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RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land

 
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RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 12/27/2011 12:19:56 AM   
brian brian

 

Posts: 1821
Joined: 11/16/2005
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OK, I spent a chunk of my free time today tracking down one of my favorite wargaming articles, from the Avalon Hill General, Volume 18 #6, the "Flat Top" issue. The nice folks at 'The General Project' have that volume up for downloading as a pdf now. I was looking for the article on how to pronounce all of the Japanese ship names, which made our many games of Victory in the Pacific and later World in Flames quite a bit more authentic. I will post that next. First, here is an excerpt from an article about modding the Flat Top game to use British CVs and their planes....it has a nice summary of one of the more odd little force pools in the game: (sorry about the column format, I have had enough editing struggles for today)


All of the British cruisers had torpedo tubes and
the torpedoes were sound. Crews were specifically
trained in night combat, gunnery was of agenerally
high standard, and damage control in most British
ships was not neglected as it was by the Japanese.
Britain had a two year head start on the
Americans in the installation of radar on their war-
ships. By 1942 most British ships sported a variety
of radars; air search, surface search, range finging,
and fire control. The sets were generally superior to
US equipment at that time, the operators wereprac-
ticed, and techniques were sound. Fighter direction
was excellent and the US navy adopted the system in
1943 after operating with H.M.S. Victorious.
British destroyers and their crews had con-
siderable experience against enemy submarines.
The battle of the Atlantic and the war in the
Mediterranean gave the British considerable ex-
pertise in anti-submarine warfare.
The largest weakness of the British navy at this
time, at least in the context of carrier task forces,
was the poor quality of the aircraft of the Fleet Air
Arm. Most of the planes appear to have been more
suitable for the Ark than the Ark Royal.
A glance at the British Aircraft specifications
clearly points out their disadvantages in most areas.
This resulted from the Fleet Air Arm being con-
trolled by the RAF until 1937. Not only did the Air
Ministry fail to understand the requirements for ef-
fective naval aircraft but were fully committed to
high-level bombing and failed to keep up with dive
bomber design. The Fleet Air Arm itself was also
capable of making mistakes and insisted that naval
fighters have two man crews, one a navigator.
Generally there was little expectation for high per-
formance in naval aircraft of any type.
The Swordfish was known lovingly as the
Stringbag. These viceless but archaic biplanes serv-
ed throughout the war, first as torpedo bombers
and eventually as subkillers. They were too slow
and vulnerable for daylight torpedo attacks and
were therefore equipped with ASV (Air to Surface
Vessel) radar and the pilots were trained for night
carrier operations and attacks. A night attack on
the Bismarck in poor weather was made possible by
radar and their night attack on the Italian Fleet in
Taranto was sufficiently successful for the
Japanese to study it in detail while planning their at-
tack on Pearl Harbor.
The Albacore was supposedly a replacement for
the Swordfish but only a marginal advance. Also
biplanes, they were slightly faster, possessed a
better range, and had an enclosed cockpit and a
windscreen wiper. It seems incredible that first
service deliveries of this antique occured in March
1940. They were also equipped with ASV radar and
were at the peak of their career as a night torpedo
bomber in 1942. The British torpedo was not equal
to the Japanese Long Lance, but was generally
reliable and considerably better than the American
Mark XIII; at least it could normally beexpected to
explode.
The desperation of the pilots of the Fleet Air
Arm can be judged by the enthusiasm with which
they accepted the first deliveries of the Fulmar in
June 1940. These were two-seater naval fighters of
few vices, ample firepower, and moderate perfor-
mance. However, they lacked speed, being unable
to catch a JU88, and couldn't stay in the air with an
Me 109 even if they had been able to catch one. For-
tunately, much of their career was spent in the
Mediterranean where their eight machine guns were
more than adequate to dispatch the nimble Italian
fighters in one burst, which was all they usually got.
The desperate need for a high performance
fighter resulted in the fitting of Hurricanes with tail
hooks and calling them Sea Hurricanes. They had
few of the usual attributes of naval fighters. Their
wings wouldn't fold, they were short on range, dif-
ficult to land on a deck, and had the ditching
characteristics of a submarine. Fortunately, they
were tough in a fight, could take punishment, and
were available.
All of the comments made about the Sea
Hurricanes apply to the Seafire. A two hour useful
endurance did not endear them to carrier skippers,
who were constantly having to turn into the wind.
They also tended to break up under the stress of
carrier landings and more Seafires were lost due to
landing accidents (prangs) than enemy action. It
has been suggested that British carriers needed ar-
mored flight decks to protect them from crashing
Seafires. Despite this they were vicious in air com-
bat and could outgun, outrun, outclimb, and out-
dive a Zero. They could also turn inside a Zero at
high speed. This fighter was not available in the Far
East until September 1942.
Martlets are Wildcats that were sold to the
British.
The following special rules should allow British
ships and aircraft to be substituted for their
American counterparts and give a realistic result,
not necessarily a balanced one. You can judge for
yourself the relative merits of a different approach.
The Fulmars were used for search in daylight, CAP
and strike escort. The Swordfish and Albacores
were used for search, anti-submarine patrol, dive
bombing, and torpedo attacks, usually at night. Sea
Hurricanes and Seafires lacked the range for most
offensive actions and were usually used for CAP.
The British player will have to assess his strengths
and weaknesses and use different tactics than either
the American or Japanese player. It's a new game.



(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2191
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 12/27/2011 12:34:22 AM   
brian brian

 

Posts: 1821
Joined: 11/16/2005
Status: offline
and now following will be the article on pronouncing all those ship names. I hope these can be used in the game; I found this original article to be one of the more educational I have read in an already quite educational hobby.

and to figure out the copyright issues that might have been involved, here is a link to the pertinent info from the people who scan and post these:

the copyright question


this is the best I can get the piece, there might be a few lingering oddities from the .pdf conversion, and I just can't get the text window on this site to let me put some space between the end of each ship name and the beginning of the pronunciation.

BLITZ JAPANESE


How to Pronounce Oi, Ire, Hiei, et .I.

by Chris L. Roehl
Translations by Grace Beard Trinity University, San Antonio

The written Japanese language includes fifty-one phonetic signs-an alphabet of sounds. Though
ideographic, Japanese can be written in arabic letters using a syllabary. However, this only hints at how
a word is pronounced. Inflection and speed of pronunciation are unknowns and some letters are silent
or not pronounced as they appear. The result is fractured Japanese.
The translations given here are from the ideographic characters (calligraphy), as read by Grace.
Don't let her name fool you. She is a native Japanese, born of a Christian family, and while a young
woman, lived in Tokyo throughout the Pacific War. The phonetic interpretationsaremy own based on
her pronunciations in face-to-face sessions.
With a few exceptions, the type of Japanese warship may be determined by its name (if you can read
Japanese). Aircraft carriers are named after mythical flying objects, animals, or large birds. Somecon-
versions retained their original hull name: Kaga, Akagi, Chitose, Chiyoda, and Shinano. Some did not:
Shoho, Zuiho, Ryuho, (former submarine tenders Tsurugizaki, Takasaki, and Taigei respectively), and
Hiyo and Junyo, (former luxury liners Izumo Maru and Kashiwara Maru). Battleships are named
after ancient provinces similar to our practice of naming battleships after states. Heavy cruisers are
named after mountains, as are the four Kongo class fast battleships originally classed as battlecruisers.
Light cruisers are named after rivers. (The Mogatniand Tone class CA's were laid down as CL's, hence
the exception.) Destroyers are paradoxically given poetic interpretations of weather conditions:
Kawakaze, (River Wind); Shigure, (Drizzling Autumn Rain). When in 1944-45, construction concen-
trated on more destroyers of smaller design, their names included flowers, fruit, and trees. The three
types of submarine are 1, RO, and HA-the first three sounds of the Japanese "alphabet" thus cor-
responding to A, B, and C.
The names of Japanese aircraft carriers are quite picturesque and often convey an intangible idea
and are thus quite difficult to translate accurately as one can the names of mountains, rivers, and pro-
vinces. For example, the Hosho translates Auspicious Bird. However, the ideaconveyed is of a gigantic
imaginary bird with a 3,000 mile wing span, and able to fly 90,000 miles in one hop! It is a name full of
great expectations for The Imperial Japanese Navy's first aircraft carrier. Important ships were given
appropriately portentous names-see Kongo, and Yamato for other examples of this practice, keeping
in mind not their fate but their significance to Japan as the finest of their kind in all the world's navies.
The ship names translated below are grouped by type, class, and order of construction, or conver-
sion. The information given is the arabic spelling, the phonetic pronunciation showing emphasis of a syllable in larger type, and an indication of the speed in which the sounds are pronounced, (Fast, Nor-
mal, Slow), and a definition or origin of the name.
The phonetic interpretation shows the pronunciation of the ship names as they sound. In somecases
the vowel sounds are pronounced as one sound-a compound sound of two vowels pronounced so
closely toether that they cannot be distinguished as two distinct sounds. An example is the Zuikaku.
"Zui" is pronounced more like "Zwee" than "Zoo-ee". Some names are pronounced with equal em-
phasis on all sounds, (or no emphasis at all depending on your outlook). The vowels, (A, I, U, E, O), are
pronounced as follows: A as ah, like "Open wide and say ah."; I as a hard E, like "easy"; U as ooo, like
"ooze"; E as a hard A, like "ale"; and 0 as a hard 0,
like "Oh, no!". The consonants are pronounced
as in English with a few exceptions which will be explained individually.
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS -
HOSHO HOE SHO (S S) Auspicious Bird.

