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RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fcharton(J) vs soliinvictus(A))�NCNo soliinvictus

 
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RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 6/30/2011 12:15:53 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 6th 1942

As expected, enemy fighters were in the air today, to avenge the bombing of Sian yesterday. This wasn’t the AVG’s finest hour. On the second of April, the enemy managed to fly 18 AVG and 5 chinese fighters. Today, there were 22 H81-A3 and 6 chinese fighters, but the small size of the airfield (level one) prevented them from taking off, and my sweeps destroyed five chinese planes, and 9 AVG (6 air to air, one by flak, and three to damage). Two squadrons of Sallies also flew and bombed the airport, but failed to coordinate with their escorts. Nine did not return to base. I probably should have waited a day.

I am sweeping again tomorrow, the Chinese fighters are gone, and the AVG is probably at half strength (given the losses and the damaged planes). If everything goes according to plan (it seldom does, but one can hope) this will finish the AVG and allow the bombing of Sian to resume. My goal is to wreck the airfield, and disrupt the garrison while reinforcements arrive (that's about a week).

Since my bombers have nothing to do tomorrow, I am sending a few of them city bomb Changsha. This serves two purposes :
- It forces the enemy to send fighters, and thus prevents him from reinforcing Sian
- It can only reinforce the idea that central China is my next target.

Little else happened in China: my troops are on the move. Here is a map of the Sian area, with a few notes on my force distribution. Missing here are the reinforcements from Wenchow, about 2300 AV, now boarding trains to Sinyang.








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< Message edited by fcharton -- 6/30/2011 12:17:49 AM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 151
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/2/2011 2:39:35 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 7th and 8th, 1942

Over Sian, a second series of sweeps over Sian downs three more AVG planes on the seventh. Aerial bombardment of the airfield and garrison is resumed on the eighth. Several deliberate attacks will be needed to reduce the forts, air bombardment aims at disrupting the defenses, to make this less costly. East of the city, ground bombardment is slowly reducing the enemy, destroying 5 squads per day, and disabling about 15.

Troops from Wenchow are now arriving in Sinyang. They need about ten days to march to Sian, I am expecting this hex to be reinforced by the 20th. Troops from Yenan are two hexes, eight days marching, from Sian. Sian could be ours by the end of the month.

Further south, near Ankang, my troops are faring a little better. We achieve 1:1 odds, and slowly damage the enemy. I am reinforcing this area with two regiments from Sian. Controlling Ankang and the road leading there by the time Sian falls would be useful, since it would cut the retreat of the defenders.

Once Sian has fallen, the road from Nanyang to Ankang to Tienshui is the front line I would like to establish. Reinforcing this area would help isolate troops in the north west (the Sian stack, the Yenan stack, and the current garrisons of Lanchow and Sining), and provide several jumping points for an invasion of the Sichuan Basin. If Lanchow and Sining can be conquered soon after Sian falls (I believe it will be the case, since Sian is the city my opponent chose to defend), I should hold all northern China by mid June, and have cleared most enemy presence behind my lines.


I am seriously considering a direct attack on Sichuan this summer. This is the industrial heart of the KMT. Even if Chungking cannot be taken at once, Chengtu probably can, and invading the cities will further complicate enemy supply situation.

The drawback of this “Chungking first” approach is that the enemy still has large numbers of troops in Central China that could be used to reinforce the basin. The Chinese army is very large, whether Japan will prevail is unclear. The bright side is that most battles would happen in open terrain, which heavily favors the IJA.


Attacking Changsha (through Ichang and Wuchang) with some of the troops freed in Sian would reduce enemy strength while I am taking Lanchow. This “Changsha first” strategy seems to be the norm in AAR where Japan fights in China.

One major risk I see in Changsha first approaches is that by delaying the capture of Chungking, one runs the risk of a successful Allied offensive in Burma, and the reopening of the Burma Road. The conquest of China can only succeed if China is starved (and must be completed, in my opinion, because once the B-road reopens, Chinese units that respawn will replace losses and all that).


Yet another strategy, then, would be to try to cut that risk for good, by attacking north from Burma, towards Paoshan and Tsuyung. This would need troops from Singapore, and have to be supported by an offensive in south China, from Liuchow to Tuyun and Kweiyang, lest an offensive in Burma cut the attackers somewhere north of Paoshan. This would be the “Kunming first” approach.

Since it implies a shift of troops from Sian to Liuchow, it is a much slower road than the two others, but since it guarantees the closing of the Burma road, it also makes an early capture of Sichuan less important. Also, by relocating units in south China, it makes a possible shift toward Burma or Indochina much easier, if China happened to fall earlier.

If China falls before the end of 1942 (this is my strategic goal for this year, as you certainly have understood by now), then a third stage will open, that will see all the troops freed move South (and by then, I will have enough PP to buy lots of units!) The Kunming first strategy makes this transition easier.


One could probably mix and match between those three strategies, but I believe this is not a good idea. Taking China is all about proceeding one region at a time. It is possible, of course, to mount a limited offensive towards Tsuyung, while implementing a Chungking first strategy, but an Allied counterattack in Burma will doom those units. Also, those would be the major offensives, but all strategies need a few troops to be diverted on other fronts, to pin as many enemy garrisons as possible.


Here is a map showing those second phase strategies for China. Chunking first is white, Changsha first yellow, Kunming first, red. Right now, I am tempted to try Chungking first, but I have a month to make up, and possibly change, my mind.





Attachment (1)

< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/2/2011 2:40:23 PM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 152
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/2/2011 9:54:03 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 9th to 11th, 1942

The fall of Surabaya, fun with facility damage


After the long attrition battle in Malang, the defense of Surabaya could not be very strong.

On the ninth, a deliberate attack achieved 1:1 odds, and reduced forts from three to two.
On the tenth; another deliberate attack achieved 2:1 odds and reduced the forts one level further.
On the eleventh odds reached 4:1, and the defenders surrendered.

Since the battle had been pretty short, I was expecting low facility damage. Yeah, you bet, gaijin! In fact, everything was destroyed. Port is 100 damaged (although I did not bomb it), runway 95 (didn’t bombard either), oil is 0 (190), refinery 0 (170), resources 1 (79).

What this is supposed to model is beyond me… An hex has a radius of 46 miles, this is a very large area, (it is about the area of the greater Paris, these days, including 12 million inhabitants and quite a bit of farmland). Resources, factories, oilfields and refineries are certainly not huddled together in one place. So, we are saying that, over a period of three days, there is a nonzero possibility that engineers could destroy EVERY facility in that hex (and the level seven port, and the airfield, while being under attack, and disrupted).

Sodeska?

This confirms my opinion that facility damage, repairs, and probably destruction, are not very well modeled. This is usually admitted with respect to China (probably because this is the first place in the game where the problem pops up), but I think the model is wrong on a deeper level (and this is too bad, given the importance of strategic bombing, which is measured in facility damage, in the late game).

In the present game, the loss of the oilfields is no big deal. I have enough oil, since I use my ships very little. Yet this confirms my impression that a wise Japanese player should better go for China and land strategies, rather than maritime conquests. The concentration and brittleness of oilfields and refineries make the latter a big gamble.

With the capture of Surabaya, only two Dutch bases remain on Java. Tjilatjap and Batavia. There, I had about 400 AV against 380 Dutch. I am sending 500 AV by rail, and Batavia should fall before the end of the month. Tjilatjap is just a couple of base forces, I will take care of them later.

Peeling the durian

Attacks on Singapore now always seem to achieve 1:1 odds. Fatigue and lack of supply limit me to two attacks a week, but the British garrison is melting away. They are below 500 AV now. A guards division is arriving soon, probably for the final attack. I wonder if this is the latest capture of Singapore ever… But curiously, the very long siege of Singapore did not prevent the capture of the DEI.

Surprise in Sian

After two more days of air bombardment, which destroyed a few more AVG planes on the ground (basing large fighter groups on level one airfields is not a good idea, after all). I thought I should try a deliberate attack, to try and reduce the forts before the reinforcements arrived. Given the heavy damage suffered during the river crossing, I was bracing for the worst, but much to my surprise, the attack achieved 4:1 odds.

Ground combat at Sian (83,41)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 88855 troops, 882 guns, 366 vehicles, Assault Value = 2828
Defending force 58512 troops, 475 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 1887
Japanese engineers reduce fortifications to 3
Japanese adjusted assault: 2956
Allied adjusted defense: 687
Japanese assault odds: 4 to 1 (fort level 3)
Japanese Assault reduces fortifications to 3

Japanese ground losses:
4560 casualties reported
Squads: 4 destroyed, 247 disabled
Non Combat: 10 destroyed, 243 disabled
Engineers: 1 destroyed, 28 disabled
Vehicles lost 68 (1 destroyed, 67 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
5036 casualties reported
Squads: 99 destroyed, 247 disabled
Non Combat: 59 destroyed, 291 disabled
Engineers: 3 destroyed, 26 disabled

I need to wait for supplies to catch up, but this is very good news. It seems Sian could fall after one or two more attacks. I wonder whether I can try and surround them…

Elsewhere in China, it seems that the enemy is reinforcing the Hunan basin (the plains around Changsha). I believe my opponent suspects this is my next target, and I am happy with this. I will start prepping units for Changsha and neighbouring cities, in case it appears in Sigint, and begin a bombing campaign over the plains.


(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 153
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/5/2011 8:56:54 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 12th to 14th, 1942

We are in a transition phase again.

In Singapore, a deliberate attack on the 13th reduced enemy AV below 500. A fresh division is arriving today. I am resting to let supplies arrive and will attack again. I expect the city to fall soon.

