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RE: Guadalcanal

 
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RE: Guadalcanal - 12/25/2011 4:43:59 PM   
sdevault


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Kindle version of this book releasing Feb. 14th, 2012: Enterprise: by Barrett Tillman

My personal favorites are the Morison series. I bought a set in the late 80's and still love to thumb through them. Thanks to this forum I have found many gems. Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway is now on my Kindle, as well as Given Up for Dead: America's Heroic Stand at Wake Island and others.

Thanks everyone!

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Post #: 91
RE: Guadalcanal - 12/25/2011 4:54:12 PM   
zuluhour


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received "The First Team and Guadalcanal Campaign" today. I guess its OK to play WITP-AE with the resident Ayatolla.

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Post #: 92
RE: The Book Thread. **Updated*** - 5/12/2012 11:41:37 PM   
LowCommand

 

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The Burma Campaign by Frank McLynn

This is a Political History. It includes all the ďdirtĒ on the various generals and high political figures etc. It explains why General X hated General Y. The silly reasons for many odd personnel decisions are explained, as well as some unsound strategy. It is decidedly written from the British point of view. The actual combat is mostly only covered at a high level. I highly recommend it for the advanced student of the war. It probably should not be your first book on the subject. If you read it, be sure to scan the notes. The author buried some of the most interesting stuff (at least to AE readers) deep in the fine print at the back, such as pg 474 ďThe corruption on the Hump and the Burma Road was egregious even by Kuomintang standards. Sixteen different Chinese agencies supervised the arriving Lend-Lease materiel, all the directors of which had been appointed by nepotism. Much of the supplies simply did not arrive, being appropriated by the KMT Ďrake-offí. One estimate was that for every 14,000 tons that left India and Burma, only 5,000 tons reached ChinaÖĒ

Warning, Warning, Will Robinson, the personal views of the author are to be taken with about a ton of salt. He is very often wrong. For example, the way to react when suddenly facing a tiger in the jungle does NOT involve running away. Nor was the invasion of Ceylon necessarily the best possible strategy for Japan. General Slim was very, very good, but probably not the best General in the whole world, ever. He might not have even been the best British General of WWII (Iím thinking about OíConnor NOT Montgomery.) Also be warned, McLynn gives the dirt on lots of people, even including his favorite Slim (he made some bad personnel decisions among other things.) McLynn is much less nice to everybody else. All the standard heroes of the war except Marshal get raked over the coals, including Churchill, Roosevelt, Stillwell, Chang etc. In places this book reads more like a gossip column rather than a history. (Yes, it does include some of who was sleeping with whom.) Again, I recommend the book but be very, very careful of the authorís conclusions.



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Post #: 93
RE: The Book Thread. **Updated*** - 5/22/2012 1:33:19 PM   
MartinB

 

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Fantastic thread, looking forward to both retirement and a long life.
Can we have this thread stickied, pls?
Thanks for all the work, Yankee!
Here comes more btw: http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tm.asp?m=3109451

(in reply to LowCommand)
Post #: 94
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 7/15/2012 7:41:51 PM   
LowCommand

 

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From: VA
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Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War by Eric Lacroix and Linton Wells II

Why you might want the book, ďNot only is this the best work by far on Japanese cruisers, it is also invaluable for the insights it provides into the Japanese navy as a whole,Ē dust jacket quote from Norman Friedman, author of the roughly comparable series of books on US, well, pretty much every class of Navy ships and boats. I pretty well agree.

Why you might not want it, Amazon wants somewhere between $200 and $300 used for it.

There is a vast quantity of information here, everything from the usual, guns, speed, armor, lots of drawings, service history, etc. to the unusual, like the launch speed attained by one cruiser. There is a detailed breakdown of which cruiser had what funnel identification bands when. There is lots of detail not usually found in this type of book, like detailed stability figures, hull weight distribution, space devoted to habitability, engine room layout, engine details, etc. There is some very interesting data like hit percentages at various ranges during practice and ammunition usage during various surface actions, so some idea can be gathered of actual combat accuracy.

What isnít there. There isnít much discussion over the design process, probably because there doesnít seem to have been that much discussion. In Friedmanís books, lots of space is devoted to long, detailed arguments between the various authorities over what should get built and why the ships came out the way they did. In Japan, the admirals decreed and the designer produced. There were some discussions over some ships, but nothing like the long fights in the US or the fights arenít in the book. That probably has something to do with the way many of the ships came out. { My opinion, The bookís authorsí do mention, in passing, that the designer of the later cruisers didnít fight the admirals the way the previous one did. } The book does have a discussion on the overweigh problem and how it seems to have been (pre treaty abrogation) a massive design error not evil planning. After treaty abrogation the treaty 10,000 ton cruisers ended up displacing over 15,000 tons.