KAGA KAH GAH (N N) Old name for Ishikawa Prefecture. ("Increased Joy", S.E. Morrison.)

AKAGI AH KAH GEE (N N N) (Hard "G", like "geese".) Mountain in Gumma Prefecture. ("Red Castle". Morrison.)

RYUJO REEOO JOE (N N) Vigorous Dragon.

SORYU SORE REEYOU (F S) (Equal emphasis.) Green Dragon

HIRYU HEE REEYOU (F S) Flying Dragon.

SHOKAKU SHO KAH KOO (F F F) Soaring Crane.

ZUIKAKU ZWEE KAH KOO (F F F) Happy Crane. ("Zui" means everything good-a good omen.)

SHOHO SHO HO (S S) True (Righteous) Gigantic Bird.

ZUIHO ZWEE HO (F S) Happy Bird of Paradise. (The bird of paradise is a good omen.)

HIYO HEE YO (N N) Flying Hawk.

JUNYO JUNE YO (N N) Obedient Hawk.

RYUHO REEYOU HO (N S) Dragon and Gigantic Bird.

CHIYODA CHEE YO DAH (N N N) Chiyoda Castle. (Emperor's Castle.)

CHITOSE CHEE TOE SAY (F F N) Thousand Years. (Longevity.) (As a CVL she survived ten months.)

TAIHO THAI EE HO (N N S) Gigantic Bird.

SHINANO SHE NAH NO (N N N) Ancient name for Nagano Prefecture.

UNRYU OON REE YOU (F N S) Cloud and Dragon.

AMAGI AH MAH GEE (N N F) (Equal emphasis. Hard "G".) Mountain on Izu Peninsula.

KATSURAGI KAHT SOO RAH GEE (N N N N) (Equal emphasis. Hard "G".) Mountain bordering Osaka and Nara.

BATTLESHIPS

KONGO KONG GO (N N) Mountain bordering Osaka and Nara meaning diamond-hard and unbreakable-the hardest metal.

HIEI HEE AY (N N) ("El" is pronounced as a hard letter "A".) Mountain northeast of Kyoto City.

HARUNA HAH ROO NAH (F N N) (Equal emphasis.) A hot springs mountain in Gumma Prefecture.

KlRlSHlMA KEE REE SHE MAH (N N N N) Mountain in Kagoshima Prefecture.

FUSO WHO SSO (F F) (The "F" is pronounced as an "H". The Japanese do not bite their lips when speaking, I'm told.) Ancient Chinese name for Japan.

YAMASHIRO YAH MAH SHE RO (N N N N) (Equal emphasis on "YAMA".) The area surrounding Kyoto City.

HYUGA HEE YOU GAH (N N F) Miyozaki area in northeast Kyushu City.

ISE EE SAY (F F) An area in Mie Prefecture, central Honshu, noted as the location of the Emperor's ancestor's shrine.

NAGATO NAH GAH TOE (N N N) Yamaguchi Prefecture at the southern tip of Honshu.

MUTSU MOOT SEH (N F) ("SU" is pronounced as the last sound of "Tecumseh".) Aomori and lwate Prefectures.

YAMATO YAH MAH TOE (N N N) Ancient name for Japan.

MUSASHI MOO SAH SHEE (N N N) Tokyo and vicinity.

CRUISERS

KAKO KAH KO (F F) River in Hyogo Prefecture.

FURUTAKA WHO ROO TAH KAH (N N N N) (Equal emphasis.) Old Hawk.

KINUGASA KEE NOO GAH SAH (N N N F) (Equal emphasis.) Mountain north of Kyoto City.

AOBA AH OH BAH (N N N) (Equal emphasis.) A castle in Sendai City.

MYOKO MEEOH KO (N S) Mountain in Niigata Prefecture.

NACHl NAH CHEE (N N) Mountain in Wakayama Prefecture.

HAGURO HAH GOO RO (F N N) Mountain in Yamagata Prefecture.

ASHIGARA AH SHEE GAH RAH (N N F F) Mountain in Kagagawa Prefecture.

TAKAO TAH KAH OH (N N N) (Equal emphasis.) A hill in Kyoto City.

ATAGO AH TAH GO (N N N) Another hill in Kyoto City.

CHOKAI CHO KHAI (S N) Mountain in Yamagata Prefecture.

MAYA MY YAH (N N) (Equal emphasis.) Mountain near Kobe City. Also the name of Buddha's mother.

MOGAMI MO GAH MEE (N N N) River in Yamagata Prefecture.

MIKUMA MEE KOO MAH (N N N) (Origin unknown.)

SUZUYA SOO SSOO YAH (F N N) (Prounounce the "Z" as a hissed "S".) Bell Valley.

KUMANO KOO MAH NO (N N N) (Equal emphasis.) River in Wakayama Prefecture.

TONE TOE NAY (N F) River in Kanti area.

CHIKUMA CHEE KOO MAH (F N N) River in Kyushu.

KlTAKAMI KEE TAH GAH MEE (N N N F) (Pronounce the second "K" as a hard "G".) River in lwate and Miyagi Prefectures.

OI OH EE (S N) River in Shizuoka Prefecture.

SPECIAL NAVAL LANDING FORCES

YOKOSUKA YO KOSS KAH (N N F) (The "U" is silent.)
KURE KOO RAY (N N)
SASEBO SAH SAY BO (N N F)

SUBMARINES: There were three categories of submarines: I, RO, and HA corresponding to the first three letters of our alphabet. Pronounce EE, ROW, and HAH.

(in reply to brian brian)
Post #: 2192
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 12/27/2011 4:54:42 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
MIKUMA was named after the Mikuma river in Oita prefecture, Japan.

It is an easy search for this information. In this case I used The Free Dictionary by Farlex.

I've done enough Japanese Cruisers thank you.


They pronounce SASEBO as Sas-suh-bo. Which is how I remember it from when I was in Japan.



< Message edited by Extraneous -- 12/27/2011 5:07:31 PM >


_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to brian brian)
Post #: 2193
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 1/16/2012 11:34:05 PM   
michaelbaldur


Posts: 4001
Joined: 4/6/2007
From: denmark
Status: online
deleted

< Message edited by michaelbaldur -- 1/16/2012 11:36:19 PM >


_____________________________

Peyton manning is a God and the wif rulebook is my bible

I work hard, not smart.

beta tester and Mwif expert

(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2194
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 2/5/2012 12:52:40 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
Please see one of the counters from a neutral - HMS Gotland from Sweden. I was reminded by Orm that Gotland featured in the Bismarck episode and I have added some brief comment to reflect that. Thanks Orm.