On Java, troops from Surabaya are now marching on Batavia. They should be there in three days, and we shall see. On Sumatra, we are a hex away from Padang, and little is left of the Palembang garrison.

Sian, as usual

It seems that Sian will fall sooner than expected. Over three days of attack, forts went down from level four to level one, and enemy AV from 2000 to less than 1200. I am resting one day or two, while 800 AV from Yenan are arriving. Then we will resume the attack and probably take the base.

East of the city, bombardment is wearing the defenders off, and more than 2000 AV should be there in about a week. Finally, on the road to Ankang, the defenders are slowly yielding. Each attack achieves better odds. Supply prevents us from attacking every day, but it seems we could prevail.

I believe Sian and the eastern hex will fall before the end of the month. Can we surround these troops? Right now, their only paths of retreat are south and south west. Tanks are moving to close the latter (red arrow), as such, surrounding of the Sian garrison depends on whether I can control the road to Ankang. If so, the enemy could be isolated and destroyed in the blue hex.

I now realize I should have pushed harder for Ankang. If it can be captured, there is a good chance we can isolate the enemy in the blue hex. If this cannot be done, we probably can cut off the troops on the road east of Sian.

Clearing the woods between Sian and Ankang is my main goal once Sian falls. By establishing the secondary road as my main defense line, I will protect the major road to Sian, which is my line of communication.

Note the Yenan garrison in the woods north of Sian. I have to dispatch a division or two to finish them too…




Building the empire

Japan now holds 552 bases (vs 541 at the beginning of the month), 224 (vs 217) have engineers. 63 fort levels have been built during those two weeks for a total of 593.

271 bases have forts (+14), we have
281 bases without forts (-3)
82 level one forts (-20)
90 level two forts (+21)
76 level three forts (+12)
15 level four
5 level five (+1)
3 level six

We have 334 ports (+4), and 748 port levels (+15).

162 level 1 (+1)
74 level 2 (+2)
44 level 3 (-1)
22 level 4 (+1)
11 level 5 (-1)
5 level 6
7 level 7 (+2)
1 level 8
4 level 9
4 level 10


There are 345 (+9) airbases, and 884 level (+51)

833 levels

141 level 1 (-3)
64 level 2 (+3)
48 level 3 (+2)
44 level 4
21 level 5 (+2)
11 level 6 (+3)
10 level 7 (+2)
3 level 8
3 level 10

In the DEI, I am getting close to the perimeter I want. I still need to conquer northern Sumatra and the Indian Ocean islands off the coast, Southern New Guinea, and a few bases in the Solomons, and to mop up a few small bases off the Celebes or the Philippines, but Japanese expansion is pretty much over for now (except in China, of course).

What about northern Australia? So far, I have decided not to go there. I might go raiding a few ports (perhaps invade them too), but I don’t think it makes sense to invest a lot there (unless one wants to plan a full scale invasion of Australia, of course). I do understand this area can be a buffer to prevent an early attack on Timor or Java, but I think there are other ways around this, notably by keeping a strong naval presence (yes, carriers) around Java.


Attachment (1)

< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/5/2011 8:58:56 AM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 154
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/9/2011 7:06:18 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 15th and 16th

My troops in Singapore, now reinforced to about 3700 AV, never fail to disappoint. An attack today brought the forts to level two, once again, destroyed a few squads on both sides, once again, and caused high disruption that will take time to rest away. I will wait a few days, to clear as much disruption as I can, and try again, but this is getting a bit crazy.

On Luzon, daily bombardment in Clark Field seem to bring results. Defender AV is now under 2150 (it was over 2400 a couple of months ago). I have 900 AV, in closed terrain, with forts, I doubt I can take the place, even against a very demoralized enemy. I might bring engineers in, and try a deliberate attack, though. I will probably be able to reduce the forts, I will take disablements (which can be cured), but probably few destroyed squads (because of terrain). It would be amusing if Clark, with twice more defenders and three times less attackers, managed to fall before Singapore…

On Java, the IJA is on its way to Batavia. There is nothing I can do but wait.

The headline news for today are the fall of Sian. After a day off, a reinforced IJA attacked, and took the city.

Ground combat at Sian (83,41)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 105968 troops, 1082 guns, 408 vehicles, Assault Value = 3194
Defending force 46009 troops, 475 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 1128
Japanese engineers reduce fortifications to 0
Japanese adjusted assault: 2203
Allied adjusted defense: 277
Japanese assault odds: 7 to 1 (fort level 0)
Japanese forces CAPTURE Sian !!!

Japanese ground losses:
3115 casualties reported
Squads: 27 destroyed, 85 disabled
Non Combat: 3 destroyed, 88 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 10 disabled
Vehicles lost 16 (1 destroyed, 15 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
21087 casualties reported
Squads: 634 destroyed, 182 disabled
Non Combat: 957 destroyed, 144 disabled
Engineers: 177 destroyed, 3 disabled
Guns lost 80 (80 destroyed, 0 disabled)
Units retreated 22

The defenders retreated into the woods, in the blue hex in the map from my previous post. I estimate their strength at about 600 AV. In the city, the industry is 60% damaged (for the record, this is the same as what I had in Palembang after a two months battle, and the battle of Sian last for about a week).

Supply draw was set to maximal, yet the base was empty and enemy troops were unsupplied from day one. This suggests overall stocks are very low. In February, I had estimated that China held (in unit and bases) about 120k supplies, and that the industry was barely sufficient to feed the troops. Over the two last months, all industry in the north was lost, as well as some southern bases, and there were repairs in Chungking. I suspect all China is on half rations now.

A nice result of the fall of Sian was the partial destruction of the AVG. Five more AVG planes were destroyed, none of them flew, they probably could not leave. Since the beginning of this month, 25 AVG planes were lost, most of them on the ground. I believe my opponent sent a large contingent to Sian, but without supplies and on a level one airfield, most of his planes could not fly, or get maintained, and Sian became a trap.

Since the beginning of the war, 62 AVG planes have been lost. This does not eliminate the volunteers but it does make them less dangerous, and will probably make my opponent think twice before committing them again.

This is good, since Chinese supplies are low, I am planning a large aerial bombing campaign, the lighter the CAP over his bases, the better.


What now?

I have about 3000 AV in Sian (this number will go up as we rest), 2600 in the woods east, and 2500 more on the road from Nanyang. There are 700 more near Ankang (where enemy defenses are crumbling), and 700 in Lanchow.

700 defeated enemy AV retreated into the woods. 1900 AV are on the road east of the city, still undefeated, and about 500 more are around Ankang. There probably are more reinforcements between Ankang and Tianshui -500 AV?). Further away, there are 1000 AV in Lanchow, and some more around Sining.

The roadblock east of Sian is my next target. They are outnumbered, probably unsupplied and disrupted, and their defeat will open the road to Nanyang. They will retreat into the blue hex, with all the other defeated troops from Sian.

Can those forty units be cut off and forced to surrender? The enemy still holds Ankang. If they try to leave now, and march south, I do not think I can block them. I just don’t have enough boots on the southern road.

Now, if they delay, procrastinate, or try to hold in the forest, I do have a chance. We shall see.

The second short term objective are Tianshui and Kungchang. Some of the troops that just captured Sian were ordered there. This serves several purposes:

1- Secure the north bank of the Wei (from Sian to Tianshui)
2- Cut off the road to Lanchow (take Kungchang)
3- Take Tianshui and then move east towards Ankang, threatening to pocket the troops in the woods south of Sian, and lengthening the supply lines of the defeated units south of Sian.

The fall of Sian is an important milestone in this game. Since the beginning of the war, this was my first phase goal for China. We are now entering a period of consolidation, where the IJA will try to exploit this victory, clear the area, and prepare for the last phase of the Northern Campaign : the capture of Lanchow and Sining. I believe this can be done by the end of June.


< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/9/2011 7:07:01 PM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 155
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/11/2011 11:08:05 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 17th and 18th 1942

The war today


Around Sian, my armored spearheads moving over the major road to Kungchang detected a number of small enemy units in the mountains between Tienshui and Kungchang. Air bombardment of Ankang identified infantry corps fragments garrisoning the base. Most of those enemy held hexes sport one or two units. This would suggest that my opponent has changed strategy, and is now trying a defense in depth of the area west and south of Sian. Several divisions from Sian are now marching west, I have about 1400 AV, but might split this force into two, if this enemy strategy was confirmed.

East of Sian, reinforcements are arriving, I will have almost 5000 AV in the hex, against 2000 enemies. Since this happens in defensive terrain, this might take a few days, but I doubt the enemy can hold more than a week. On the road to Ankang, my troops are prevailing, as the defenders are now unsupplied.


On Java, reinforcements are arriving in Batavia. I will have 950 AV in the city tomorrow, and 1200 in three days. The enemy has 375 AV, behind level three forts.

In Singapore, I am waiting for disruption to fall, and supplies to arrive. The enemy is now under 500 AV.

The most interesting battle in the upcoming days will happen in Clark Field. I have been reinforcing my troops with a few engineer regiments, and will have 1000 AV, against 2100 enemies. I want to try a deliberate attack, to see what happens. Normally, I should get very bad odds, and terrible results, but the enemy seems badly damaged by the bombardment of the city, and AV are falling fast these days.

I very much doubt this can work, but I want to try out of curiosity. There is little danger involved: at worst, I will get a bloody nose, but I very much doubt the enemy can exploit this to launch any kind of counterattack.

