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wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective

 
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wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/14/2006 11:20:22 PM   
wneumann


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I started this string to be a "private, classified" thread for the Allied side of the campaign. Those with an interest in following the game and/or offering comments or advice from the Allied perspective are welcome to enter and contribute. I will be posting information re: combat results, overall strategy, and operational moves.

We are playing CHS campaign scenario 158 (with NikMod changes). Ground rules for the game include but not limited to

1) Operations of air and land combat units will be restricted to the geographic area of the command to which they are currently assigned. I am interpreting this where PP's may be expended to re-assign units from one command to another, provided that sufficient PP are available to do so.

2) Bombing missions on vacant enemy-controlled for training purposes are prohibited.

3) 4E bombers (i.e B-17, 24, 29 and the like) cannot be used for naval attack missions at altitudes under 10,000 ft. I view the employment of 4E bombers (in general) for this type of mission as an inefficient use of this asset. However, I would not exclude the use of 4E bombers to attack naval and merchant shipping disbanded in a port, particularly when the ship(s) in port being targeted are damaged.

4) We are playing historical 12/7/41 opening and otherwise conducting this game in a historical spirit.


Being relatively new to all this, a little bit about myself... I picked up the game just less than a year ago (late 2005) and been test-driving (the plain vanilla version) vs Japanese AI and like the game system. This is the first time I'm playing this particular game vs a human opponent. I have owned the old Pacific War game for a long time and played it extensively as the Allies vs both human opponents and the AI. The old Pacific War game and this is somewhat apples and oranges, but the prior experience is not totally irrelevant.

I've also done a lot of wargaming in the past beyond the Pacific theater, in particular, playing the Russians in the European theater (WWII).






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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/14/2006 11:23:48 PM   
VSWG


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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/14/2006 11:48:00 PM   
.AdmYamaguchi.

 

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Good Luck !

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/15/2006 1:28:42 AM   
wneumann


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Looking at the big picture... The Allies are strategically on the defensive, and will be for some time. In some respects, the strategic situation (in general) is not dissimilar to what the USSR faced six months earlier in 1941 when Adolf launched his panzers across the border. The common threads between this game, and the USSR in 1941...

a) The allies will be punched early and often.
b) The allies are going to have to roll with said punches.
c) At some point in the future, the allies will be able to stop the enemy's advance and then hit back on a large scale (exactly when and where is probably the most crucial judgment call).
d) This is a war of attrition.

Getting back to the Allied position in the Pacific at this stage... This is what I'm viewing as the most immediate problems and short-term strategy.

1) Delay the Japanese advance as long as possible at the lowest possible cost (from a long-term perspective). This is something that is possible only on a very small and localized scale. The units to be employed in delaying the Japanese will largely include those that are going to be lost anyway. The general purpose behind delaying tactics will be to inflict casualties (however small) and gain time (however little) for their compatriots to escape or prepare a stand elsewhere. It will be the policy in doing this that units employed in delaying the Japanese will be positioned in the best possible location and provided with the best possible supply and resources as the situation permits.

China: Withdraw troops from positions that form a salient into Japanese-occupied territory. Salient positions will be gradually dissolved - units in excess of those required to occupy the front lines will be withdrawn first, once this is accomplished the remaining front line units will begin pulling back. This will shorten the overall front line and allow concentration of units in locations where needed.

Malaya: As of 12/08/41, nearly all air units located in Malaya have "already left the country". Ground units in northern Malaya other than those holding the front at Kota Bharu have started withdrawing to the south and west, non-combat units being ordered back to Singapore. All merchant shipping and naval ships are or already have left port, most of them to ports in the DEI where they will refuel (depleting the fuel stocks in these ports) before proceeding to Ceylon.

Burma: Rangoon has been the primary destination for many of the air units leaving left Malaya - these air units will continue on to India over the next several days. Plans to remove oil and resources stockpiled in Rangoon are underway, shipping to evacuate this stockpile has already been dispached from ports in India. A minimal "crust" of ground units is being maintained along the Burma-Siam border to detect and slow down a Japanese advance overland, ground units in excess of this requirement are already moving to the west. To the north, Chinese divisions have been dispached toward Lashio to delay the Japanese there and also "plug up" the China-Burma border area.

India: All ground units not required to defend specific localities are moving to the east. All U.S. merchant shipping in Indian ports not being used for other purposes is being collected with the intent of transferring them to Australia, these ships will be used in Australia to start the "pool" of transport shipping needed for the South and SW Pacific commands.

Hong Kong: Everybody's leaving town (or at least those who can). Good luck! Just so happens there are two minelaying ships in Hong Kong - I'm having them dump their cargo (of mines) in Canton harbor, hopefully before they get sunk. Likewise, there are some MTB's that can maybe cause mischief before their eventual demise.

Phillipines: Except for those holding the front lines, all other ground units and HQ on Luzon (with one exception) are headed for Bataan. One USAAF base unit (I believe the 20th) along with several (P-40) fighter units were transferred to SW Pacific and have left Manila aboard much of the available merchant shipping. If they make it, fine. Otherwise I'm gonna lose them anyway. All SS available in Manila are being employed as submarine transports, along with several cargo ships are loading up with supply for transfer to Bataan. One damaged French AK is in port at Napa, loading as many resource points as possible before the Japs come back and sink it. Likewise, there is a TK doing the same with a fuel cargo. Many of the B-17's that could do so have flown out to the south for transfer to SW Pacific. The 5th USAAF base unit in Mindinao has also been re-assigned to SW Pacific and elements of this unit have already departed to the south. Additional evacuations from the Phillipines will be considered and done as time and the situation allows. All naval and merchant ships not employed for other purposes have left port and heading to the south.

DEI: The Japanese are coming. The question is how soon and where. The majority of Dutch ground units will have to hold and die where they stand, though a number will be re-assigned to other commands and evacuated to Australia as possible. Priority for evacuation of land units will be given to air and naval base support units - it is unlikely that any ground combat units will be evacuated due to their size and the probable time frame under which any evacuation will be possible. Evacuated base support units will be re-assigned to South or SW Pacific to form the basis and augment logistical support for these commands when they come online. As many Dutch air units as possible will be re-assigned and evacuated. Priority for air units will be given to recon (Do-24) and transports, bombers will be next. The remainder will be moved to locations where they can best assist the defense before they are destroyed. As much as possible of the oil and resource point stockpiles in the DEI, along with excess fuel and supplies, are being loaded up on merchant shipping for removal. Much of this will reach Australia for our later use, anything of this aboard ships the Japanese sink is considered "scorched earth".

