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RE: Need help!!!

 
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RE: Need help!!! - 11/22/2007 6:40:30 PM   
grisouille

 

Posts: 605
Joined: 6/7/2007
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: capitan

Status-report on Landunits (all countries):
574 out of 1062 units done (54%)

DONE:
Siberian Russia 4/4 (Adam) DONE!
Finland 8/8 (Adam) DONE!
Rumania 10/10 (Adam) DONE!
Mongolia 1/1 (Adam) DONE!
Switzerland 6/6 (Adam) DONE!
Phillipines 1/1 (Adam) DONE!
Afghanistan 2/2 (Adam) DONE!
Australia 8/8 (Michaelbaldur) DONE!
New Zeeland 3/3 (Michaelbaldur) DONE!
South Africa 5/5 (Michaelbaldur) DONE!
Denmark 1/1 (Michaelbaldur) DONE!
Norway 3/3 (Michaelbaldur) DONE!
Poland 14/14 (Michaelbaldur) DONE!
AOI 1/1 (Mziln) DONE!
Croatia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Ecuador 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Peru 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
French Somalia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Ivory Coast 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
French Sudan 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Senegal 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Middle Congo 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Niger 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Indo-China 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
N. East Indies 2/2 (Capitan) DONE!
Belgian Congo 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Saudi Arabia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Iraq 2/2 (Capitan) DONE!
Liberia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Cameroon 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Gabon 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Madagascar 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Morroco 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Algeria 2/2 (Capitan) DONE!
Tunisia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Syria 2/2 (Capitan) DONE!
Sudan 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Nigeria 2/2 (Capitan) DONE!
Sierra Leone 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
British Somalialand 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Egypt 2/2 (Capitan) DONE!
Kenya 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Uganda 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Tanganyika 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Northern Rhodesia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Southern Rhodesia 1/1 (Capitan) DONE!
Sweden 13/13 (Toed) DONE!
Ireland 2/2 (bj_rodhe) DONE!
Hungary 6/6 (Grisouille) DONE!
Bulgaria 3/3 (Grisouille) DONE!
France 68/68(Grisouille)DONE (but not redacted)
Greece 4/4 (Grisouille) DONE!
SS-Germany 19/19 (Grisouille) DONE!

ASSIGNED but NOT DONE:
USA 50/99 (Adam)
Russia 124/146 (Adam)
Ukraine 0/8 (Adam)
Communist China 16/18 (Wosung)
Nat. China 34/38 (Wosung)
Korea 0/2 (Wosung)
Manchuko 0/4 (Wosung)
Formosa 0/1 (Wosung)
Italy 22/61 (Jimm)
Libya 0/3 (Jimm)
Eritrea 0/1 (Jimm)
Italian Somalialand 0/2 (Jimm)
Canada 1/10 (Michaelbaldur)
India 1/13 (Michaelbaldur)
Burma 0/2 (Michaelbaldur)
Germany 73/128 (Capitan)
Thailand 0/1 (Capitan)
Palestine 0/1 (Capitan)
Aden 0/1 (Capitan)
New Caledonia 0/1 (Capitan)
Belgium 0/4 (BredsjMagnus)
Nat. Spain 2/14 (SPerdomo)
Yugoslavia 1/9 (Dale)
Zoya and Tito 0/2 Dale)
Northern Ireland 0/1 (IrishDrago0nGuards)
Japan 11/76 (Hazpak)
UK 9/57 (bj_rodhe)
Brasil 0/5 (Horaf)
Argentina 0/3 (Horaf)

UNASSIGNED:
Mexico 0/6
Panama 0/2
Colombia 0/1
Venezuela 0/1
Bolivia 0/1
Paraguay 0/1
Uruguay 0/1
Chile 0/2
-----------
Iran 0/2
Netherlands 0/2
Portugal 0/2
Turkey 1/13

LOW PRIORITY:
Ethiopia 1/6
Rep. Spain 1/14
Czeckoslovakia 1/15
Austria 0/3
-------------
"NEW UNITS" 7/61

Also the ART (including ART, AA and AT) for all nations is UNASSIGNED.

Anyone who like to pitch in with any of the unassigned countries is welcome to take part! Just send me a PM and I will help you get started!



- Capitan


Capitan,

I'm going to do the netherlands!

(in reply to capitan)
Post #: 571
RE: Need help!!! - 11/22/2007 7:35:30 PM   
capitan


Posts: 694
Joined: 7/29/2006
Status: offline
Noted! :-)

(in reply to grisouille)
Post #: 572
RE: Need help!!! - 11/23/2007 10:26:02 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
Here are some of the new writeups of French land units I thought you might find interesting (I did).




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to capitan)
Post #: 573
RE: Need help!!! - 11/23/2007 10:28:04 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
Since the territorial units often saw little or no action, a brief overview of the country at the time of WWII is given for most of these units.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 574
RE: Need help!!! - 11/23/2007 10:29:46 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
This helps explain some of the rules in WIF concerning Madagascar.




Attachment (1)

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Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 575
RE: Need help!!! - 11/23/2007 10:31:45 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
4th and last in the series. [Capitan (land) and Graf Zeppelin (naval) are still looking for authors.]




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 576
RE: Need help!!! - 11/25/2007 10:02:52 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
Some of the new naval writeups.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 577
RE: Need help!!! - 11/25/2007 10:03:59 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
The second Finnish battleship in MWIF.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 578
RE: Need help!!! - 11/25/2007 10:05:42 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
The Turkish navy didn't see any action in WWII but they saw a lot in WWI.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 579
RE: Need help!!! - 11/25/2007 10:06:47 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline
4th and last in the series. A light cruiser - for a change of pace.




Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 580
RE: Need help!!! - 11/25/2007 11:59:34 PM   
capitan


Posts: 694
Joined: 7/29/2006
Status: offline
Reading the writeups I must say I am really impressed with the work done (not talking about my own of course, they are utter crap ).

Good work everyone involved!


< Message edited by capitan -- 11/26/2007 12:00:27 AM >

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 581
RE: Need help!!! - 11/26/2007 1:15:11 AM   
Neilster


Posts: 2254
Joined: 10/27/2003
From: Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Shannon V. OKeets

This helps explain some of the rules in WIF concerning Madagascar.




It might be better to add a date rather than "early summer". Madagascar is in the southern hemisphere where the seasons are in their correct places in the calender.

Strangely you northern hemisphere folk have Christmas when it's all cold and snowy when everybody knows it should be stinking hot with a fat dude in a red suit sweating his arse off.

Cheers, Neilster

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 582
RE: Need help!!! - 11/26/2007 2:58:35 AM   
brian brian

 

Posts: 1667
Joined: 11/16/2005
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beautiful, beautiful stuff everyone.

I think with the French divisions it would be interesting to know what DLM stands for. Reading that corps summary above introduced two more, DM and DIM. I've just always kind of wondered how those intials connect to the full French phrase and how that translates to English. It's not too hard to figre out overall but it might be interesting to see the original French.


re: Madagascar, I thought the Allies were somewhat frustrated by the length of time the Vichy forces resisted (which I think was partially due to poor communications on the large island). The important objectives of Diego Suarez and other ports potentially of use to the Japanese were taken quickly but the interior and the capital were not cleared for some time (without a lot of serious combat, iirc) but then the Allies didn't commit a lot of forces to these secondary objectives. So it reads a little odd to hear a 6 month campaign described as a 'quick' surrender.

(in reply to Neilster)
Post #: 583
RE: Need help!!! - 11/26/2007 3:57:10 AM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Tulsa Oklahoma
Status: offline
quote:

ORIGINAL: brian brian

beautiful, beautiful stuff everyone.

I think with the French divisions it would be interesting to know what DLM stands for. Reading that corps summary above introduced two more, DM and DIM. I've just always kind of wondered how those intials connect to the full French phrase and how that translates to English. It's not too hard to figre out overall but it might be interesting to see the original French.


re: Madagascar, I thought the Allies were somewhat frustrated by the length of time the Vichy forces resisted (which I think was partially due to poor communications on the large island). The important objectives of Diego Suarez and other ports potentially of use to the Japanese were taken quickly but the interior and the capital were not cleared for some time (without a lot of serious combat, iirc) but then the Allies didn't commit a lot of forces to these secondary objectives. So it reads a little odd to hear a 6 month campaign described as a 'quick' surrender.


DLM = Division Lgre Mcanique (See my post this thread Post # 498)

DLM = Mechanical Light division
DIM = Motorized Infantry Division
DM = Division Marocaine (Moroccan infantry division)

1939-1940 FRENCH ARMAMENT ~ by David Lehmann April 19, 2006

< Message edited by Mziln -- 11/26/2007 4:40:31 AM >

(in reply to brian brian)
Post #: 584
RE: Need help!!! - 11/26/2007 5:32:36 PM   
mlees


Posts: 2261
Joined: 9/20/2003
From: San Diego
Status: offline
*Insert grump about Europeans using commas as a decimal point*

(14,5 knots...)

Two suggestions for the write ups:

quote:

As France fell in 1940 the colony was isolated and unsupplied with goods and arms.


Should this be read as: "As France fell in 1940, the colony was isolated, and remained undersupplied with modern weapons."?