The perimeter

Strange as it may seem for a Japanese general who failed to capture Clark Field and Singapore by mid-April 1942, I shall soon be done with the conquest of my defensive perimeter in the Pacific and Indian Ocean. In the map below, the red line is my intended perimeter, the yellow line, the current limit of my expansion. I hold almost all the bases inside the yellow line (I have been patiently capturing all the small green dots).




Once the perimeter is captured, there will be no further expansion in the Pacific or Indian Ocean until China is completely conquered. I might launch a few raids, or go for a couple of free lunches (small isolated bases in Australia, or Baker Island), but building and garrisoning my possessions will be the main focus.

According to Tracker, this area, China included, holds 666 bases, the perfect size for an evil empire! This allows for a nice and simple reformulation of Japanese war goals in 1942: hold 666 bases by the end of the year. I have 556 now, 110 to go… (a nicely accountable mission, but not an easy one).

How can the perimeter be consolidated? Right now, I am trying to make a list of small garrison units (60 AV Nav Guards, basically), and small engineer outfits (airfield units, or construction battalions). This will be the typical garrison in small and isolated bases: a Naval Guard, behind forts (level 3 or 4), sometimes with engineers, and sitting on a stack of supplies. The most important areas now, are those that might constitute early objectives for the enemy : the Gilberts, the Kuriles, the Solomons Timor, and perhaps the Andamans.

All these forward bases will be supported by rear area depots, which will act both as staging points and depots for local reserves. For the Kuriles, it will be Hokkaido, for the Solomons, Rabaul, for the Gilberts the Marshalls, for Timor the Celebes, and for the Andamans, Georgetown. These will hold large airbases, surface forces ready to intervene, stock of supplies and fuel, and reserves. This is also where garrison forces will assemble.

Finally, all my perimeter will be divided into four “coasts”, each with a major headquarter (level seven port or more, large strategic reserve, etc…)
- Indian Ocean (Sumatra to Burma), Singapore (when it falls)
- Java Timor: Surabaya
- Solomons and Gilbert: Truk
- Home Islands, Kuriles, Bonin, Mariannas : Tokyo

At present, I believe the most likely direction of an early Allied strike is the “Truk Coast”, ie the Gilberts and especially the Solomons. The risk of an attack before June is low, which gives me some time to prepare, but I need to be quick. The Solomons are most exposed, it has been raided several times, and I lack good airbases (only have Rabaul).

In the Gilbert, apart from Tarawa, which has been built into a pretty strong base, everything remains to be done. One recurrent problem is the constant lack of fuel in the Marshalls. I probably need to organize fuel convoys from the DEI to Truk to the Marshalls.





Attachment (1)

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 156
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/14/2011 1:32:17 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 19th, 20th and 21st

Lie back and think of England


The enemy is being cheeky, these days. Instead of just staying nicely behind his lines, building airfields in Soviet Union, letting the Dutch die on Java, the Indians resist in Singapore, the Chinese fall back in disorder, and the rest of the Allies lie back and think of their homeland, while the Japanese are busy conquering the world, he tried, on three separate occasions, to damage my possessions.

On the nineteenth, a squadron of Wellingtons sneaked on Magwe at night and tried to bomb the oilfields. Fortunately, I had Zeroes on night CAP. One bomber was shot down, two more were damaged, and the enemy, courageux mais pas téméraire (as we say in Japanese), did not try his luck again the next day. No harm done, but this I wouldn’t call that ‘nice’.

Worse still, on the twentieth, a destroyer task force attacked Shortlands, and sank a small task force (one patrol boat, and one cargo, with a construction company on board). The next day, the same task force managed to destroy another small group in Rabaul (a destroyer, a torpedo boat, and another light cargo with a company on board). The latter was my mistake. The enemy task force was around, I should have postponed troop loading and huddled in port.

Again, this is not really damaging, but it shows the vulnerability of my position in the Solomons. I badly need to reinforce this area.

I wonder why the Nells from Rabaul did not fly. The enemy was as detected as one can be, in range, the weather was clear, yet none of them flew.

The pilots were probably lying back and thinking of Japan…

Lust of the mind

I wanted to know whether Clark Field could be taken now, by an inadequate force… The answer is no.

Ground combat at Clark Field (79,76)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 30054 troops, 540 guns, 533 vehicles, Assault Value = 971
Defending force 62304 troops, 885 guns, 821 vehicles, Assault Value = 2100
Japanese engineers reduce fortifications to 2
Japanese adjusted assault: 512
Allied adjusted defense: 3091
Japanese assault odds: 1 to 6 (fort level 2)
Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), forts(+), preparation(-), experience(-)
supply(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
8106 casualties reported
Squads: 22 destroyed, 435 disabled
Non Combat: 19 destroyed, 527 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 61 disabled
Vehicles lost 132 (10 destroyed, 122 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
620 casualties reported
Squads: 1 destroyed, 47 disabled
Non Combat: 3 destroyed, 93 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 14 disabled
Vehicles lost 21 (5 destroyed, 16 disabled)

Yeah, it does hurt. But I’ll get my AV back, since I am supplied and most casualties are disablements. I am happy to have reduced the forts, and to know the enemy lacks supply. But that was a costly lesson…


Lettuce and kippers
(I know, those titles are ridiculous)

In Batavia, two deliberate attacks reduced the garrison from 320 to 250 AV. Forts were not reduced, and disruption was mounting, so the troops were ordered to rest for a day. Reinforcements arrived and we now have more than 1000 AV in the hex. I doubt the place can hold for long. A tank regiment is marching on Tjilatjap, the last enemy base on Java.

For some reason, supplies do not seem to flow into Malaysia, and my troops in Singapore are waiting. This delays (again) the capture of Singapore, but also helps to reduce disruption and fatigue.

And now for something typical

Around Sian, we are back to the slow pace of land warfare in the game. Three operations are being conducted now.

The enemy stack on the road to Nanyang was attacked for three days, and their AV went down from 2000 to 1200. I need to rest now and will attack again tomorrow or the day after. Yet, it seems obvious that the enemy cannot hold for long. This is the last of three big stacks that defended Sian. The first one was destroyed in the woods a month ago, and the Sian stack was defeated last week.

South, on the road to Ankang, I am trying to maneuver and to cut off the defenders. The long stalemate was broken as the enemy lacks supplies. In a few days, the troops from Sian will have only one path of retreat left: through Ankang. I still don’t know whether I can force the surrender of the 35+ units in the pocket, but they certainly are out of the game for a long period of time (and they represent a third of Chinese forces).

West of Sian, we are marching on Kungchang, and the roads from Lanchow to Sichuan are cut. I have about 1200 AV on the way. Depending on what I find there, I might proceed on Lanchow, and clear all the region between Sian and Kungchang, or just leave blocking forces the roads, and turn south towards Tianshui to cut reinforcements from Sichuan and isolate Ankang.

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 157
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/15/2011 7:45:02 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 22nd and 23rd 1942

A taper for Saint Rita


On the twenty second, the troops besieging Singapore were supplied at last. They attacked the next day, and, much to my surprise, achieved 2:1 odds. That day, Allied VP fell by more than 900 points, mostly base points.

Since no city was captured today, the only explanation for such a drop is that a very large base got unsupplied, probably because of combat (or the drop would not have been that brutal).

The smoking taper points to Singapore (and while we’re on candles, I will add, for the enlightenment of those of my readers who did not benefit from a Catholic education, that St Rita is the patroness of lost causes, hence the title).

My troops are short of supply, but I will attack tomorrow nevertheless, and see what happens… I doubt the city will fall, but I am hoping that this will further deplete enemy supplies, a few days of rest and a last attack should then take the place.

The fall of Singapore would be very welcome these days. I am getting worried about Burma. I have very few troops there (the Imperial Guard division, and a couple of regiments, less than 1000 AV overall), and I am detecting large enemy concentrations in the bases on the border. It might just be defensive preparations against a move into India, but I do not want to take chances.

As soon as Singapore falls, half of the 4000 AV there will be sent to Burma. The rest will go to Clark field and northern Sumatra.


Java, the final cut

The battle for Batavia is costly. For some reason (lack of engineers, probably), I cannot reduce the forts, and attack at bad odds. The enemy is outnumbered, and will not last, but he sure can complicate things.

One lone base force in the mountains north of Tjilatjap was driven away today. My tanks are moving on Tjilatjap, where several defeated units have taken refuge. If my tank regiment is not sufficient, I will rail infantry from Surabaya.


Peace in the West
(This is what Sian means in Chinese, strange name for a battlefield, I would say, but who am I to judge)

A day rest and a last attack was all it took to clear the roadblock east of Sian. A good number of enemy squads were destroyed in the process.

Ground combat at 84,42 (near Sian)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 147536 troops, 1877 guns, 959 vehicles, Assault Value = 4266
Defending force 54165 troops, 310 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 1177
Japanese adjusted assault: 1677
Allied adjusted defense: 460
Japanese assault odds: 3 to 1

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), disruption(-), experience(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
4003 casualties reported
Squads: 25 destroyed, 228 disabled
Non Combat: 4 destroyed, 201 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 12 disabled
Vehicles lost 42 (2 destroyed, 40 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
20937 casualties reported
Squads: 808 destroyed, 3 disabled
Non Combat: 961 destroyed, 8 disabled
Engineers: 25 destroyed, 25 disabled
Guns lost 16 (9 destroyed, 7 disabled)
Units retreated 14

There are now 37 units in bad shape (but still probably worth more than 500 AV) in the woods south of Sian. I am not pursuing. This would take too long.

