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Operation Rudyard

 
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Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 8:46:32 AM   
Dixie


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27th December 1941

Generally fairly quiet...

PACIFIC
One of GBL's subs put a torpedo into the liner Matsonia yesterday at Christmas Island 47/27 flt damage id the main result, luckily she'd unloaded all her troops. The ships is heading back to Pearl Harbor for emergency repairs.

Still no sign of IJN submarines around Hawaii, looks like they have actually gone away. This means I can get my damaged BBs shifted away to safer waters for long term repairs.


EAST INDIES
Not a great deal happened yesterday. Sandakan on Northern Borneo was captured by the Japanese.


MALAYA
Taiping has been captured by Japanese armoured forces. The British defence consisted of two u/s Bren guns so the Japanese victory was clearly hard fought...

Japanese bombers have been raiding Singapore, by now most Allied fighters are either wrecked or needing repairs. A total of two Japanese fighters were shot down over the island in return for 7 RAF Buffs shot down. Luckily the bombers are staying high to avoid the worst of Singapore's massed AA batteries.


BURMA/INDIA
Japanese troops at Moulmein may actually be Thai troops. Intel reports that the 2nd RTA Division is present at Moulmein. Further troops are known to be moving in from Thailand, but I'm unsure whether they are Japanese or Thai troops at this point.

Plans for the defence of India (Operation Rudyard) are almost finalised, final options are still flexible especially with regard to the Australian divisions and the 7th Indian Division. I'm probably going to put one of the Australian divisions on the Bengal coast and one on the Burmese border. The Indian 7th is currently the major garrison force at Bombay, but in a pinch they could be moved south to shore up the defences. Another option is swapping either the 19th or 23rd Indian Divisions for the more experienced 11th.




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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 9:47:30 AM   
cantona2


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Operation Rudyard, love it

As an aside Dixie, did you abandon your RN artwork project you had going on at the birth of AE?

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 10:04:29 AM   
Dixie


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I'm not hosting the website any more, but I've got most of the art stuff still.

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 11:05:56 AM   
Mike Solli


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Dixie, your maps never cease to amaze me. Wonderful!

I never realized there were so many Indian troops available at the start of the war. How many of them are restricted?

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 11:43:06 AM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Mike Solli

Dixie, your maps never cease to amaze me. Wonderful!

I never realized there were so many Indian troops available at the start of the war. How many of them are restricted?



The vast majority of the Indian forces are restricted, as well as almost all of the British armoured forces. The exceptions are 11th Indian Div and (the currently unreconstructed) 12th Indian Bde, both part of Indian III Corps. 11th Division is slightly understrength, 12th Bde is almost at full strength and the Argyles have fantastic morale.

The restricted Indian troops are generally Exp 20, the British armoured troops fare even worse with 43rd Cavalry boasting an almost unheard of 5 Exp. So although the defence looks pretty good it's not actually all that capable in a stand-up fight.

Until mid-April the defence will mostly rely on the two Australian divisions and the British 7th Armoured Bde (when they arrive) supported by the British 18th Div and Indian 11th. After April the British 70th Division will arrive (with exp 80) allowing some reshuffling of forces. The low experience units are going to be tied to city and jungle positions where the terrain (and forts) will partly compensate for the lack of experience.


EDIT: There has been a reshuffling of troops in north and wet India to free up some of the units shown. In particular units have moved from the NW frontier to garrison locations that were guarded by armoured units (who were probably wasted sitting watching villagers).

There will also be more additions to Operation Rudyard as the Burma campaign winds down, a few knackered British and Indian Bns/Bdes will be available for 2nd/3rd line defence.

< Message edited by Dixie -- 10/5/2011 11:48:59 AM >

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 11:50:03 AM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: cantona2

Operation Rudyard, love it



I liked it, and it makes it sound like I have some sort of actual plan should GBL notice the title!

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 3:31:37 PM   
cantona2


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dixie

I'm not hosting the website any more, but I've got most of the art stuff still.


Would you mind sharing it or is it for personal use only now?
Thanks

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Post #: 67
RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/5/2011 6:55:55 PM   
mc3744


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Do you keep your Indian LCUs on Strat to move them quickly or do you prefer to keep them on combat to take advantage of the engineers (or a mix)?
Maybe a couple of "fire brigades" on Strat in mid India for quick redeployment?