[4967 Gotland]
.B Engine(s) output: 33,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 28 knots
.B Main armament: 6 x 6-inch (152mm), 4 x 3-inch (75mm) guns
.B Aircraft: Maximum 11 (typically 6)
.B Displacement (full load): 5,550 tons
.B Thickest armour: 1-inch (belt)
.P The Gotland was an aircraft carrying cruiser built for the Royal Swedish
Navy in the early thirties. She was the only ship of her class.
.P Originally conceived as a small aircraft carrier, the design work for Gotland
began in 1926. However, budgetary constraints meant a revision of the plans and
this resulted in her re-design as an "aircraft cruiser", a concept later copied
and developed by the Japanese.
.P With no flight deck or landing capability, Gotland was designed to operate
only floatplanes, and British Hawker Ospreys were purchased for this purpose. Her
aft section was given over to a single, German-made catapult, that was used to
get her aircraft aloft. She also had a large crane at the stern to allow recovery
of the aircraft after they had landed on the water. A maximum of eleven Ospreys
could be carried, but the optimal number for operational purposes was just six.
Note: World In Flames gives this vessel no aircraft carrying capacity, due to the
fact that by the time of the Second World War, six obsolete Ospreys would provide
the ship with little offensive or defensive air capability. The aircraft were
only designed to act as the “eyes of the fleet” in any case.
.P Reflecting that she was part cruiser, Gotland was given six 6-inch guns,
fitted in two twin turrets one fore and one aft, with the remaining two fitted in
casemates. Secondary armament was provided by four 3-inch guns in one twin and
two single mounts, with close-range anti-aircraft (AA) defence provided by four
25mm guns. Gotland was also capable of carrying up to 100 mines and her weapons
package was completed by two triple torpedo tubes.
.P Armour protection was very light with less than 1-inch of armour for both
horizontal and vertical protection.
.P Her top speed was only 28 knots and her range was limited, although given the
coastal defence ships that she was designed to operate with, these were adequate
performance figures for the needs of the Royal Swedish Navy.
.P Gotland, named after the Swedish-owned Baltic island, was completed in 1934.
Her life as an aircraft cruiser was to be limited thanks to advances in naval
aviation. The Ospreys were replaced in 1942 by Saab floatplanes, but these
aircraft provided insufficient improvement on the British aircraft and with no
other suitable alternative, Gotland was placed into the dockyard in 1943 for
conversion to an AA cruiser. For this role she was given additional 3-inch guns
and was fitted with both 40mm Bofors and additional 25mm guns.
.P Although Sweden was not a belligerent in World War II, Gotland played a small,
but important role in one of the most famous episodes of the war. On the 18th May
1941, the German battleship Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen had set
sail from Gdynia and, two days later, were heading north along the west coast of
Sweden. In the early afternoon of the 20th, the German ships were spotted by both
Swedish reconnaissance aircraft and by look-outs aboard Gotland. Gotland was
undertaking gunnery exercises off Vinga, south of Göteborg when the German ships
came into view, and following the sighting, Gotland followed Bismarck and Prinz
Eugen at a discreet distance for more than three hours. More importantly, her
crew had sent a contact report, and this news found its way to the British
Admiralty via the Norwegian military attaché who had good access to the Swedish
intelligence service. The latter were only too happy to pass on the news that
Bismarck was heading northwest; a course that could mean she was possibly trying
to break-out into the North Atlantic.
.P As we know, that was indeed the intention, and in an epic encounter that
lasted nine days, Bismarck was eventually cornered and sunk by units of the
British Home Fleet. But for Gotland, there was to be no further adventures
during the Second World War.
.P HMS Gotland was scrapped in 1962.
.P Note, the Swedish Royal Navy use the prefix HMS for their warships; Hans /
Hennes Majestäts Skepp, in the same way that the British Royal Navy use the
prefix HMS; His / Her Majesty's Ship. To avoid confusion, in English, the prefix
HSwMS is used for Swedish warships; His / Her Swedish Majesty's Ship.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to michaelbaldur)
Post #: 2195
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 2/5/2012 3:21:20 AM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
[4967 Gotland]
.B Engine(s) output: 33,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 28 knots
.B Main armament: 6 x 6-inch (152mm), 4 x 3-inch (75mm) guns
.B Aircraft: Maximum 11 (typically 6)
.B Displacement (full load): 5,550 tons
.B Thickest armour: 1-inch (belt)
.P The only ship of her class the aircraft cruiser Gotland was commissioned into the
Royal Swedish Navy December 14, 1934.
.P Originally conceived as a small aircraft carrier, the design work for Gotland
began in 1926. However, budgetary constraints meant a revision of the plans and
resulted in her re-design as an "aircraft cruiser". This concept was later copied and
developed by the Japanese.

.P With no flight deck or landing capability, Gotland was designed to only operate
floatplanes,
and British Hawker Ospreys were purchased for this purpose. Her
aft section was given over to a single, German-made catapult that was used to
get
her aircraft aloft. She also had a large crane at the stern to allow recovery
of the aircraft after they had landed on the water. A maximum of eleven Ospreys
could be carried, but the optimal number for operational purposes was just six.
Note: World In Flames gives this vessel no aircraft carrying capacity, due to the
fact that by the time of the Second World War, six obsolete Ospreys would provide
the ship with little offensive or defensive air capability. The aircraft were only
designed to act as the “eyes of the fleet” in any case.
.P Reflecting that she was part cruiser, Gotland was given six 6-inch guns,
fitted in two twin turrets one fore and one aft, with the remaining two fitted in
casemates. Four 3-inch guns (one twin mount and two single mounts) provided
secondary armament,
with close-range anti-aircraft (AA) defence provided by four
25mm guns. Gotland was also capable of carrying up to 100 mines and her weapons
package was completed by two triple torpedo tubes.
.P Armour protection was very light with less than 1-inch of armour for both
horizontal and vertical protection.
.P Her top speed was only 28 knots and her range was limited, although given the
coastal defence ships that she was designed to operate with, these were adequate
performance figures for the needs of the Royal Swedish Navy.
.P Gotland, named after the Swedish-owned Baltic island, was completed in 1934.
Her life as an aircraft cruiser was to be limited thanks to advances in naval
aviation. The Ospreys were replaced in 1942 by Saab floatplanes, but these
aircraft provided insufficient improvement on the British aircraft and with no
other suitable alternative, Gotland was placed into the dockyard in 1943 for
conversion to an AA cruiser. For this role she was given additional 3-inch guns
and was fitted with both 40mm Bofors and additional 25mm guns.
.P Although Sweden was not a belligerent in World War II, Gotland played a small,
but important role in one of the most famous episodes of the war. On the 18th May
1941, the German battleship Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen had set
sail from Gdynia and, two days later, were heading north along the west coast of
Sweden. In the early afternoon of the 20th, the German ships were spotted by both
Swedish reconnaissance aircraft and by lookouts aboard Gotland. Gotland was
undertaking gunnery exercises off Vinga, south of Göteborg when the German ships
came into view, and following the sighting; Gotland followed Bismarck and Prinz
Eugen at a discreet distance for more than three hours. More importantly, her
crew had sent a contact report, and this news found its way to the British
Admiralty via the Norwegian military attaché who had good access to the Swedish
intelligence service. The latter were only too happy to pass on the news that
Bismarck was heading northwest; a course that could mean she was possibly trying
to breakout into the North Atlantic.
.P As we know, that was indeed the intention, and in an epic encounter that
lasted nine days, Bismarck was eventually cornered and sunk by units of the
British Home Fleet. But for Gotland, there was to be no further adventures
during the Second World War.
.P HMS Gotland was scrapped in 1962.
.P Note, the Swedish Royal Navy use the prefix HMS for their warships; Hans /
Hennes Majestäts Skepp, in the same way that the British Royal Navy use the
prefix HMS; His / Her Majesty's Ship. To avoid confusion, in English, the prefix
HSwMS is used for Swedish warships, His / Her Swedish Majesty's Ship.


JFYI:
catapult that was used to get ~ has no comma
catapult, which was used to get ~ has a comma

Bismarck-class.dk site ~ Gotland
Launched: September 14, 1933
Commissioned: December 14, 1934


_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2196
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/1/2012 10:59:20 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
I am unlikely to be able to do many (if any) more full write-ups from scratch between now and the launch date (which hopefully will be this year given Steve's recent pronouncements in the When thread). What I am therefore concentrating on is to ensure that the earlier introductions I did are of the same detail and content as the latter ones. To this end I have started with the Royal Navy D-class cruisers; available if using Cruisers in Flames.