Most of the 4000 AV that were east of Sian have been ordered to Kungchang. They will join the 1500 AV I have in this area, and probably split into two columns: one marching on Lanchow, the other one on Tienshui. I am keeping a reserve in Sian (2000+ AV, probably more as disablements fall).

As we speak, all the north bank of the Wei is occupied, and cordoned by Japanese units. This means the Chinese north and west of Sian are isolated. The enemy is apparently trying to set up a few road blocks, around Tienshui, and before Lanchow, but he seems very thin on the ground (most of his forces probably went into the three stacks that were defeated around Sian).

In Ankang, the hex that was about to fall was reinforced by a fragment of a corps. I have a regiment on its way too.

Kungchang and Tianshui are the next objectives. I believe I will go for Lanchow, then, while trying to march from Tianshui to Ankang.

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 158
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/18/2011 7:08:00 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 24th 1942
Nothing, like something, happens anywhere (Philip Larkin)

VPs, and Singapore

The drop in Allied base points observed yesterday was confirmed today. In fact, Allied base VP went down 60 points, while the port of Noumea went up one level (which means 50 VP for the allies). This confirms my impression Singapore is now unsupplied, and that the large number of troops stationed there will soon make the situation untenable.

We attacked again today, but the troops lacked supplies and odds were very bad (1:6). This caused lots of disablements but also destroyed almost 150 enemy squads, and reduced the forts to level one. I am now resting, and waiting for supplies to arrive (this could take a couple of days), but I am very confident than one or two attacks is all it takes for Singapore to fall.

In Batavia, another deliberate attack disabled 200 japanese squads, while destroying about 50 enemies. I need to rest, but I believe this is a good trade. Enemy AV were 220 AV, they probably are below 200 now. The forts will not go down, though…

Maneuvers in China

Here is a map of the situation between Sian and Lanchow. A bombardment probe in the hex east of Kungchang (due South mapwise) revealed a light garrison (127 AV). I have 1300 AV in the hex: the road to Kungchang is open, and the troops north of the road are doomed.

South of the Wei, the enemy seems to be reinforcing Tianshui and Ankang. I don’t think this is a good idea. Tianshui can be turned and cut off, and this will expose the troops in Ankang.

I believe the enemy was careless here. Maybe Sian fell earlier than he thought, but I think my opponent should have prepared a defense line in the mountains or rough terrain between Sian and Tianshui. It is a bit too late, now.






Attachment (1)

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 159
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/21/2011 6:45:13 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 25th 26th and 27th 1942
Time will say nothing but I told you so (WH Auden)

Singer supply rollercoaster

For two days, Allied base VP had gone down, due to the lack of supply in Singapore. It went up on the 25th and 26th, and down again on the 27th. This is probably due to the fact that, since I am not attacking, supply needs went down between the 24th and the 26th.

Over the period (and taking into account Allied base points gained because of construction, and lost because of captured cities), the Allies lost over 650 points in Singapore, out of 2070 VP for the city. Since a base without supply is worth 25% of its VP value, 650 represent more than 40% of the maximal point loss for being unsupplied, which suggests Singapore supply stock represent about 60% of its needs.

This would be perfect if I were not unsupplied as well… It seems very difficult to keep supply flowing though Malaya these days. I am not sure why. I have been redirecting two convoys from Japan to Mersing and Malacca. But this is yet another delay. Oh well, it is not like I expect Singapore would fall early…

Fun in the Philippines

In Clark Field, I am getting my AV back (almost 800 now), while the enemy is getting his reduced (below 2000). On the 25th, the enemy sported 1996 AV, and 1971 on the 27th. Life is good when the bad guys are unsupplied.

Bacolod fell on the 26th. Apart from Clarke and Bataan, there are three enemy held bases left in the Philippines: Cebu where the Kimura detachment will reinforce the Japanese garrison unit facing a PA division, and Iloilo/San Jose (where the enemy should have at least another division).

Sweeping the silk road

Kashgar was captured on the 27th. This concludes the occupation of western China (apart from Lanchow and Sining, which are my next major targets).

My troops are making good progress towards Kungchang. We are attacking tomorrow with two divisions. A third will arrive the next day. Intelligence reports two units, one of them being the corps fragment I defeated east of the base. It seems that the four divisions I have in the region will be sufficient to clear all enemies north of the Wei and march on Lanchow.

This suggests I do not need to commit my main force, the 5000 AV I have around Sian. I can wait for them to rest and refit, and keep the enemy guessing as to where the next blow will fall.

South of Sian, a hasty line of defense is being put up between Tianshui and Ankang. Tianshui and neighboring forest hexes have been garrisoned (by two units each, this is not enough…). The roadblock east of Ankang was reinforced several times, and now sports six units. It seems that units retreated from Sian are being exfiltrated from the woods, towards Ankang. I am fine with this. Those units are not combat worthy, and will eat up supply stocks.

My opponent seems to be making preparations for a move on Changsha. Over the last days, more and more troops have been detected in this area. I am not going these, but I like the enemy’s suspicion. I will prep more troops for Changsha, and start bombing units in clear terrain from the air…

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 160
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/22/2011 11:32:30 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
April 28th 1942

Iron rice bowl

Kungchang fell today. I had two divisions against two thirds of a Chinese corps, the lack of supply did the job. To my surprise, both units retreated in the mountains, instead of marching back towards Lanchow. This is good, just getting back into the game will take them a long time.

I have three divisions in Kungchang. One will march on Lanchow, to clear the road and reopen the supply line. There are now twelve units in Lanchow, and reinforcements are arriving from Sining. Apparently, the enemy is planning to make a stand there. Once my division arrives, I will bombard to see what I am facing. But there is no rush.

A few hundred miles east, my troops from Sian are taking position between Sian and Tianshui. The goal is to cross the Wei, isolate Tianshui, and then take the crossroad (Baoji, I presume) that connects Northern China to Sichuan. The goal of this maneuver is less to prevent my opponent from reinforcing Ankang (I don’t think he has much troops to bring) than to complicate retreat from the Sian stack. If this happens fast enough, I might send a tank column towards Kienko and the Sichuan plains.

Last gamelan in Java

In Batavia, an attack reduced the forts (at last) and achieved 1:1 odds. The defenders are probably close to 150 AV now. My troops are disrupted and fatigued. I am trying one more time, and I rest. But it seems clear that Batavia will most certainly fall in the beginning of May.

In Tjilatjap, my tank regiment is slowly damaging the enemy. An SNLF battalion from Surabaya is on its way. Again, I believe the place will be mine in the first week of May.

So far, all enemy units on Java were destroyed. There will be no pockets or remnants, save perhaps a few base forces around Tjilatjap. Overall, Java will have been Japan’s easiest conquest.

Supply woes

Enemy base points are down again. Every day makes the supply situation in Singapore worse. I will probably be supplied in a week, and since the troops will be rested, there is a good chance that the city will fall first try.

The situation in Singapore reveals a major flaw in my logistical planning. Since the beginning of the game, I have been supplying China from Japan (using the return cargo of resource convoys from Shanghai and Korea). As a result, China is well supplied (there are about 700k supply points there), but supplies do not flow south of Shanghai, towards Bangkok and Singapore. Everything seems to remain stuck in Port Arthur.

I also have underestimated the need to send supplies from Japan to the DEI. At this point most of the stocks I had in the beginning of the game are depleted. The situation is not catastrophic, since most of my expansion phase is over now. Yet, the lack of supply delays industry repairs, and needs to be corrected at once.

I am trying two methods, and will report on them:

- In China, try to use the supply draw to pump stuff out of Port Arthur, and down to Malaysia.
- In Japan, set up a couple of large supply convoys, probably to Formosa, which I will use as a depot (being an island, this prevents unwanted movement of stocks to some port the system decided was in want of supplies, because it is large, eg Port Arthur)


(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 161
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/22/2011 2:34:03 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: fcharton

April 28th 1942

Supply woes

...but supplies do not flow south of Shanghai, towards Bangkok and Singapore. Everything seems to remain stuck in Port Arthur.



What version are you running? Last official patch or the beta? The beta has made a number of very good changes to resource/supply flow to address this and other issues.

_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 162
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/23/2011 4:30:47 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
@Pax Mondo: we’re in the “c” beta (ie the one current around last Christmas when we started the game). As such, I suspect the new features about supply flow don’t work. We did try to update several weeks ago, but difficulties with Tracker derailed the attempt. I am trying again this week end.

April 29th and 30th 1942

Singabore


I’ll miss the Singapore slugfest once the city falls… On the 29th, my troops there were supplied, quite unexpectedly I must say. Not wanting to waste those good bullets, I ordered a shock attack the next day, which reduced the forts (again), killed an enemy unit, destroyed about 130 enemy squads (for 150 mine, why did I shock attack?). And now, I’m good for a good rest, a long wait for supplies…

The only good thing with this attack was that it brought enemy supplies to a new low. VP went down by almost 700, which suggests the city has almost no supplies left. My supply convoy to Mersing should arrive tomorrow. This means I should be able to attack in three or four days.

The end is near, but slowly so…

The return of the Reds

North of Sian, the Red Army, retreating from Yenan, marching through mountains and woods, finally crossed the Yellow River, back to the road to Lanchow, and right into the arms of a waiting IJA division. Sometimes, life is unfair.

Ground combat at 83,39 (near Sian)
Allied Shock attack
Attacking force 1610 troops, 58 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 38
Defending force 13665 troops, 124 guns, 92 vehicles, Assault Value = 482
Allied assault odds: 1 to 999

I am counterattacking tomorrow. I wonder whether they will retreat or surrender.