The write-up for the Ilmarinen needs a space between "the" and "Kalevala" in the first paragraph.

The write-up for the Hamidieh should mention which war the ship was fighting in in 1913...

*waves at you guys*

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 585
RE: Need help!!! - 11/26/2007 8:05:45 PM   
capitan


Posts: 694
Joined: 7/29/2006
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: brian brian
So it reads a little odd to hear a 6 month campaign described as a 'quick' surrender.


As I read it Operation Ironclad was over pretty quickly and then mopping up took longer as the inland is quite difficult terrain.

(in reply to brian brian)
Post #: 586
RE: Need help!!! - 11/26/2007 8:06:28 PM   
capitan


Posts: 694
Joined: 7/29/2006
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: mlees
Two suggestions for the write ups:

quote:

As France fell in 1940 the colony was isolated and unsupplied with goods and arms.


Should this be read as: "As France fell in 1940, the colony was isolated, and remained undersupplied with modern weapons."?


Yes, that is a nice change.

(in reply to mlees)
Post #: 587
RE: Need help!!! - 11/27/2007 12:45:06 PM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Tulsa Oklahoma
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: mlees

*Insert grump about Europeans using commas as a decimal point*

(14,5 knots...)

Two suggestions for the write ups:

quote:

As France fell in 1940 the colony was isolated and unsupplied with goods and arms.


Should this be read as: "As France fell in 1940, the colony was isolated, and remained undersupplied with modern weapons."?

The write-up for the Ilmarinen needs a space between "the" and "Kalevala" in the first paragraph.

The write-up for the Hamidieh should mention which war the ship was fighting in in 1913...

*waves at you guys*



The write-up for the Hamidieh tells you the ship was fighting in World War I at the start of the second sentence.


"In WW I on the night of January 1, 1913"

(in reply to mlees)
Post #: 588
RE: Need help!!! - 11/27/2007 5:06:10 PM   
brian brian

 

Posts: 1667
Joined: 11/16/2005
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so that would be "In the Second Balkan War ..." ???

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 589
RE: Need help!!! - 11/27/2007 6:27:22 PM   
mlees


Posts: 2261
Joined: 9/20/2003
From: San Diego
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mziln


quote:

ORIGINAL: mlees

*Insert grump about Europeans using commas as a decimal point*

(14,5 knots...)

Two suggestions for the write ups:

quote:

As France fell in 1940 the colony was isolated and unsupplied with goods and arms.


Should this be read as: "As France fell in 1940, the colony was isolated, and remained undersupplied with modern weapons."?

The write-up for the Ilmarinen needs a space between "the" and "Kalevala" in the first paragraph.

The write-up for the Hamidieh should mention which war the ship was fighting in in 1913...

*waves at you guys*



The write-up for the Hamidieh tells you the ship was fighting in World War I at the start of the second sentence.


"In WW I on the night of January 1, 1913"


WW1 didn't start until August 1914. That's why it might not be clear (to someone not as well versed in history as we are) which war the Hamidieh was fighting in 1913.

I believe the First Balkan War lasted from Oct 8, 1912, to May 30, 1913.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Balkan_War

The Second Balkan War went from June 16, 1913 until July 18, 1913.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Balkan_War

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 590
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 12:28:28 AM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Tulsa Oklahoma
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: mlees


quote:

ORIGINAL: Mziln


quote:

ORIGINAL: mlees

*Insert grump about Europeans using commas as a decimal point*

(14,5 knots...)

Two suggestions for the write ups:

quote:

As France fell in 1940 the colony was isolated and unsupplied with goods and arms.


Should this be read as: "As France fell in 1940, the colony was isolated, and remained undersupplied with modern weapons."?

The write-up for the Ilmarinen needs a space between "the" and "Kalevala" in the first paragraph.

The write-up for the Hamidieh should mention which war the ship was fighting in in 1913...

*waves at you guys*



The write-up for the Hamidieh tells you the ship was fighting in World War I at the start of the second sentence.


"In WW I on the night of January 1, 1913"


WW1 didn't start until August 1914. That's why it might not be clear (to someone not as well versed in history as we are) which war the Hamidieh was fighting in 1913.

I believe the First Balkan War lasted from Oct 8, 1912, to May 30, 1913.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Balkan_War

The Second Balkan War went from June 16, 1913 until July 18, 1913.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Balkan_War



See my post ~ This thread ~ Page 19 ~ #549

I don't remember changing it to WW I.

(in reply to mlees)
Post #: 591
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 12:38:30 AM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Tulsa Oklahoma
Status: offline
Here are some more for you to desk check


Japanese Navy:

5 x CVL Shinyo, Ryj, Kaiyo, Chidya, Ibuki

CVL Shinyo


Displacement: 17,500 tons Dimensions: 625 1/2 (pp) 650 1/5 (oa) x 843/4 x 25 1/2 feet. Flight Deck: 590 1/2 x 80 feet. Propulsion: 2-shaft geared Turbines. Speed: 22 knots. Crew: 948 Armament: 8 x 5 inch DP guns, 42 x 25mm AA (10 x 3 and 12 x 1), 33 aircraft.

She was launched December 14, 1934 as the passenger liner Scharnhorst for the German Norddeutscher Line. The Japanese purchased her in the spring of 1942 to be used as a troop transport. But after the Battle of Midway she was urgently converted into an aircraft carrier for the purpose of training new pilots. She was refitted in 1944 to increase anti-air battery. The submarine USS Spedefish torpedoed and sank her on November 14, 1944 in the Yellow Sea by . Fewer than 200 of the crew survived.

CVL Ryj ("Prancing Dragon") (1933-1942) ex-tender Taigei

Displacement: 12,732 tons Dimensions: 167 x 20.32 x 5.56 meters. Propulsion: Steam turbines, 6 boilers, 2 shafts, 65,000 hp (48.5 MW) Speed: 29 knots (54 km/h) Range: 10,000 nautical miles at 14 knots (19,000 km at 26 km/h) Complement: 924. Armament: 8 x 5 inch (127mm) AA guns (in dual mounts), 4 x 25mm AA guns, 24 x 13mm AA guns. Aircraft: 38

Ryj was a was laid down in 1929, launched in 1931 and commissioned in 1933. She first saw action in the Second Sino-Japanese War supporting land operations of the Japanese Army in China. Where her aircraft complement consisted of 27 aircraft. Durring World War II, she as the flagship of Carrier Division 4. In 1941 she supported several landiings in the Philippines. In 1942 she supported the conquest of Malaya and attacked the Allied forces arround Java. As part of the Indian Ocean raid. Durring April her and her escort were credited with the sinking of 23 merchant ships. She was part of the Northern Force that attaced the Aleutians. Where one of her Mutsubishi A6M Zero's crashed. The intelligence gained from this crash helped the United States to develop the F6F Hellcat.

Durring the Battle of the Eastern Solomans she was sunk by U.S. carrier aircraft with a loss of 120 of the crew.


CVL Kaiyo (1943-1945) ex-luxury liner Argentina Maru

Displacement: 17,500 tons Dimensions: 516 (pp) 545 1/2 (oa) x 69 x 26 1/3 feet. Flight Deck: 524 x 75 1/2 feet. Propulsion: 2-shaft geared Turbines. Speed: 23 1/2 knots. Crew: 829 Armament: 8 x 5 inch (127mm) AA guns (in dual mounts), 24 x 25mm AA guns (in triple mounts). Aircraft: 24
Compleated in 1939 she was originaly built as Argentina Maru a luxury liner. The Japanese Navy took her over in 1941 for use as a transport under her original name. And in 1942 she was renamed Kaiyo and work was started to convert her to a aricraft carrier. She served from 1942 until 1945 as a escort carrier, transporting aircraft, and as a training carrier. In 1945 she was seriously damaged in port by carrier aircraft July and stricken in November.


CVL Chidya ("Field of a thousand generations") (1943-1945) Chitose class CVL

Displacement: 11,200 tons (standard) 15,300 tons (max.) Dimensions: 192.5 x 20.8 x 7.5 meters. Propulsion: 2 geared turbines, 2 steam turbines, 2 shafts 56,800 shp Speed: 28.9 knots Complement: 800 Armament: 8 127mm, 30-48 (in 1944) 25mm Aircraft: 30
Commission in 1938 as a seaplane carrier. She was converted to a light carrier in 1943-1944. On October 25, 1944 she was sunk with all hands at the Battle of Cape Engano as part of the decoy carrier force during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.


CVL Ibuki

She was to be very light armed with only 4 x 76mm AA, 48 x 25mm AA, stern rails for up to 30 depth charges, fitted with radar, 120mm AA rockets, and a air complement of only 27 aircraft. This would have given her an smaller air complement than any other Japanese light carrier. Sadly due to construction changes her maximum speed had been reduced from a planned 32 knots to 29 knots.

The ship was ordered under the 1941 Program as a slightly modified version of the Tone Class. And had the distinction of being the last named heavy cruiser that the Imperial Japanese Navy began. Before she was laid down in early 1942 her design was altered to an improved Mogami design. This required an extensive rebuild to save as much weight as possiable and fix defects found after trials. Her construction was slowed after the battle of Midway due to all priority for ship construction being given to aircraft carriers. She was launched May 21, 1943 at Kure Japan. But construction was halted again a month later before her main armament was installed.