.B Engine(s) output: 40,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 29 knots
.B Main armament: 6 x 6-inch (152mm), 2 x 3-inch (76mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 5,870 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P Twelve D or Danae-class cruisers were ordered for the Royal Navy (RN)
between 1916 and 1918. The first three - Danae, Dauntless and Dragon - were
ordered in September 1916; the next three - Delhi, Dunedin and Durban - followed
ten months later, and the last six were ordered in March 1918. Four of the third
group were cancelled at the end of the First World War however, and only Despatch
and Diomede proceeded to completion. The surviving eight ships of the class were
completed between 1918 and 1922.
.P The original D-class design was essentially an improved version of the C-class
cruisers and the technical details above reflect the original design features (as
indeed do the factors assigned to the WIF counters).
The D-class ships were fitted with increased firepower compared to the C-class;
an extra, single 6-inch gun was fitted, making six in all. For anti-aircraft (AA)
defence the D-class had two 3-inch guns and two 2-pdr pompoms. Their weaponry was
completed by four, triple, 21-inch torpedo tubes.
.P Armour protection consisted of a belt, 3-inches at its maximum, to protect the
vital machinery spaces, and an armoured deck just 1-inch thick.
.P The D-class cruisers had poor range and were capable of only 29 knots. This
relatively poor performance was even worse by the 1930's as by then the ships
were desperately in need of refitting and a machinery overhaul.
.P The RN could not afford to scrap the D-class because of their need for a large
cruiser fleet, and so instead, it was decided to convert the ships to AA cruisers
similar to the planned C-class conversion.
.P The plan for the D-class, adopted in 1936, was to fit four twin 4.5-inch guns
together with two High Angle Control Systems (HACS) and a quadruple pompom.
Although the new guns were ordered for the first three ships, and work was to
have begun in 1938, there was not the capacity or resources to begin the work. As
a result the un-modernised D-class entered the Second World War somewhat limited
in deployment options for their own safety.
.P The RN's need for cruisers in the early half of the war was acute and these
cruisers were deployed in mostly backwater theatres while awaiting an upgrade.
Only Delhi received a comprehensive AA modernisation. She was sent to the United
States in 1941 and given five, single, 5-inch/38 guns (with two fire control
systems), two quadruple pompoms and eight Oerlikons. Her ageing machinery was
also completely overhauled. By the time the work was completed in 1942, the US
was at war and no further D-class conversions would be carried out.
.P For Delhi's sisters, ultimately there was no uniform upgrade carried out and
each ship was essentially given what was readily available. Delhi aside, the two
ships thatwere given the most attention were Danae and Dragon which had their
No.3 turrets removed and replaced with two quadruple pompoms and a twin 4-inch
mount.
.P Only one ship - Dunedin - was lost to enemy action, two were scuttled for use
as breakwaters off the coast of Normandy in 1944, and the remaining five were
scrapped after the war.
.P There was no uniform pattern for the names other than all ships of the class
were named with words beginning with the letter D. Danae and Diomede are
characters from Greek mythology; Durban, Dunedin and Delhi are cities in parts of
the Brtish Commonwealth; while Despatch, Dauntless and Dragon are names that have
long been used by the RN.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2197
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/1/2012 6:44:40 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
.B Engine(s) output: 40,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 29 knots
.B Main armament: 6 x 6-inch (152mm), 2 x 3-inch (76mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 5,870 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P Twelve D or Danae-class cruisers were ordered for the Royal Navy (RN)
between 1916 and 1918. The first three - Danae, Dauntless and Dragon - were
ordered in September 1916; the next three - Delhi, Dunedin and Durban - followed
ten months later, and the last six were ordered in March 1918. Four of the third
group were cancelled at the end of the First World War however, and only Despatch
and Diomede proceeded to completion. The surviving eight ships of the class were
completed between 1918 and 1922.
.P The original D-class design was essentially an improved version of the C-class
cruisers and the technical details above reflect the original design features (as
indeed do the factors assigned to the WIF counters).
The D-class ships were fitted with increased firepower compared to the C-class;
an extra, single 6-inch gun was fitted, making six in all. For anti-aircraft (AA)
defence the D-class had two 3-inch guns and two 2-pdr pompoms. Their weaponry was
completed by four, triple, 21-inch torpedo tubes.
.P Armour protection consisted of a belt, 3-inches at its maximum, to protect the
vital machinery spaces, and an armoured deck just 1-inch thick.
.P The D-class cruisers had poor range and were capable of only 29 knots. This
relatively poor performance was even worse by the 1930's as by then the ships
were desperately in need of refitting and a machinery overhaul.
.P The RN could not afford to scrap the D-class because of their need for a large
cruiser fleet, and so instead, it was decided to convert the ships to AA cruisers
similar to the planned C-class conversion.
.P The plan for the D-class, adopted in 1936, was to fit four twin 4.5-inch guns
together with two High Angle Control Systems (HACS) and a quadruple pompom.
Although the new guns were ordered for the first three ships, and work was to
have begun in 1938, there was not the capacity or resources to begin the work. As
a result the un-modernised D-class entered the Second World War somewhat limited
in deployment options for their own safety.
.P The RN's need for cruisers in the early half of the war was acute and these
cruisers were deployed in mostly backwater theatres while awaiting an upgrade.
Only Delhi received a comprehensive AA modernisation. She was sent to the United
States in 1941 and given five, single, 5-inch/38 guns (with two fire control
systems), two quadruple pompoms and eight Oerlikons. Her ageing machinery was
also completely overhauled. By the time the work was completed in 1942, the US
was at war and no further D-class conversions would be carried out.
.P For Delhi's sisters, ultimately there was no uniform upgrade carried out and
each ship was essentially given what was readily available. Delhi aside, the two
ships that were given the most attention were Danae and Dragon which had their
No.3 turrets removed and replaced with two quadruple pompoms and a twin 4-inch
mount.
.P Only one ship - Dunedin - was lost to enemy action, two were scuttled for use
as breakwaters off the coast of Normandy in 1944, and the remaining five were
scrapped after the war.
.P There was no uniform pattern for the names other than all ships of the class
were named with words beginning with the letter D. Danae and Diomede are
characters from Greek mythology; Durban, Dunedin and Delhi are cities in parts of
the British Commonwealth; while Despatch, Dauntless and Dragon are names that have
long been used by the RN.


Shocking you spelled "British" incorrectly.



_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2198
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/1/2012 7:58:59 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Extraneous

.B Engine(s) output: 40,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 29 knots
.B Main armament: 6 x 6-inch (152mm), 2 x 3-inch (76mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 5,870 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P Twelve D or Danae-class cruisers were ordered for the Royal Navy (RN)
between 1916 and 1918. The first three - Danae, Dauntless and Dragon - were
ordered in September 1916; the next three - Delhi, Dunedin and Durban - followed
ten months later, and the last six were ordered in March 1918. Four of the third
group were cancelled at the end of the First World War however, and only Despatch
and Diomede proceeded to completion. The surviving eight ships of the class were
completed between 1918 and 1922.
.P The original D-class design was essentially an improved version of the C-class
cruisers and the technical details above reflect the original design features (as
indeed do the factors assigned to the WIF counters).
The D-class ships were fitted with increased firepower compared to the C-class;
an extra, single 6-inch gun was fitted, making six in all. For anti-aircraft (AA)
defence the D-class had two 3-inch guns and two 2-pdr pompoms. Their weaponry was
completed by four, triple, 21-inch torpedo tubes.
.P Armour protection consisted of a belt, 3-inches at its maximum, to protect the
vital machinery spaces, and an armoured deck just 1-inch thick.
.P The D-class cruisers had poor range and were capable of only 29 knots. This
relatively poor performance was even worse by the 1930's as by then the ships
were desperately in need of refitting and a machinery overhaul.
.P The RN could not afford to scrap the D-class because of their need for a large
cruiser fleet, and so instead, it was decided to convert the ships to AA cruisers
similar to the planned C-class conversion.
.P The plan for the D-class, adopted in 1936, was to fit four twin 4.5-inch guns
together with two High Angle Control Systems (HACS) and a quadruple pompom.
Although the new guns were ordered for the first three ships, and work was to
have begun in 1938, there was not the capacity or resources to begin the work. As
a result the un-modernised D-class entered the Second World War somewhat limited
in deployment options for their own safety.
.P The RN's need for cruisers in the early half of the war was acute and these
cruisers were deployed in mostly backwater theatres while awaiting an upgrade.
Only Delhi received a comprehensive AA modernisation. She was sent to the United
States in 1941 and given five, single, 5-inch/38 guns (with two fire control
systems), two quadruple pompoms and eight Oerlikons. Her ageing machinery was
also completely overhauled. By the time the work was completed in 1942, the US
was at war and no further D-class conversions would be carried out.
.P For Delhi's sisters, ultimately there was no uniform upgrade carried out and
each ship was essentially given what was readily available. Delhi aside, the two
ships that were given the most attention were Danae and Dragon which had their
No.3 turrets removed and replaced with two quadruple pompoms and a twin 4-inch
mount.
.P Only one ship - Dunedin - was lost to enemy action, two were scuttled for use
as breakwaters off the coast of Normandy in 1944, and the remaining five were
scrapped after the war.
.P There was no uniform pattern for the names other than all ships of the class
were named with words beginning with the letter D. Danae and Diomede are
characters from Greek mythology; Durban, Dunedin and Delhi are cities in parts of
the British Commonwealth; while Despatch, Dauntless and Dragon are names that have
long been used by the RN.


Shocking you spelled "British" incorrectly.


Warspite1

Whoops

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2199
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/9/2012 10:44:22 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
Next on the upgrade list is the Hawkins-class.