What is unfortunately missing. There is a detailed discussion on where some ships got hit and how much damage was caused, including drawings and pictures. With others there isnít much. For example one cruiser survived three torpedo hits and came home by itself, but there isnít much info, probably because of war related document destruction (the authors donít say much about such things.) There also isnít much discussion about what worked and what didnít. The authors do discuss the controversial practice of centerline bulkheads (they tend to led to very severe danger of capsizing.) In their opinion the provision of extensive counter flooding equipment etc. was mostly sufficient. (I disagree, but Iím not an expert.)

Again, I think this is a great book for anybody really intrested in the gritty details of WWII cruisers.



_____________________________

"Mines reported in the fairway,
"Warn all traffic and detain,
"'Sent up Unity, Cralibel, Assyrian, Stormcock, and Golden Gain."

(in reply to Argos)
Post #: 95
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 7/15/2012 7:46:56 PM   
LowCommand

 

Posts: 130
Joined: 8/14/2002
From: VA
Status: offline

Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War by Eric Lacroix and Linton Wells II

Why you might want the book, ďNot only is this the best work by far on Japanese cruisers, it is also invaluable for the insights it provides into the Japanese navy as a whole,Ē dust jacket quote from Norman Friedman, author of the roughly comparable series of books on US, well, pretty much every class of Navy ships and boats. I pretty well agree.

Why you might not want it, Amazon wants somewhere between $200 and $300 used for it.

There is a vast quantity of information here, everything from the usual, guns, speed, armor, lots of drawings, service history, etc. to the unusual, like the launch speed attained by one cruiser. There is a detailed breakdown of which cruiser had what funnel identification bands when. There is lots of detail not usually found in this type of book, like detailed stability figures, hull weight distribution, space devoted to habitability, engine room layout, engine details, etc. There is some very interesting data like hit percentages at various ranges during practice and ammunition usage during various surface actions, so some idea can be gathered of actual combat accuracy.

What isnít there. There isnít much discussion over the design process, probably because there doesnít seem to have been that much discussion. In Friedmanís books, lots of space is devoted to long, detailed arguments between the various authorities over what should get built and why the ships came out the way they did. In Japan, the admirals decreed and the designer produced. There were some discussions over some ships, but nothing like the long fights in the US or the fights arenít in the book. That probably has something to do with the way many of the ships came out. { My opinion, The bookís authorsí do mention, in passing, that the designer of the later cruisers didnít fight the admirals the way the previous one did. } The book does have a discussion on the overweigh problem and how it seems to have been (pre treaty abrogation) a massive design error not evil planning. After treaty abrogation the treaty 10,000 ton cruisers ended up displacing over 15,000 tons.

What is unfortunately missing. There is a detailed discussion on where some ships got hit and how much damage was caused, including drawings and pictures. With others there isnít much. For example one cruiser survived three torpedo hits and came home by itself, but there isnít much info, probably because of war related document destruction (the authors donít say much about such things.) There also isnít much discussion about what worked and what didnít. The authors do discuss the controversial practice of centerline bulkheads (they tend to led to very severe danger of capsizing.) In their opinion the provision of extensive counter flooding equipment etc. was mostly sufficient. (I disagree, but Iím not an expert.)

Again, I think this is a wonderful, if expensive, book for anybody intrested in the gritty details of WWII cruisers.


_____________________________

"Mines reported in the fairway,
"Warn all traffic and detain,
"'Sent up Unity, Cralibel, Assyrian, Stormcock, and Golden Gain."

(in reply to LowCommand)
Post #: 96
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 7/15/2012 8:38:25 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 16040
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: LowCommand


Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War by Eric Lacroix and Linton Wells II

Why you might want the book, ďNot only is this the best work by far on Japanese cruisers, it is also invaluable for the insights it provides into the Japanese navy as a whole,Ē dust jacket quote from Norman Friedman, author of the roughly comparable series of books on US, well, pretty much every class of Navy ships and boats. I pretty well agree.

Why you might not want it, Amazon wants somewhere between $200 and $300 used for it.

There is a vast quantity of information here, everything from the usual, guns, speed, armor, lots of drawings, service history, etc. to the unusual, like the launch speed attained by one cruiser. There is a detailed breakdown of which cruiser had what funnel identification bands when. There is lots of detail not usually found in this type of book, like detailed stability figures, hull weight distribution, space devoted to habitability, engine room layout, engine details, etc. There is some very interesting data like hit percentages at various ranges during practice and ammunition usage during various surface actions, so some idea can be gathered of actual combat accuracy.