All the northern bank of the Wei is now safely in Japanese hands. Apart from the Yenan boys, a lone unit, probably the third fragment of the corps I defeated in Kungchang a few days ago, is in the mountains between Sian and Kungchang. I will deal with them soon.

My division from Lanchow should join the troops in Lanchow the day after tomorrow. Overall, I have about six divisions in the regions, which could meet in Lanchow in about ten days.

West of Sian, my main stack (now 4200 AV strong) is crossing the Wei, they should arrive on the road from Ankang to Tianshui, and isolate the latter, in three days.

Base building report

As of today, Japan holds 567 bases (vs 552 on the 15th of April, and 541 at the beginning of the month, the "666 base at the end of the year objective is still in sight). 235 of those (vs 224 and 217) have engineers and are being built.

Half my bases (284) are fortified. Over the last two weeks, 42 fort levels have been built. We have:
75 level one forts (-7)
102 level two forts (+12)
83 level three forts (+7)
16 level four (+1)
5 level five
3 level six

We have 337 ports (+3), and 755 port levels (+7)

162 level 1
77 level 2 (+3)
44 level 3
21 level 4 (-1)
12 level 5 (+1)
5 level 6
7 level 7
1 level 8
4 level 9
4 level 10

There are 355 (+10) airbases, and 921 levels (+37)

142 level 1 (+1)
69 level 2 (+6)
48 level 3 (-1)
43 level 4 (-1)
24 level 5 (+3)
10 level 6 (-1)
13 level 7 (+3)
3 level 8
3 level 10


< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/23/2011 4:32:20 PM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 163
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/23/2011 7:09:48 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: fcharton

@Pax Mondo: we’re in the “c” beta (ie the one current around last Christmas when we started the game). As such, I suspect the new features about supply flow don’t work. We did try to update several weeks ago, but difficulties with Tracker derailed the attempt. I am trying again this week end.

be sure to put the updated pwsdll.dll into your tracker folder. The beta pwsdll.dll is different from the last official patch. Tracker should run fine then, does for me.

_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 164
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/23/2011 7:52:39 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
Hi Pax,

quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo
be sure to put the updated pwsdll.dll into your tracker folder. The beta pwsdll.dll is different from the last official patch. Tracker should run fine then, does for me.


I tested it this morning, and it did work fine. Last time, the problem was with some Windows update that had not been done, apparently.

The only problem, so far, is that all the resource/oil/fuel flow network has changed. In the "c" version, Keijo, in Korea, was the "resource sink": everything in northern China flowed there. I had built the port, brought naval support and set convoys in accordance. Now, everything seems to flow to Port Arthur.

Francois

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 165
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/23/2011 8:17:02 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: offline
PA is a sink due to size.  You can get stuff to flow to Keijo or Fusan, but it takes persistance, use of the hoarding switches, and remembering the flow sequences (how many days/week).

< Message edited by PaxMondo -- 7/23/2011 8:21:37 PM >


_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 166
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/25/2011 7:17:09 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
May first 1942

Around Sian, May Day commemorations featured an attack on the Red Chinese. Of the nine units that escaped from Yenan, seven are presnet. Two construction regiments vanished during the retreat.

The battle was just as lopsided as yesterday’s. Odds ended at 31:1, and three of the seven units surrendered (the base forces mostly, which is good since they don’t respawn). We’ll try again tomorrow.

That was pretty much all for today. Most of the IJA was probably parading on the streets of occupied towns, behind red banners, shouting “workers of the world unite” or something like this. Mayday, you know…

That month of April

April was a pretty good month for the Japanese. In the East Indies, most of Java was captured. In China, the southern front was stabilized (with the capture of Nanning and Liuchow) and Sian and the northern bank of the Wei were occupied. The enemy still holds Singapore and Clark Field, but both are unsupplied, and should not be able to resist long.


Over the month, Japan’s VP went up 2400 points, from 13 100 to 15 500, while Allied VP, which had increased from January to March, went down from 9 600 to 8 800. VP ratio is now around 1.75:1. It should improve a lot in May, once Singapore, Batavia (and perhaps Clark) fall.

Since the beginning of the game, Japanese victory points have been progressing very linearly. If we go on along this trend, Japanese VP should hit 35 000 by the end of the year. This is probably not enough for auto-victory : lost bases will probably bring the Allied total close to 7000, but Japanese losses will most certainly bring it over 10 000 by the end of the year. And, of course, this assumes my VP go up along the same trend, which is far from certain.

Ground losses were a bit high this month. Japan has lost 720 points, for 6500 allies, a 9:1 ratio. The fall of Singapore and Batavia should bring this back to parity.

Air losses went down this month. We lost 150 planes (vs 220 in March), most to operational losses. The enemy only lost 70 planes. They have more sorties than we do, and lose fewer planes in the process. I most certainly need to work on this. Ship losses were extremely low. Six Japanese and three allied ships are reported sunk this month…


Resourcewise, the situation is good, despite the heavy damage on captured oilfields (Surabaya was entirely destroyed, and Palembang is operating at one third of capacity). Resource stocks went up from 10.2 to 10.6 millions, oil were down by 90k points, at 4.360k. At this rate, my oil stocks will last four years. Fuel situation is almost stable (stocks went down 13k fuel points this month, I could last until 1980 at this rate…)

The only worry is supplies. Because of base building, stocks went down almost 140k this month, down to 5 225k. Nothing dramatic, mind you. At this rate, my stocks will last three years. But it might be worth repairing, and perhaps developing light industry in China.


The perimeter today

Overall, the situation is pretty good in China. The enemy is unsupplied. The defense of Sian (which probably mobilized half of his forces) has failed. My troops are regrouped in the North. I hold a continuous line, with almost no enemy troops left behind.

The conquest of the East Indies is almost over. I don’t think I handled it very well (loss of time in Singapore, destroyed oilfields), but there were no major setbacks. In the end, I’m pretty much on schedule.

Burma used to worry me. I am spread very thin there, but it seems my opponent did not opt for an early counterattack there. I think it is too late now. An armored division is on its way, and the fall of Singapore should provide reinforcements. I will have four divisions there soon, probably enough to hold for a while.

My main weakness, at present, is in the Gilberts and Solomons. Garrisons are not very strong, supply is limited, and base building has not really started. This is probably where my opponent will launch an early counterattack. My intention is to make this a very costly endeavour: the busier he is on Guadalcanal, the easier it gets elsewhere.





Attachment (1)

< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/25/2011 9:13:01 PM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 167
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/25/2011 8:48:15 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
May 2nd and 3rd, 1942

Slow mops


In the Indies, enemy resistance is crumbling.

In Singapore, supplies seem to be exhausted. There was no increase in Allied VP the day after the last attack (which would show supply levels are just below needs). My troops are ‘half supplied’ today. I am waiting one more day, and will attack again.

On Java, the forts in Batavia are gone, the enemy is now around 100 AV. I am attacking again, but might need to wait a few day then, to rest disruption and fatigue. In Tjilatjap, forts are level one, terrain is what keeps the base from falling.

In the Philippines, daily attacks in Cebu have reduced the forts. It might take a while to end, though, since we are in the jungle. In Clark Field, enemy AV is now below 1900. I will probably try another deliberate attack in a couple of days.

The only interesting action happened in northern Sumatra. On the third, two parachute units were dropped on Langsa and Tandjoengbalai (the two bases north and south of Medan, on the straits of Malacca). Both bases fell. I will now reinforce them, and march on Medan.

Solomon gambit

It seems very obvious now that the Allied path for reconquest is through the Solomons. This was suggested by the strong buildup in New Caledonia (Noumea and La Foa, now have large airfields, and Noumea has a level 5 port). Since the beginning of the month, enemy transports have been detected in Kirakira, south of Tulagi. I suspect they are unloading a couple of engineers, to set up a small airfield to provide cover for an invasion of Guadalcanal. My Nells from Rabaul flew, but did not manage to hit. KB was in the area, but her planes did not fly (in this alternate timeline, KB planes seldom fly, anyway).

I do not have strong enough bases in the area to prevent such moves. I could play mischief with KB, but I think this is an unnecessary risk. If the enemy wants Guadalcanal in May, let him have it. Meanwhile, I am building New Britain, the northern Solomons and the Milne Bay area. From there, I can probably make any early presence in Guadalcanal (or an early attempt at Shortlands) very costly.


Port Moresby was bombed, by B17E from Australia (not sure where). One bomber was damaged by the flak on the first day, a destroyer, being repaired in the port was hit on the second. I am sending fighters on long range CAP, but I suspect this was made possible by the former PM garrison moving back into town. Now, they have almost nothing left, they are being attacked (and defeated) daily, but take a while to die since we’re in jungle terrain, yet they can act as spotters for heavy bombers from Australia… Seems a bit too much, if you ask me. But then, it is not as if they did a lot of damage, so.

To Tienshui and beyond!

North of Sian, the Yenan garrison was defeated again. One base force surrendered, the three others (one infantry corps, a cavalry corps and an headquarter) retreated to the woods north east of the road. They’ll be back in a month, I’m sure… I am now marching on the last enemy roadblock, and then to Lanchow. There, my three divisions bombarded, to test the water. It appears that the enemy has 1800 AV. I have six divisions, about 2500 AV, a week away, and will probably commit a couple more from Sian. Whether Lanchow can resist will depend upon the forts and supply those units can muster.