[4620 Effingham - by Robert Jenkins]
.B Engine(s) output: 58,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 29.75 knots
.B Main armament: 9 x 6-inch (152mm), 4 x 4-inch (102mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 12,514 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P The cruisers of the Cavendish-class originally numbered six ships. They
were designed in 1915 specifically to meet the threat posed by German commerce
raiders.
.P Five ships were laid down between 1916 and 1918 - the sixth was never ordered
- but the ending of the First World War meant that completion was slower than
normal and indeed one of the ships - Cavendish - was to go through a number of
conversions during her life, was but never to be finished as a cruiser. The
remaining four ships - henceforth known as the Hawkins-class - were completed
between 1919 and 1925 and were finished to different specifications. The
technical details above are as Effingham appeared in September 1939.
.P World In Flames allows the Commonwealth player three of the ships - Effingham,
Frobisher and Hawkins - as the fourth, Raleigh, was wrecked in 1922 after running
aground.
.P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 standard displacement.
.P The ships were originally fitted with seven, single 7.5-inch guns, two
forward, three aft and two amidships either side of the aft funnel. Secondary
armament consisted of four, single 3-inch guns. Both submerged and above-the-
waterline torpedo tubes were also mounted.
.P At the 1930 London Naval Conference, in a bid to stop the building of 8-inch
gunned cruisers, Britain agreed to demilitarise the Hawkins-class ships. Whilst
Hawkins and Frobisher had their armament removed by 1937, it was decided to
convert Effingham at the same time to a "light" cruiser i.e. she was given a
6-inch main armament. She was fitted with nine, single 6-inch guns. Her secondary
armament consisted of four twin 4-inch anti-aircraft (AA) guns. A catapult was
added at this time too.
.P Neither of her sisters received the same treatment. For Hawkins it was a case
of re-fitting her seven 7.5-inch guns and providing her with four, single 4-inch
AA guns. But Frobisher took longer to convert back due to other priorities, and
it was not until February 1942 that she was ready for service once more, armed
with five, single 7.5-inch guns and a similar number of 4-inch AA weapons. Note
that Frobisher starts the Global War scenario in the repair pool to reflect the
fact that she was not ready at the start of the war. Close-range AA weaponry
differed from ship to ship, but a variable number of 2-pdr pompoms and 20mm guns
were provided to the three vessels.
.P Both Effingham and Frobisher were oil-burning originally, but Hawkins had a
coal and oil mix for greater flexibility when operating overseas. She was
converted to oil only during her re-armament work.
.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her stacks were trunked into one. The speed of each ship was
between 29 and 31 knots.
.P Defensive armour for the Hawkins-class was similar to their contemporaries,
with a belt of 3-inches at its maximum thickness, and a 1.5-inch armoured deck
covering the vital areas.
.P The class were named after famous Elizabethan-era sea captains.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2200
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/9/2012 11:03:47 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
Next on the upgrade list is the Hawkins-class.

[4620 Effingham - by Robert Jenkins]
.B Engine(s) output: 58,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 29.75 knots
.B Main armament: 9 x 6-inch (152mm), 4 x 4-inch (102mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 12,514 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P The cruisers of the Cavendish-class originally numbered six ships. They
were designed in 1915 specifically to meet the threat posed by German commerce
raiders.
.P Five ships were laid down between 1916 and 1918 - the sixth was never ordered
- but the ending of the First World War meant that completion was slower than
normal and indeed one of the ships - Cavendish - was to go through a number of
conversions during her life, was but never to be finished as a cruiser. The
remaining four ships - henceforth known as the Hawkins-class - were completed
between 1919 and 1925 and were finished to different specifications. The
technical details above are as Effingham appeared in September 1939.
.P World In Flames allows the Commonwealth player three of the ships - Effingham,
Frobisher and Hawkins - as the fourth, Raleigh, was wrecked in 1922 after running
aground.
.P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 standard displacement.
.P The ships were originally fitted with seven, single 7.5-inch guns, two
forward, three aft and two amidships either side of the aft funnel. Secondary
armament consisted of four, single 3-inch guns. Both submerged and above-the-
waterline torpedo tubes were also mounted.
.P At the 1930 London Naval Conference, in a bid to stop the building of 8-inch
gunned cruisers, Britain agreed to demilitarise the Hawkins-class ships. Whilst
Hawkins and Frobisher had their armament removed by 1937, it was decided to
convert Effingham at the same time to a "light" cruiser i.e. she was given a
6-inch main armament. She was fitted with nine, single 6-inch guns. Her secondary
armament consisted of four twin 4-inch anti-aircraft (AA) guns. A catapult was
added at this time too.
.P Neither of her sisters received the same treatment. For Hawkins it was a case
of re-fitting her seven 7.5-inch guns and providing her with four, single 4-inch
AA guns. But Frobisher took longer to convert back due to other priorities, and
it was not until February 1942 that she was ready for service once more, armed
with five, single 7.5-inch guns and a similar number of 4-inch AA weapons. Note
that Frobisher starts the Global War scenario in the repair pool to reflect the
fact that she was not ready at the start of the war. Close-range AA weaponry
differed from ship to ship, but a variable number of 2-pdr pompoms and 20mm guns
were provided to the three vessels.
.P Both Effingham and Frobisher were oil-burning originally, but Hawkins had a
coal and oil mix for greater flexibility when operating overseas. She was
converted to oil only during her re-armament work.
.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her stacks were trunked into one. The speed of each ship was
between 29 and 31 knots.
.P Defensive armour for the Hawkins-class was similar to their contemporaries,
with a belt of 3-inches at its maximum thickness, and a 1.5-inch armoured deck
covering the vital areas.
.P The class were named after famous Elizabethan-era sea captains.


quote:

P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 standard displacement.


"10,000 standard displacement"

What kind of displacement BRT, GRT, Long tons, or Tons?




_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2201
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/9/2012 11:07:23 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Extraneous

Next on the upgrade list is the Hawkins-class.

[4620 Effingham - by Robert Jenkins]
.B Engine(s) output: 58,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 29.75 knots
.B Main armament: 9 x 6-inch (152mm), 4 x 4-inch (102mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 12,514 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P The cruisers of the Cavendish-class originally numbered six ships. They
were designed in 1915 specifically to meet the threat posed by German commerce
raiders.
.P Five ships were laid down between 1916 and 1918 - the sixth was never ordered
- but the ending of the First World War meant that completion was slower than
normal and indeed one of the ships - Cavendish - was to go through a number of
conversions during her life, was but never to be finished as a cruiser. The
remaining four ships - henceforth known as the Hawkins-class - were completed
between 1919 and 1925 and were finished to different specifications. The
technical details above are as Effingham appeared in September 1939.
.P World In Flames allows the Commonwealth player three of the ships - Effingham,
Frobisher and Hawkins - as the fourth, Raleigh, was wrecked in 1922 after running
aground.
.P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 standard displacement.
.P The ships were originally fitted with seven, single 7.5-inch guns, two
forward, three aft and two amidships either side of the aft funnel. Secondary
armament consisted of four, single 3-inch guns. Both submerged and above-the-
waterline torpedo tubes were also mounted.
.P At the 1930 London Naval Conference, in a bid to stop the building of 8-inch
gunned cruisers, Britain agreed to demilitarise the Hawkins-class ships. Whilst
Hawkins and Frobisher had their armament removed by 1937, it was decided to
convert Effingham at the same time to a "light" cruiser i.e. she was given a
6-inch main armament. She was fitted with nine, single 6-inch guns. Her secondary
armament consisted of four twin 4-inch anti-aircraft (AA) guns. A catapult was
added at this time too.
.P Neither of her sisters received the same treatment. For Hawkins it was a case
of re-fitting her seven 7.5-inch guns and providing her with four, single 4-inch
AA guns. But Frobisher took longer to convert back due to other priorities, and
it was not until February 1942 that she was ready for service once more, armed
with five, single 7.5-inch guns and a similar number of 4-inch AA weapons. Note
that Frobisher starts the Global War scenario in the repair pool to reflect the
fact that she was not ready at the start of the war. Close-range AA weaponry
differed from ship to ship, but a variable number of 2-pdr pompoms and 20mm guns
were provided to the three vessels.
.P Both Effingham and Frobisher were oil-burning originally, but Hawkins had a
coal and oil mix for greater flexibility when operating overseas. She was
converted to oil only during her re-armament work.
.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her stacks were trunked into one. The speed of each ship was
between 29 and 31 knots.
.P Defensive armour for the Hawkins-class was similar to their contemporaries,
with a belt of 3-inches at its maximum thickness, and a 1.5-inch armoured deck
covering the vital areas.
.P The class were named after famous Elizabethan-era sea captains.


quote:

P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 standard displacement.


"10,000 standard displacement"

What kind of displacement BRT, GRT, Long tons, or Tons?



Warspite1

Good spot - will add in

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2202
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/9/2012 11:18:46 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
Mmmm - a bit more of a tidy-up req'd - sorry.

