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A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond.

 
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A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/11/2011 10:02:01 PM   
andym


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I thought this might be fun in response to the "Tea" thread.In UK we hear of all manner of odd foods,Corn Dogs,Jelly and peanut sandwiches.So apart from the usual burgers ,fries and Pastrami sandwiches,what kind of stuff do you have thats particular to the US or your State?To kick this off we have a spread called "Sandwich Spread",i dont know if anyone but us brits eat it or not.I am sure us brits can trot out some real Regional Culinary "delights" LOL


I actually found this site hilarious,mostly wrong ,but hilarious all the same.

http://www.britsfood.com/

< Message edited by andym -- 9/11/2011 10:10:17 PM >


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/11/2011 10:12:39 PM   
JW

 

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I'm from Louisiana, with our unique Cajun food, gumbo, jambalaya, crawfish boils, boudin,  etc.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/11/2011 10:13:18 PM   
andym


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Whats Boudin?
Is it the same as the French Boudin Noire?

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/11/2011 10:55:50 PM   
AW1Steve


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From Maine, I'd like to nominate Indian pudding , whoopie pies, lobster rolls, clam cakes and salmon pie.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/11/2011 11:03:22 PM   
apathetic lurker

 

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I'm from Buffalo...We have super roast beef sandwiches and we are the home of the original chicken wing.......Barbecue or suicide...mmmmmmmmmmm

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 12:29:39 AM   
JW

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: andym

Whats Boudin?
Is it the same as the French Boudin Noire?


I had to look it up and learned something about different variants of boudin. This is an excerpt from wikipedia:

Boudin blanc: A white sausage made of pork without the blood. Pork liver and heart meat are typically included. In Cajun versions, the sausage is made from a pork rice dressing, (much like dirty rice; such brands consist of Foreman's Boudin, Richard's Cajun Kitchen, and Nu Nu's) which is stuffed into pork casings. Rice is always used in Cajun cuisine, whereas the French/Belgian version typically uses milk, and is therefore generally more delicate than the Cajun variety. In French/Belgian cuisine, the sausage is sauteed or grilled. The Louisiana version is normally simmered or braised, although coating with oil and slow grilling for tailgating is becoming a popular option in New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

Boudin noir: A dark-hued blood sausage, containing pork, pig blood, and other ingredients. Variants of the boudin noir occur in French, Belgian, Cajun and Catalan cuisine. The Catalan version of the boudin noir is called botifarra negra.

Boudin blanc de Rethel (pronounced: [bu.dɛ̃ blɑ̃ də ʁə.tɛl]: a traditional French boudin, which may only contain pork meat, fresh whole eggs and milk, and cannot contain any bread crumbs or flours/starches. It is protected under EU law with a PGI status.[1][2]

Crawfish boudin, popular in Cajun cuisine, is made with the meat of crawfish tails added to rice. It is often served with cracklins (fried pig skins) and saltine crackers, hot sauce, and ice cold beer.

Boudin ball, a Cajun variation on Boudin blanc but instead of the filling being stuffed into pork casings, it is rolled into a ball, battered, and deep fried.[3]

Boudin rouge: In Louisiana cuisine, a sausage similar to boudin blanc, but with pork blood added to it. It originated from the French boudin noir.

Gator boudin, made from alligator, can be found sporadically in Louisiana and the Mississippi gulf coast.

Brown Rice Boudin: Brown-rice boudin is a flavor you won't find in many places. You will be surprised to find out the taste is very similar to traditional pork boudin, except this boudin is made with a brown-rice substitute for those looking to cut down on white rice intake. [4]

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 1:46:04 AM   
ilovestrategy


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I grew up in Louisiana up near Shreveport, which has a bit different food than JW's part of the state. Food fare there is stuff like Sweet Tea(restaurants sometimes serve it by the pitcher), which is a huge staple in the South, red beans and rice, hot water cornbread, chicken fried steak covered in gravy next to mash potatoes or gravy covered rice, deep fried chicken with spices next to gravy covered rice(we Southerners love our gravy! ), chicken and dumplings in chicken broth, alligator, and we love catfish with potatoes. Oh, and biscuits covered with sausage gravy. Oh, and Texas chili with hot water cornbread.

Basically two words can describe Southern food. "Simple and Fattening"!