A second cruiser of her class No. 301 was started but later scrapped in 1943. The materials going to other construction.
The Imperial Navy considered compleating her as a fleet oiler. But since her hull had been finished she was instead towed to Sasebo in November 1943 to be converted to a light aircraft carrier.

Work continued until March 1945, when shipyard damage and shortage of materials made construction impossible. She was 80% complete when surrendered and was scrapped 1947.

5 x CV Shikishima, Fuji, Shwa, Meiji, Karyu

CV Shikishima (1898-1948)
Served in the Russo-Japanese War 1904-1905.
CV Fuji (1896-1948) Served in the Russo-Japanese War 1904-1905. She served as a training vessel durring WW II.
CV Shwa refers to Emperor Shwa (Hirohito) (April 29, 1901-January 7, 1989)
CV Shwa refers to Emperor Meiji Tenno (Mutsuhito) (November 3, 1852-July 30, 1912)
Karyu ("Fire Dragon")

CV Shikishima, Fuji, Shwa, Meiji, and Karyu represent five modified versions of the Taih class, Hull Nos. 5021 through 5025. In 1942 two modified versions of the Taih class were ordered, Hull Nos. 801 & 802. But instead they were canceled and it was planned to construct five modified versions of the Taih class, Hull Nos. 5021 through 5025. One was reported as ordered but the others weren't. They were planned to be of a larger design.

http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/carriers/



6 x BB Unebi, Suma, Shinano, Seiki, Karyu, Hizen

BB Shinano


She had been planed as the third ship in the Yamato class. Built at Yokosuka Navy Yard. Laid down November 4, 1937. Work was suspended December 1940, cancelled 1942 when 50% complete. Converted to a carrier, 62,000 tons standard; 71,890 tons full load, 16 x 127mm (5 inch)/40-caliber guns, 145 - 25mm/60-caliber AA guns, 12 x 28-barreled 127mm (5 inch) AA rocket launchers. Air complement: 47 aircraft but capable of servicing 120 aircraft to replace losses on other carriers. Crew:2,400. Torpedoed and sunk November 29, 1944 while moving to Kure for final outfitting.

BB Hizen (a provence in Japan) (ex-Russian Retvizan) (1905-1924)

BB Hizen represents Hull No. 111 was to be the fourth Yamato class battleship. Work was stopped when the hull was 30% in November 1941. The order was canceled in September 1942.

BB Seiki ~ Named for an early Japanese cruser famed for being the first ship to sail from Japan to Europe with a entirely Japanese crew.

BB Seiki represents Hull No. 797 was to be the fifth Yamato class battleship. This vessel was to have two 155mm triple turrets removed and replaced with a large battery of 100mm AA guns. No construction order was ever placed.

BB Karyu ("Fire Dragon")
BB Suma (1896-1928)
An protected cruiser that served in the Russo-Japanese War 1904-1905. 1943

BB Karyu and Suma represent Hull Nos. 798 and 799 were to be the first "Super Yamato" class battleships. These were designed in 1941 and construction was to begin the following year. The orders were never placed, so any specifications are rudimentary at best. These ships were also referred to as design A-150.

Displacement:(tons) Standard: 70,000 Trials: 82,650 Armament: 6-20"/45 (510mm) 3 x 2 numerous 100mm/65 dual purpose Speed: 30 knots Additional protection was planned and full-scale models of the magazines and handling rooms for the turrets were constructed.

Ballistic tests were conducted on the 20-inch gun with an AP round that weighed 4,188 lb! No examples of this gun were found after the war.

No further preparations were carried out on these ships due to the changing strategic situation after 1942. There are frustratingly few details on four ships that were to be the ultimate Japanese battleship. Designed in 1941, it is uncertain when these were to begin building. These four, all unnamed, were to each carry eight 20-inch guns, and displace some 100,000 tons. Unfortunately, no further specifics are available.


BB Unebi ~ (1886-1887) A cruiser that disappeared without a trace somewhere in the South China Sea between Singapore and Yokohama. No trace of the ship or crew were ever found.

BB Unebi represents hull No. B65 Officially classified as a "Super A-type" cruiser. Displ: 32,000 tons standard; 34,800 tons trial Dim: 802.5 x 89 x 29 feet Propulsion: Steam turbines, 8 boilers, 4 shafts, 160,000 hp, 33 knots Crew: ? Arm: 3 x triple 14.2 inch, 8 x dual 3.9/65, 12 x 25mm AA, 8 x 13.2 mm AA, 8 x 24 inch Torpedo Tubes. Armor: 7.5 inch belt, 5 inch deck. Cancelled due to war restrictions.

http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/battleships/

http://1stbattalion3rdmarines.com/02-world-war-two/jap_yamoto.htm



6 x CA Myk , Aoba, Kinugasa, Kako, Idzumo, Kurama

CA Myk (1929-1946)

ADD THIS DESCRIPTION.


In December 1941 the heavy cruisers Myk and Nachi formed Cruiser Division Five part of the Cover Force for "Operation M," the invasion of the southern Philippine Islands. The flagship of the Cover Force was the light aircraft carrier Ryj.
In January 1942 Myk underwent repairs after being hit with a 500lb (227kg) bomb from an American B-17 Flying Fortress. In March 1942 she participated in the Battle of the Java Sea where the last of the remaining Allied fleet units were destroyed in the Rast Indies. Later that month she underwent a refit in Japan returning to duty in April. In May she took part in the Battle of the Coral Sea which was forced to withdraw without invading Port Moresby. In June Cruiser Division Five was part of the support force at the Battle of Midway which did not engage the enemy. At the end of June, Cruiser Division Five supported the reinforcement convoy Aleutuan Islands. In 1942 she sailed as part of the Second Fleet to reinforce and resupply of Japanese troops on Guadalcanal.

In January and Febuary 1943 she again underwent refit then took part in the Successful evacuation of 11,700 troops from Guadalcanal. In May 1943 she assisted in the evacuation of Kiska. In June she underwent another refit. and was equipped with 4 x twin Type 96 25mm AA gun mounts, and a Type 21 air search radar. In November she was refited 8 x single-mount 25mm AA guns, bringing the total to 24 guns.

In June 1944 Cruiser Division Five took part in the Battle of the Philippine Sea. Returning to Camranh Bay after taking part in the Battle of Leyte Gulf she was torpedoed. She had to be towed to Singapore where she finished the war as an anti-aircraft platform. Surrendered at wars end and scuttled in 1946.


Aoba Class: Aoba(1927-1945), Kinugasa (1927-1942)

CA Aoba(1927-1945)


Aoba was commissioned in September 1927 and served as a flagship during much of her career. From the the late 1920s to the early 1930s she served in Japanese and Chinese waters. She underwent modernization from 1938 to 1940 when she received new torpedo tubes, an enhanced anti-aircraft gun battery, improved gunnery fire controls and better aircraft handling facilities.

After the outbreak of war she took part in the capture of Guam and Wake. In May 1942 she participated in the Battle of the Coral Sea. During the Guadalcanal campaign she was heavily engaged with Allied sea and air forces.

On August 9, 1942 she participated in the the Battle of Savo Island. Where the cruisers USS Astoria, Quincy, Vincennes, HMAS Canberra were sunk. With the cruiser USS Chicago destroyers Bagley and Ralph Talbot being damaged.

On October 11, 1942 at the the Battle of Cape Esperance. She was seriously damaged by gunfire from U.S. warships. Having been hit by up to forty 6 and 8 inch rounds. She was sent to Japan for repairs and returned to duty in Febuary 1943. In April she was again damaged by air attack which placed her out of action until Decenber, when she resumed her duties in the East Indies area. She was torpedoed by the submarine USS Bream (SS-243) and before she could be repaired further damaged by bombing. She managed to limp into Japan in December where she spent the rest of the war as an anti-aircraft platform. She was sunk in shallow water and scrapped in 1947.


CA Kinugasa (1927-1942)

Kinugasa was commissioned in September 1927. She became the first Japanese combat ship to carry an aircraft catapult. She served off China from 1928 through 1930. She was placed in reserve in September 1937, until she was recommissionrd in October 1940 after extensively modernization.

In December 1941, she took part in the invasions of Guam and Wake Island. She participated in the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942 and in the heavy fighting to retake Guadalcanal later in the year. During the latter campaign, she took part in the Battle of Savo Island on August 9, the Battle and the Battle of Cape Esperance on October 13, and in the shelling of Guadalcanal's Henderson Field on November 14, 1942. While withdrawing on the morning after that bombardment, Kinugasa was sunk by planes based at Henderson Field and on the aircraft carrier Enterprise (CV-6).


CA Kako (1926-1942) Kako was one of two heavy cruisers of the Furutaka class.

Kako was completed on July 20,1926. Where she saw action while serving off the China coast. She was given a major refit in 1929-30, improving her machinery and slightly changing her appearance. and in 1933 briefly operated with Cruiser Division 6 in 1933. She went into guard ship status in November of that year and into reserve in 1934.

