just can't change on the fly as most of what you decided at game start won't have an impact for years and it's impossible to know the long term effects. Factor in the Allies' have a nasty habit of making much of it irrelevant and then it's fun times ahead!

I think you still have time. Now that you have a plan it's much easier to make your dispositions. Not knowing how or where you want to defend makes it almost impossible to create an adequate defence. You have the plan now.

< Message edited by SqzMyLemon -- 11/6/2013 10:35:35 PM >


_____________________________

Luck is the residue of design - John Milton

Don't mistake lack of talent for genius - Peter Steele (Type O Negative)

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 658
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/6/2013 9:32:04 PM   
obvert


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Well, then you get to 45 and realize your HI/LI is burning up anyway. Even if you did have a solid defense of the DEI all ready he might just go all-in for the Marianas and start the B-29 engines, in fact he might be more likely to do that if recon showing tough fortresses everywhere else.

You can have all of the oil you want but if your HI is gone it's not going to matter much. One way or another we're going down gentlemen, so get ready and take some stuff out as you go!

_____________________________


"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

(in reply to SqzMyLemon)
Post #: 659
RE: Perfection, of a kind, spence (A) vs fcharton (J) - 11/6/2013 9:40:27 PM   
SqzMyLemon


Posts: 2862
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quote:

ORIGINAL: obvert

You can have all of the oil you want but if your HI is gone it's not going to matter much. One way or another we're going down gentlemen, so get ready and take some stuff out as you go!


Yep, I often laugh at how much effort we put into production and the economy. The debate about increasing LI or not, expanding HI, and how much we focus on keeping the oil fields pumping and under our control and yet it all means squat if the factories are in ruins and the supply has gone up in smoke.

I often think this is the biggest reason to go hell bent with Japan during the first two years. Why play a conservative Japan and set yourself up for years of being ground into dust. Oh wait, that's exactly how I play.



_____________________________

Luck is the residue of design - John Milton

Don't mistake lack of talent for genius - Peter Steele (Type O Negative)

(in reply to obvert)
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