Southern cooking is the thing I miss the most while living here in San Diego. I think a San Diego native would run out screaming if they walked into a true Southern restaurant. My wife, who was born and raised in the Philippines could not believe the fact that sweet tea was served by the pitcher when we went out to eat.

Ok, I better stop, I'm getting delirious!


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 1:54:44 AM   
ilovestrategy


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Went and found a picture of hotwater cornbread.



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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 2:17:16 AM   
nelmsm


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Here in Texas we make what we call Armadillo Eggs.  Take a hollowed out jalapeno pepper and fill it with cream cheese and wrap it with bacon and roast it on the grill.  That will get your blood flowing.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 2:42:44 AM   
mdiehl

 

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quote:

From Maine, I'd like to nominate Indian pudding , whoopie pies, lobster rolls, clam cakes and salmon pie.


No kidding? Another yankee? Bangor. How about you?

Maine foods: lobster rolls, whoopie pies, and Burnham & Morrell's beans.

Where I now live, the defining foods are chiles relleno and Sonoran Hot Dogs. The Sonoran Hot Dog is a particular beastie. Sounds terrible in principle but tastes great.

< Message edited by mdiehl -- 9/12/2011 2:43:35 AM >


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 3:42:23 AM   
ilovestrategy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: andym



I actually found this site hilarious,mostly wrong ,but hilarious all the same.

http://www.britsfood.com/



I love the article on tea. Boy, did I laugh!

I love your thread title too, "Colonial Cousins!"

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 3:57:55 AM   
JW

 

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Actually I'm from Monroe, so similar to Shreveport. A mix of Cajun food and Louisiana style Southern food, sometimes called Soul Food, although both rural white and black Southerners basically like the same kind of food. Actually my mom cooked really simple Southern food when I was growing up back say 50 years ago, and I had a lot of meals of cornbread, turnip greens, and pinto or red beans. I was really grown before I developed a real taste for Cajun food, which also has become more readily available in north Louisiana over the last 50 years.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 5:22:20 AM   
ilovestrategy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: JW

Actually I'm from Monroe, so similar to Shreveport. A mix of Cajun food and Louisiana style Southern food, sometimes called Soul Food, although both rural white and black Southerners basically like the same kind of food. Actually my mom cooked really simple Southern food when I was growing up back say 50 years ago, and I had a lot of meals of cornbread, turnip greens, and pinto or red beans. I was really grown before I developed a real taste for Cajun food, which also has become more readily available in north Louisiana over the last 50 years.



Ooooo, I forgot about the pinto beans! I love Soul Food. Even though I'm white my mom cooked it all the time. Dang JW, you're bringing back memories!

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 8:26:01 AM   
apathetic lurker

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: nelmsm

Here in Texas we make what we call Armadillo Eggs.  Take a hollowed out jalapeno pepper and fill it with cream cheese and wrap it with bacon and roast it on the grill.  That will get your blood flowing.


And your arteries clogged.......

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 12:37:36 PM   
roeddog


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South Carolina here checking in. In the coastal and central areas of SC (possibly upstate as well) we have Barbecue. I know, I know my friends from Texas will jump in and say they invented the interne.... er Barbecue and I'll admit they probably have the best tomato based sauce I've ever had. BUT, here in SC we have MUSTARD based sauce. Imagine, hickory smoked and cooked pulled pork saturated with a greenish-yellow colored sauce, mmm sounds scrumptious, and it really is! Don't let the fact that it looks like a science experiment gone bad from your fridge put you off, it's actually pretty good. Makes me want to head to Piggy Park and grab a pint.


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 1:50:15 PM   
sterckxe


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quote:

ORIGINAL: JW
Boudin blanc: A white sausage made of pork without the blood. In French/Belgian cuisine, the sausage is sauteed or grilled.


.. or simply boiled, then eaten cold (sliced) on a sandwich with some mustard. All boudin blancs you can buy in a supermarket are already pre-boiled so you can eat them straight away.

quote:

ORIGINAL: JW
Boudin noir: A dark-hued blood sausage, containing pork, pig blood, and other ingredients. Variants of the boudin noir occur in French, Belgian, Cajun and Catalan cuisine.


One of my favourite dishes : only let grill for a couple of minutes so the sausage is hot but not entirely cooked and dried out. Kind of like eating your steak rare. Sublime, tastes nothing like blood, but many people cringe about basically eating heated pig's blood so it's not that popular.