Australia: Ground combat units are moving overland to cover possible Japanese invasion sites. A small amount of merchant shipping has been dispached to assist evacuation of the DEI. Darwin is not being counted on as a safe haven for most ships leaving the Phillipines or DEI. It appears the most feasible de-embarkation port for many evacuated units reaching Australia is actually Perth - this port has better land communications with the rest of Australia. Also, many of the units evacuated to Australia cannot profitably be re-deployed immediately, so where they "land" is not particularly crucial in the short term.

New Guinea, Coral Sea, Solomons: There is a small amount of merchant shipping here, all this is leaving the region via Rabaul where they are picking up bits and pieces of an Australian unit for evacuation to Down Under. Several Allied CA and CL are also present about the region - these are being individually sent to various locations to disrupt Japanese landings where it is possible to do so. These warships are operating under orders to initiate surface combat only against unescorted Japanese amphibious TF - contact to be avoided if warships are present in these TF, or if land or carrier-based aircraft are in the area.

Hawaii: We didn't get off too bad at Pearl - two BB (Nevada and Oklahoma) sunk, moderate levels of damage to the other BB. Nothing to be done about the Japanese CV, the good news may be that they had many aircraft damaged due to flak over PH. I will be devoting air resources to track (but not attack) the Japanese CV. US carrier TF will be avoiding contact and heading back to PH or the west coast to re-organize. What can be dealt with now is the large number of Japanese SS hanging around Oahu. Every US ship capable of ASW is being formed up into ASW TF's - these TF's will "hover" to the south of Oahu with the intent of sinking or damaging as many Japanese SS as possible as long as they care to remain in the area. Available bomber aircraft based in Hawaii have been placed on ASW missions as well.

U.S. West Coast: John Belushi is driving a tank through the streets of Los Angeles to deliver a devastating attack upon a Jaoanese SS that is shelling a local amusement park. Otherwise, war hysteria as usual.

Alaska. It's cold up there. Yamamoto would freeze his patooties off.




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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/15/2006 6:31:51 PM   
wneumann


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Turned my move in, for now the ball's on Pillager's side of the court. Some observations and stuff I neglected to mention earlier.

1. The "stash" of PP's I began the game with was a little bit of a dilemma. From what I read (don't remember exactly where in here) and just noticing for myself, the purpose of those PP's is to allow the Allied player to save them up for re-assigning (U.S.) land and air units to South and SW Pacific commands once they appear in the game. What I also saw was an opportunity to "pre-assign" units to South and SW Pacific before they came online and have these "pre-assigned" units in place to immediately start operating under South or SW Pacific command as soon as these HQ appear in the theater. 

I opted for the second choice despite two risks - one being the fact I have to evacuate the units I am "pre-assigning" before I can start using them, the second risk being I will not have sufficient PP's later to re-assign U.S. units to South and SW Pacific. Three factors influenced this decision - (1) there are few if any U.S. units located on the west coast worth re-assigning at this time, none of these units would have any significant effect on the course of battle even if any of them arrived in the correct location and they could be transported there in time (2) it is highly likely that I will have sufficient PP at a later time when I will have U.S. units that could usefully be assigned to South or SW Pacific (3) there are numerous small units already "in theater" (Phillipines and DEI) that could usefully augment operations by South and SW Pacific commands at a later time, provided these units are re-assigned and successfully evacuated. 

My choice of units to be "pre-assigned" was based as follows - (1) there will be a need for air and naval base support LCU's in both South and SW Pacific, this being especially true for air base support. There are many Dutch units in the DEI that are eminently suitable to "fill this bill". Even one or two U.S. support units in the Phillipines if they can be successfully pulled out. Hence the priority on evacuating air and naval support LCU's. (2) Any air units from the DEI and Phillipines that can be evacuated is added "profit" and relatively easy to get out. Catalinas, B-17's, and P-40's from the Phillipines were a no-brainer, the Dutch Do-24 air units also capable of performing the same tasks as Catalinas. Two Dutch air transport units also useful. I'll also try to get out at least some of Dutch fighter and bomber units as possible.

2. A guiding philosophy... There are no idle hands in this war. There is something for every unit to do, and every unit has something to do.

3. Above all, the Pacific War from the Allied view is a war of attrition - not unlike the Russian view of Hitler's "adventure" in the USSR. Every Japanese plane, ship, or casualty from a LCU you get today makes it easier to get the next one tomorrow. Of course, the Allies must also survive today to have the opportunity tomorrow.

               

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/19/2006 6:46:43 AM   
wneumann


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Report for 12/08/41

Hawaii: The KB has split into two TF's. One TF (6 ships) is now immediately west of the islands (on a SW heading) and is believed to contain 4 CV's (Akagi and Soryu are confirmed) - this TF launched a second strike on Pearl Harbor. Combat reports indicate that many aircraft from this strike were damaged by flak over Pearl and a significant (though small) number of aircraft destroyed. It remains to be seen whether this part of the KB will linger to launch a third strike. I would estimate that the CV's in this group have used a substantial part of their available air ops and possibly have a large number of damaged aircraft on board as well. The second TF from the KB is moving away from Oahu on a NW heading.

At this point, both my carrier TF's are between "the KB's pincers" - both TF's moved a short distance back toward Pearl. As I'm not expecting to get out of "the KB's pincers" without a fight, my intent is to remain a little bit to the south, just outside the first KB TF's detection range. I am not planning to engage the KB at this time, but watching the situation very carefully. If forced to make a move, my CV's will strike to the south. In this situation, a third strike on Pearl from the first KB TF would be an advantage (expending more air ops and reducing the number of serviceable aircraft).

Judging from the lack of sub contacts by my ASW TF's, Japanese SS operating to the south of Oahu have apparently left this area. The KB had their eye on some of them, though none were attacked.

