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HAH! - 12/2/2011 2:33:36 AM   
Mynok


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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-15959067

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RE: HAH! - 12/2/2011 9:09:40 AM   
cantona2


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That sub looks HUUUGGGEEEE in that photo

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RE: HAH! - 12/2/2011 11:53:12 AM   
PaxMondo


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Wow.  One lucky guy ... just to have survived the surfacing from 170 ft ... amazing ...

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RE: HAH! - 12/2/2011 3:37:44 PM   
Canoerebel


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Wow, they omitted one fact a reader really wanted to know - did the divers discover that the broken depth gage truly read 270 feet?

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RE: HAH! - 12/2/2011 3:54:05 PM   
Cap Mandrake

 

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Amazing story. Perhaps the overpressure from the explosion damaged the depth gage?

You have to admit there are some curious features. For eg., did the RN really transport stokers to new duty stations in submarines? Makes me wonder if he really worked for MI5 or something.

Also not an easy decision to flood the compartment with wounded men about. Of course, objectively, to stay was to die as well.

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 12:58:17 PM   
zuluhour


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He should have had the bends and died very shortly thereafter.

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 2:38:55 PM   
PaxMondo


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quote:

ORIGINAL: zuluhour

He should have had the bends and died very shortly thereafter.

Exactly ... to have survived from that depth/pressure. 170ft is deep. Never been that deep myself, don't even know the timings for that depth ... but it would be a long time ...

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 3:33:35 PM   
MateDow


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Double post



< Message edited by MateDow -- 12/3/2011 3:36:46 PM >

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 3:36:07 PM   
MateDow


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quote:

ORIGINAL: zuluhour

He should have had the bends and died very shortly thereafter.


The air in the sub is basically at atmospheric pressure so there isn't excessive nitrogen in the blood. The US Navy used to put submariners through a 30m ascent every four years for training. They trained to exhale throughout the ascent ("ho ho ho") to prevent lung damage.

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 4:16:42 PM   
Cap Mandrake

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: MateDow


quote:

ORIGINAL: zuluhour

He should have had the bends and died very shortly thereafter.


The air in the sub is basically at atmospheric pressure so there isn't excessive nitrogen in the blood. The US Navy used to put submariners through a 30m ascent every four years for training. They trained to exhale throughout the ascent ("ho ho ho") to prevent lung damage.


Exactly. It takes time for the nitrogen at supratmospheric pressures to go into solution and even to find a home in lipid membranes. He wasn't at 170 ft-equivalent pressure until he flooded the compartment. Still, 170 ft, complete darkness, hatch is stuck. That must have been a "Holy crap, I am still alive" (or whatever an MI5 guy would say) moment when he got to the surface.

And then the Royal Navy sends a rescue mission for one guy on a Greek island with the Luftwaffe all over the place. Hmmmm?

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 5:48:57 PM   
JWE

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: MateDow
quote:

ORIGINAL: zuluhour
He should have had the bends and died very shortly thereafter.

The air in the sub is basically at atmospheric pressure so there isn't excessive nitrogen in the blood. The US Navy used to put submariners through a 30m ascent every four years for training. They trained to exhale throughout the ascent ("ho ho ho") to prevent lung damage.

MateDow is right on the money. Atmo, in a sub back then, was darn near 30 inHG (760 torr, 101kPa). Nitrogen does not abnormally diffuse into the bloodstream at diving depth pressures because the interior of the vessel is at atmospheric (or close). So it is a 'duh' when someone ascends from 1 atm at 170' to 1 atm at the surface with no ill effects whatever (except, of course, the deep water pressure contracts the body and forces the lungs to exhaust, and the poor ba$tard reaches the surface gasping for breath, but hey).


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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 9:44:20 PM   
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quote:

ORIGINAL: MateDow


quote:

ORIGINAL: zuluhour

He should have had the bends and died very shortly thereafter.


The air in the sub is basically at atmospheric pressure so there isn't excessive nitrogen in the blood. The US Navy used to put submariners through a 30m ascent every four years for training. They trained to exhale throughout the ascent ("ho ho ho") to prevent lung damage.


In my era it was only once, in Sub School, using Steinke hoods. My dad did it in 1960 bare-faced, with a nose clip and a Mae West, they being in the period between the Momsen lung and the Steinke. We were loaded in "nuts-to-butts" in the chamber, a smelly, round cylinder. Access clanged shut, really loud. One peanut light bulb up in the corner. All students plus one corpsman. Arms trapped at your sides when they started letting warm water in around your feet, and it rose up your torso, giving ample time to think about where you were. This was done on purpose to test for claustrophobia. Water rose steadily until it was just below my Adam's apple (I'm 6 ft. 3. One guy I know we had to hold up by his bent elbows.) Standing in the dark, immobile, with water rising in a sealed chamber will make anyone who shouldn't go subs freak out. (This was the same day we'd already been through the pressure tank and experienced nitrogen narcosis. And snow when they rapidly decompressed when one guy blew a drum.) Once the water was stable they put about two atmospheres of air on top and opened the door to the tank. I remember looking down between my legs and seeing the female safety diver floating there, a foot away out in the tank. Steinke hood goes on over the head, pressure in the vest, squat, side-step out into the tank, and up you go.

We were trained to YELL "Ho ho ho" all the way up. It wasn't a choice. That air wanted out and it just kept coming and coming and coming . . . If the divers didn't hear "Ho" they grabbed the student by whatever they could reach and shoved them into a half-sphere plexiglass hood mounted on the tank wall every few yards to calm down. That didn't happen with my group, but one guy did refuse to exit the chamber. That female diver reached in and grabbed him by the jewels and hauled him out into the tank. He came to the surface while I was waiting to get on the exit stairs, sputtering and cursing a blue streak. I guess it was close enough to "Ho-ho" to get the job done.

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RE: HAH! - 12/3/2011 10:54:39 PM   
Cap Mandrake

 

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Dang...great description Bullwinkle. I'm not sure I could handle that sardine can part.

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RE: HAH! - 12/4/2011 6:13:15 AM   
Bullwinkle58


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Cap Mandrake

Dang...great description Bullwinkle. I'm not sure I could handle that sardine can part.

I couldn't do it now. It's a young man's game.

I think they closed the tanks in the mid or late 80s. A lot of maintenance, and the DSRV makes escape a different proposition. That said, we were only in water shallow enough for either the DSRV or Steinkes about 5% of the time.

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