Keep it up

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/6/2011 7:10:26 AM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: cantona2


quote:

ORIGINAL: Dixie

I'm not hosting the website any more, but I've got most of the art stuff still.


Would you mind sharing it or is it for personal use only now?
Thanks


I can make it freely available, a few tweaks are needed before then though.

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Post #: 69
RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/6/2011 7:15:15 AM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: mc3744

Do you keep your Indian LCUs on Strat to move them quickly or do you prefer to keep them on combat to take advantage of the engineers (or a mix)?
Maybe a couple of "fire brigades" on Strat in mid India for quick redeployment?

Keep it up



For now, the units will be in combat mode in the first and second defensive lines. Get those forts built up quickly and provide some sort of safety zone. There needs to be some sort of mobile reserve, but until I get some forces with halfway decent experience it's probably not going to help. Throwing an unprepared exp 20 division into combat will just result in lots of casualties, holding a well prepared defensive position will help to alleviate some of that disadvantage.


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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/6/2011 10:54:44 AM   
mc3744


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I hadn't noticed that Indian units are so low on experience.
It's certainly a good point.

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/6/2011 8:48:09 PM   
cantona2


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dixie


quote:

ORIGINAL: cantona2


quote:

ORIGINAL: Dixie

I'm not hosting the website any more, but I've got most of the art stuff still.


Would you mind sharing it or is it for personal use only now?
Thanks


I can make it freely available, a few tweaks are needed before then though.



Would love to have them as I already have your RN Carriers, BBs and cruisers installed! Many thanks

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/7/2011 12:40:23 PM   
Dixie


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28th December 1941

MALAYA

More raids on Singapore yesterday, but for a change the RAF Buffaloes managed to shoot down two Oscars in return for two of their own lost. This marks the first time that the RAF has managed parity in air combat since the opening of hostilities!

Latest ULTRA intercepts reveal that the IJA 21st Division, previously en route to Mersing, has changed direction and is heading to Singora instead. The presence of Allied submarines and HDMLs (now sunk) seems to have caused GBL to divert the convoy far to the north instead. If this is the case then it's bought several more days breathing room for Singapore.


EAST INDIES

A rare success for the Allies at sea, the Dutch O-19 hit a Japanese tanker with two torpedoes. This was followed by the sounds of a sinking vessel shortly after. It's a nice little morale boost and sinking a tanker is never a bad thing.

Pontianak has fallen, Japanese tanks over-ran the handful of Dutch clerks, cooks and mechanics at the base.


INDIA

Nothing to report really.


PACIFIC

Japanese forces are sweeping through the Gilberts. Sort of. They've taken two islands with decent AF potential, Tabitauea is their latest conquest. From here they can either go east towards Pago Pago or south towards Fiji. I can't see GBL sitting still whilst Allied SOPAC forces are so weak.

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/7/2011 2:06:08 PM   
Dixie


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Below is the current situation in Southern Burma. Two Thai divisions have crossed into Southern Burma supported by Japanese troops. There's more AV than I can (or want to) bring to Rangoon so things are looking poor for the Brits.

Defending Burma would need an investment of troops which I could probably manage, but it would mean stripping India of troops. The Raj is a far more important base of operations than Burma, so that's where the soldiers are staying. The only possible plus point I can take is that the majority of my Rangoon defence is made of British and Indian troops who have a better anti-soft rating than the Thai units. Not that I can expect them to make much use of that with the huge disparity in strength.




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< Message edited by Dixie -- 10/7/2011 2:07:35 PM >

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/7/2011 2:18:37 PM   
Mike Solli


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Dixie, I can't speak for your forces, but there isn't much Japanese strength there. The Thai forces (1 + 2/3 divisions) have very poor experience. The engineers don't have much AV, but they're most likely there to help capture stuff without causing them much damage. The only real forces of note are the 112 IR and the 5 Cav, and the cav doesn't have a lot of AV either.

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/8/2011 2:26:21 PM   
Dixie


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29th December 1941

PACIFIC
The ocean is living up to it's name at the moment. Allied HQ is taking advantage of the current lull to redirect more supply convoys to the South Pacific. With Pearl Harbor and Hawaii having a decent stockpile of fuel and supply several Hawaii bound convoys are instead making longer trips to New Zealand and Fiji. The convoys also include a number of support vessels from Pearl Harbor which will be based in the South Pacific in readiness for the Allied counter attack, whenever that actually happens...