In July 1936, Kako underwent an extensive reconstruction where she had her six single 200mm (7.9-inch) main gun turrets replaced by three 203.2 mm (8-inch) twin turrets.

At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor her division was to support the invasion of Guam. After the first invasion of Wake Island failed they were assigned to the second larger successfull invasion. They next supported numerious other Japanese troop landings.

At the Battle of the Coral SeaKako and Aoba covered the withdraw of the Port Moresby invasion convoy.
In a major reorganization of the Japanese navy Kako was assigned to the newly created Eighth Fleet and was assigned to patrols around the Solomon Islands, New Britain and New Ireland.

After the Battle of Savo Island her division was ordered to proceed to Kavieng unescorted. She was attacked and sunk enroute by the American submarine USS S-44. Kako was removed from the Navy list on September 15, 1942.


CA Idzumo (1900-1945)

With the start of the Pacific War, despite its antiquated age, the Izumo was retrofitted with AA guns and re-classified back as a 1st class cruiser on July 1, 1942. However, throughout the WW II, it was used as a training vessel, never departing from the safe confines of the Inland Sea.

The Izumo sank durring an air raid on July 24, 1945, it was raised and scrapped in 1947.


CA Kurama Hull No. 301 B64 class large cruiser

Displacement: 32,000 tons standard; 34,800 tons trial Dimensions: 802.5 x 89 x 29 feet Propulsion: Steam turbines, 8 boilers, 4 shafts, 160,000 hp, 33 knots Crew: ??? Arm: 3 x triple 12.2/50, 8 x dual 3.9/65, 12 x 25mm AA, 8 x 13.2 mm AA, 8 x 24 inch Torpedo Tubes. Armor: 7.5 inch belt, 5 inch deck Cancelled due to war.

The original Ibuki class consisted of the Ibuki and her sister ship Kurama and were classified as battlecruisers. They were scrapped in acordance with the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922.

Durring WW II the Ibuki heavy cruiser class was to consist of the Ibuki and her sister ship designated Hull No. 301.
So Kurama represents the sister ship that was actualy started but then scrapped in 1943. The materials going to other construction.

Ibuki was to have a similar armament to Mogami, with ten 200 mm guns mounted in five twin turrets, three turrets at the bow and two at the aft. She was to have a secondary armament of eight 127 mm dual-purpose guns, sixteen 600 mm torpedo tubes and two catapults for three floatplanes. She was to have a maximum speed of 33 knots. The Mogamis had been built to save as much weight as possible but had to be extensively rebuilt shortly after trials to fix several defects. Because Ibuki was ordered after Japan had withdrawn from the Washington Naval Treaty and was not hindered by the 10,000-ton displacement limitation for cruisers, she was designed to weigh 12,200 tons and make a good balance of armament, armour, speed & seaworthiness.

Japanese Navy:

28 x CL
Agano Class: Agano (1942-1944), Yahagi (1943-1945), Noshiro (1943-1944), Sakawa (1944-1945)
Katori Class: Katori (1940-1944), Kashima (1940-1945), Kashii (1941-1945)
Kuma Class: Kuma (1919-1944), Tama (1920-1944), Kitakami (1920-1947), Oi (1920-1944), Kiso (1920-1944)
Nagara Class: Nagara (1921-1944), Isuzu (1923-1945), Yura (1923-1942), Natori (1922-1944), Kinu (1922-1944), Abukuma (1925-1944)
Ōyodo Class: Ōyodo (1943-1945)
Sendai Class: Sendai (1924-1943), Jintsu (1925-1943), Naka (1925-1944)
Tenryū Class: Tenryū (1919-1942), Tatsuta (1919-1944)
Takachiho (1885-1914)
Saien
Yubari (1923-1944)


Agano (1942-1944)

Displacement: 6,652 tons (standard); 7,590 tons (loaded) Length: 162 meters x15.2 meters x 5.6 meters Propulsion: 4 shaft Gihon geared Turbines, 6 Kampon boilers
Speed: 35 knots (67 km/h) Range: 6000 nautical miles at 18 knots. Crew: 726
Armament: 6 152mm Type 41 guns (3 x 2), 4 76 mm guns, 32 x 25 mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 610 mm torpedo tubes (4 dual mounts), 16 depth charges, 2 x floatplanes, 1 catapult.

Completed at the Sasebo Navy Yard and commissioned October 1942.

By February 9, 1943, the Japanese successfully evacuate 11,700 troops from Guadalcanal.

On May 21, 1943 In response to the American landings at Attu in the Alaskan Aleutians Ilands chain. She joined a naval force in Tokyo Bay consisting of the aircraft carriers Shōkaku, Zuikaku, Zuiho, Junyo, Hiyo, the Battleship Musashi, and several cruisers and destroyers. But before this fleet could sail Attu fell and the opration was canceled.

Durring June and July of 1943 she underwent a refit installing a Type 21 air search radar, 2 x triple and 2 x twin Type 96 25mm. AA gun mounts.Making her total 25mm. AA complement equal 16 guns (in 4 x tripple and 2 x double mounts).

Durring July 1943 the aircraft carriers Shokaku, Zuikaku, Zuihō, Chuyo, the seaplane carrier Nisshin, and several cruisers and destroyers embarks troops and material, then departs Tokyo Bay to renforce Truk. The ships are spotted by American submarines that are unable to successfuly attack. Later in July the Tone, Chikuma, Mogami, light cruisers Agano and Ōyodo along with destroyers successfuly transported troops to Rabaul and returned to Truk.

In September 1943 In an attempt to engage the Americans that are raiding Tarawa, Makin and Abemama Atolls. She sailed with a fleet consisting of the aircraft carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku, the battleships Yamato and Nagato, with several cruisers and destroyers. Unable to make contact the fleet returned to Truk.

After Ameican carrier raids on Wake Island and the Marshall Islands in October 1943. Japanese inteligence, based on intercepted radio trafic, belived that another raid on Wake Island was planned. Agano joins a fleet consisting of the aircraft carriers Shokaku, Zuikaku, Zuihō. The battleships Yamato, Musashi, Nagato, Fuso, Kongō, Haruna along with other cruisers and destroyers. When no contact is made the fleet returned to Truk.

October 1943 Agano sails with a fleet that includes the aircraft carriers Shokaku, Zuikaku, and Zuihō. The carriers lanch their aircraft 200 miles from Rabaul to reenforce the units there and return to truk. But Agano is ordered to continue on to Rabaul.

November sees the americans landing in Bougainville. A Japanese force from Rabaul is to attempt to land troops to oppose the Americans. Heavy cruisers Myoko, Haguro, light cruiser Sendai, along with destroyers are to support Agano with 3 destroyers are to escort 4 destroyers transporting 1,000 Japanese troops. This force is met by the Americans and the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay is fought and the Sendai and a destroyer are sunk. The Japanese withdraw to Rabaul. From Rabaul she is ordered to Truk. She is torpedoed by USS Scamp (SS-277) while in route but the Japanese manage to tow her into port where emergency repairs are made. In mid Febuary she departs for Japan but is hit by 2 torpedoes from the USS Skate (SS-305). The next day American aircraft sink her. She is removed for the list in March 1944.



Yahagi ("The arrow maker")(1943-1945)
Displacement: 6,652 tons (standard); 7,590 tons (loaded) Length: 162 meters x15.2 meters x 5.6 meters Propulsion: 4 shaft Gihon geared Turbines, 6 Kampon boilers
Speed: 35 knots (67 km/h) Range: 6000 nautical miles at 18 knots. Crew: 726
Armament: 6 152mm Type 41 guns (3 x 2), 4 76 mm guns, 32 x 25 mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 610 mm torpedo tubes (4 dual mounts), 16 depth charges, 2 x floatplanes, 1 catapult.

After being compleated on December 29,1843 she was sent to Singapore for training and patrol duties.

In June 1944 she underwent a refit in Japan where 2 triple mount Type 96 25mm AA guns were installed amidship. And a type 13 air-search and Type 22 surface-search radar radar were installed.



Durring the "Battle of the Philippine Sea" June 19-20, 1944 (A.K.A. Operation A-Go and Operation A) . She helped rescue 570 crewmen from the Shōkaku afteer it was torpedoed.



The "Battle of Leyte Gulf" (October 1944) this was actualy several battles consisting of:

The "Battle of the Sibuyan Sea" where Admiral Kurita's Force "A" (Center Force) which consisted of the battleships Yamato, Musashi, Nagato, Kongō, Haruna, along with cruisers and destroyers. They were attacked 11 times by over 250 carrier aircraft which sank the battleship Musashi. While the heavy crusier Atago was sunk by the submarine USS Dace, and Maya was sunk by the submarine USS Darter.

The "Battle of Suirgao Straits" where the Japanese Southern force (2 battleships, a heavy cruiser, and 4 destroyers ) met the 7th Fleet Support Force (8 battleships, 4 heavy cruisers, 4 light cruisers, 28 destroyers, and 39 PT boats).

The "Battle off Engao" where Admiral Halsey was lured to attack the last of the Japanese carrier forces.