What isnít there. There isnít much discussion over the design process, probably because there doesnít seem to have been that much discussion. In Friedmanís books, lots of space is devoted to long, detailed arguments between the various authorities over what should get built and why the ships came out the way they did. In Japan, the admirals decreed and the designer produced. There were some discussions over some ships, but nothing like the long fights in the US or the fights arenít in the book. That probably has something to do with the way many of the ships came out. { My opinion, The bookís authorsí do mention, in passing, that the designer of the later cruisers didnít fight the admirals the way the previous one did. } The book does have a discussion on the overweigh problem and how it seems to have been (pre treaty abrogation) a massive design error not evil planning. After treaty abrogation the treaty 10,000 ton cruisers ended up displacing over 15,000 tons.

What is unfortunately missing. There is a detailed discussion on where some ships got hit and how much damage was caused, including drawings and pictures. With others there isnít much. For example one cruiser survived three torpedo hits and came home by itself, but there isnít much info, probably because of war related document destruction (the authors donít say much about such things.) There also isnít much discussion about what worked and what didnít. The authors do discuss the controversial practice of centerline bulkheads (they tend to led to very severe danger of capsizing.) In their opinion the provision of extensive counter flooding equipment etc. was mostly sufficient. (I disagree, but Iím not an expert.)

Again, I think this is a wonderful, if expensive, book for anybody intrested in the gritty details of WWII cruisers.

Warspite1

Why so damn expensive?? I would love that book....but at that price its sadly not possible


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Post #: 97
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 7/15/2012 9:31:12 PM   
YankeeAirRat


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quote:

Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War


It is an out of print book and popular. The classic of supply and demand

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Post #: 98
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 7/17/2012 5:22:09 PM   
Lokasenna


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Joined: 3/3/2012
From: Iowan in MD/DC
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Surprised this one isn't in the thread yet. I found it at the library as a young man about 15 years ago, and recently bought it used off of Amazon. My copy didn't come with the jacket, but that's OK...

http://www.amazon.com/The-campaign-Guadalcanal-battle-history/dp/0385043546/

A couple hundred pages with an extensive appendix and bibliography. Hundreds of drawings and maps of the campaign. Every major engagement is detailed. Hardcover, and you can get a copy in "very good" or "like new" condition for about $15 US.

It really is an amazing book. I got my copy yesterday, and while paging through I noticed that Coggins' sources stated that I-19 torpedoed Wasp while I-15 tried for Hornet and hit North Carolina/O'Brien instead, when in reality it was the same salvo that traveled (I still go at that) all the miles in between the task forces to hit the BB and DD. But hey, we might not have known that in 1972...

(in reply to YankeeAirRat)
Post #: 99
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 7/20/2012 2:00:08 PM   
Skyros


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From: Columbia SC
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Great book, I remember reading it back in the 70s when I was in high school. Its detailed battle obs got me into naval miniatures.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

Surprised this one isn't in the thread yet. I found it at the library as a young man about 15 years ago, and recently bought it used off of Amazon. My copy didn't come with the jacket, but that's OK...

http://www.amazon.com/The-campaign-Guadalcanal-battle-history/dp/0385043546/

A couple hundred pages with an extensive appendix and bibliography. Hundreds of drawings and maps of the campaign. Every major engagement is detailed. Hardcover, and you can get a copy in "very good" or "like new" condition for about $15 US.

It really is an amazing book. I got my copy yesterday, and while paging through I noticed that Coggins' sources stated that I-19 torpedoed Wasp while I-15 tried for Hornet and hit North Carolina/O'Brien instead, when in reality it was the same salvo that traveled (I still go at that) all the miles in between the task forces to hit the BB and DD. But hey, we might not have known that in 1972...



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Post #: 100
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 4/12/2013 8:13:16 AM   
chemkid

 

Posts: 263
Joined: 12/15/2012
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thanks!
really nice thread. should be sticky!!

chem!

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Post #: 101
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 5/13/2013 11:32:06 PM   
mikkey


Posts: 632
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From: Slovakia
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Can you recommend some good books about the Battle of the Coral Sea and Marianas? Thanks.

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Post #: 102
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 5/16/2013 11:05:38 PM   
SuluSea


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Joined: 11/17/2006
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Lokasenna

Surprised this one isn't in the thread yet. I found it at the library as a young man about 15 years ago, and recently bought it used off of Amazon. My copy didn't come with the jacket, but that's OK...

http://www.amazon.com/The-campaign-Guadalcanal-battle-history/dp/0385043546/

A couple hundred pages with an extensive appendix and bibliography. Hundreds of drawings and maps of the campaign. Every major engagement is detailed. Hardcover, and you can get a copy in "very good" or "like new" condition for about $15 US.