Kittyhawk and Hammondsport are heading to the West Coast with a fast USN freighter, these three 16kt ships will form the core component of the West Coast-New Zealand aircraft ferrying run with further vessels being added to the fleet as they become available.

The only downer on a quiet day was Matsonia giving up her fight to stay afloat, the liner eventually slipped beneath the waves just 30 miles off shore from Palmyra.


AUSTRALIA
The past three weeks has been a period of rest and refit for the Australian Army, now that most units are approaching full readiness (if not full strength) they are being deployed to their new defensive locations. Several LCUs are being shifted from Victoria and New South Wales and will deploy to Queensland and Western Australia to guard against a feared invasion of the more vulnerable parts of Australia.


EAST INDIES
Japanese troops have landed at Ketapang, the base is unguarded by military personnel so there's no chance of holding the line. But unless GBL wants to ship in large numbers of engineers the base isn't likely to be much trouble for the Allies just yet. Once it's fallen the plan is to drop bombs on it as often as possible to delay the construction of any usable airfield.

Another Japanese submarine, RO-33 has been spotted in the Batavia channel where the tanker Augustina was torpedoed. She's limping into Oosthaven for temporary repairs.


PHILIPPINES
The end is nigh for organised effective resistance. If it ever actually began. The US and Filipino forces are clustered in a decreasing perimeter around Manila and Bataan. It's the historical option for the defence here, hide in the peninsula. It may be full of malaria and foliage, but it blocks GBL from using Manila harbour and it's full of malaria and foliage for the Japs as well.


INDIA AND BURMA
Moulmein fell today, unsurprisingly, following a shock attack by the combined Japanese and Thai force. In all honesty I don't expect Southern Burma to hold for long even given the inferiority of the Thai army. The only reason I'm leaving a garrison at Rangoon is because I need to to prevent partisan attacks.

Although it's not technically a part of India, Diego Garcia has entered my thoughts. Do I send a garrison force here to stop GBL taking it on the cheap? Or let him take it? It's not a major strategic outpost, but it could be useful to either of us. I'm fully expecting GBL to send some sort of force to take the island given that he knows how thinly the Allies are spread early on. I can spare the Winnipeg Grenadiers Bn to sit on the island, they were rescued from Hong Kong so he probably isn't expecting them to spring up in the Indian Ocean.




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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/9/2011 7:48:56 PM   
Dixie


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30th December 1941

PACIFIC

Japanese submarines are lurking off the US West Coast, slow convoy SQ-10 encountered a Jap I-boat which was driven off by the destroyer escorts. Canadian Escort Group A1 was less fortunate, the Flower corvette Chiliwack being sunk by a Japanese submarine near San Francisco. Despite the presence of US air patrols the blighters are proving to be slippery little devils, a lack of ASW vessels is making the situation all the more frustrating.

Three damaged battleships have departed Hawaii for the continental US, their routing should steer them clear of I-boat concentrations and their heavy escort of destroyers should dissuade any potential submarines from approaching. Another group of crippled battleships will be departing in a couple of days, via a different route just in case.

Japanese troops have landed on, and seized, Nauru Island and Ocean Island. The invasions were swift and the outnumbered Aussie troops capitulated after brief battles. If nothing else, the battles have at least provided some useful intel on Japanese troops and ships.


NEW GUINEA & THE SOLOMONS

Japanese landings are reported at Vanimo, a small force believed to be 2nd AF Coy.


MALAYA

Japanese forces advancing along the Malayan peninsula have been joined by troops coming ashore at Kuantan, a mixed brigade, an recon regiment and a base force. The transport for the invasion is reported to include a submarine tender, is GBL that desperate for ships to haul supplies?

Fighter sweeps against Singapore hacked down more Buffs. With those aircraft now smoking wrecks the RAF no longer has a fighter force at Singapore. There are still a handful of bombers although they're reluctant to attack anything.


EAST INDIES

AVP Poolster was sunk near Batavia whilst attempting to flee the area. Looks like the Jap subs are still kicking around. Another submarine has been located near Soerbaja by a Dutch naval patrol.