[4627 Hawkins]
.B Engine(s) output: 60,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 30 knots
.B Main armament: 7 x 7.5-inch (191mm), 4 x 4-inch (102mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 13,160 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P The cruisers of the Cavendish-class originally numbered six ships. They
were designed in 1915 specifically to meet the threat posed by German commerce
raiders.
.P Five ships were laid down between 1916 and 1918, while the sixth was never
ordered. The end of the First World War meant that completion of the remaining
five was slower than normal and indeed one of the ships - Cavendish - was to go
through a number of conversions during her life, and was never completed as a
cruiser. The remaining four ships - henceforth known as the Hawkins-class - were
completed between 1919 and 1925 and were finished to different specifications.
The technical details above are as Hawkins appeared in early 1940 (see below).
.P World In Flames allows the Commonwealth player three of the ships - Effingham,
Frobisher and Hawkins - as the fourth, Raleigh, was wrecked in 1922 after running
aground.
.P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 tons standard displacement.
.P The ships were originally fitted with seven, single 7.5-inch guns, two
forward, three aft and two amidships either side of the aft funnel. Secondary
armament consisted of four, single 3-inch guns. Both submerged and above-the-
waterline torpedo tubes were also mounted.
.P At the 1930 London Naval Conference, in a bid to stop the building of 8-inch
gunned cruisers, Britain agreed to demilitarise the Hawkins-class ships. Whilst
Hawkins and Frobisher had their armament removed by 1937, it was decided to
convert Effingham at the same time to a "light" cruiser i.e. she was given a
6-inch main armament. She was fitted with nine, single 6-inch guns. Her secondary
armament was altered to four, twin 4-inch anti-aircraft (AA) guns. A catapult was
added at this time too.
.P Neither of her sisters received the same treatment. For Hawkins it was a case
of re-fitting her seven 7.5-inch guns and providing her with four, single 4-inch
AA guns. But Frobisher took longer to convert back due to other priorities, and
it was not until February 1942 that she was ready for service once more, armed
with five, single 7.5-inch guns and a similar number of 4-inch AA weapons. Note
that Frobisher starts the Global War scenario in the repair pool to reflect the
fact that she was not ready at the start of the war. Close-range AA weaponry
differed from ship to ship, but a variable number of 2-pdr pompoms and 20mm guns
were provided to the three vessels.
.P Both Effingham and Frobisher were oil-burning originally, but Hawkins had a
coal and oil mix for greater flexibility when operating overseas. She was
converted to oil only during her re-armament work.
.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her stacks were trunked into one. The maximum speed of each
ship was between 29 and 31 knots.
.P Defensive armour for the Hawkins-class was similar to their contemporaries,
with a belt of 3-inches at its maximum thickness, and a 1.5-inch armoured deck
covering the vital areas.
.P The class were named after famous Elizabethan-era sea captains.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2203
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/9/2012 11:36:34 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
4627 Hawkins]
.B Engine(s) output: 60,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 30 knots
.B Main armament: 7 x 7.5-inch (191mm), 4 x 4-inch (102mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 13,160 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P The cruisers of the Cavendish-class originally numbered six ships. They
were designed in 1915 specifically to meet the threat posed by German commerce
raiders.
.P Five ships were laid down between 1916 and 1918, while the sixth was never
ordered. The end of the First World War meant that completion of the remaining
five was slower than normal and indeed one of the ships - Cavendish - was to go
through a number of conversions during her life, and was never completed as a
cruiser. The remaining four ships - henceforth known as the Hawkins-class - were
completed between 1919 and 1925 and were finished to different specifications.
The technical details above are as Hawkins appeared in early 1940 (see below).
.P World In Flames allows the Commonwealth player three of the ships - Effingham,
Frobisher and Hawkins - as the fourth, Raleigh, was wrecked in 1922 after running
aground.
.P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 tons standard displacement.
.P The ships were originally fitted with seven, single 7.5-inch guns, two
forward, three aft and two amidships either side of the aft funnel. Secondary
armament consisted of four, single 3-inch guns. Both submerged and above-the-
waterline torpedo tubes were also mounted.
.P At the 1930 London Naval Conference, in a bid to stop the building of 8-inch
gunned cruisers, Britain agreed to demilitarise the Hawkins-class ships. Whilst
Hawkins and Frobisher had their armament removed by 1937, it was decided to
convert Effingham at the same time to a "light" cruiser i.e. she was given a
6-inch main armament. She was fitted with nine, single 6-inch guns. Her secondary
armament was altered to four, twin 4-inch anti-aircraft (AA) guns. A catapult was
added at this time too.
.P Neither of her sisters received the same treatment. For Hawkins it was a case
of re-fitting her seven 7.5-inch guns and providing her with four, single 4-inch
AA guns. But Frobisher took longer to convert back due to other priorities, and
it was not until February 1942 that she was ready for service once more, armed
with five, single 7.5-inch guns and a similar number of 4-inch AA weapons. Note
that Frobisher starts the Global War scenario in the repair pool to reflect the
fact that she was not ready at the start of the war. Close-range AA weaponry
differed from ship to ship, but a variable number of 2-pdr pompoms and 20mm guns
were provided to the three vessels.
.P Both Effingham and Frobisher were oil-burning originally, but Hawkins had a
coal and oil mix for greater flexibility when operating overseas. She was
converted to oil only during her re-armament work.
.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her stacks were trunked into one. The maximum speed of each
ship was between 29 and 31 knots.
.P Defensive armour for the Hawkins-class was similar to their contemporaries,
with a belt of 3-inches at its maximum thickness, and a 1.5-inch armoured deck
covering the vital areas.
.P The class were named after famous Elizabethan-era sea captains.


quote:

.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her funnels were trunked into one. The maximum speed of each
ship was between 29 and 31 knots.


Use "funnels" or "stacks".





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(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2204
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/10/2012 3:21:25 AM   
paulderynck


Posts: 4656
Joined: 3/24/2007
From: Canada
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: warspite1

Mmmm - a bit more of a tidy-up req'd - sorry.

[4627 Hawkins]
.B Engine(s) output: 60,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 30 knots
.B Main armament: 7 x 7.5-inch (191mm), 4 x 4-inch (102mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 13,160 tons
.B Thickest armour: 3-inches (belt)
.P The cruisers of the Cavendish-class originally numbered six ships. They
were designed in 1915 specifically to meet the threat posed by German commerce
raiders.
.P Five ships were laid down between 1916 and 1918, while the sixth was never
ordered. The end of the First World War meant that completion of the remaining
five was slower than normal and indeed one of the ships - Cavendish - was to go
through a number of conversions during her life, and was never completed as a
cruiser. The remaining four ships - henceforth known as the Hawkins-class - were
completed between 1919 and 1925 and were finished to different specifications.
The technical details above are as Hawkins appeared in early 1940 (see below).
.P World In Flames allows the Commonwealth player three of the ships - Effingham,
Frobisher and Hawkins - as the fourth, Raleigh, was wrecked in 1922 after running
aground.
.P When the first of the post-war naval treaties, designed to keep naval spending
in check, was held in 1922, the British were keen to retain these ships. It is
for this reason that the "treaty" or "heavy" cruiser upper limit was subsequently
set at 8-inch guns and 10,000 tons standard displacement.
.P The ships were originally fitted with seven, single 7.5-inch guns, two
forward, three aft and two amidships either side of the aft funnel. Secondary
armament consisted of four, single 3-inch guns. Both submerged and above-the-
waterline torpedo tubes were also mounted.
.P At the 1930 London Naval Conference, in a bid to stop the building of 8-inch
gunned cruisers, Britain agreed to demilitarise the Hawkins-class ships. Whilst
Hawkins and Frobisher had their armament removed by 1937, it was decided to
convert Effingham at the same time to a "light" cruiser i.e. she was given a
6-inch main armament. She was fitted with nine, single 6-inch guns. Her secondary
armament was altered to four, twin 4-inch anti-aircraft (AA) guns. A catapult was
added at this time too.
.P Neither of her sisters received the same treatment. For Hawkins it was a case
of re-fitting her seven 7.5-inch guns and providing her with four, single 4-inch
AA guns. But Frobisher took longer to convert back due to other priorities, and
it was not until February 1942 that she was ready for service once more, armed
with five, single 7.5-inch guns and a similar number of 4-inch AA weapons. Note
that Frobisher starts the Global War scenario in the repair pool to reflect the
fact that she was not ready at the start of the war. Close-range AA weaponry
differed from ship to ship, but a variable number of 2-pdr pompoms and 20mm guns
were provided to the three vessels.
.P Both Effingham and Frobisher were oil-burning originally, but Hawkins had a
coal and oil mix for greater flexibility when operating overseas. She was
converted to oil only during her re-armament work.
.P The ships had two funnels, although during modernisation, Effingham had two
boilers removed and her stacks were trunked into one. The maximum speed of each
ship was between 29 and 31 knots.
.P Defensive armour for the Hawkins-class was similar to their contemporaries,
with a belt of 3-inches at its maximum thickness, and a 1.5-inch armoured deck
covering the vital areas.
.P The class were named after famous Elizabethan-era sea captains.

Were there eight 4" guns in total or four?

_____________________________

Paul

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2205
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/10/2012 4:11:01 AM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 19281
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Elsie93

Here are couple of naval writeups.

Where?

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.
Post #: 2206
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/10/2012 6:33:05 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
Re 4-inch AA

Effingham had 8; four twin
Hawkins had 4 single
Frobisher had 5 single

You have read the section on Effingham and not her sisters - although having said that, I see that Effingham also states 4 in the technical details - I have amended to 8 and referred to mounts not guns.