The "Battle off Samar" where the US lost 2 escort carriers, 2 destroyers, 1 destroyer escort. While the Japanese lost 3 heavy cruisers but withdrew thinking they faced a superior force.


Yahagi was part of Admiral Kurita's Force "A" (Center Force) came through the "Battle of the Sibuyan Sea" and "Battle off Samar" without damage and returned to port safely.

On April 6, 1945, Yahagi received orders for "Operation Ten-Go", She was to accompany the Yamato and attack the American invasion force off Okinawa. She was hit by at least 7 torpedoes and 12 bombs and went down with 445 crewmen. She was removed form the list in June 1940.



Noshiro (1943-1944)
Displacement: 6,652 tons (standard); 7,590 tons (loaded) Length: 162 meters x15.2 meters x 5.6 meters Propulsion: 4 shaft Gihon geared Turbines, 6 Kampon boilers
Speed: 35 knots (67 km/h) Range: 6000 nautical miles at 18 knots. Crew: 726
Armament: 6 152mm Type 41 guns (3 x 2), 4 76 mm guns, 32 x 25 mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 610 mm torpedo tubes (4 dual mounts), 16 depth charges, 2 x floatplanes, 1 catapult.

Noshiro was completed in June of 1943 and was transfered in August 1943 from 1st Fleet to 2nd fleet to replace the Jintsu which had been sunk at the "Battle of Kilimbangara".

In September 1943 In an attempt to engage the Americans that are raiding Tarawa, Makin and Abemama Atolls. She sailed with a fleet consisting of the aircraft carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku, the battleships Yamato and Nagato, with several cruisers and destroyers. Unable to make contact the fleet returned to Truk.

After Ameican carrier raids on Wake Island and the Marshall Islands in October 1943. Japanese inteligence, based on intercepted radio trafic, belived that another raid on Wake Island was planned. Agano joins a fleet consisting of the aircraft carriers Shokaku, Zuikaku, Zuihō. The battleships Yamato, Musashi, Nagato, Fuso, Kongō, Haruna along with other cruisers and destroyers. When no contact is made the fleet returned to Truk.

Noshiro underwent repairs and refit in Japan in Febuary 1944 to have 6 x triple-mount and 8 single single-mount Type 96 25mm AA guns installed. This brought the Noshiro's 25mm total to 32 guns (8 x tripple mounts) (8 x single mounts).??

Noshiro was flagship for the 2nd Destroyer Squadron durring the "Battle of the Philippine Sea" June 19-20, 1944 (A.K.A. Operation A-Go and Operation A).

From late June-early July 1944, she was re refitted. Two more triple-mount Type 96 25mm AA gun mounts amidships, and a Type 13 air-search and Type 22 surface-search radar were installed. This brought the number of 25mm AA to total 48 guns (10 x tripple mounts and 18 x single mounts).



The "Battle of Leyte Gulf" (October 1944) this was actualy several battles consisting of:

The "Battle of the Sibuyan Sea" where Admiral Kurita's Force "A" (Center Force) which consisted of the battleships Yamato, Musashi, Nagato, Kongō, Haruna, along with cruisers and destroyers. They were attacked 11 times by over 250 carrier aircraft which sank the battleship Musashi. While the heavy crusier Atago was sunk by the submarine USS Dace, and Maya was sunk by the submarine USS Darter.

The "Battle of Suirgao Straits" where the Japanese Southern force (2 battleships, a heavy cruiser, and 4 destroyers ) met the 7th Fleet Support Force (8 battleships, 4 heavy cruisers, 4 light cruisers, 28 destroyers, and 39 PT boats).

The "Battle off Engao" where Admiral Halsey was lured to attack the last of the Japanese carrier forces.

The "Battle off Samar" where the US lost 2 escort carriers, 2 destroyers, 1 destroyer escort. While the Japanese lost 3 heavy cruisers but withdrew thinking they faced a superior force.



Noshiro was part of Admiral Kurita's Force "A" (Center Force) came through the "Battle of the Sibuyan Sea" without damage.

The following day, at the Battle off Samar, Noshiro hit the escort carrier USS White Plains (CVE-66) with several 150mm shells. West of Panay, Kurita's force was attacked by 80 torpedo-planes. One bomb exploded in Noshiro's AA shell magazine, starting a fire that was quickly extinguished. In the 2nd attack, six more torpedo-planes attacked Noshiro, which dodged their torpedoes, but in the 3rd attack, an torpedo-planes hit her in the boiler room which flooded which brought her to a halt. She was undergoing emergency repairs when a 4th attack of 28 torpedo-planes and dive-bombers struck her with another torpedo to starboard beneath the No. 2 main turret. The forward magazines flooded in an attempt to righten the ship. Five minutes later Noshiro sank. Destroyers rescued 328 crewmen. She was removed from the List december 1944.



Sakawa (1944-1945)
Displacement: 6,652 tons (standard); 7,590 tons (loaded) Length: 162 meters x15.2 meters x 5.6 meters Propulsion: 4 shaft Gihon geared Turbines, 6 Kampon boilers
Speed: 35 knots (67 km/h) Range: 6000 nautical miles at 18 knots. Crew: 726
Armament: 6 152mm Type 41 guns (3 x 2), 4 76 mm guns, 32 x 25 mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 610 mm torpedo tubes (4 dual mounts), 16 depth charges, 2 x floatplanes, 1 catapult.

Sakawa was completed in November 1944 and was assigned to the Combined Fleet.

In April 1945, she was assigned to the Second Fleet for "Operation Ten-Go". Where She was to accompany the Yamato and attack the American invasion force off Okinawa. Due to lack of fuel her orders were canceled and she reassigned back to the Combined Fleet.

At the time of the Japans surrender, Sakawa was taken as a prize of war by the Americans. The US used her as aa troop transport to evacuate stranded Japanese troops in the Palau Islands group. In October 1945, well after the war ended, she was officially removed from the list. She had never been in combat.

During the atomic bomb tests at Bikini Lagoon, Sakawa and Nagato were the primary target the air burst detonation test "Able", The detonation of the Able bomb occurred 490 yards (450 meters) above and slightly to starboard of Sakawa's stern. The blast caused Sakawa to burn fiercely for twenty-four hours; the force crushed her superstructure, damaged her hull and breached her stern. She sank when the Navy tried to tow her to prevent her from sinking.


Katori Class: Katori (Named after the Katori Shrine)(1940-1944), Kashima (Named after the Kashima Shrine)(1940-1945), Kashii ("Stream Ford" and a shrine)(1941-1945), Kashiwara (not completed)

Katori (Named after the Katori Shrine)(1940-1944)
Displacement: 5,890 tons Dimensions: 129.77 x 15.95 x 5.75 meters. Propulsion: 2-shaft geared Turbines plus diesel motors; 3 Kampon boilers. Speed: 18 knot (speed) Range: 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) Crew: 315
Armament: 4 x 140mm/50 caliber guns(2 x 2) 2 x 127mm/40 caliber AA guns (1 double mount), 4 x 25mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 x 13mm AA guns, 4 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 double mounts) Aircraft carried: 1 x floatplane, and 1 catapult


Katori was completed in April 1940. Katori and Kashima participated in the last pre-war midshipman cruise in July 1940.
On November 11, 1941, Vice Admiral Shimizu, The Comander in Chief Sixth Fleet (Submarines) convened a briefing of his commanders aboard the Sixth Fleet's flagship, Katori on the planned attack on Pearl Harbor. At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, Katori was in the Marshall Islands.

Katori returned to Truk by the end of 1941. Vice Admiral Shimizu briefed his commanders January 3, 1942 on the details of the invasion plans for "Operation R" (the invasions of Rabaul and Kavieng).

Katori came under attack at Kwajalein during Febuary 1942 Vice Admiral Shimizu was wounded in the raid, and Katori sustained enough damage to warrant a return to Japan for repairs. She returned to Kwajalein in May 1942 where the new admiral, of the Sixth Fleet (Submarines) Vice Admiral Marquis Theruhisa Komatsu, ordered Captain Sasaki Hankyu's detachment of midget submarines to attack Australian ports.

Katori returned briefly to Yokosuka in August 1942 for upgrading with 2 x Type 96 twin 25mm AA guns, which were fitted in the forward part of the bridge. It then returned to Truk, where it continued to be based (with occasional returns to Yokosuka).

Vice Admiral Takagi assumed command of the Sixth Fleet (Submarines) in June 1943, but after the fall of Kwajalein Katori was reassigned to the General Escort Command. Katori had departed shortly before the attack on Truk Febuary 17-18, 1944, escorting the armed merchant cruiser Akagi maru, 2 destroyers, and a minesweeper towards Japan, but came under attack by fighters and torpedo planes. The Akagi maru was sunk, and Katori hit by a torpedo which did minor damage. However, several hours later, battleships USS New Jersey and Iowa with 2 hevy cruisers and 2 destroyer spotted the Katori and opened the attack. The screening destroyers fired six salvos of torpedoes at Katori (which was already listing slightly to port and on fire amidships), but all torpedoes missed. Katori responded with a salvo of torpedoes which also missed.
The Iowa straddled Katori with eight salvos. After being under attack by the Iowa for only 11 minutes, She sank. A large group of survivors were seen in the water after she sank, but the Americans did not recover any. She was officially stricken from the list in March 1944.