In a morale moment, the Dutch decided to launch an attack on the invasion TF at Ketapang, flying at low level the bombers managed to put three bombs into a freighter and one into an APD with the result that the freighter rapidly sank. It's not much of a victory, but I'll take what I can get right now, especially with those damned Zeroes almost everywhere at the moment.


BURMA & INDIA

More Indian, Australian and Canadian soldiers have left Java and Sumatra. The Canadians will definitely be heading to Diego Garcia in order to try and provide some sort of defence for the island. It's a vulnerable place and a battalion may provide enough defence to stop it being taken on the cheap.

Not much else happened, a few bombers arrived in Aden but replacements don't start arriving for several more months...

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/9/2011 8:08:44 PM   
Dixie


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AUSTRALIA

This is the current planned defence for Western Australia, Operation Kelly. I'm giving consideration to the idea of moving more LCUs west from the Brisbane/Sydney area to boost the defences around Perth. The likelihood of GBL taking these areas is probably remote, unless he wants to trigger the Australian emergency reinforcements so it may be possible to shift a good proportion of the Australian militia to other areas.






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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/9/2011 8:10:44 PM   
witpqs

 

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I love the fact that you have named your merchant convoys such! Is "Rock" Tory in charge of convoy routing?

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/10/2011 4:31:55 PM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

I love the fact that you have named your merchant convoys such! Is "Rock" Tory in charge of convoy routing?


Too much time on my hands!


Not AAR related, but it'll pad out this post a little bit. Ladies and Gentlemen, or given that this is the Matrix Games forum; Gentlemen, Geeks and Fanboys. I present to you, Force Z capital ships throughout the ages (well, 1941-45 at any rate). From top to bottom;

Appearance as sunk. PoW needs redoing as it's based on an old design and is the starboard side rather than the port design.
Post refit, hypothetical appearance for Repulse, camo based on a number of schemes carried by RN BBs at this time. PoW is wearing a delightful number created by the RN camouflage department, as seen on fellow models Anson, Howe and KGV.
And finally, the late war Admiralty Standard scheme, should your ships survive that long...




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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/10/2011 5:11:34 PM   
mc3744


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Hi Dixie
Cool graphics
Could you post once in a while the Intel screen? To get a feeling of the overall losses.

Keep it up

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/10/2011 5:22:48 PM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: mc3744

Hi Dixie
Cool graphics
Could you post once in a while the Intel screen? To get a feeling of the overall losses.

Keep it up


This one? It's not pretty reading for me, but hey-ho. The losses, particularly in shipping are high so far but have been dropping away with an increase where the KB showed up Generally speaking most of my shipping is now 'outside' the DEI, away to the West of Java/Sumatra in the Indian Ocean or outside the Pacific island chains.

Aircraft losses have been dropping cos I haven't got much else to throw at GBL right now!




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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/10/2011 5:37:18 PM   
mc3744


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As far as I can tell ship losses are quite normal.
I find air losses a bit high though.
I'm guessing that's because you've been actively engaging Zero's with Buffalo's
Personally I prefer to keep the Buffalo as a training plane. Air squadrons with maxed out planes train much faster.
I keep them back to train till they are good enough not to waste their Hurricane's
But I'm definitely the Sir Robin type

Thanks for the info. It'd be nice if you'd post it every couple of weeks. Helps connecting the dots.

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/10/2011 6:13:39 PM   
Dixie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: mc3744

As far as I can tell ship losses are quite normal.
I find air losses a bit high though.
I'm guessing that's because you've been actively engaging Zero's with Buffalo's
Personally I prefer to keep the Buffalo as a training plane. Air squadrons with maxed out planes train much faster.
I keep them back to train till they are good enough not to waste their Hurricane's
But I'm definitely the Sir Robin type

Thanks for the info. It'd be nice if you'd post it every couple of weeks. Helps connecting the dots.


I'm down to around 30 Buffs in the pool and three squadrons. One NZ Buff Sqn is in India, one RAF sqn is in Burma and one RAAF sqn is making it's way down to Oz. Needless to say there is some intensive training going on at the moment, but the Buff has had it's day as a front line fighter. The three squadrons have claimed 12 kills between them so far, up to this point the RAF has lost 76 Buffs in air combat, plus another 26 written off after combat (17.5% of all Allied losses, fact fans!).