It really is an amazing book. I got my copy yesterday, and while paging through I noticed that Coggins' sources stated that I-19 torpedoed Wasp while I-15 tried for Hornet and hit North Carolina/O'Brien instead, when in reality it was the same salvo that traveled (I still go at that) all the miles in between the task forces to hit the BB and DD. But hey, we might not have known that in 1972...



Thanks for the heads up!! Pulled the trigger yesterday......


quote:

ORIGINAL: mikkey

Can you recommend some good books about the Battle of the Coral Sea and Marianas? Thanks.



I understand Hoyt doesn't go into great depth but I enjoy his books. I'd recommend Blue Skies and Blood

I'd also recommend To the Marianas: War in the Central Pacific 1944 by Hoyt which is also light reading.

< Message edited by SuluSea -- 5/16/2013 11:06:12 PM >


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Post #: 103
RE: the Book Thread - Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War - 5/17/2013 10:22:47 PM   
mikkey


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thanks for suggestion SuluSea, Blue Skies and Blood is on my wish list.

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Post #: 104
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 12/18/2013 3:55:49 PM   
rsallen64


Posts: 41
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From: Tacoma, WA
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Someone asked for general strategy. You could try:

Modern Strategy by Colin S. Gray (1999)
Principles of Maritime Strategy by Julian S. Corbett (Dover Ed. 2004)

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Post #: 105
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/4/2014 10:22:58 PM   
dr.hal


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I hope folks are still reading this thread, it is very informative! I just picked up a book and don't see it mentioned, so I thought I would get your collective view. It is Alan Zimm's Attack on Pearl Harbor, Strategy, Combat, Myths, Deception. Anyone read it, it looks very much like a very detailed review of the attack. Thanks in advance. Hal

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Post #: 106
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/5/2014 3:37:07 AM   
Lokasenna


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I actually just picked up "Pacific Crucible" today. Looking forward to reading it, and will post about it if it's good.

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Post #: 107
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/5/2014 12:13:07 PM   
Encircled


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"The Burma Campaign by Frank McLynn"

Lowcommand is spot on about this. I wanted something about the Burma Campaign, not a general history of the various leaders. One of the few history books I actually regret buying.

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Post #: 108
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/5/2014 3:16:33 PM   
dr.hal


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

"The Burma Campaign by Frank McLynn"

Lowcommand is spot on about this. I wanted something about the Burma Campaign, not a general history of the various leaders. One of the few history books I actually regret buying.

I have an older book, 1979, "Behind Japanese Lines" by Richard Dunlop. I centers on the OSS in Burma, but it is very interesting. Hal

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Post #: 109
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/5/2014 4:16:55 PM   
msieving1


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

"The Burma Campaign by Frank McLynn"

Lowcommand is spot on about this. I wanted something about the Burma Campaign, not a general history of the various leaders. One of the few history books I actually regret buying.


Try Burma: The Longest War 1941-45 by Louis Allen. Allen was an intelligence officer in the British army in Southeast Asia during World War II, spoke Japanese, and accessed both British and Japanese sources and personal correspondence.

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Post #: 110
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/7/2014 7:06:21 PM   
Schanilec

 

Posts: 3062
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quote:

ORIGINAL: msieving1


quote:

ORIGINAL: Encircled

"The Burma Campaign by Frank McLynn"

Lowcommand is spot on about this. I wanted something about the Burma Campaign, not a general history of the various leaders. One of the few history books I actually regret buying.


Try Burma: The Longest War 1941-45 by Louis Allen. Allen was an intelligence officer in the British army in Southeast Asia during World War II, spoke Japanese, and accessed both British and Japanese sources and personal correspondence.

Read it just last year. Thank god for all the maps to help guide me along the operations. I may have to reread 'Sittang: the Last Battle'. Been over 30 years since I read that one.

< Message edited by Schanilec -- 1/7/2014 8:07:04 PM >


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Post #: 111
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/7/2014 7:34:44 PM   
John 3rd


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I read Operation KE by Roger Letourneau and thought it to be a nice 'niche' book covering the Japanese withdrawal from Guadalcanal.


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Post #: 112
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/7/2014 8:05:36 PM   
Schanilec

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: John 3rd

I read Operation KE by Roger Letourneau and thought it to be a nice 'niche' book covering the Japanese withdrawal from Guadalcanal.


Oh no! Damn you guys. 'Operation KE'. Off to the on-line store...again.

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Post #: 113
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/7/2014 8:22:18 PM   
John 3rd


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You are WELCOME!

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Post #: 114
RE: Potentially the Book Thread. - 1/7/2014 9:55:02 PM   
Schanilec

 

Posts: 3062
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Bastards! All of you.

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Post #: 115
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