Kashima (Named after the Kashima Shrine)(1940-1945)
Displacement: 5,890 tons Dimensions: 129.77 x 15.95 x 5.75 meters. Propulsion: 2-shaft geared Turbines plus diesel motors; 3 Kampon boilers. Speed: 18 knot (speed) Range: 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) Crew: 315
Armament: 4 x 140mm/50 caliber guns(2 x 2) 2 x 127mm/40 caliber AA guns (1 double mount), 4 x 25mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 x 13mm AA guns, 4 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 double mounts) Aircraft carried: 1 x floatplane, and 1 catapult


Kashima was completed in May 1940. Kashima and Katori participated in the last pre-war midshipman cruise in July 1940. Upon her return she was reassigned to the Japanese Fourth Fleet as flagship for Cruiser Division 18 based at Truk.
She covered the landings during "Operation R" (the invasions of Rabaul and Kavieng) January 23-24, 1942. During "Operation MO(the invasions of Tulagi and Port Moresby) May 4, 1942, the Kashima arrived at Rabaul to direct operations, and missed the "Battle of the Coral Sea", which occurred durring that period. After the successful Japanese landings on New Guinea, the she returned to Truk. She underwent a refit in July 1942, to install in the forward part of the bridge 2 twin Type 96 25mm AA guns. She then returned to Truk.

Kashima departed from Truk for Japan in November 1943 with the submarine tender Chogei and 2 destroyers . Shortly after departing they were attacked by the submarine USS Sculpin (SS-191), which they sank without any Japanese losses. Upon reachin Japan Kashima became the training ship for the Navy.

Durring May, June, and July of 1944 she was pressed into service transporting troops and supplies to various outposts. As she did durring "Operation Ro-Go" (the reinforcement of Rabaul July 1944).

She underwent a refit in December of 1944 to replace her torpedo tubes with 2 x Type 89 twin unshielded 40-caliber (127mm) HA guns, 4 x Type 96 triple mount 25mm AA guns, 6 x Type 96 single mount 25mm AA guns, a Type 22 radar, 4 depth charge throwers, 2 depth charge rails, hydrophonics, sonar, and 2 Type 2 infa-red communications devices. She also had some aft compartments changed to concrete-protected magazines to store up to 100 depth charges. She was assigned escort and anti-submarine patrols in the South China Sea and off Korea until the end of the war. She was stricken from the list in October 1945.

Kashii (Named after the Kashii Shrine)(1941-1945)
Displacement: 5,890 tons Dimensions: 129.77 x 15.95 x 5.75 meters. Propulsion: 2-shaft geared Turbines plus diesel motors; 3 Kampon boilers. Speed: 18 knot (speed) Range: 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) Crew: 315
Armament: 4 x 140mm/50 caliber guns(2 x 2) 2 x 127mm/40 caliber AA guns (1 double mount), 4 x 25mm Type 96 AA guns, 8 x 13mm AA guns, 4 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 double mounts) Aircraft carried: 1 x floatplane, and 1 catapult


Kashii was completed on July 1941. From December 1941 to January 1942 she was involved in transporting troops to Thailand, Malaya, and Hainan. January through March 1942 saw her on patrol and convoying troopships invading the Dutch East Indies, where she participated in Operation "T" the invasion of Northern Sumatra. After which she continued with patrol and convoy duties in the Indian Ocean. Kashii embarked on an emergency transport mission to reinforce Japanese forces at Rabaul in October 1942. Where she successfully mimiced a American heavy cruiser by installing a fake second funnel and landed reinforcements there.

She underwent a refit in January 1943, to shorten her masts and add a "submarine spotting station. Kashii resumed its patrol and convoy duties in the eastern Indian Ocean from February through July 1943.

She underwent a refit in Japan from March through April 1944. Where her torpedo tubes were removed.2 x twin mount Type 89 127mm HA guns, 4 x triple mount Type 96 25mm AA guns, Four depth charge throwers and two depth charge rails, a Type 21 air-search radar, Hydrophone, and sonar were installed. Some of her aft compartments were modified into concrete-protected depth charge magazines to hold up to 300 depth charges. This brought her total guns to 20 (4 triple mounts and 4 double mounts).

After more patrol and convoy escort duties she underwent further refit in Japan in June 1944. Where 10 x single mount Type 96 25mm AA guns and a new Type 22 surface-search radar were installed. This brought her total guns to 30 (4 triple mounts, 4 double mounts, and 10 single mounts),

Another convoy mission was undertaken to the Philippines in August through September 1944. On the return voyage the convoy was attacked on September 16, 1944 by the American sumarines Queenfish (SS-393) and Barb (SS-220), which sank two oilers and the aircraft carrier Unyo. Even though the convoy managed to rescue 761 cremen more than 900 were lost, along with 48 aircraft.

Shortly after departing Qui Nhon Bay, Indichina on January 12, 1945 with convoy HI-86 America carrier planes attacked, sinking most of the convoy's ships. Kashii was hit starboard amidships by a torpedo plane, then a divebomber struck with two bombs that set off the depth charges in the aft magazine, she sank stern first. Of her crew 621 were lost and only 19 were rescued. She was removed from the list in March 1945.


Kuma Class: Kuma (Named for the Kuma river)(1919-1944), Tama (Named for the Tama river)(1920-1944), Kitakami (Named for the Kitakami river)(1920-1947), Ōi (Named for the Ōi river)(1920-1944), Kiso (Named for the Kiso river)(1920-1944)


Kuma (Named for the Kuma river)(1919-1944)
Displacement: 5,870 tons. Dimensions: 490 (pp) 535 (oa) x 46 1/2 x 15 3/4 feet. Propulsion: 4-shaft geared Turbines. Crew: 439 Armament: 7 x 140mm single mount guns, 2 x 80mm AA single mount guns, 4 x 24 inch dual mount torpedo tubes, 80 mines, 1 aircraft

Kuma was completed in August 1920 and after commissioning was immediately assigned to cover the landings of Japanese troops against the Bolshevik Red Army. Was based in Port Auther and patrolled the China coast in this area durring the Siberian Intervention (1918 -1922).

At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack she was part of the "Invasion of the Philippines". She patrolled the islands there and covered landing there until September 1942.

In October 1942 to November 1943 she was assigned to patrol the Netherlands East Indies. She underwent refit in Singapore where the No. 5 140-mm gun, her catapult, and derrick were removed. And 2 x Type 96 triple mount 25mm AA guns were installed. This brought the total number of Kuma's 25-mm AA to ten guns (2 tripple mounts and 2 double mounts). After her refit she returned to patrol the N.E.I. In January 1944, Kuma was torpedoed by the Royal Navy submarine HMS Tally-Ho (P317). Kuma was hit starboard aft by two torpedoes, setting the ship on fire, and detonating her own depth-charges. A destroyer picked up survivors, but 138 crewmen were lost with the ship. She was removed from the list in March 1944.


Tama (Named for the Tama river)(1920-1944)
Displacement: 5,870 tons. Dimensions: 490 (pp) 535 (oa) x 46 1/2 x 15 3/4 feet. Propulsion: 4-shaft geared Turbines. Crew: 439 Armament: 7 x 140mm single mount guns, 2 x 80mm AA single mount guns, 4 x 24 inch dual mount torpedo tubes, 80 mines, 1 aircraft

Tama was completed in January 1921 and after commissioning was immediately assigned to cover the landings of Japanese troops against the Bolshevik Red Army. Was based in Port Auther and patrolled the China coast in this area durring the Siberian Intervention (1918 -1922). She was assigned a diplomatic mission in 1925 to return the remains of the US Ambassador Edgar A. Bancroft to Japan. She was assigned to patrol the northern coasts of China after the Manchurian Incident in 1932. As the war in China escalated she covered landings of Japanese troops in central China.

At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack she was patrolling in the Kuril Islands north of Japan, and after suffering damage due to severe weather, was forced to return to Japan for repairs by the end of the year. From January to end April 1942, she was back on patrol in the waters north of Japan, accompanied by her sister ship, the light cruiser Kiso. At the end of May 1942, She was part of "Operation AL" the "Battle of the Aleutian Islands". Tama covered the invasion force as it landed troops on Kiska on June 7, 1942. She continued patrolling and running supplies to the Aleutians. Heavy crusisers Maya, Nachi, light crusiers Tama, Abukuma and 5 destroyers were escorting a 3-ship supply mission to Attu in March 1942. They ran into a American Surface Task Group consisting of heavy cruiser Salt Lake City, light cruiser Richmond, and 4 destroyers. In the insuing "Battle of the Komandirski Islands" The Japanese light cruiser Nachi was hit several times and one American destroyer damaged. Vice Admiral Shiro Kawase ordered the Japanese to withdraw and abort the mission. He was disgraced and forced to retire for retreating from an inferior force. Tama remained on patrol north of Japan until the end of August 1943.