In total the RAF and USAAF have lost 179 fighters in aerial combat for a score of 64 Japanese fighters, 48 of which are A6M2 (plus assorted bombers). Almost a 3:1 ratio, however my pilots are widely known to be poor and will only get better. GBL has the advantage of better equipment and better pilots, but this advantage will erode over time. So whilst my losses are high, I'm happy that GBL's better pilots are slowly wearing out.

At the most basic level, those Buffaloes (and particularly) P-40s are lost to me regardless when the PI/Malaya falls. Right now they're still gone, but so have some of GBL's Zeroes. That's going to cost him in HI to build new ones and train pilots.

Also, the sacrifice of the Buffs has helped to evacuate over a division's worth of troops from Singapore. I don't have to deal with sending e-telegrams to the pixelated next of kin so I'm OK there!

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/10/2011 6:28:54 PM   
mc3744


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The troop evac out of Singers was indeed a relevant feat.
I dare say that it was probably, at least partially, GBL's oversight rather than the prowess of your Buffalo's
Still an enviable result. I have to admit that I've never even tried to evac Sing by sea after the first day.
I often had problems saving empty ships running at full speed from day one!

Given the troops saved it was certainly worth it. Good job! I wish I did it!!

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RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/11/2011 11:09:26 PM   
Dixie


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31st December 1941

A new year beckons and some interesting developments are, erm, developing.


PACIFIC
Two important convoys are heading south through the Pacific, supply convoy WB-01S and the SOPAC support squadron are both on their way to the South Pacific. Between them these two convoys will provide the basis for the support of the Allied war effort in 1942. The plan is to drop supplies and fuel at Brisbane, Sydney, Auckland and Melbourne. USN support ships (AV, AVP, AD, AS, AR, AE, AG) will be based in either Australia or New Zealand to provide forward operating bases when the time is right. There are currently no plans to station any USN oilers in the area, the fast ones will be operating with the carrier TFs and the slower ones will be attached to convoys to keep the destroyers operating.

A further convoy of troop ships escorted by Pensacola and Le Triomphant is at Fiji, where they were to pick up one of the US Base Forces. However, they have been spotted by a Japanese float plane. Given the distance from the Japanese lines, and the fact my ships are still afloat, this is most likely a commerce raider rather than a carrier strike, but I'm not hanging around to find out. The convoy is going to make a break for safety whilst the NZ strike squadrons have been readied for action.

Strong SCTF are departing Pearl Harbor to escort the two vital convoys through the South Pacific, even though they should be routed safely away from any surface raiders it's probably best to err on the side of caution.


NEW GUINEA AND THE SOLOMON ISLANDS
Japanese soldiers have seized Vanimo on the Northern coast of New Guinea. A strong force of cooks and mechanics stormed ashore under heavy backpacks, the total lack of opposition did not go unnoticed by the Japanese commander who seems to have ordered some of his own men shot. Because, as we all know it's dishonourable to go home without any casualties...


EAST INDIES
Japanese carriers have been spotted 120 miles NE of Batavia, somehow the reported three carriers, two light carriers, a battleship and several escorting destroyers and cruisers has managed to slip past the Allied submarine picket line. Despite a reported five plus carriers the Japanese attacks were on a small scale, either due to the reports being wrong, a lack of targets or some other issue.
The carrier based aircraft launched two dive-bomber raids against a troop convoy on Sumatra's western coast where several small troop ships were attempting to evacuate the last few support troops of the Indian 11th Division.
In conjunction with the carrier raids several land based Betties and Nells launched from Borneo, sinking one small troop ship and a coastal minesweeper.

The KB is now in a position to either sweep down the Java coast or to make a dart into the Indian Ocean. No matter which option he takes GBL is not going to find many targets. A few small freighters are tucked up in Soerbaja along with three tankers, but most Allied ships left the region last time the KB turned up just in case they went for a course reversal. A raid into the Indian Ocean is not too likely at this point, the potential for coming away empty handed is probably not worth the waste of fuel.