< Message edited by warspite1 -- 4/10/2012 6:43:39 AM >


_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to paulderynck)
Post #: 2207
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/14/2012 6:05:08 PM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
Next on the list for intoduction finalisation are the Queen Elizabeth-class:


[4604 Warspite]
.B Engine(s) output: 80,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 24 knots
.B Main armament: 8 x 15-inch (381mm) guns, 8 x 6-inch (152mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 36,096 tons
.B Thickest armour: 13-inches (belt)
.P The Queen Elizabeth-class numbered five battleships that were ordered for
the Royal Navy (RN) in 1912. All five ships were laid down prior to World War I,
and were completed during 1915/16. A sixth ship, Agincourt, was ordered in 1914
but was cancelled upon the outbreak of war.
.P At completion they were the most powerful battleships afloat. For their main
armament, they used a new, and at that time, untested, 15-inch gun that was to
prove a highly successful weapon. They were originally to have five twin turrets,
but the centre "Q" turret was left off the final design to allow space for extra
boilers. For their secondary armament, fourteen (sixteen in Queen Elizabeth)
6-inch guns were mounted, mostly in casemates. Anti-aircraft (AA) defence was
originally limited to just two, 3-inch high-angle guns. Rounding off the weapons
package were four, submerged, 21-inch torpedo tubes.
.P Defensive armour centred on a belt, 13-inches at its maximum thickness, while
deck armour was 2-inches over the magazines and 1-inch over the machinery spaces.
.P The battleships of the Queen Elizabeth-class were the first such RN ships to
use oil rather than coal. The removal of the fifth turret mentioned above allowed
room for additional boilers and thus an increase in top speed from 21 to 25
knots. These ships could be described as the first fast battleships, although in
practice, 23-24 knots was the highest speed that they could obtain. Even so this
class gave the RN the fast, well armoured battle squadron that it desired.
.P Four of the five ships: Warspite, Valiant, Barham and Malaya fought in the
fleet encounter at Jutland in May 1916 (Queen Elizabeth was undergoing a refit at
the time). While Barham and Malaya suffered relatively light damage during that
famous battle, Warspite was lucky to survive; she was hit by a staggering twenty-
nine shells after her steering jammed and she sailed straight for the
German battlefleet.
.P During the post-war period the battleship building holiday imposed by the 1922
Washington Naval Treaty meant that existing battleships needed to be modernised,
and the Queen Elizabeths benefitted from a limited modernisation program starting
with Warspite (1924) and ending with Barham (1934). Bulges were fitted to improve
underwater protection at this time and AA weaponry was increased; the 3-inch guns
being replaced with four, single 4-inch guns. Visually the ships were altered by
the trunking of the two funnels into one.
.P With the failure of the Japanese to ratify the 1936 London Naval Treaty,
three ships: Warspite, Valiant and Queen Elizabeth benefitted from further, and
more substantial, modernisation. This program started with Warspite and lasted
from 1934 to 1937. Work on Valiant was complete just after the outbreak of the
Second World War, but Queen Elizabeth was not ready for service until the end of
1940, Note: for this reason she appears in the Repair Pool in the World In Flames
Global War scenario. Improvements included the fitting of brand new, smaller and
lighter machinery which increased power and extended their range. The biggest
visual change was the addition of a completely new, modern looking bridge and
superstructure, as a result of which, these battleships became a remarkable
vision of new (superstructure) meets old (hull).
.P The main guns had their elevation increased to 30 degrees, appreciably
improving their range. Both secondary and close-range weapons were substantially
improved. As a result, Warspite retained just eight of her 6-inch casemated guns,
with the remainder being removed, and her four single 4-inch AA guns were
replaced with a similar number of twin mounts. Valiant and Queen Elizabeth had
all their 6-inch guns removed, and instead of a separate 4-inch AA battery, these
two ships were given twenty, dual-purpose 4.5-inch guns fitted in ten twin
mounts. All three battleships were given four, 8-barrel 2-pdr pompoms for close-
range AA defence. A catapult and a hanger that could carry two aircraft were also
fitted to each.
.P Belt armour remained the same, but the weak horizontal armour was greatly
increased, with a maximum thickness of 5.5-inches over the magazines and 3.5-
inches over the machinery spaces.
.P Unfortunately financial and resource constraints meant that Malaya and Barham
failed to receive the same level of upgrade and they entered World War II with
the benefit of neither new machinery nor new superstructure. The two ships did at
least receive improved levels of AA weaponry (both had four, twin 4-inch mounts
and two 8-barrelled 2-pdr pompoms installed) and a limited increase in horizontal
protection over the vital machinery and magazine spaces.
.P The technical details above reflect how Warspite looked during World War II.
.P The names of the ships of the class had no common theme. Queen Elizabeth was
named after the Tudor Queen of England, Elizabeth I; Warspite, meaning "to
treat war with contempt" was originally used by the RN during Elizabeth's reign
in the 16th Century; Valiant was a typically bold name, the like of which the RN
used frequently on their capital ships; Barham was named after Admiral Charles
Middleton, Lord Barham, who was the First Sea Lord of the Admiralty during the
Napoleonic war; and finally Malaya was named after the British colony; the funds
for her construction having been paid for by the Malay government.

< Message edited by warspite1 -- 4/14/2012 6:06:17 PM >


_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2208
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 4/15/2012 12:19:34 AM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
[4604 Warspite]
.B Engine(s) output: 80,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 24 knots
.B Main armament: 8 x 15-inch (381mm) guns, 8 x 6-inch (152mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 36,096 tons
.B Thickest armour: 13-inches (belt)
.P The Queen Elizabeth-class numbered five battleships that were ordered for
the Royal Navy (RN) in 1912. All five ships were laid down prior to World War I,
and were completed during 1915/16. A sixth ship, Agincourt, was ordered in 1914
but was cancelled upon the outbreak of war.
.P At completion they were the most powerful battleships afloat. For their main
armament, they used a new, and at that time, untested, 15-inch gun that was to
prove a highly successful weapon. They were originally to have five twin turrets,
but the centre "Q" turret was left off the final design to allow space for extra
boilers. For their secondary armament, fourteen (sixteen in Queen Elizabeth)
6-inch guns were mounted, mostly in casemates. Anti-aircraft (AA) defence was
originally limited to just two, 3-inch high-angle guns. Rounding off the weapons
package were four, submerged, 21-inch torpedo tubes.
.P Defensive armour centred on a belt, 13-inches at its maximum thickness, while
deck armour was 2-inches over the magazines and 1-inch over the machinery spaces.
.P The battleships of the Queen Elizabeth-class were the first such RN ships to
use oil rather than coal. The removal of the fifth turret mentioned above allowed
room for additional boilers and thus an increase in top speed from 21 to 25
knots. These ships could be described as the first fast battleships, although in
practice, 23-24 knots was the highest speed that they could obtain. Even so this
class gave the RN the fast, well armoured battle squadron that it desired.
.P Four of the five ships: Warspite, Valiant, Barham and Malaya fought in the
fleet encounter at Jutland in May 1916 (Queen Elizabeth was undergoing a refit at
the time). While Barham and Malaya suffered relatively light damage during that
famous battle, Warspite was lucky to survive; she was hit by a staggering twenty-
nine shells after her steering jammed and she sailed straight for the
German battlefleet.
.P During the post-war period the battleship building holiday imposed by the 1922
Washington Naval Treaty meant that existing battleships needed to be modernised,
and the Queen Elizabeths benefitted from a limited modernisation program starting
with Warspite (1924) and ending with Barham (1934). Bulges were fitted to improve
underwater protection at this time and AA weaponry was increased; the 3-inch guns
being replaced with four, single 4-inch guns. Visually the ships were altered by
the trunking of the two funnels into one.
.P With the failure of the Japanese to ratify the 1936 London Naval Treaty,
three ships: Warspite, Valiant and Queen Elizabeth benefitted from further, and
more substantial, modernisation. This program started with Warspite and lasted
from 1934 to 1937. Work on Valiant was complete just after the outbreak of the
Second World War, but Queen Elizabeth was not ready for service until the end of
1940, Note: for this reason she appears in the Repair Pool in the World In Flames
Global War scenario. Improvements included the fitting of brand new, smaller and
lighter machinery, which increased power and extended their range. The biggest
visual change was the addition of a completely new, modern looking bridge and
superstructure, as a result of which, these battleships became a remarkable
vision of new (superstructure) meets old (hull).
.P The main guns had their elevation increased to 30 degrees, appreciably
improving their range. Both secondary and close-range weapons were substantially
improved. As a result, Warspite retained just eight of her 6-inch casemated guns,
with the remainder being removed, and her four single 4-inch AA guns were
replaced with a similar number of twin mounts. Valiant and Queen Elizabeth had
all their 6-inch guns removed, and instead of a separate 4-inch AA battery, these
two ships were given twenty, dual-purpose 4.5-inch guns fitted in ten twin
mounts. All three battleships were given four, 8-barrel 2-pdr pompoms for close-
range AA defence. A catapult and a hanger that could carry two aircraft were also
fitted to each.
.P Belt armour remained the same, but the weak horizontal armour was greatly
increased, with a maximum thickness of 5.5-inches over the magazines and 3.5-
inches over the machinery spaces.
.P Unfortunately financial and resource constraints meant that Malaya and Barham
failed to receive the same level of upgrade and they entered World War II with
the benefit of neither new machinery nor new superstructure. The two ships did at
least receive improved levels of AA weaponry (both had four, twin 4-inch mounts
and two 8-barrelled 2-pdr pompoms installed) and a limited increase in horizontal
protection over the vital machinery and magazine spaces.
.P The technical details above reflect how Warspite looked during World War II.
.P The names of the ships of the class had no common theme. Queen Elizabeth was
named after the Tudor Queen of England, Elizabeth I; Warspite, meaning "to
treat war with contempt" was originally used by the RN during Elizabeth's reign
in the 16th Century; Valiant was a typically bold name, the like of which the RN
used frequently on their capital ships; Barham was named after Admiral Charles
Middleton, Lord Barham, who was the First Sea Lord of the Admiralty during the
Napoleonic war; and finally Malaya was named after the British colony; the funds
for her construction having been paid for by the Malay government.



