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Perfectionistic obsession

 
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Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 5:03:16 PM   
jay102

 

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Witp:AE is probably the most complicated game in history. This also makes it a nightmare for someone with perfectionistic obsession. After a couple of turns I usually urge myself to restart because I feel there must be mistakes. Then the game is restarted again and again. Obviously, PBEM game is not feasible with this mindset. This is frustrating. How do I get rid of it?
Post #: 1
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 5:08:39 PM   
Cribtop


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I feel your pain, as I'm pretty anal too. My advice is to get the best first turn you can set up. Then, realize that this is a LONG war. I often know there are things I need to do, such as establish pilot training bases, re-size air units, re-deploy engineers, etc. Rather than trying to do all of those tasks in one turn, I tell myself "today is the day I look over production, tomorrow I work on pilot training, the next day I load up reinforcements to head to the front, etc."

In addition to that, try to look at it as "This isn't a game, there is no reset button. In a real war we'd have to take our lumps and figure out what to do after that."

Finally, know what assets are irreplaceable and think hard about what orders they are given every day. There's a reason both sides only committed CVs to missions of strategic importance - they were vital to the war effort.

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Post #: 2
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 5:12:14 PM   
herwin

 

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From: Sunderland, UK
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quote:

ORIGINAL: jay102

Witp:AE is probably the most complicated game in history. This also makes it a nightmare for someone with perfectionistic obsession. After a couple of turns I usually urge myself to restart because I feel there must be mistakes. Then the game is restarted again and again. Obviously, PBEM game is not feasible with this mindset. This is frustrating. How do I get rid of it?


There is a theorem in chaos theory that says a good model more or less tracks reality (when it's highly non-linear), but can't match it. That's good enough for me.

_____________________________

Harry Erwin
"For a number to make sense in the game, someone has to calibrate it and program code. There are too many significant numbers that behave non-linearly to expect that. It's just a game. Enjoy it." herwin@btinternet.com

(in reply to jay102)
Post #: 3
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 5:21:19 PM   
koontz

 

Posts: 274
Joined: 8/27/2009
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Accept the fact that there is always plenty of misstakes in war
Just look at the whole WW2 for i.e

Just try minmize them, and also play aginst an human is alot more fun!

Good luck Admiral!



_____________________________

Amateurs study tactics, professionals study logistics.

"All warfare is based on deception. There is no place where espionage is not used. Offer the enemy bait to lure him."

(in reply to herwin)
Post #: 4
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 5:33:05 PM   
LoBaron


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Joined: 1/26/2003
From: Vienna, Austria
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jay102, there is one very easy cure to your problem: start a PBEM.

Bonk. Gone. No option to restart anymore.


This does not mean I don´t know how you feel. After I sent a turn I close to always have that nagging feeling that I missed something...

_____________________________

S**t happens in war.

All hail the superior ones!

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Post #: 5
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 6:04:05 PM   
Wirraway_Ace


Posts: 1143
Joined: 10/8/2007
From: Briz Vegas
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cribtop

I feel your pain, as I'm pretty anal too. My advice is to get the best first turn you can set up. Then, realize that this is a LONG war. I often know there are things I need to do, such as establish pilot training bases, re-size air units, re-deploy engineers, etc. Rather than trying to do all of those tasks in one turn, I tell myself "today is the day I look over production, tomorrow I work on pilot training, the next day I load up reinforcements to head to the front, etc."

In addition to that, try to look at it as "This isn't a game, there is no reset button. In a real war we'd have to take our lumps and figure out what to do after that."

Finally, know what assets are irreplaceable and think hard about what orders they are given every day. There's a reason both sides only committed CVs to missions of strategic importance - they were vital to the war effort.


This is also the method I use. Just try to do one thing well each turn.

(in reply to Cribtop)
Post #: 6
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 6:23:48 PM   
tacfire


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I second what Cribtop said. It is good advise. This is what I do as well.

< Message edited by tacfire -- 8/7/2010 6:26:12 PM >

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Post #: 7
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 6:44:49 PM   
topeverest

 

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From: Houston, TX - USA
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perhaps the greatest feature of PBEM is the requirement to play on after you either screwed up, failed to plan, or just plain were grossly unlucky in combat.

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Andy M

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Post #: 8
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 7:05:44 PM   
jay102

 

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Thanks guys. I'll follow Cribtop's advice and try again.

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RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 8:21:41 PM   
Nemo121


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I think cribtop's idea is good. Mix it with a bit of "I'll ALWAYS make mistakes so it is best to just keep playing and learning from and, hopefully, in time my mistakes will be smaller ones and less frequent." That's really the best you can hope for in this game or in life.