MALAYA
Japanese forces now control all of the Malay peninsula north of Kuala Lumpur. With the RAF fighters gone the aerial defence of Singapore now rests entirely in the hands of the anti-aircraft batteries. Strangely it turns out that they are better than the Buffalo squadrons, shooting down one bomber for no losses to themselves. There were quite a few bombers damaged although they all seem to have got home safely.


BURMA AND INDIA
The elite 7th Hussars (xp 75) have arrived in Aden. Fresh from their exploits chasing Italians across the vast expanses of the Western Desert they arrive full of excitement, ready to sit still and guard lots of jungle. With their high experience and tanks they will form part of the garrison for Southern India and be based in the Madras area. From there they should be able to rapidly shift to new positions and shoot any Japs who try and invade from the sea. The general carpness of Jap tanks means the 7th may be a decisive weapon if they're called into action, despite the pretty poor quality of their own tanks.
The soon to arrive 2nd Royal Tank Rgt will be deployed to the Calcutta area in order to provide a similar role in the event of a Japanese overland drive or landing near Chittagong, unlikely though it may be.

Not much else to report, plans are afoot to fully move the Royal Navy HQ from Ceylon to Bombay in order to reduce the chance of the IJN catching the RN at anchor. There's plenty of excess transport capacity in the Indian Ocean right now so it'd be easy to do, any thoughts?
Prince of Wales is going for a refit tomorrow, gaining an extra 100 in AA value. Priceless for when she finally forms some sort of integral element to an RN taskforce... Still, Force Z lives on and will incorporate the RN carriers when they arrive.

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Post #: 86
RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/12/2011 1:33:50 AM   
Mike Solli


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dixie
NEW GUINEA AND THE SOLOMON ISLANDS
Japanese soldiers have seized Vanimo on the Northern coast of New Guinea. A strong force of cooks and mechanics stormed ashore under heavy backpacks, the total lack of opposition did not go unnoticed by the Japanese commander who seems to have ordered some of his own men shot. Because, as we all know it's dishonourable to go home without any casualties...


Dixie, has anyone ever told you that you are nuts?

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Created by the amazing Dixie

(in reply to Dixie)
Post #: 87
RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/12/2011 3:36:33 AM   
Cribtop


Posts: 3629
Joined: 8/10/2008
From: Lone Star Nation
Status: online
He's quite mad.

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(in reply to Mike Solli)
Post #: 88
RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/12/2011 11:28:59 AM   
Dixie


Posts: 10174
Joined: 3/10/2006
From: UK
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mike Solli


quote:

ORIGINAL: Dixie
NEW GUINEA AND THE SOLOMON ISLANDS
Japanese soldiers have seized Vanimo on the Northern coast of New Guinea. A strong force of cooks and mechanics stormed ashore under heavy backpacks, the total lack of opposition did not go unnoticed by the Japanese commander who seems to have ordered some of his own men shot. Because, as we all know it's dishonourable to go home without any casualties...


Dixie, has anyone ever told you that you are nuts?



Only once, but I didn't listen. Everyone knows that you can't trust a fox to tell the truth


In a shameless attempt to bump up my viewers, I'm going to post some more pictures of stuff in the pipeline.




I'm particularly pleased with the two tone grey on Indomitable mixed with the blue. Plain grey ships are boring And everyone knows that the better your in-game ships look the less likely they are to be sunk

Attachment (1)

< Message edited by Dixie -- 10/12/2011 11:31:49 AM >

(in reply to Mike Solli)
Post #: 89
RE: Operation Rudyard - 10/12/2011 11:41:55 AM   
Dixie


Posts: 10174
Joined: 3/10/2006
From: UK
Status: offline
Time for some strategic thinkings...


I currently have a few scattered groups of B-17s in a position to do something worthwhile. One and a half groups in India, from the Calcutta area they can reach down into Burma and the Thai border area. There's not a lot to hit, but there are raids going up against Japanese troops and airfields.

Two groups are still stationed in the Philippines, from here they can actually bomb strategic targets, which is allowed under our HRs. The targets aren't great, but the best option is probably the oilfields at Miri. It's not going to be a major effort, just enough to give GBL something else to deal with and hopefully force him to station fighters in the rear areas. After a few days of bombing the oilfields it'll be back to hitting airfields for a few days, after that it's probably time to relocate the big burds.


(in reply to Dixie)
Post #: 90
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