Phillipines: A SNLF (Yokosuka 1st) landed at and captured Puerto Princesa (Palawan I.). This should not significantly interfere with shipping that is evacuating from the Phillipines, at least for the next several days. Within the next 1-2 days there should be no Allied surface ships remaining in the northern or central Phillipines. Puerto Princesa has only a size 2 airfield so Japanese air strikes from there are not anticipated to be a major problem in the next few days. Most SS have been pressed into service as submarine transports - transporting as much supply as possible from Manila to Bataan.

The Japanese CVL operating off Legaspi has remained to the north for the time being. Good news.

DEI: Much of the activity centers around who's staying (and where) and who's moving out. Force Z along with other Allied warships are converging on Batavia to form a combined TF there.

Malaya: All serviceable RAF aircraft have successfully left - the first of these have reached bases in India. With the anticipated fall of Kota Bharu, the retreat to the south begun last turn from exposed positions in northern Malaya was none too soon. Where the British will make a stand depends on the rate and success of the initial withdrawal as well as the Japanese pursuit. Too soon to tell.

Some aircraft and LCU assigned to North Pacific are preparing to leave the US west coast for that theater.

Keepin' our fingers crossed. Go Gators!



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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/19/2006 2:41:16 PM   
VSWG


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quote:

ORIGINAL: wneumann

If forced to make a move, my CV's will strike to the south.

Are you sure you've got enough fuel in that area to operate mulitple CV TF's?

Nice AAR, keep it up!

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/20/2006 2:10:14 AM   
wneumann


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VSWG. Thanks. I'll try to continue the coverage.

As far as the fuel situation with my carrier TF's is concerned, so far so good. Good enough to outlast the KB (at least fuel-wise). If the KB is looking for my CV's, it should be sufficient to stay out of their way and wait them out. The KB is gonna run out of gas and have to go home before I will. My choice of striking to the south with my CV's if engaged by the KB is based on the following considerations: (1) The southern KB TF has already launched three large strikes on Pearl Harbor - it is likely that many of their planes are damaged, also they have used up much of their available air ops. Even though there may be 4 CV's in this group, these CV's may not be able to launch a large air strike on my CV's especially if this TF lauches another strike (the fourth) on Pearl. (2) In contrast, the northern KB TF has used up fewer air ops and a larger amount of their aircraft remain operational. (3) If my CV's are required to engage the KB, my odds (as good as they may be) could be slightly better vs the southern KB TF. With fewer operational aircraft and remaining ops (and maybe less CAP), a strike from my CV's might just get through and inflict some damage.


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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/21/2006 7:38:50 AM   
wneumann


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12/09/41 AAR:

Several unidentified Japanese SS detected to the N and NE of Oahu.

Southern KB task force moved away from the Hawaiian Is on a W heading. This TF is now reported to contain 8 ships. Catalina aircraft have kept contact with this TF and have identified the Kaga as being in the TF (in addition to Akagi and Soryu reported yesterday). Contact has been lost with the Northern KB task force (last observed yesterday moving away from Oahu on a NW heading).

Both U.S. carrier TF's are still located between the Northern and Southern KB TF's and remain outside of the detection range of either Japanese TF. The U.S. TF's are both moving on a NNW heading and are still under orders to avoid contact with the KB - if they remain undetected, both TF's are projected (as of now) to change movement to a NE and later an E heading, passing to the north of Hawaiian Is.

A task force (probably) containing one CVL was located west of Okinawa, heading unknown. Aircraft from this CVL spotted and attacked two Allied AK’s moving to the south of Okinawa.

Japanese land based bombers continue attacking airfields in Northern Malaya and at Singapore. Little significant damage as few or no serviceable aircraft remain at the attacked airbases.

Phillipines: Several hundred supply points evacuated via submarine transport from Manila are being unloaded into stocks on Bataan. The submarines will continue moving supply from Manila to Bataan as long as Manila remains in Allied hands. Most serviceable U.S. aircraft (PBY, B-17, P-40 in particular) have left the Phillipines - none remain on Luzon, a handful of planes are laying over at Cagayan for further movement south. No U.S. shipping remaining in the northern Phillipines, most U.S. ships in the central and southern Phillipines will leave this area within the next day or so. British MTB's from Hong Kong are refuling at Lingayen - they will remain in this area for a day or so to interdict Japanese landing operations if any occur during this time before continuing movement to the south.

Burma: A large number of transport ships are anticipated to arrive in Rangoon within the next day. These transports will load oil stockpiles, air and land units in Rangoon for evacuation to India.

DEI: Evacuation and re-deployment of units is continuing. So far, no interference from Japanese air or naval forces.

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/23/2006 9:36:15 PM   
wneumann


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Contact has been lost with both the Northern and Southern KB task forces.

Japanese land based bomber attacks on airfields in Malaya have declined (only one air strike on Alor Star in the north). It has been probably realized at this point there is no longer any significant Allied air opposition in Malaya.

Japanese land units attacking Hong Kong include 38th and 104th Divisions, three artillery units (21st Mortar, 3rd and 5th FA), and one unit of combat engineers.

Sigint reports a tank regiment (6th Reserve) is being transported by sea to Truk.

Japanese air recon activity has been reported over Kuching (SW Borneo) and detected the 107th RN Base Force LCU. The last elements of the 107th have embarked for evacuation (other elements of the 107th have already left Kuching). A coastal defence garrison still remains in Kuching. Capture of Kuching by the Japanese could be problematical to evacuation efforts in the DEI as Kuching is capable of supporting Betty and Nell air uints. Two Dutch SS nearby are proceeding to Kuching to interdict any Japanese landing TF, also a ML has been dispatched to lay mines at Kuching. No Japanese TF have been detected in the area.

A Japanese TF (4 ships reported) has been spotted SW of Palau moving on a west heading. The composition of this TF could not be determined. It appears this TF has just departed Palau. Possible destinations for this TF include Morotai and Menado. A surface combat TF (parts of Force Z reinforced by Dutch warships) and two TF of Dutch PT-boats are heading eastward.