On the third, my troops crossed the Wei between Tienshui and Ankang. The KMT garrison was routed. I now have 1200 AV there (and lots of artillery), and 3000 more crossing the river tomorrow. Those troops will split. The largest part will move towards Ankang, to cut the road from Sichuan, and then to try and pocket the units south of Sian. A smaller group will move towards Tienshui. I don’t intend to attack there, just to pocket them and finish them later.

Sinks

After the version change, I had noticed the resource stocks in Keijo (my main port for convoys to the home islands) had fallen from 400k to 200k. Well, they’re back today at 600k. I believe I need to wait a few days for the new algorithms to get steady.





Attachment (1)

< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/25/2011 9:00:41 PM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 168
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/27/2011 1:03:21 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
May 4th, 1942

The one before one before last


Cebu fell today, much to my surprise. My troops were fatigued, the enemy was still supplied, not really outnumbered, and in the jungle.

Ground combat at Cebu (80,86)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 5111 troops, 47 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 160
Defending force 3496 troops, 48 guns, 54 vehicles, Assault Value = 112
Japanese adjusted assault: 128
Allied adjusted defense: 53
Japanese assault odds: 2 to 1 (fort level 0)
Japanese forces CAPTURE Cebu !!!

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), fatigue(-), experience(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
97 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 16 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 12 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Allied ground losses:
1584 casualties reported
Squads: 202 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 254 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 24 destroyed, 0 disabled
Guns lost 63 (63 destroyed, 0 disabled)
Vehicles lost 69 (69 destroyed, 0 disabled)
Units destroyed 2

Only two bases are left in the Philippine Islands: Iloilo and San Jose. On Luzon, I have repaired all the AV lost to the last deliberate attack in Clark Field. I am trying again tomorrow. I am not expecting the base to fall, but I think it will help reducing the defenders.

Jungle hell

In Port Moresby, Zeroes from Rabaul prevented further damage from the B17. For the third day in a row, and IJA regiment attacked the remnants of the three units defeated long ago. Odds are impressive (8:1 today), the enemy is unsupplied, disrupted, badly led, fatigued, unexperienced discouraged, you name it… yet no damage is done.

Japanese assault odds: 8 to 1
Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), disruption(-), fatigue(-), morale(-)
experience(-), supply(-)
Attacker: fatigue(-)

Allied ground losses:
44 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

But when the IJA fails, nature sometimes comes to the rescue.

49th Australian Battalion Wiped Out at Port Moresby by attrition!!!
Allied Unit(s) surrounded at Port Moresby

And the next day, only one unit was left…


As the game progresses, I notice that there are large parts of the system I don’t understand and therefore never use. So, in the hope of improving, and to fill this AAR which is about to become even duller as the expansion phase is ending, I am beginning this series of “things learnt”.

A small caveat for experienced players: I am but a newbie, so you probably know all this already.


A lesson a day : ops losses and fatigue

Looking at the operation reports for today, I noticed this:
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai crashes on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing

And the next day, I had:
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing
Ki-43-Ic Oscar from 24th Sentai is damaged on landing

The 24th Sentai is based in Appari (a level four airfield, with plenty of air support), and flies escort missions for the bombing runs over Clark Field, not a very dangerous mission these days. Most of its pilots have high experience (in the 70s).

Yet, this unit has the lowest morale in all my air force (32!!!), its pilots are also the most fatigued. Why is this so? I am of course to blame for never looking at fatigue, and never setting the pilots to rest. But, believe me, I am consistently incompetent, and have several squadrons in the same case, some with much harsher tasks than just escorting bombers against no opposition…

Why the 24th, then?

Looking at pilot fatigue, I notice this is mostly an issue with fighter pilots. Bombers, patrols, transports seem to accumulate less fatigue. It also seems to be a non linear process: once fatigue sets in, it gets worse and worse, very fast… And then morale falls. Once a squadron rests, fatigue falls fast, but morale takes a while to restore.

What produces fatigue in the first place? Regular long range CAP does, I knew that already, but it is not the case here. I suspect the absence of CAP or training percentage plays a role. A fighter squadron on escort, with no CAP, is probably flying more, and this gets tiring in the long run. Weather probably plays a role too. There was bad weather in China lately, and my squadrons were grounded (and rested) a bit more. I have also noticed that the closer you are to the base you attack, the less you abort. This, again, means more fatigue.

But there does not seem to be a single reason for the current situation.

I’m standing down the 24th, that’s for sure, but I am planning to experiment with the CAP, Training and Rest settings, for fighter squadrons on escort duty. I will post my observations here (if any).

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 169
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/27/2011 1:17:17 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
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Interesting comments on fatigue.  I've also see it build up, but like you never fully understood all of the causes.  Watching your notes here with great interest.  Thanks!

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Post #: 170
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/27/2011 4:18:31 PM   
SqzMyLemon


Posts: 2757
Joined: 10/30/2009
From: Alberta, Canada
Status: offline
I echo Pax's comment. My Ops losses are through the roof in my PBEM and have been trying to figure out why. I can often lose 10+ a day just to Ops alone. Fatigue was not something that crossed my mind to check. Morale of my air units is good and every one of them is set to a minimum of 10% rest or more in some cases, yet the losses continue to mount. I'll be sure to see what the fatigue levels are and which units seem to be affected the worst from Ops losses and see if fatigue could be the common denominator.

_____________________________

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Don't mistake lack of talent for genius - Peter Steele (Type O Negative)

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 171
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/28/2011 9:00:46 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
May 5th, 1942

Tjilatjap


… fell today, and its garrison surrendered (that’s about 300 squads lost). Batavia is the last enemy holdout on Java now. I need a few more days to rest, but the Dutch have nowhere to go. The Campaign of Java is almost over.

On Sumatra, the former defenders of Palembang, and those of Bengkalis are now being push northwards, along the west coast of the island (ie towards Sibolga). My paras are still being transferred to the bases on the east coast, and a supply convoy with an additional SNLF is on its way.

Clark Field

Another tough battle there… The enemy is unsupplied, and odds are 1:2 (better than the raw AV odds, despite the forts and terrain). Losses are disablements, mostly. I still need a couple of weeks, but it seems clear that there will be no need to move large reinforcements in once Singapore falls.

I believe this long siege is the right approach to conquering Luzon if the Allies choose to defend Clark. I have lost a couple of weeks in January, trying a direct approach. Correctly handled, this probably means Luzon falls in May, and it does not mean a very high commitment of troops. Once the siege is in place, and bombardment has started damaging the defenders, 500 AV is probably enough to keep the enemy in place.

Ground combat at Clark Field (79,76)
Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 28803 troops, 540 guns, 533 vehicles, Assault Value = 905
Defending force 58506 troops, 830 guns, 795 vehicles, Assault Value = 1877
Japanese adjusted assault: 582
Allied adjusted defense: 1564
Japanese assault odds: 1 to 2 (fort level 2)

Combat modifiers
Defender: terrain(+), preparation(-), experience(-), supply(-)
Attacker:

Japanese ground losses:
5806 casualties reported
Squads: 10 destroyed, 358 disabled
Non Combat: 19 destroyed, 387 disabled
Engineers: 4 destroyed, 79 disabled
Vehicles lost 183 (10 destroyed, 173 disabled)

Allied ground losses:
851 casualties reported
Squads: 3 destroyed, 67 disabled
Non Combat: 14 destroyed, 86 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Guns lost 1 (1 destroyed, 0 disabled)
Vehicles lost 29 (4 destroyed, 25 disabled)

A lesson a day : ground unit morale and experience

In Manchukuo, it was nice to see that one unit I had put to rest at the beginning of the game has greatly benefited from it. The Ninth Manchukuo Infantry Brigade begins the game at 25 experience and 25 morale. I put her to rest, and by mid-March, she was exp 47 and morale 99. She’s now 52/99.

Yet, rest/training does not seem to be such an important factor for morale building. The 7th Manchukuo Infantry Brigade, that also began the game at 25/25 is now at 52/99 too, without having been put to rest (nor engaged in any action). Comparing, it seems units in Combat mode increase experience a little faster, whereas units in Rest mode improve morale at a better rate.

This is an interesting lesson. Most collaborationist units (Manchukuo units, Mongol division, RGC, NCPC, Thais, Vietnamese militiae) start the war with bad experience and morale, but all it takes is three or four months, and they become decent outfits (experience around 50, and morale maxed at 99). Right now, almost two third of my units have 99 morale.

It also shows that, without committing to battle, experience of those units cannot go much over 50 (with combat, they can increase : one of my RTA divisions, involved in the siege of Singapore, has now 69 experience…), but their morale will increase.

… or not…

This is yet another mystery. Whereas, for most units, morale will improve over (inactive) time, for some it will either remain unchanged, or even drop down.

Take for instance the four VM divisions. Those are static Vietnamese units that appear when Chinese units cross the border.

In Hanoi, the first VM, went, over time, from 44/44 to 49/44.
In Haiphong, the second went from 37/37 to 45/45
In Luangpranbang, the third went from 38/38 to 48/99
In Hue, the fourth went from 42/42 to 50/34

As you can see, all of them got their experience improved, towards a maximum value which should be around 50 (it is in the manual), but their morale changed in less predictable fashion.

Why would morale go up or down? Again, fatigue is the most likely suspect.

At present, I have 1000 active units. 600 of them have 99 morale, and those units have an average fatigue of 2. 100 have a morale between 91 and 98, and an average fatigue of 13. 200 units have a morale between 51 and 90, average fatigue is 17. And the 100 units with morale below 50 have an average fatigue of 25.

In fact, those units, like the fourth VM, that seem to lose morale over time are those who never seem to recover from fatigue (ie remaining in the high 20s).