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John Dillworth: "I had GreyJoy check my spelling and he said it was fine."
Well, that's that settled then.

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Post #: 10
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/7/2010 9:18:43 PM   
Cribtop


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Thanks for the love, guys. I second what LoBaron says - ironically starting a PBEM means no restart, which forces you to soldier on, and really ups the excitement factor of the replays.

< Message edited by Cribtop -- 8/7/2010 9:51:57 PM >


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Post #: 11
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/8/2010 3:19:35 AM   
Thayne

 

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In my game, playing the allies, I actually took advantage of the fact that there will be mistakes.

I started my game before knowing anything, figuring that my mistakes simulates the allies getting up to speed on all the war efforts.

The Allies were not set up with a perfect set of plans all ready to go off with exact precision the instant the first bomb hit the ground at Pearl Harbor. It took them a while to figure out what they were doing. So, I decided that I would take a while to figure out what I was doing.

I started my game (as reported in the AAR [I]The Thayne Report and figured stuff out as I went. I did make mistakes at the start - in pilot training, in submarine operations, in loading and transporting land combat units, in the expenditure of political points, in the use of headquarters, in coordinating air force missions. But my getting better over time represents the allies getting better over time.

Mostly, if I may repeat myself, it's the idea that the Allies did not have a perfect battle plan in operation right away, so why should I?

Thayne

(in reply to Cribtop)
Post #: 12
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/8/2010 11:32:08 AM   
tigercub


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From: chiang mai ,thailand
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all good advice with the Japanese its a bit harder they cannot make too many mistakes...they can go from a win to a draw in a click...i feel at times.


Tigercub!

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Post #: 13
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/8/2010 2:13:03 PM   
LST Express


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From: Texas
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Happily I can't even spell perfectionist, never restarted any of my games and I don't plan to either.

(in reply to tigercub)
Post #: 14
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/8/2010 7:20:25 PM   
Canoerebel


Posts: 9776
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From: Northwestern Georgia, USA
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This has nothing to do with perfectionism!

The true cause of your problem is that you are afraid of commitment.

You start a game, realize it's going to take not days or weeks but umpteen million years to complete, so you get cold feet and subconciously come up with a reason to end the relationship.

You need to come to grips with your fear of long term relationships.  Go ahead.  Slip a garter over your computer and then say the vows:  "I, Jay102, will respect, honor, and pay homage to AE now and in the future; in sickness and in health (preferably the former so that I can spend a day home planning my next invasion of Addu Atoll); for better (when my carriers achieve surprise) or worse (when my 36-ship xAK convoy bumps into a CA Aoba TF at night), till death do us part (hopefully death will catch me in late '42 if I'm the Allied player rather than in early '44 when things are just getting really fun)."

A committed relationship with AE entails remaining faithful and allowing noone to come between you and the game:  not your children, your spouse, your elderly parents, or you Labrador Retriever "Butch" who you haven't taken for a walk in 17 days).

Good luck from the rest of us:  The Committed, The Clever, the Obsessed.

(in reply to LST Express)
Post #: 15
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/8/2010 10:31:10 PM   
rockmedic109

 

Posts: 2020
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From: Citrus Heights, CA
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You need to look at AE as a career, not a game.  It will take just as long and be far more rewarding.  You will have slow times and good times.  It will be a long career that you will not get fired from {kinda like a government job}. 

"or you Labrador Retriever "Butch" who you haven't taken for a walk in 17 days"????

I haven't fed my dogs for 17 days!  A three week AE binge every couple of months is good for keeping the rodent population down at my house.  Jack Russells make great ratters, especially when forced to for sustenance.  Now if I can only get them to flush after using the bathroom.....

(in reply to Canoerebel)
Post #: 16
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/9/2010 2:52:29 AM   
Gräfin Zeppelin


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Personaly I go bonkers if I spot an undisbanded/undocked taskforce and ponder since how many days it must be siting there and consuming my precious fuel.I also dont like tankers consuming underway something of the fuel they transport.It feels like they eat sweets on the sly.

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Post #: 17
RE: Perfectionistic obsession - 8/9/2010 5:01:52 AM   
ChickenOfTheSea


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From: Virginia
Status: offline
Another aspect that becomes more apparent, I think, when playing PBEM is that your local commanders have minds of their own. Much like the real world, nothing will be executed the way you planned it anyway, so why obsess about it. When the option to restart is taken away, this all gets a little clearer.

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In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice, there is. - Manfred Eigen

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Post #: 18
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