Evacuation efforts in the DEI will be speeded up. I anticipate maybe 7-10 days remaining (maximum) where Allied shipping can move within the DEI without interference from Japanese attack. This time interval will be sufficient to allow the bulk of U.S. shipping headed south from the Philippines and a small number of British ships escaping Hong Kong to move southward throuth the DEI enroute to Australia. Also within this time, evacuation of ships and units designated to leave eastern Borneo, Sumatra (including Palembang), and western Java will be largely completed.

Fear the Gator!

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/25/2006 7:15:34 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/11/41

Japanese bombing attack on port facilities in Singapore

Japanese 18th Division is advancing diagonally across the Malayan peninsula to the southwest in the direction of Malacca. Allied units have succesfully withdrawn southward down the west coast of Malaya - they have not been pursued by the Japanese to this point. The northernmost Allied units in western Malaya are currently in Kuala Lumpur – these units will evacuate Kuala Lumpur in response to the Japanese 18th Division’s advance. Allied forces are preparing a stand along the Kuantan-Malacca line in south central Malaya. Allied LCU's are moving into position to the NE of Malacca to form a concentrated defense vs the Japanese 18th Division along the Kota Bharu-Malacca rail line either in or just west of the central mountains in terrain favoring the defense.

Ki-48 Lily and Ki-51 Sonia bombers are now operating from Singora and engaged in striking ground targets in the north of Malaya.

Japanese land units continue attacking Hong Kong – these units continue to include 38th and 104th Divisions, three artillery units (21st Mortar, 3rd and 5th FA), and one unit of combat engineers.

The Japanese TF spotted near Palau in yesterday's turn (4 ships still reported) has been spotted again farther to the SW of Palau and confirmed to be moving on a west heading. Composition of this TF is still undetermined.

A Japanese surface combat TF consisting of CA Chokai and 3 DD’s is operating in the China Sea west of Bataan.

Burma: Air attacks on Allied shipping pariticipating in the evacuation of Rangoon were made by Ki-21-II Sally and G3M Nell bombers operating from Bangkok. Light damage was inflicted by these raids. HQ and base units along are being evacuated from Rangoon, along with supply, fuel, oil, and resource points. Most Allied shipping in Rangoon will be leaving in the course of tomorrow's move.

The RAF airbase unit stationed at Tavoy was successfully picked up and evacuated by a British transport TF. This TF has since departed Tavoy enroute to India.

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/27/2006 7:35:17 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/12/41

Japanese still bombing air fields in northern Malaya - no operational allied aircraft remaining in these bases.

Allied ground forces have reached the Kuantan-Malacca line. Several units under Indian III Corps are forming a defensive position in the central mountains NE of Malacca to oppose the Japanese 18th Division advancing to the SW along the rail line from Kota Bharu. Japanese 5th division has captured Alor Star and moving westward.

A6M2 Zero and G4M Betty aircraft now operating from Kota Bharu. G4M’s from this airfield were responsible for some attacks on Allied shipping in and near Rangoon. G3M Nell and Ki-21 Sally operating from Bangkok also attacked shipping in the Rangoon area. Light damage reported from these air raids.

Japanese ground units continue attacking Hong Kong and have been reinforced with 1st Hvy Artillery Brigade.

The Japanese TF (4 ships still reported) moving W from Palau is now spotted just east of Morotai. Composition of this TF is still undetermined. Possible destinations of this TF now include Morotai and Amboina.

A Japanese surface combat TF consisting of CA Chokai and 3 DD’s previously operating in the China Sea has bombarded Jesselton (northern Borneo).

A Japanese surface combat TF consisting of CL Izuzu and 4 DD’s entered the harbor at Palembang and attacked AK’s and TK’s wrapping up the evacuation at Palembang. Two heavily damaged TK escaped Palembang, all others were sunk. Cargo on these ships included a small number of RAF aircraft that had escaped from Singapore along with at least 4,800 fuel and 12,000 oil points - the fuel and oil points are basically “scorched earth”.

It must be considered that the Japanese surface TF in Palembang could continue on to Batavia. Measures being taken in response to this possibility this could happen - (1) Evacuation of what is to be removed from Batavia must and is being completed immediately. All merchant shipping remaining in Batavia is set to depart with whatever cargo is already loaded or can be loaded in the current orders phase. (2) An Allied surface combat TF consisting of Prince of Wales, Repulse, and the majority of Dutch surface warships is proceeding towards Batavia. (3) Dutch bomber squadrons totalling approx 25 Martin 139's have been transferred into Batavia, other non-essential aircraft leaving Batavia for other bases. (4) The LCU garrison in Batavia has already been reinforced by additional LCU's from the immediate surrounding area, with the intention of turning Batavia into a stronghold.

Japanese 48th Division now operating in northern Luzon in divided in two parts – one part of the division is now landing at San Fernando, the remainder of the division having just captured Tuguegarao. Yokosuka 3rd SNLF has captured Lucena (southern Luzon). U.S. and Phillipine forces have formed a defensive front to the north centered on Lingayen and Clark Field, forces in southern Luzon have withdrawn back to Manila. Supply point stockpiles in Bataan have been augmented with supply transported there from Manila.

A Japanese TF consisting of CL Sendai and 4 DD’s bombarded Cagayan. All Allied surface ships (except for one AK, one TK, and the British MTB's escaping Hong Kong) have left the Phillipines. The AK and TK are both damaged and not expected to make it. The British MTB's refueled in Bataan and are moving southward - unless intercepted, these should be out of the Phillipines within 2-3 days. There are a number of SS heading to Cagayan - these are on a submarine transport mission to evacuate final elements of the USAAF airbase unit still in Cagayan - these SS are scheduled to exit the Phillipines once they reach Cagayan, refuel, and load troops.

A Japanese TF containing what is probably a CVL is operating in the China Sea to the west of Bataan. A6M2 Zeros from this TF participated in an airstrike on Clark Field.

No significant enemy activity in South or Central Pacific area to report.

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RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/29/2006 4:18:32 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/13/41
 
Malaya: No enemy ground activity along the Kuantan-Malacca line. Japanese 18th Division is now in the interior of the Malay Peninsula to the east of the central mountains and NE of Malacca. Units of the Indian III Corps occupy a position in the central mountains along the Kota Bharu-Malacca rail line facing the Japanese 18th Division. No movement of the Japanese 5th division from Alor Star has been detected, though this division is expected to move towards George Town and then advance southward down the west coast of Malaya to Singapore. A garrison of coastal defense troops remain in George Town to engage the Japanese with they reach there. Heavy air attacks reported on Singapore.
 