This seems to be a cumulative process: once morale starts improving because fatigue goes down, it keeps getting better. On the other hand, if fatigue remains high, morale goes down and fatigue is not recovered. There probably is some kind of “feedback” in the game mechanism (ie morale depends on fatigue, which depends on morale), which explains this tendency of morale to “go for the extremes” instead of stabilizing around some average value (which is what most natural processes do).

The situation of my VM divisions might be the result of early fatigue/morale rolls, which sent the 3rd VM on a nice improving orbit, and the fourth on a downwards trend.

This strikes me as a design flaw (having 99 morale in two third of my units is not serious). But it is a typical one in wargames (board and computer). Game systems have a strong tendency to overestimate the willingness of paper soldiers to go to war, and their ability to recover or become crack troops once properly trained. I suspect a careful inspection of the pilot training system would reveal the same : every pilot, given enough time, can become a crack pilot in some category. I do enjoy this as a player (and it does sound nice from a moral standpoint), but it strikes me as very unnatural. Real life (and especially war) is much less deterministic than our game systems.

But I am rambling …

Back to the system as it is, there are two lessons here:

1- Check those long term morale/fatigue trends. Most of the units will be all right, but you need to take care of those who are not. Sorting all ground units by increasing morale will easily find the weaker ones.
2- This is probably where rest/training has a role, since it helps morale back (and probably fatigue down)

At this point, I probably need to read what the manual says about fatigue recovery…

An interesting side not is that there does not seem to be much correlation between experience and morale. No matter how morale changes, experience will increase to 50.

(in reply to SqzMyLemon)
Post #: 172
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/31/2011 9:12:37 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
May 6th and 7th, 1942

The great naval battle of Kirakira


You might remember, dear reader that the enemy had landed troops in Kirakira, south of Tulagi, a couple of days ago. On that day, I had sent a small cruiser force to bombard the place. Their mission was threefold:
- Gather information on the troops that occupied the island
- Catch any ship that might be left unloading in the harbor (it was a dot base, so unloading would be slow)
- Make sure my opponent does not feel like he owns the area

Today, light cruiser Tatsuta, together with two destroyers (Shiranui and Hamakaze), arrived in Kirakira, and found four enemy ships in port, an auxiliary (AM Townsville), a light cargo (xAKL Hamakua) and two Dutch transports (xAP Rochussen and Rooseboom). The four Allied ships were sunk.

Later, bombardment of the island revealed the presence of the 1/198th Coast AA Battalion. I suppose an engineer unit is there too, and an airfield is being built.

Another victory in New Guinea

Well, yeah, sort of… Today, in Port Moresby, the last enemy unit was finally eliminated.

Ground combat at Port Moresby (98,130)

Japanese Deliberate attack
Attacking force 3994 troops, 42 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 136
Defending force 416 troops, 0 guns, 1 vehicles, Assault Value = 12
Japanese adjusted assault: 55
Allied adjusted defense: 1
Japanese assault odds: 55 to 1

Allied ground losses:
465 casualties reported
Squads: 31 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 36 destroyed, 0 disabled
Engineers: 5 destroyed, 0 disabled
Vehicles lost 1 (1 destroyed, 0 disabled)
Units destroyed 1

Hunger in Singapore

Another attack there reduced the forts to level one. Apparently, the enemy is not rebuilding anymore. Enemy AV is now around 450.


Chinese maneuvers

Around Kungchang, the last roadblock between Sian and Lanchow was repulsed with heavy losses. We can now move on Lanchow.

Between Ankang and Tienshui, my troops are finally getting into position. We will bombard tomorrow to test enemy strength. It seems that the enemy has evacuated Tienshui. I am ordering tanks to take the base

A lesson a day : fun with air upgrades

Since the beginning of the game, I had three squadrons of Claudes, in the Gilberts and Carolines that never seemed to be able to upgrade to Zeroes (we’re PDU off, and they all promote to zeroes). I have enough Zeroes in the pool, but I never seemed to have large enough airfields, or enough supplies to allow upgrades.

A few days ago, I started moving them, from base to base, into Japan, in order to convert them. And thus, the Chitose Ku S-1 squadron went from Roi Namur, to Ponape, to Truk, to Tinian, to Pagan, to Haha Jima… (lots of hops since Claudes are very short legged)

There, I was expecting to transfer to Japan, but, lo and behold, next time I checked, they had upgraded to Zeroes. Now, Haha Jima is the last base where this could happen : level 1 airfield, just a little air support, and supplies around 3000…

And, even more surprisingly, on the same day, my two other Claude squadrons, in Pagan and Tinian upgraded as well.

I don’t understand what happened (why all three on the seventh of May?) But it seems that some planes can upgrade automatically without satisfying the “upgrade now” requirement (ie 20k supplies, and some airfield size).





Attachment (1)

< Message edited by fcharton -- 7/31/2011 9:14:13 PM >

(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 173
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 7/31/2011 11:26:18 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
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They might have gotten in range of command HQ.  IIRC, HQ levels lower AF requirements for upgrades.

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Post #: 174
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 8/1/2011 9:05:01 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
Hi Pax,

That might explain the upgrade in Haha Chima (even though I believe it is too far off Japan to be in command range), but not those, on the same day, in Pagan and Tinian, two bases where Claudes had been based the previous days, and did not convert.

Thinking about it overnight, I was wondering whether there could be some "auto-upgrade" feature in the game. Past a certain date (in this case 5 months after the game begins), all squadrons with a certain plane set to "upgrade" a certain plane do so automatically, without the usual conditions applying. This is the only explanation I can find for the three upgrades happening at the same time. If it were some kind of die roll, or a condition being true in the Bonins, only one squadron would have gotten its zeroes, wouldn't it?

Francois

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 175
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 8/1/2011 1:50:04 PM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: offline
Maybe, but I'm not aware of any auto-upgrade "feature".  Have you moved the 5th Fleet?  Where is she now?  You really only have 2 mobile command HQ's: Southern and 5th.

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(in reply to fcharton)
Post #: 176
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 8/3/2011 10:54:27 AM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
@Pax Mondo
Southern Fleet is still in Saigon, Fifth in Ominato. I didn’t know what to do with them when the game began, and now, I’m waiting for the conquests to stabilize to transfer them.

May 8th to 11th 1942
This AAR is a bit lagging behind. I’m on holidays, busy with way too many things. This longish installment is meant to catch up with the game.

Five months after Pearl Harbor, Japan is now very close to achieving all its first phase objectives, and the game is now moving towards a much slower consolidation/exploitation phase.

Slow wars in the DEI

There are about 420 AV left in Singapore, and no forts. The enemy is still barely supplied, but his losses are mounting. On the eight, a deliberate attack destroyed 120 squads, the next one, on the eleventh took 80 more. Fortunately for the Allies, supply still flows very slowly, and I can only attack twice a week. Late as I am already, I don’t feel any need to rush.

On Sumatra, my troops around Medan are now supplied and have begun to move to isolate the base. I would love to take the base undamaged, but I know myself… It will probably be 80% broken, anyway.

On Java, Batavia has no forts left, and about 100 AV in the garrison. Disruption is making the battle last, but like Singapore, it stands on the edge of collapse.

An empty Christmas Island (IO) was captured on the eleventh. The Cocos are the next target, together with the small islands of the west coast of Sumatra.

In the Philippine Islands, Iloilo fell on the tenth. San Jose is the last enemy base. On Luzon, bombardment is steadily wearing off the enemy. AV are now close to 1700, against 1900 at the beginning of the month. Meanwhile, my troops are recovering their disablements from the last deliberate attack…

That is pretty much all for this theater. I am waiting for Singapore and Batavia to fall. Then, I need to finish northern Sumatra and the Andamans, and the islands due north of Darwin. I am also planning to move my HQ from Indochina and Borneo to more forward positions (Java, Sumatra).

In the South Pacific, little is happening. I have been reinforcing the small bases between Rabaul and Port Moresby, and sending a couple of troops to Truk. Lots of building is happening now around Milne Bay, Woodlark Island, Buna…

I am still very weak in the Solomons. I want to reinforce the area, but not too much. In my opinion, Guadalcanal is just too far away to be adequately defended. I am a bit clueless about this area. For now, I think I will build reserves in the region, and decide later on the best way to deploy them. When in doubt, think again.

The road to Chungking

In northern China,enemy forces have been regrouping on the road between Ankang and Tienshui.

In Tienshui, it seems the enemy has changed his mind. After concentrating about 2000 AV in the base, they retreated south. There are now nine infantry corps, for a total of 2400 AV due south of Tienshui. The road before them is cut, and several tank regiments have moved into Tienshiui and captured the base. This stack is not isolated, since they can retreat across country south or west, or even move East to reinforce the other stack, but they are useless as a fighting force. They will make a good roadblock, though.

Due East, ten units defend the road to Sichuan. A first bombardment, on the eight, revealed 2000 AV, six infantry corps, most of them pretty strong, and four headquarters, and more (15 units) one hex away, moving north. I believe this is a good part of the strategic reserve my opponent kept in Sichuan.

Most of my artillery is there, and my first attempt at bombardment was quite successful. Three squads were destroyed, eight disabled. This caused complaints from my opponent about the unreality of bringing so much heavy artillery to bear in a mountain hex, over a secondary road. I have to say I agree with him, but then, fielding half a million men (probably more, on both sides) in such a hex, hundreds of miles away from the closest base, during a battle that will probably last for weeks, if not months, doesn’t seem less fantastic to me…

I still do agree that heavies bombarding in mountains is not correct. I have decided not to use them (heavies being defined here as “independent artillery units with ‘heavy’ in their designation”). I doubt it will make much difference anyway, and I see no reason to ruin a very nice and gentlemanly game over such an affair.