She was assigned to the south in September 1943 and transported troops to various garrisons. While carring troops to Rabaul in October 1943 she was damaged by a RAAF bomber and was forced to return to Rabaul for emergency repairs.
Tama returned to Japan for a major refit in October 1943. Where she had her No. 5 and No. 7 140-mm guns, catapult, and derrick removed. And a twin 127-mm HA gun, 18 x Type 96 25mm AA guns (4 triple mounts and 6 single mounts), and a type 21 air search radar installed. This brought her total to 22 x 25-mm guns (4 triple mounts, 2 double mounts, and 6 single mounts). She was then assigned patrol and supply assignments until being assigned to the Northern Mobile Force in August 1944.

During the "Battle of Leyte Gulf" (October 1944), Tama was assigned to the Northern Mobile ("Decoy") Force. During the "Battle off Cape Engano", which was attacked by carrier planes from the Anerican Third Fleet commanded by Admiral William Frederick "Bull" Halsey, Jr. Tama was attacked by torpedo planes. A torpedo hit her in the No. 2 boiler room. After emergency repairs, the Tama retired from the battle, escorted by a destroyer, but this destroyer was soon ordered to protect the damaged aircraft carrier Chiyoda. The Tama was then escorted by another destroyer, but later it was ordered to assist the damaged carrier Zuiho. Tama proceeded northward alone at 14 knots but her luck had run out. Northeast of Luzon, the American submarine USS Jallao (SS-368), on her first war patrol, picked her up on radar. Jallao's first attack with her bow tubes missed, but her second salvo from the stern tubes scored 3 hits, breaking the Tama in two. She sank within minutes with all hands. She was removed from the list in december 1944.


Kitakami (Named for the Kitakami river)(1920-1947)
Displacement: 5,870 tons. Dimensions: 490 (pp) 535 (oa) x 46 1/2 x 15 3/4 feet. Propulsion: 4-shaft geared Turbines. Crew: 439 Armament: 7 x 140mm single mount guns, 2 x 80mm AA single mount guns, 4 x 24 inch dual mount torpedo tubes, 80 mines, 1 aircraft

Kitakami was completed in July 1920. Soon after her commissioning she was based in China and covered landings there as the tension leading up to the Second Sino-Japanese War continued to to increase.

She underwent a refit in Japan durring August 1921 to convert her to a "Torpedo Cruiser". She was refitted with 4 x 140mm guns, 10 x quadruple mount Type 93 "Long Lance" 61cm torpedo tubes, and her seaplane was removed. This was part of the Japanese Navys plan to create a "Night Battle Force".

At the time of the Pearl Harbor Attack she was on escort duty from Japan to the Bonin Islands and back again. At the time of the "Battle of Midway" (May 1942), Kitakami and Ōi were part of the Aleutian Screening Force.
Kitakami and Ōi were converted into fast transports from August through September 1942. They had their torpedo mounts reduced to six quadruple torpedo mounts (a total of 24 tubes). Which were replaced with two Daihatsu landing barges, 2 x triple mount Type 96 25mm AA guns, and depth charge rails. After the conversion Kitakami and Ōi were pressed into transporting troops to numerious bases. While in the Celebes in June 1943, B-24 Liberators bombed the Kitakami, Ōi, Kinu and Kuma. None of the ships were hit but some sustained slight damage from near-misses.

While returning from escorting a convoy in Malaya in January 1944 she was hit by 2 torpedos from the HMS Templar (P316). The light crusier Kinu towed Kitakami to port where she underwent emergency repairs which were followed by extensive repairs in Singapore in February. She continued to take on water. In August 1944 she repaired and modified to a Kaiten human torpedo carrier.

A 20-ton crane, formerly from the seaplane carrier Chitose, was fitted to raise and lower the Kaiten into the water. Her stern was remodeled into an overhanging ramp configuration and one engine room was cionverted to a store room for equipment for the Kaitens which reduced her speed to 23 knots. All of Kitakami's armaments were removed and replaced by 2 x Type 89 127mm AA guns, 67 x Type 96 25mm AA guns (12 tripple mounts and 31 single mounts), 2 Type 13 air-search radar, a Type 22 surface-search radar, 2 depth charge throwers, and 2 depth charge rails. With modifications completed she was assigned directly to the Combined Fleet in January 1945. Kitakami was damaged by strafing American carrier planes in July 1945 and thirty-two crewmen were killed. After the war, Kitakami was assigned as a repair tender for ships on repatriation duties. She was removed from the list November 1945 and scrapped March 1947.


Ōi (Named for the Ōi river)(1920-1944)
Displacement: 5,870 tons. Dimensions: 490 (pp) 535 (oa) x 46 1/2 x 15 3/4 feet. Propulsion: 4-shaft geared Turbines. Crew: 439 Armament: 7 x 140mm single mount guns, 2 x 80mm AA single mount guns, 4 x 24 inch dual mount torpedo tubes, 80 mines, 1 aircraft

Ōi was completed in May 1921. From 1928-1931, it was assigned to be a training vessel at the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy. Due to the Shanghai Incident in 1937, Ōi was re-assigned to patrol of the coast of China. She resumed her training role from the end of 1933 to August 1937. At which time she covered landings China as the tension leading up to the Second Sino-Japanese War continued to to increase. She again returned to her training suties in December 1937 through 1939.

She underwent a refit in Japan durring August 1941 to convert her to a "Torpedo Cruiser". She was refitted with 4 x 140mm guns, 10 x quadruple mount Type 93 "Long Lance" 61cm torpedo tubes, and her seaplane was removed. This was part of the Japanese Navys plan to create a "Night Battle Force". At the time of the Pearl Harbor Attack she was on escort duty from Japan to the Bonin Islands and back again. Chief of Staff Rear Admiral Matome Ugaki inspected Ōi in January 1942, and expressed strongly disapproved of the Navy's plans for the use of the newly remodeled torpedo cruisers and urged a change to the Navy's tactics. While the Imperial Japanese General Staff discussed the issue, Ōi was assigned to escort duty from the end of January through mid April 1942. At the time of the "Battle of Midway" (May 1942), Kitakami and Ōi were part of the Aleutian Screening Force.

Kitakami and Ōi were converted into fast transports from August through September 1942. They had their torpedo mounts reduced to six quadruple torpedo mounts (a total of 24 tubes). Which were replaced with two Daihatsu landing barges, 2 x triple mount Type 96 25mm AA guns, and depth charge rails. After the conversion Kitakami and Ōi were pressed into transporting troops to numerious bases. While in the Celebes in June 1943, B-24 Liberators bombed the Kitakami, Ōi, Kinu and Kuma. None of the ships were hit but some sustained slight damage from near-misses.

In July 1944 she was sighted 570 miles south of Hong Kong by USS Flasher (SS-249). When she was 1,400 yards astern, the Flasher fired its stern tubes; hitting Ōi with two torpedoes portside aft. One was a dud, but the other one exploded flooding Ōi's aft engine room. The Flasher then fired its four bow torpedoes from 3,500 yards, but all missed. At 1725, Ōi sank by the stern. A destroyer rescued Captain Shiba and 368 crewmen, but 153 men were lost with the ship. Captain Shiba was later one of the representatives of the Imperial Japanese Navy during the Japans formal surrender aboard the USS Missouri on September 2, 1945. Ōi was removed from the List in September 1944.


Kiso (Named for the Kiso river)(1920-1944)
Displacement: 5,870 tons. Dimensions: 490 (pp) 535 (oa) x 46 1/2 x 15 3/4 feet. Propulsion: 4-shaft geared Turbines. Crew: 439 Armament: 7 x 140mm single mount guns, 2 x 80mm AA single mount guns, 4 x 24 inch dual mount torpedo tubes, 80 mines, 1 aircraft.

Kiso was completed in may 1921 and soon after completion, was fitted with both a forward and an aft flat superstructure, with a rotating floatplane take-off platform located aft for experimental and testing purposes. She covered the landings of Japanese troops against the Bolshevik Red Army. Was based in Port Auther and patrolled the China coast in this area durring the Siberian Intervention (1918 -1922). On April 17, 1939, she fired a 21-gun salute as the USS Astoria arrived in Japan carrying the remains of the Japanese ambassador, Hiroshi Saito, who died while on assignment to the United States.

At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack she was patrolling in the Kuril Islands north of Japan, and after suffering damage due to severe weather, was forced to return to Japan for repairs by the end of the year. From January to end April 1942, she was back on patrol in the waters north of Japan, accompanied by her sister ship, the light cruiser Tama. In April, after the Doolittle Raid, She scuttled guard boats No. 26 Nanshin Maru and No. 1 Iwate Maru which had been damaged by planes the raid. In May 1942, Kiso accompanied the converted Seaplane tender on a scouting mission to Adak and Kiska, in the Aleutian Islands. The Adak mission was successful, but Kiska was obscured by weather.

At the end of May 1942, She was part of "Operation AL" the "Battle of the Aleutian Islands". Kiso covered the invasion force as it landed troops on Kiska on June 7, 1942. While off Kiska, Kiso, a few destroyers, and several other ships were attacked by a formation of Six B-24 Liberators on June 10, 1942, but she was undamaged. She was again attacked by PBY Catalina flying boats on June 14, 1942, but only suffered near misses.