Sigint has reported the Japanese Guards (2nd) Division is advancing on Victoria Point. The RAF airbase ground unit stationed there was evacuated to India by sea 4-5 days ago, no Allied units remain in Victoria Point.
 
Heavy air attacks on Allied shipping in and around Rangoon by Betty, Nell, and Sally bombers from Bangkok and Kota Bharu. Substantial damage to Allied ships resulted from these raids. Most Allied shipping has left or is in the process of leaving Rangoon – authorities report the “cupboard” in Rangoon is “largely bare”.
 
Japanese ground units facing Hong Kong are now reinforced with the Shanghai SNLF and another engineer regiment.
 
The Japanese TF previously reported moving W from Palau is now spotted has now been joined by a second TF (9 ships reported) Composition of both TF’s are sttil undetermined. Amboina is now the probable destination of at least one of these TF’s. An Allied TF of 6-7 PT boats (from the Phillipines) is expected to reach Amboina at the same time as the Japanese.  
 
A Japanese surface combat TF consisting of BB Kongo and Haruna, CA Atago and Takao, and 3 DD’s has bombarded Brunei. A Japanese carrier TF is also operating off NW Borneo – air strikes consisting of Kates and Vals were launched from this TF (is this part of the KB?).
 
The Japanese have landed at Jesselton (NW Borneo) – the LCU coming ashore has not been identified.
 
No further Japanese naval activity detected around Palembang.
 
Nearly all Allied evacuation activity from Borneo has been completed. A handful of AK and TK are still in Balikpapan – these expected to leave within a day. Mine laying operations are underway for Tarakan and Balikpapan. All Allied shipping will have completely left the Makassar Straits within the next 1-2 days. Much of the Alllied shipping has already exited the DEI, most ships remaining the DEI in or near Soerabaja, Tjilatjap, and Makassar. Allied ships (other than surface combat TF) still in the DEI are expected to leave within the next 4-5 days.
 
Japanese are landing at Talasea on New Britain – LCU has not been identified. Australian CL Adelaide is currently in Rabaul and will engage the Japanese TF executing the landing at Talasea (reportedly 2 ships, probably unescorted). A second small Japanese TF is moving eastward along the north coast of New Guinea, possibly headed towards Lae. Two small surface combat TF’s of Australian and New Zealand CA and CL are south of New Britain and moving to intercept the second TF.
 
British MTB’s evacuating from Hong Kong had safely reached the Phillipines and were refueling at San Fernando (Luzon) before continuing to the south. The MTB’s engaged a Japanese invasion TF attempting to land at San Fernando. Two MTB’s were sunk and one seriously damaged, Japanese losses from the MTB’s were one MSW and one PC sunk, additional Japanese ships also damaged by hits from artillery onshore. The remaining MTB’s have refuleled again and leaving to the south.    

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Post #: 13
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/29/2006 4:26:55 AM   
wneumann


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ED note and minor correction: The British MTB's in the Phillipines had reached Bataan on the 12th and refuelled there, their route out of the Phillipines included a brief "dog-leg" via San Fernando.  

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Post #: 14
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/29/2006 5:09:41 AM   
stldiver


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I have noticed in my CHS, just moving the HQ from Manila to Bataan will draw the supply. No need for subs to move it, the HQ will just draw it back to Manila or where it is located. Release the subs for other activities. Just a suggestion.

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Post #: 15
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 9/29/2006 5:01:55 PM   
ny59giants


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I'll give you a few suggestions from my previous play as the Allies.
I move via ship some of those BF's from western Sumatra to Palembang (aid in building up forts and more importantly, aid in the damage of OIL facilities when it is captured ). I use the Dutch transport aircraft to either: move supplies from Palembang to Singapore or transport LCU out of Singapore. Usually, the Japanese player will leave this alone for a while. Be careful about what LCU's you leave in Ragoon as any left there to defend have no escape route. Most player withdraw the CD and the BF to Andmann Island to make the Japanese send more that a Brigade to take it. Also, you need it move your short legged air units from Singapore to India.

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Post #: 16
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/1/2006 10:05:19 PM   
wneumann


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Appreciate the suggestions.

stldiver - I do see what the Phillipine HQ units did with supplies at Manila. I only had to make one trip hauling supplies between Manila and Bataan with the subs, looks like all I hauled away was most of the "leftover" supply points the HQ left behind in Manila (more than was necessary for my "token" defense of Manila). My subs have since moved out of there for other activities.

ny59giants - Most of the Dutch air and naval base LCU's have been re-assigned to South or SW Pacific, aboard ships, and many of them well on their way to Australia. Unfortunately I didn't realize they could perform demolition of oil facilities though I can still do this at Sorabaja before shipping out of there. I did evacuate much of the oil and fuel stockpiles in the DEI. As for Rangoon, the "cupboard's mostly bare" except for a copious amount of mines floating about the harbor - all LCU's and aircraft have already left.

I didn't see how you could perform demolition ops with LCU's - I assume this capability must exist somehow with engineers or LCU containing engineers. So how is this done?

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Post #: 17
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/1/2006 10:06:46 PM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/14/41

Malaya: Japanese 18th Division attacked Indian III Corps position in the interior mountains along the Kuantan-Malacca line. Air attacks on Indian III Corps also reported. Air attacks continuing on Singapore.

Phillipines: A Japanese surface TF consisting of CA Ashigara and Maya along with CL Kuma bombarded San Fernando (Luzon). British MTB’s had left San Fernando for the south prior to the Japanese bombardment.

AK Tairyu Maru reported sunk near Lingayen – cause of sinking believed to be shellfire from shore batteries during initial landing ops at San Fernando. The Tairyu Maru had not been engaged by the British MTB’s last turn.

DEI: A Japanese surface TF with CA Myoko, Haguro and 4 DD’s engaged three Phillippine PT boats engaged in rear-guard activity before moving south. No losses or damage reported on either side.