Just wondering if anyone in here is familiar with "Green sausages" - boudin vert - it's the white variant with added green vegetables like cabbage and spinach processed into it. A complete meal in one sausage :)

Greetz,

Eddy Sterckx

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 3:44:52 PM   
Canoerebel


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Georgia, here.  Yesterday morning, I fixed myself a big bowl of grits, seasoned with salt, butter, and plenty of sharp cheddar cheese.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 5:35:41 PM   
andym


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Amazing how different what we eat can be.But what are:

a,Grits

b,Indian Pudding

Also them Armadillo eggs sound absoloutly devine,i am going to give them a go.I will also leave you with what is possibly the best pie EVER invented in the World,simply it is Pie Pornography.

Pastry Ingredients;

12oz plain flour
6oz butter (do not substitute margarine or the God of Fine Cuisine small smite thee with a baguette)
Salt
Black pepper
One and a half tbsp of ketchup.

Filling;

1lb sausagemeat
1/2 an onion, chopped very finely
1 tbsp wholegrain mustard
Salt
Black pepper
6 rashers streaky bacon
4 eggs
A little milk (to glaze)

Making Pastry:

Blend butter and flour to breadcrumb-like consistency. Add seasoning to taste, and ketchup, and 5 tablespoons cold water. Blend again until you can form mixture into a ball. Chill for at least half an hour.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Roll out half the pastry, fairly thinly, and line pie dish.

Mix sausagemeat well with onion and mustard, season to taste. Spread evenly as possible over base of pie crust. Place the bacon over the sausage, aiming to line completely. Crack the eggs over the bacon (try to keep the yolks intact. Makes no difference to the taste but it looks prettier when the pie is sliced) roll remaining pastry and cover pie top. Press the edges down firmly to seal. Decorate the top as you like - I loathe those little leaves some people do - I like the farmhouse crisscross scoring look. Brush on a little milk to glaze.

Bake the pie for 20 mind at 400 degrees, then reduce to 350 and bake for another 30 mins. Allow to cool before serving. Good with cold lager on hot days, and good Scotch on cold days, or so I am told.

Do not eat with HP sauce. Use a napkin. Do not fold napkin into a bloody swan.



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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 9:55:37 PM   
uncc


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quote:

ORIGINAL: roeddog

South Carolina here checking in. In the coastal and central areas of SC (possibly upstate as well) we have Barbecue. I know, I know my friends from Texas will jump in and say they invented the interne.... er Barbecue and I'll admit they probably have the best tomato based sauce I've ever had. BUT, here in SC we have MUSTARD based sauce. Imagine, hickory smoked and cooked pulled pork saturated with a greenish-yellow colored sauce, mmm sounds scrumptious, and it really is! Don't let the fact that it looks like a science experiment gone bad from your fridge put you off, it's actually pretty good. Makes me want to head to Piggy Park and grab a pint.



As a native NORTH Carolinian (very close to Lexington), I could not let this stand unchallenged! The hickory smoked, pulled pork BBQ from NC is far superior to SC or that beef stuff they "bbq" in Texas . I will say that I can not stand the red slaw. Give me some sweet white slaw along with some hush puppies any day...

Kinda something like this (except the pork is slow cooked on a covered smoker/grill, NOT in an oven!)

< Message edited by uncc -- 9/12/2011 10:18:00 PM >


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/12/2011 9:56:31 PM   
uncc


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quote:

ORIGINAL: uncc


quote:

ORIGINAL: roeddog

South Carolina here checking in. In the coastal and central areas of SC (possibly upstate as well) we have Barbecue. I know, I know my friends from Texas will jump in and say they invented the interne.... er Barbecue and I'll admit they probably have the best tomato based sauce I've ever had. BUT, here in SC we have MUSTARD based sauce. Imagine, hickory smoked and cooked pulled pork saturated with a greenish-yellow colored sauce, mmm sounds scrumptious, and it really is! Don't let the fact that it looks like a science experiment gone bad from your fridge put you off, it's actually pretty good. Makes me want to head to Piggy Park and grab a pint.



As a native NORTH Carolinian (very close to Lexington), I could not let this stand unchallenged! The hickory smoked, pulled pork BBQ from NC is far superior to SC or that beef stuff they "bbq" in Texas . I will say that I can not stand the red slaw. Give me some sweet white slaw any day...