In April she was refited, during which its 900mm searchlights were replaced by three 1100mm searchlights. 2 x Type 96 twin mount 25mm AA guns were added above the aft port and starboard torpedo-tube mounts, and a No. 21 air-search radar was installed. She returned to patrolling Kuriles Islands and Aleutians Islands until the end of August 1943.
She was assigned to the south in September 1943 and transported troops to various garrisons. While carring troops to Rabaul in October 1943 she was damaged by a RAAF bomber and was forced to return to Japan for repairs.

She arrived in Japan in November 1943, Kiso was refitted having its two 140-mm gun mounts removed and replaced by a dual 127-mm HA gun mount. 3 x triple mount and 6 x single mount Type 96 25-mm AA guns were also installed bringing their total to 19 (3 triple mounts, 2 double mount, and 6 single mounts). After her refit she was again sent to petrol the northern islands from March through August of 1944. In October 1944 she was orderded to resupply Japanese naval units after the "Battle of Leyte Gulf". After delivering the supplies she was detached to Manila. Due to the threat of American carrier strikes she was ordered in November 1944 to Borneo. Before she could leave Luzon, she was attacked by more than 350 carrier planes. Three bombs hit Kiso to starboard - one in the bow, one near her boiler rooms and one near her aft gun mounts. Kiso sank in shallow water and most of the Kiso's crew survived. She was removed from the list in March 1945.



< Message edited by Mziln -- 11/28/2007 1:10:23 AM >

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 592
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 12:58:09 AM   
Froonp


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From: Marseilles, France
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Seems great ! Although I did not read all.

But, I propose that the funny accents be dropped, because they are rarely used elswhere, and especially the counters have none of that. So, for consistency, I would prefer if the writups did not have all those funny accents.
Example, Ryujo instead of Ryj, Myoko instead of Myk.

Also, isn't it Chiyoda ? instead of Chidya ?

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 593
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 1:19:04 AM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
Joined: 2/9/2004
From: Tulsa Oklahoma
Status: offline
I'm sure they will be edited Patrice.

only...

Nagara Class: Nagara (1921-1944), Isuzu (1923-1945), Yura (1923-1942), Natori (1922-1944), Kinu (1922-1944), Abukuma (1925-1944)
yodo Class: yodo (1943-1945)
Sendai Class: Sendai (1924-1943), Jintsu (1925-1943), Naka (1925-1944)
Tenry Class: Tenry (1919-1942), Tatsuta (1919-1944)
Takachiho (1885-1914)
Saien (?)
Yubari (1923-1944)

left of the Japanese to do

(in reply to Froonp)
Post #: 594
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 1:24:26 AM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Mziln

I'm sure they will be edited Patrice.

only...

Nagara Class: Nagara (1921-1944), Isuzu (1923-1945), Yura (1923-1942), Natori (1922-1944), Kinu (1922-1944), Abukuma (1925-1944)
yodo Class: yodo (1943-1945)
Sendai Class: Sendai (1924-1943), Jintsu (1925-1943), Naka (1925-1944)
Tenry Class: Tenry (1919-1942), Tatsuta (1919-1944)
Takachiho (1885-1914)
Saien (?)
Yubari (1923-1944)

left of the Japanese to do



_____________________________

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Perfection is an elusive goal.

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 595
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 2:35:10 AM   
brian brian

 

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I love the translation of the Japanese names.

I looked around for an article from The General I mentioned, one that had the English phonetic spellings of the main Japanese ships, or at least all of the ones in Victory in the Pacific (only some of the CLs, iirc; "Oi" = Ooo eee, frex, though the article showed the accent syllable mark). The only thing you can find online these days is the title and the authors. Unfortunately, unlike several other gamer article writers, there were no contact links for the two authors. ("Blitz Japanese" General volume 18, #6 I think. Maybe Volume 17. Anyway the issue with a "Flat Top" theme). I gave my copy to a wargame dealer a long time ago so he could find a good home for it. I kinda regret that.

[meanwhile I find it a little frustrating that no one can make content from the General available on-line, for fear of copyright problems ... for games that are out of print and will probably never be published ever again, from a magazine that is defunct. ]

(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 596
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 3:02:58 AM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
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quote:

ORIGINAL: brian brian

I love the translation of the Japanese names.

I looked around for an article from The General I mentioned, one that had the English phonetic spellings of the main Japanese ships, or at least all of the ones in Victory in the Pacific (only some of the CLs, iirc; "Oi" = Ooo eee, frex, though the article showed the accent syllable mark). The only thing you can find online these days is the title and the authors. Unfortunately, unlike several other gamer article writers, there were no contact links for the two authors. ("Blitz Japanese" General volume 18, #6 I think. Maybe Volume 17. Anyway the issue with a "Flat Top" theme). I gave my copy to a wargame dealer a long time ago so he could find a good home for it. I kinda regret that.

[meanwhile I find it a little frustrating that no one can make content from the General available on-line, for fear of copyright problems ... for games that are out of print and will probably never be published ever again, from a magazine that is defunct. ]

Sort of a catch 22 there.

If you find it frustrating, then you think the articles are of value - hence the copyright owners want their copyright inviolate. If no one thought the articles were of any value, then the copyright owners probably wouldn't care.

_____________________________

Steve

Perfection is an elusive goal.

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Post #: 597
RE: Need help!!! - 11/28/2007 6:42:45 AM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
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From: Tulsa Oklahoma
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The hardest thing about the writeups is knowing when to quit. Some of the things I leave out are:


Other ship losses in a battle. Just look up losses arround Guadalcanal and you will see what I meen.

Example: The light cruiser Nagara took part in "the Battle for the Eastern Solomons" August 1942, "the Battle of Santa Cruz" October 1942, The "the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal'" November 13, 1942, "the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal" November 14, 1942.

Near misses that did not adversly effect the ship in question.

The actual ports of call made when going to a destination, unless important.

The changing names of the ships captains, unless important.

The longatude and latitude of the sinking of the ship.

The names of carriers and carrier air groups involved in a attack against the ship being described.

Ship names that cannot be confirmed.




(in reply to Shannon V. OKeets)
Post #: 598
RE: Need help!!! - 11/30/2007 6:16:36 PM   
Mziln


Posts: 1107
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From: Tulsa Oklahoma
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I am too involved doing write up on the Japanese to look this up. Maybe somone can answer this.

The United States Navy and Marines has a naming system for air units. For example MAG 16 meens U.S. Marine Air Group 16. Please note there are many countries that have Marines so you have to specify which countries Marines.


VMF 16 would be translated:


V ~ Fixed wing

M ~ U.S. Marine

F ~ Fighter

Squadron 16


VF 16 would be United States Navy, Fixed wing, Fighter Squadron 16


What determines if an aircraft is a "Fixed wing" aircraft or not?
Does this go back to the time when the U.S. Navy used many "Lighter than Air" craft?




We had a saying when I was in the U.S. Marines "Over 200 years of tradition unhampered by progress".


Since somone posted there is very little humor here in the forum. So Just for fun here is somthing I found out doing write ups on Japanese light cruisers.


Light cruiser Kinu (Named for the "Kinugawa" river )(1922-1944)

Kinugawa literally means Angry Demon River. Kinugawa's official mascots are a pair of CUDDLY oni (demons) named "Kinu", red-skinned with blond hair, and "Kawa", blue-skinned with brown hair. Both have earrings, exactly one fang and a single stubby horn poking out from their heads.

(in reply to Mziln)
Post #: 599
RE: Need help!!! - 11/30/2007 6:45:32 PM   
Shannon V. OKeets

 

Posts: 18316
Joined: 5/19/2005
From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mziln

I am too involved doing write up on the Japanese to look this up. Maybe somone can answer this.

The United States Navy and Marines has a naming system for air units. For example MAG 16 meens U.S. Marine Air Group 16. Please note there are many countries that have Marines so you have to specify which countries Marines.


VMF 16 would be translated:


V ~ Fixed wing

M ~ U.S. Marine

F ~ Fighter

Squadron 16


VF 16 would be United States Navy, Fixed wing, Fighter Squadron 16


What determines if an aircraft is a "Fixed wing" aircraft or not?
Does this go back to the time when the U.S. Navy used many "Lighter than Air" craft?




We had a saying when I was in the U.S. Marines "Over 200 years of tradition unhampered by progress".


Since somone posted there is very little humor here in the forum. So Just for fun here is somthing I found out doing write ups on Japanese light cruisers.


Light cruiser Kinu (Named for the "Kinugawa" river )(1922-1944)

Kinugawa literally means Angry Demon River. Kinugawa's official mascots are a pair of CUDDLY oni (demons) named "Kinu", red-skinned with blond hair, and "Kawa", blue-skinned with brown hair. Both have earrings, exactly one fang and a single stubby horn poking out from their heads.


When I was going through the air unit names, Patrice sent me documents on how the different countries (and branches of service within each country) handled the use of hyphens and periods and the like. Italy versus Germany and US Navy versus US Amry were quite distinct, for instance. And the people who know about this stuff can get quite offended if you get it wrong. I don't remember seeing anything specific about what the abbreviations meant though.

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Perfection is an elusive goal.

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