One of the two Japanese TF reported moving on a W heading from Palau has landed an LCU at Boela (eastern end of Amboina island) and captured Boela unopposed. Identity of the LCU landing at Boela is not known at this time. The second Japanese TF is still in the area – no activity from this TF as of yet.

The Japanese LCU landing at Jesselton (NW Borneo) has been identified as Sasebo 1th SNLF.

No Japanese attacks or activity reported at Hong Kong.

Japanese 4th Division identified attacking Hangchow (China).

The Japanese LCU landing at Talasea (New Britain) has been identified as Sasebo 1th SNLF – the TF that landed this unit left Talasea on a N heading. CL Adelaide and other ANZAC cruisers are searching for a second small Japanese TF detected in the straits between New Britain and New Guinea and will engage this TF if found.

CA Pensacola engaged a Japanese surface TF at Tarawa consisting of CL Tenryu and Tatsuta along with 4 DD’s. The Tenryu and one DD was hit, both receiving minor damage. The Pensacola left Tarawa with moderate damage but should reach home safely with no major difficulty.

Burma: Evacuation ops at Rangoon are wrapping up. Minelaying operations at Rangoon are underway.

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Post #: 18
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/1/2006 10:18:23 PM   
stldiver


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When an Unit with Engineers is in a base and they are retreated out. They will automatically cause damage as they retreat. The more units the more possible damage. That is why at Palembang you want several Eng units as this is a major oil producer.

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Post #: 19
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/2/2006 6:21:12 AM   
wneumann


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Appreciate the advice, stldiver. Unfortunately I no longer have any engineers in Palembang to perform demolitions (looks like I could have done this in Tarakan and Balkipapan too). The Japanese haven't captured any of these yet, but it's not gonna be possible to get any engineers back into these places. They would have to be brought back in by sea - any ships trying to go back there will almost certainly be attacked and sunk by Japanese LBA, if not carriers, before they could reach a destination. I still have engineers in Soerabaja.

Looks like I'll file this one for future reference. The advice is still appreciated.

One question though ... you mentioned retreat. Would the LCU with the engineers be required to stay in Palembang (or wherever) until the Japanese come and make a ground attack and the engineers retreat as a result of combat in order for demolitions to happen?

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Post #: 20
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/2/2006 6:44:07 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/15/41

Malaya: Penang fell to Japanese 5th Division advancing overland from Kota Bharu. No enemy activity reported against Allied positions along the Kuantan-Malacca line. Air attacks continued on Singapore. Ki-21 Sally bombers now operating from Kota Bharu.

Phillipines: A Japanese surface TF consisting of BB Mutsu and Nagato, and CL Kitakami bombarded San Fernando (Luzon). An unidentified Japanese LCU landed at Naga in east Luzon.

DEI: Japanese TF executed minesweeping ops and also landed ground forces (identified as 35th Brigade and 9th Base Force) at Kuching (SW Borneo). Kuching was captured. A Japanese carrier TF is also located just off Kuching – a small number Kates and Vals attacked and sunk a ML leaving Kuching after performing minelaying ops there. Two Dutch SS are still located at Kuching.

The Japanese LCU landing and capturing Boela (eastern Amboina island) is identified as 23rd NLF.

Surface combat engagement between six U.S. PT boats and a Japanese surface combat TF consisting of CL Nagara and 3 DD’s – no losses or damage reported on either side.

No Japanese attacks or activity reported at Hong Kong.

An unidentified Japanese LCU landed at Gasmata. CL Achilles and Leander engaged a Japanese surface combat TF (consisting of CL Kashima and 2 PG’s) near Gasmata. The Kashima and one PG is reported sunk, no damage to Allied CL.

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Post #: 21
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/2/2006 3:35:05 PM   
ny59giants


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The engineer units in a base like Palembang will damage the oil/resources when the base is captured by the Japanese. Only those engineers that are not disrupted count for this. This is for all LCU's in the hex, not just BF or engineer rgt.

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Post #: 22
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/3/2006 12:07:04 AM   
stldiver


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Palembang is not a base you wanted to give up freely, As it will be Japans major source of oil and you want to damage it as much as possible. Can you fly back in unts?

ny59giants is correct any unit with engineers will do damage, just Eng units usually have more.

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Post #: 23
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/4/2006 12:52:07 AM   
wneumann


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stldiver - I have no transport aircraft remaining in the DEI capable of carrying engineers to Palembang. This is what I do have to work with in the area -

28 Martin 139 bombers based in Batavia. These do not appear to be capable of carrying troops but could start bombing Palembang once the Japanese take it.

There are ten Dutch and U.S. submarines located around Singapore. I could reassign their mission to submarine transport, pick up as much as possible of one of the British base LCU's in Malaya, and move them to Palembang that way. With a little luck, they may get there before the Japanese do.

I have already laid a sizeable number of mines in Palembang port and there is one LCU holding the place. My ships removed approx 14,000 oil and a similar number of fuel points from Palembang, however, the oil stockpile there is at least as much as it was before I pulled out (no doubt due to its continuing production).

The closest Japanese to Palembang are presently in Kuching - they captured it and now have some LBA based there. My opponent has not been terribly aggressive (to date) in this area for whatever reason but I anticipate this is about to change rapidly. In this situation, time is not my friend.

I noticed before the start of the game I could use engineers for demolition, though saw nothing anywhere about exactly how to go about this. Live and learn I guess.

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Post #: 24
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/4/2006 1:19:11 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/16/41

Malaya: Japanese 5th Division advancing southward from George Town along the west coast of Malaya. Light enemy activity reported against Allied positions along the Kuantan-Malacca line.

Phillipines: Japanese 65th Brigade now at San Fernando (Luzon) along with parts of 48th Division. Japanese LCU at Naga (Luzon) include Kure 1st SNLF.

DEI: Several Japanese surface TF’s bombarded Amboina and engaged U.S. and Dutch PT’s. No hits or damage reported on Japanese ships, 4 Allied PT sunk, one damaged. Japanese warships at Amboina include BB Ise and Hyuga; CA Myoko and Haguro; CL’s Kura, Kinu, and Oi, and 10 DD.

A small number of B5N2 Kates reported flying over Amboina – unspotted Japanese carrier(s) must be present in this area.

Japanese LBA are now based at Kuching (SW Borneo) – number and type of aircraft undetermined.