I am also planning to enforce, as much as I can, a second rule: no artillery moving across country over forests, mountains or jungles. Not sure if armor should be concerned as well. This is of course imperfect, since artillery and armor inside infantry divisions will not be restricted, I suppose we could say it represents the grunts helping tow the guns (yeah, you bet!)


Back the the mountain hex, on the ninth, the Japanese were reinforced, and fielded seven infantry divisions (Stacking? what do you mean?). Since enemy reinforcements had not arrived yet, I launched a deliberate attack. It only came at 1:2 odds, but destroyed 20 enemy squads, disabled 350, and revealed that the enemy is unsupplied already. Bombardment, the next day, put AV at 1800.

Since then, I have been sending all my bombers there, and have been bombarding (without the heavies) on a daily basis. On the eleventh, the hex had been partly reinforced, to 2070 AV. I expect something like 4000 AV in a few days.

What then? I will conduct aerial reconnaissance of Chungking and Chengtu soon, but I am pretty certain that the enemy have mobilized their reserves. I am also confident that their supply situation is abominable.

I intend to continue bombarding and take my time wearing them off. Meanwhile, my troops will go and take Lanchow and Sining, and I will develop airfields in the region (Sian, Tienshui, Kungshang, and Ankang if I can take it) to conduct an air bombardment campaign over the cities of Sichuan.

This means the war will probably slow down in China, now.

A lesson a day, air unit morale and fatigue revisited

Remember those Oscars in Appari, with very high fatigue and low morale? After they were stood down, fatigue went down from 41 to zero in two days, and morale went from 32 to 84 (!!!) in a week. This is happening consistently. In Chengchow, a squadron of zeroes had its morale go up from 50 to 99 in a few days, in Magwe, two days were enough to max another fighter group.

It seems that, unlike ground units, which need a lot of time to recuperate, air squadrons, only need a couple of days rest.

Does this have an effect on ops losses. I believe so, even though this is too early to judge.



< Message edited by fcharton -- 8/3/2011 6:22:40 PM >

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 177
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 8/3/2011 6:09:26 PM   
SqzMyLemon


Posts: 2757
Joined: 10/30/2009
From: Alberta, Canada
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo

Maybe, but I'm not aware of any auto-upgrade "feature".  Have you moved the 5th Fleet?  Where is she now?  You really only have 2 mobile command HQ's: Southern and 5th.


Is Combined Fleet HQ a Command HQ? That can also be moved.

_____________________________

Luck is the residue of design - John Milton

Don't mistake lack of talent for genius - Peter Steele (Type O Negative)

(in reply to PaxMondo)
Post #: 178
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 8/4/2011 8:34:36 PM   
fcharton

 

Posts: 928
Joined: 10/4/2010
From: Nemours, France
Status: online
@SqzMyLemon: Combined Fleet is a Naval HQ. according to the manual, those mostly help with loading/unloading and ship repair. With the game not being very naval so far, I left it in Hiroshima.

May 12th 1942

Air bombardment


Most of my bombers in Northern China are now attacking the “mountain stack”, between Ankang and Tienshui. It seems to be quite efficient. Here are the attacks for today, weather was moderate rain, not even excellent:

Morning Air attack on 18th Chinese Corps, at 81,40 , near Ankang
Japanese aircraft
G4M1 Betty x 16
No Japanese losses
Allied ground losses:
35 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 7 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Morning Air attack on 18th Chinese Corps, at 81,40 , near Ankang
Japanese aircraft
Ki-21-Ic Sally x 9
Ki-45 KAIa Nick x 3
Ki-48-IIa Lily x 5
Ki-49-Ia Helen x 36
No Japanese losses
Allied ground losses:
135 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Non Combat: 1 destroyed, 18 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Morning Air attack on 87th Chinese Corps, at 81,40 , near Ankang
Japanese aircraft
Ki-21-Ic Sally x 34
Japanese aircraft losses
Ki-21-Ic Sally: 1 damaged
Allied ground losses:
60 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 6 disabled
Non Combat: 1 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Morning Air attack on 100th Chinese Corps, at 81,40 , near Ankang
Japanese aircraft
Ki-48-IIa Lily x 20
No Japanese losses
Allied ground losses:
20 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 2 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

Altogether 250 casualties are reported, about 20 combat and 30 non combat squads disabled.

And then there was the regular bombardment.

Ground combat at 81,40 (near Ankang)
Japanese Bombardment attack
Attacking force 95938 troops, 1383 guns, 772 vehicles, Assault Value = 2910
Defending force 66717 troops, 268 guns, 0 vehicles, Assault Value = 2403

Japanese ground losses:
16 casualties reported
Squads: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 1 disabled

Allied ground losses:
152 casualties reported
Squads: 2 destroyed, 10 disabled
Non Combat: 0 destroyed, 13 disabled
Engineers: 0 destroyed, 0 disabled

The stack was reinforced : the enemy had 2000 AV at first, which went down to 1800 after my first attack, and the back to 2000 and now 2400 thanks to reinforcements. 13 more units are arriving from Kienko.

I’m happy with this state of affairs. On the 13th, the daily bombardment of this hex reported 2384 AV, with the same units present. A 1% attrition rate per day, for no casualties on my side (in fact, my units are repairing disablements) looks like a pretty good deal.

A small riddle, now. Some troops in the enemy stack are reported to be moving eastwards, towards Ankang. Why would the enemy do so? A counterattack seems very unlikely, I suppose my opponent will reinforce the roadblock east of Ankang, but he could also be sending support units (army/war area HQ) towards the big 35 unit defeated stack, to help them recover.

This is another interesting aspect of daily ground bombardment : it provides intelligence about what units are present, and their nominal strengths (whether this is realistic and historical is anyone’s guess, of course…)

Almost there

In Lanchow, ground bombardment confirmed enemy strength at 1800. The fact that those bombardments cause Japanese casualties, but not a single disablement of KMT troops suggests high fort levels. Lanchow and Sining are one of the few places in China that might still be supplied. Lanchow does not produce oil and resources (since I have been occupying the hex for several months), but Sining does, and both have light industry.

I will have 2600 AV in the city the day after tomorrow, we shall see, very soon…

In Batavia and Singapore, my troops are rested (just a bit) and supplied (just a little). I’m attacking again tomorrow. Whether none, any, or both of those bases will fall, or hold for a few more days, is pretty much up to a lucky die roll.

A lesson a day : recovery

For quite a while, I have been wondering how fast ground units recover lost strength. Like most sensible questions, this one has a short, correct, and useless answer, which is “it depends”. But using Tracker, I thought I’d try to figure some long, imprecise, but useful solution.

By the way, this ability to look at turn by turn statistics is in my opinion the most important aspect of Tracker. Most of its other functionalities can be found in the game, but this one cannot (well unless you want to load all turns one by one).

So, for what it is worth (probably not much), here are stories of units that were badly damaged in battle…

The 52nd Infantry Brigade fought in Wenchow, and ended the battle at 12 AV (vs 120 nominal), and 32% of its TOE. After the battle, it remained in Wenchow, in Combat mode. Disruption (26) and fatigue (47) fell in a week. It was back at 55% TOE after fifteen days, 75 after 30, and 93 after 50 days.

The 4th Independent Infantry regiment fought in Palembang, and ended at 53% of TOE (43 AV vs 120 nominal). Disruption and fatigue, both in the 50s, fell over the first week, but never quite repaired (climate?). It was at 69% after 15 days, 80% after a month, and 91 after two.

The 3rd Infantry division was at 55% strength at the end of the battle for Sian. Fatigue was in the 80s, and took a week to fall. After seven days, it was at 61%, 65 after two weeks, and 70 after a month.

The 37th Division was mauled during the river crossing to Sian. When the city fell, it was under 20% of nominal. It was at 35% after 10 days, and 50% after a month.

The 3rd Infantry regiment was at 13% at the fall of Sian, 33% ten days later, and 60% after a month.

What do I make of this?

Generally speaking, recovery is an exponential process: the amount you recover the first week is about the same as the one you recover during the next two, which is about the same as the amount you recover during the next four, and so on.

With supplies and in controlled hexes, a unit will recover about 30% of its losses in 15 days, 60% in a month, and 90 or more in two months. Recovering all losses takes about two months. In enemy held hexes, the process is much slower. In Lanchow, for one division, it was more like 10% in two weeks, 20 in a month, and 30 in two. Now this is for disablements. Being in a base is important if many squads were lost. Finally, fatigue and disruption seem to take about a week to fall down, in base, out of base, marching even…

The rule of thumb I plan to use for now on is :
- One week for fatigue
- Two weeks to be out of trouble
- Four to be in fighting shape
- Eight to be back at full strength


(in reply to SqzMyLemon)
Post #: 179
RE: Now when the land rings with the clash of arms (fch... - 8/5/2011 5:21:31 AM   
PaxMondo


Posts: 5464
Joined: 6/6/2008
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: SqzMyLemon

quote:

ORIGINAL: PaxMondo

Maybe, but I'm not aware of any auto-upgrade "feature".  Have you moved the 5th Fleet?  Where is she now?  You really only have 2 mobile command HQ's: Southern and 5th.


Is Combined Fleet HQ a Command HQ? That can also be moved.

I do not beleive so, just a 9 hex Naval HQ. But not a Command HQ.

_____________________________

Pax

(in reply to SqzMyLemon)
Post #: 180
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