...oops...double post

< Message edited by uncc -- 9/12/2011 9:59:54 PM >


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 1:06:07 AM   
JW

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: sterckxe

quote:

ORIGINAL: JW
Boudin blanc: A white sausage made of pork without the blood. In French/Belgian cuisine, the sausage is sauteed or grilled.


.. or simply boiled, then eaten cold (sliced) on a sandwich with some mustard. All boudin blancs you can buy in a supermarket are already pre-boiled so you can eat them straight away.

quote:

ORIGINAL: JW
Boudin noir: A dark-hued blood sausage, containing pork, pig blood, and other ingredients. Variants of the boudin noir occur in French, Belgian, Cajun and Catalan cuisine.


One of my favourite dishes : only let grill for a couple of minutes so the sausage is hot but not entirely cooked and dried out. Kind of like eating your steak rare. Sublime, tastes nothing like blood, but many people cringe about basically eating heated pig's blood so it's not that popular.

Just wondering if anyone in here is familiar with "Green sausages" - boudin vert - it's the white variant with added green vegetables like cabbage and spinach processed into it. A complete meal in one sausage :)

Greetz,

Eddy Sterckx



Many people think that all Cajun boudin is what I now know is called boudin noire, or what we would call a "blood sausage." However, as noted in the excerpt I posted, the most common Cajun boudin is a boudin blanc with a rice-based filler, though there are different varieties of boudin found in Louisiana, also as noted in what I posted. I like boudin, but I much prefer a good seafood gumbo or shrimp or crawfish boil.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 2:34:34 AM   
WBaugh

 

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Sweet tea...nectar of the gods.

And Key Lime pie.

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 2:37:05 AM   
ilovestrategy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: WBaugh

Sweet tea...nectar of the gods.
.



I just finished some!


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 4:02:16 AM   
Jeffrey H.


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Carne Asada Fries. a.k.a "Irish Nachos". Goooood ...

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 7:52:14 AM   
ilovestrategy


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Jeffrey H.

Carne Asada Fries. a.k.a "Irish Nachos". Goooood ...


I get mine at Cotixans in Mira Mesa!

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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 1:09:01 PM   
H Gilmer

 

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Buffalo Wings.

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Post #: 26
RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 3:37:49 PM   
redcoat


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Interesting thread. Many of the foods/dishes are new to me. If the thread were a menu I think I’d play safe and opt for the chicken and dumplings – since I was raised on a traditional British staple of beef stew and dumplings. Of course, I would need my own pitcher of Sweet Tea to go with it.

The closest thing we have to ‘boudin vert’ in Britain are pork and leak or pork and apple sausages. Pork and apple sausages are especially good when they are braised in cider and served with parsnip mash.

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Post #: 27
RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 4:34:50 PM   
andym


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Dont forget our Black pudding and White or Boars Pudding.You cant beat a good Snorker or sausage esp with Mashed potato and minted mushy peas and onion gravy.Not tried Parsnip mash but have a great love for mashed swede with a big dollop of butter.Going back to sausages,if you like me are an afficianado i found a website that rates sausages,our local butchers in Kings Lynn has the lowest shrinkage rate in the country!

http://bangersandsausages.blogspot.com/2010/09/giffens-pork-sausage.html

< Message edited by andym -- 9/13/2011 4:50:16 PM >


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RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 9:41:41 PM   
SeaMonkey

 

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Well not exactly a "Colonial Cousin" but here in Texas, ie ..."The Republic" of.... we have some cuisine that has a bit of our southern neighbors' influence called "TexMex". Things like enchiladas, tacos, nachos, guacamole, margaritas, rice and beans, the charo and refried type. Fajitas, brisquet, deer sausage, various types of taquitos, pollo, gorditas, etc...etc. round out some of the meaty flavorings all with a distinct types of flavorings and herbs, like cilantro. I won't mention the excellent salsas and tortillas of all varieties and desserts, like tres leche' cake, key lime pie, the kind with sweetened condensed milk, flan, homemade icecreams, it goes on.

Shall I proceed to the seafood?

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Post #: 29
RE: A question to Our Colonial Cousins across the Pond. - 9/13/2011 9:46:54 PM   
ilovestrategy


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TexMex is awesome! Can't beat the Texas style bowl of chili. No competition.

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