Japanese landing at Menado – LCU’s include 2nd SNLF and 30th Special Base Force.

Japanese landing at Sandaken (north Borneo) – LCU not identified.

Japanese 51st Naval Guard landed on and captured Tarawa.

Japanese LCU at Gasmata now identified as 24th NLF.

A portion of the KB (composition unknown) now detected between Hawaii and Los Angeles. One U.S. merchant TF with 2 AK carrying 2nd Marine CD attacked – both AK severely damaged. Other U.S. merchant shipping in the immediate area was not detected by the KB and taking evasive action. The KB task force is reported moving on a SW heading.

I'm gonna have to start seriously working on secure routes from the U.S. west coast to Hawaii and Australia. It appears the first step in the process is creating a network of small bases with recon LBA primarily for naval search missions to detect the presence of KB or Japanese surface TF's. This network can be developed eastwards from Australia using evacuated Dutch recon LBA and base LCU (these are already reassigned to South Pacific HQ). This would be in addition to expanding the network westwards from Hawaii and the U.S. Knowing where the enemy is at least useful initially for re-routing convoys to avoid them.

I have created one rather strong CV TF - maximum complement of 25 ships including Lexington, Enterprise and escorts. Ships assigned to this TF were selected to maximize anti-aircraft protection (6500 or so AAA). Question... how useful is 6500 AAA as far as warding off Japanese air strikes? My premise for doing this is that I'd rather have one air combat TF as strong as possible rather than two weak ones.

Light air attacks on Allied shipping near Rangoon – minor damage reported. All Allied shipping has left Rangoon at this time and should be beyond Japanese air range in the next game turn.

(in reply to wneumann)
Post #: 25
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/4/2006 3:49:32 AM   
ctangus


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quote:

ORIGINAL: wneumann

I have created one rather strong CV TF - maximum complement of 25 ships including Lexington, Enterprise and escorts. Ships assigned to this TF were selected to maximize anti-aircraft protection (6500 or so AAA). Question... how useful is 6500 AAA as far as warding off Japanese air strikes? My premise for doing this is that I'd rather have one air combat TF as strong as possible rather than two weak ones.



I'd advise against that. In 1942 with over 100 aircraft in a TF you could likely suffer coordination penalties on offensive missions. Also, one Japanese strike could potentially sink both carriers while if you had separate TFs one Japanese strike could at most sink one CV.

I'd suggest putting them in 2 TFs, up to 15 ships in size. (Above 15, AA effectiveness is reduced.) In '42 I usually operate my CVs with 1 cruiser div (2-3 ships) and 1 destroyer squadron (2 divs of 4 + a squadron leader). 13 ships total.

By '43 if you haven't lost a zillion escorts like I have, you can max it out to 25 ships in an air TF.

I'm sure this isn't the best advice in the world, but hopefully it well be some food for thought at least. Whatever you do, good luck!

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Post #: 26
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/5/2006 6:06:54 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/17/41

Malaya: Japanese 5th Division advanced southward along the western coast of Malaya and captured Taiping - this advance will require the Indian III Corps to prepare for withdrawal from positions in the interior to avoid being cut off there. The Kuantan-Malacca line can probably hold until the Japanese 5th Division reaches and captures Kuala Lumpur, after that this defensive position is on borrowed time as both the Jap 5th and 18th Divisions will then be able to attack it together. Light enemy activity against other Allied positions along the Kuantan-Malacca line. Japanese army bombers (mainly Ki-21) operating from Alor Star, Singora, and Kota Bharu.

Phillipines: Laong (north Luzon) captured by Yokosuka 3rd SNLF. British MTB’s moving southward to DEI engaged a Japanese TF consisting of 3 AP’s south of Jolo Is. Two of the AP’s hit by torpedoes and heavily damaged. No damage or losses to the MTB’s.

DEI: A Japanese surface TF consisting of BB Kongo and Haruna, CA Takao and Atago, and 3 DD’s entered Palembang and engaged Dutch ML Krakatau (which was sunk).

Ground combat reported between Japanese and Allied LCU at Menado.

No new activity in the area around Amboina

Japanese 53rd Naval Guard landed at and captured Baker Is.
Japanese 66th Naval Guard landed at and captured Kavieng.

The KB task force detected between Hawaii and Los Angeles moved eastward and attacked the U.S. merchant TF (2 AK) carrying 2nd Marine CD. Both AK were sunk (and 2nd Marine CD with it). Ouch! Other U.S. merchant shipping in the area was detected though beyond striking range of the KB – these ships are moving on a NE heading towards San Francisco and will be inside CAP range of San Francisco in the next game turn. Additional fighter and bomber air groups based on the mainland have been dispatched to San Francisco.

No further air attacks on Allied shipping near Rangoon.

(in reply to ctangus)
Post #: 27
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/6/2006 5:57:46 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/18/41

Malaya: Japanese 5th Division continuing its advance southward along the western coast of Malaya. Japanese army bombers (mainly Ki-21) operating from Kota Bharu bomb Singapore.

Japanese surface TF consisting of BB Fuso and Yamashiro plus 7 DD’s bombard Kuantan.

Phillipines: No major activity. Japanese ships sighted approaching Davao.

DEI: Continued naval surface combat between Japanese TF consisting of BB Hyuga and Ise, CL Oi, and 3 DD’s vs three Dutch PT. All three PT were sunk with no hits or damage to enemy ships.

Unidentified Japanese LCU landing at Amboina.

Unidentified Japanese LCU landing at Toboali (near Palembang). The Japanese TF landing troops at Toboali was attacked by Dutch Martin 139 bombers from Batavia – bomb hit reported on one AP.

Ground combat reported between Japanese and Allied LCU at Menado.

Air attack on base at Pontianak (SW Borneo) by Zero and Kate aircraft – maybe CVL in the area.

Air attack on base at Balikpapan by 57 Nell bombers now operating from Kuching.

Japanese 51st Naval Guard landed at and captured Nauru.

Contact was lost with the KB task force previously detected between Hawaii and Los Angeles. Sigint reports a fresh unidentified contact just south of Los Angeles - this does not appear to be the KB.