_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2209
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 5/31/2012 8:58:31 PM   
michaelbaldur


Posts: 4001
Joined: 4/6/2007
From: denmark
Status: online
just read this one ... and it is clearly wrong.

the Italians did not use 175.000 troops to invade British Somaliland





Attachment (1)

_____________________________

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I work hard, not smart.

beta tester and Mwif expert

(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2210
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 6/1/2012 2:33:36 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: michaelbaldur

just read this one ... and it is clearly wrong.

the Italians did not use 175.000 troops to invade British Somaliland



Pleae post the entire write up for the AOI unit. The scroll bar indicates more information.

Also Your sorce showing what information is incorrect.


So we can compare with the original write up.

Please note Zeila, Odweina, and Hargeisa are in Somalia (French Somali Coast, Italian Somaliland, and British Somaliland).




< Message edited by Extraneous -- 6/1/2012 2:56:16 PM >


_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to michaelbaldur)
Post #: 2211
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 6/1/2012 3:20:12 PM   
Orm


Posts: 6868
Joined: 5/3/2008
From: Sweden
Status: offline
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_conquest_of_British_Somaliland list the attacking Italian force at around 24,000 men.

_____________________________

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(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2212
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 6/1/2012 6:33:21 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 19281
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Extraneous

quote:

ORIGINAL: michaelbaldur

just read this one ... and it is clearly wrong.

the Italians did not use 175.000 troops to invade British Somaliland



Pleae post the entire write up for the AOI unit. The scroll bar indicates more information.

Also Your sorce showing what information is incorrect.


So we can compare with the original write up.

Please note Zeila, Odweina, and Hargeisa are in Somalia (French Somali Coast, Italian Somaliland, and British Somaliland).




Not much was missing.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2213
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 6/1/2012 6:51:51 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
East African Campaign (World War II)

Italy Invades British Somaliland

British and Italian Campaign in East Africa, 1940-41

Perhaps it should have read "Had available".


But then again note only 2 of the 3 columns were used at Tug Argan.

< Message edited by Extraneous -- 6/1/2012 6:54:53 PM >


_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to Orm)
Post #: 2214
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 8/27/2012 9:36:26 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline
Here's the final draft for the write-up for HMS Iron Duke.

[4585 Iron Duke]
.B Engine(s) output: 29,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 21.25 knots
.B Main armament: 10 x 13.5-inch (343mm), 12 x 6-inch (152mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 30,380 tons
.B Thickest armour: 12-inches (belt), 2.5-inch (deck)
.P Four battleships of the Iron Duke-class were built for the Royal Navy (RN)
between 1912 and 1914. The ships - Iron Duke, Marlborough, Benbow and Emperor of
India - were essentially improved versions of the preceding King George V-class
(KGV).
.P For their main armament, these battleships were fitted with ten 13.5-inch guns
that were housed within five twin turrets. They were the first RN dreadnoughts
that featured a 6-inch, rather than a 4-inch, secondary armament. Twelve single
guns were mounted in casemates in the hull, six each side. The Iron Dukes were
also the first RN battleships to be fitted with an anti-aircraft (AA) defence;
two 3-inch guns were mounted for this purpose. Rounding off their weapons package
were four submerged 21-inch torpedo tubes.
.P Defensive armour was improved in comparison to the earlier KGV's. The main
belt was a maximum of 12-inches and deck armour was 2.5-inches at its thickest.
.P Machinery was similar to the KGV's, but at 21.25 knots the Iron Dukes could
boast a marginal improvement in top speed allied to an increased range.
.P There was no common theme to the naming of the four ships; two were named
after famous British Army commanders - Iron Duke in honour of Arthur Wellesley,
the Duke of Wellington and Marlborough after John Churchill, 1st Duke of
Marlborough. Benbow honoured John Benbow, the 17th century RN Admiral. The
Emperor of India was originally to have been named Delhi, but her name was
altered during construction in honour of King George V.
.P The Iron Dukes were excellent ships and gave good service during World War I.
Three of the four - including Iron Duke - were veterans of the fleet encounter at
Jutland in 1916 and all four ships of the class survived the war.
.P The four sisters were sent to the Mediterranean in 1919, from where they were
posted to the Black Sea to support White Russian forces during the Russian Civil
War.
.P However, by the late twenties they were already obsolete with faster and more
powerful ships having been built by the British, Americans and the Japanese since
their own launch in 1912/13. Two ships, Marlborough and Benbow, were scrapped in
1931 under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty. The same fate awaited the
Emperor of India, although she was to be a target ship during firing tests
before meeting her end.
.P The only survivor was Iron Duke. She was de-militarised - she had two main
turrets removed along with her torpedo tubes and her speed was reduced to 18
knots due to the removal of some of her boilers - and turned initially into a
training ship.
.P At the outbreak of World War II Iron Duke was at Scapa Flow where she was used
as a base ship. While at anchor there, on the 17th October 1939, she was damaged
during an attack by four Ju-88's of KG30 and she had to be beached. She remained
there for the rest of the war.
.P Reflecting her de-militarised state in 1939, Iron Duke begins the World In
Flames Global War scenario in the Construction Pool. The Commonwealth player has
the choice of leaving her there or spending build points to bring her into a
limited serviceable condition.
.P Note: Iron Dukes' statistics above are as she appeared in World War I.
.P HMS Iron Duke was scrapped in 1948.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2215
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 8/28/2012 10:33:24 PM   
Extraneous

 

Posts: 1682
Joined: 6/14/2008
Status: offline
HMS Iron Duke checked.

_____________________________

University of Science Music and Culture (USMC) class of 71 and 72 ~ Extraneous (AKA Mziln)

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2216
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 8/30/2012 2:45:19 AM   
warspite1


Posts: 19994
Joined: 2/2/2008
From: England
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Extraneous

HMS Iron Duke checked.
Warspite1

Thank-you Extraneous.

_____________________________

England expects that every man will do his duty - Horatio Nelson 1805.




(in reply to Extraneous)
Post #: 2217
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 8/30/2012 4:27:07 AM   
christo

 

Posts: 95
Joined: 11/24/2005
From: adelaide, australia
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: warspite1

Here's the final draft for the write-up for HMS Iron Duke.

[4585 Iron Duke]
.B Engine(s) output: 29,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 21.25 knots
.B Main armament: 10 x 13.5-inch (343mm), 12 x 6-inch (152mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 30,380 tons
.B Thickest armour: 12-inches (belt), 2.5-inch (deck)
.P Four battleships of the Iron Duke-class were built for the Royal Navy (RN)
between 1912 and 1914. The ships - Iron Duke, Marlborough, Benbow and Emperor of
India - were essentially improved versions of the preceding King George V-class
(KGV).





.
Sorry if I am displaying my ignorance here but was HMS KGV not part of the Centurion class ?
The KGV class was not commissioned til 1939.

(in reply to warspite1)
Post #: 2218
RE: Unit Descriptions: Air, Naval, Land - 8/30/2012 5:00:02 AM   
christo

 

Posts: 95
Joined: 11/24/2005
From: adelaide, australia
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: christo


quote:

ORIGINAL: warspite1

Here's the final draft for the write-up for HMS Iron Duke.

[4585 Iron Duke]
.B Engine(s) output: 29,000 hp
.B Top Speed: 21.25 knots
.B Main armament: 10 x 13.5-inch (343mm), 12 x 6-inch (152mm) guns
.B Displacement (full load): 30,380 tons
.B Thickest armour: 12-inches (belt), 2.5-inch (deck)
.P Four battleships of the Iron Duke-class were built for the Royal Navy (RN)
between 1912 and 1914. The ships - Iron Duke, Marlborough, Benbow and Emperor of
India - were essentially improved versions of the preceding King George V-class
(KGV).





.
Sorry if I am displaying my ignorance here but was HMS KGV not part of the Centurion class ?
The KGV class was not commissioned til 1939.


Having done more reading am I right that there are 2 classes of KGV battleships ?
Those commissioned in 1911 (KGV, Centurion, Audacious, Ajax) and the second world war (KGV, Prince of Wales, Duke of York, Howe, Anson).

(in reply to christo)
Post #: 2219
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