Land based air units on the U.S. mainland have been deployed to increase naval air search capability off the central and southern parts of the U.S. west coast.

No further air attacks on Allied shipping near Rangoon

(in reply to wneumann)
Post #: 28
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/13/2006 3:02:39 AM   
wneumann


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Summary of Operations 12/19 - 12/25/41

Malaya: The Kuantan-Malacca defense line was outflanked by a Japanese landing at (and capture of) Mersing and an attempted airborne assault on Johore Bahru. Mersing and Johore were both occupied by Allied troops when the Japanese attacked. Mersing held out for 3-4 days before falling, the airborne assault on Johore repulsed by Allied troops stationed there. Most Allied LCU in Malaya are now in Singapore or holding the bridgehead at Johore - LCU now at Johore are gradually withdrawing through Johore into Singapore. HQ Indian III Corps, one infantry brigade, and a base unit (forming a rear guard) were attacked by Japanese 18th Division in the central mountains before they could withdraw and forced to retreat eastward to Kuantan. These units along with Allied units that were holding Kuantan (22nd Indian Brigade and a base unit) were cut off by the 18th Division's attack and the capture of Mersing - Kuantan still in British control. No Allied ships or operational air units remain in Malaya.

Phillipines: Manila was captured on 12/21. Japanese activity in the Phillipines has almost completely centered on Luzon - Japanese control only Palawan and captured Dadjangas (on Mindanao), all other bases in the Phillipines outside Luzon are still in U.S. control. With the possible exception of two reserve divisions (51st and 91st) in eastern Luzon, all U.S. and Phillpine LCU should be able to withdraw into Bataan. 51st and 91st Divisions are currently pulling back to Clark Field, only a matter of whether they can reach Clark before the Japanese capture it. Supply situation in Bataan is good - approx 33,000 supply on stock there.

DEI. Japanese control western and northern Borneo, Amboina, Menado, and Sorong. They have a sizeable number of LBA (Zero, Nells, and some Bettys) based at Kuching (SW Borneo), these aircraft are attacking Batavia daily. Unfortunately, no demolitions were carried out on oil production facilities at Palembang, Tarakan, or Balikpapan - the base units at these locations had already been evacuated at the time I discovered they were capable of demolitions. By the time I found out this, Kuching had been taken by the Japanese and LBA (Kates and Bettys) operating from there. There was no question of getting any engineers back to these locations, any AK or AP making the attempt would have been sunk by LBA from Kuching before getting there.

China: It's a quagmire, what more can I say. Hopefully I can make into an even bigger one.

Burma: A thin "crust" of British LCU occupy main entry points to Burma along the border with Thailand - at this time no Japanese units have appeared to engage them. All other Allied LCU in Burma are moving towards India. Rangoon has basically been stripped clean. Chinese divisions are moving toward Lashio to seal off the Burma-China border crossing.

South Pacific: Japanese have landed on and captured Baker Is, a surface TF bombarded Palmyra. Part of the KB is also in the area - they caught CA Pensacola (damaged) and Louisville at Canton Is, both were sunk. I expect the main route of communication between the U.S. and Australia/New Zealand to be cut.

Hawaii and U.S. west coast: Part of the KB is also hanging out in this area - so far they hit two convoys, one carrying supply, the other carrying the 2nd Marine CD LCU (which sank with all hands).

One small silver lining... One of my subs (Pollack) torpedoed a Japanese AO (Ondo) at Kwajalein, apparently was carrying fuel (cargo on fire). Perhaps the KB is (temporarily) running out of gas.

Any advice on how to deal with the KB at this point of time is appreciated. One measure I have begun to take is deploying my PBY squadrons out of Pearl (now that the aircraft are operational again) - half the battle knowing where the KB is, at least I can avoid it for the next six months or so until I can fight it. I see no point in engaging the KB at this time with my own carriers - at least they have some deterrent value to the rest of the IJN as long as they remain afloat. I am also well along in the process of deploying submarine patrols at major Japanese bases in the Central Pacific, especially those with large port capacities. I may or may not torpedo much, but I can at least get a look at what the IJN has going into and out of their bases.

A small "beef" with the CHS map design... In general it is pretty good. The one problem is that there's little room to maneuver in the eastern Pacific - the shortage of "open" ocean in the eastern Pacific combined with the exits from Panama City create a limited number of easily identifiable (to the Japanese) shipping lanes from the U.S. west coast. Theoretically, if one could spread the KB thin enough and in the right places (with minimal support from the remainder of the IJN), the Japanese could effectively blockade the entire Western Hemisphere until at least 1943. Granted I'm new to the game so it's possible I'm not seeing something here, so y'all welcome to chime in on this issue - advice will be gracefully appreciated. Maybe there is some way around the problem before Pearl Harbor dries up.

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Post #: 29
RE: wneumann vs Jolly Pillager- the Allied perspective - 10/13/2006 4:18:12 PM   
ny59giants


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quote:

Any advice on how to deal with the KB at this point of time is appreciated. One measure I have begun to take is deploying my PBY squadrons out of Pearl (now that the aircraft are operational again) - half the battle knowing where the KB is, at least I can avoid it for the next six months or so until I can fight it. I see no point in engaging the KB at this time with my own carriers - at least they have some deterrent value to the rest of the IJN as long as they remain afloat. I am also well along in the process of deploying submarine patrols at major Japanese bases in the Central Pacific, especially those with large port capacities. I may or may not torpedo much, but I can at least get a look at what the IJN has going into and out of their bases.


This is a common opening of many Japanese players. To leave KB around Hawaii to the WC to try to make raids on your shipping. You need to allow the airfields at Pearl and the air units to recover so if he tries to hit it one more time on the way back, it won't be pleasant for him. KB has about 6 days worth of sorties before it has to leave (can refuel from tankers, but no ammo!!). Go back through your combat reports to see how many full strength sorties he has launched (play a one or two game as Japan at start to see how much of his sortie rate it uses). Right now, it is more of a nuisance, than a threat. Start to worry if you see invasion TF's heading for the East Pacific island chains.

The blocked hexes to support the movement from Panama is a minor incovenience, but he will not spend much time there. Get your subs out to try to hit him and scout around Midway and such. Good idea getting your PBY's up and looking!!

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