Matrix Games Forums

Happy Easter!Battle Academy is now available on SteamPlayers compare Ageods Civil War to Civil War IIDeal of the week - An updated War in the East goes half Price!Sign up for the Qvadriga beta for iPad and Android!Come and say hi at Pax and SaluteLegends of War goes on sale!Piercing Fortress Europa Gets UpdatedBattle Academy Mega Pack is now availableClose Combat: Gateway to Caen Teaser Trailer
Forums  Register  Login  Photo Gallery  Member List  Search  Calendars  FAQ 

My Profile  Inbox  Address Book  My Subscription  My Forums  Log Out

RE: How he got the new ratings

 
View related threads: (in this forum | in all forums)

Logged in as: Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Current Games From Matrix.] >> [World War II] >> War In The Pacific - Struggle Against Japan 1941 - 1945 >> Scenario Design >> RE: How he got the new ratings Page: <<   < prev  4 5 [6] 7 8   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 2:15:46 AM   
m10bob


Posts: 7119
Joined: 11/3/2002
From: Dismal Seepage Indiana
Status: offline
Was the Oscar given a bonus for its' truly unique "butterfly flap"??

_____________________________




(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 151
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 2:44:49 AM   
ChezDaJez


Posts: 3422
Joined: 11/12/2004
From: Chehalis, WA
Status: offline
quote:

and it will outperform any 1 engine plane in combat - because it will survive better and it has punch.


Susvivability as compared to a single-engine US aircraft should be a wash. True, 2 engines allow significant redundancy in combat however the tail section was much weaker than on a comparable single-engine aircraft. It was very prone to failure after sustaining even relatively light damage, especially if that damage was not evenly distributed along the booms or horizontal stabilizer.

Chez

_____________________________

Ret Navy AWCS (1972-1998)
VP-5, Jacksonville, Fl 1973-78
ASW Ops Center, Rota, Spain 1978-81
VP-40, Mt View, Ca 1981-87
Patrol Wing 10, Mt View, CA 1987-90
ASW Ops Center, Adak, Ak 1990-92
NRD Seattle 1992-96
VP-46, Whidbey Isl, Wa 1996-98

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 152
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 3:24:20 AM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14120
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online
If the figures reflect the plane's characteristics without the powered aerilons, then it should probably get an adjustment. However, I still suspect that the rule of 'diminishing returns' applies to this one. So, when it was 15 an adjustment of 6 or 7 was guessed. At 20, I would guess 4 or at most 5.

(in reply to ChezDaJez)
Post #: 153
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 6:34:18 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline
Nope - no bonus in maneuverability for any plane. But there is a special bonus for a Russian bomber and a British bomber in durability. The Russian one has a cast armor forebody. The British one has geodesic construction.

(in reply to m10bob)
Post #: 154
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 6:36:20 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: ChezDaJez

quote:

and it will outperform any 1 engine plane in combat - because it will survive better and it has punch.


Susvivability as compared to a single-engine US aircraft should be a wash. True, 2 engines allow significant redundancy in combat however the tail section was much weaker than on a comparable single-engine aircraft. It was very prone to failure after sustaining even relatively light damage, especially if that damage was not evenly distributed along the booms or horizontal stabilizer.

Chez



Doesen't matter. In RHS an extra engine counts. So does armor and all metal construction. P-38 has all three.
So it gets the rating for them. The extra engine point matters for lots of reasons - 1 E planes are less likely to return even on non-combat missions. So it is properly a durability contributer.

(in reply to ChezDaJez)
Post #: 155
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 7:11:13 AM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14120
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online
Error - thought you were replying to me, I see now it was m10bob.

< Message edited by witpqs -- 9/21/2006 7:13:23 AM >

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 156
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 9:05:30 AM   
ChezDaJez


Posts: 3422
Joined: 11/12/2004
From: Chehalis, WA
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again


quote:

ORIGINAL: ChezDaJez

quote:

and it will outperform any 1 engine plane in combat - because it will survive better and it has punch.


Susvivability as compared to a single-engine US aircraft should be a wash. True, 2 engines allow significant redundancy in combat however the tail section was much weaker than on a comparable single-engine aircraft. It was very prone to failure after sustaining even relatively light damage, especially if that damage was not evenly distributed along the booms or horizontal stabilizer.

Chez


Doesen't matter. In RHS an extra engine counts. So does armor and all metal construction. P-38 has all three.
So it gets the rating for them. The extra engine point matters for lots of reasons - 1 E planes are less likely to return even on non-combat missions. So it is properly a durability contributer.



No problem. I would have done it a little different but its not my mod. You asked for input and I threw it out there for consideration. I do understand the point concerning 2 engines.

Chez

_____________________________

Ret Navy AWCS (1972-1998)
VP-5, Jacksonville, Fl 1973-78
ASW Ops Center, Rota, Spain 1978-81
VP-40, Mt View, Ca 1981-87
Patrol Wing 10, Mt View, CA 1987-90
ASW Ops Center, Adak, Ak 1990-92
NRD Seattle 1992-96
VP-46, Whidbey Isl, Wa 1996-98

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 157
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 11:31:35 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline
If it was your mod - how would you do it?

(in reply to ChezDaJez)
Post #: 158
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 1:40:47 PM   
Mike Scholl

 

Posts: 9349
Joined: 1/1/2003
From: Kansas City, MO
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again

Nope - no bonus in maneuverability for any plane. But there is a special bonus for a Russian bomber and a British bomber in durability. The Russian one has a cast armor forebody. The British one has geodesic construction.



The Sturmovik certainly deserves a "special" consideration..., even the Germans called it a flying tank. But I don't thing the Brits should get an "edge" for the Wellington/Lancaster/whatever. The geodesic construction was stronger, but the Brits used it to lighten the overall aircraft and increase bombload (show me another bomber that can carry an 11-ton "Grand Slam" bomb)......When the Germans could find them in the dark, British bombers went down at a depressing rate.

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 159
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 4:24:29 PM   
Nemo121


Posts: 5807
Joined: 2/6/2004
Status: offline
Well British and German wartime accounts do point to the geodesic construction as being particularly strong and giving the British bomber involved a greater ability to survive damage inflicted.

(in reply to Mike Scholl)
Post #: 160
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 5:27:11 PM   
ChezDaJez


Posts: 3422
Joined: 11/12/2004
From: Chehalis, WA
Status: offline
quote:

If it was your mod - how would you do it?


I would take into account where ever possible any particularly vulnerable part of an aircraft such as the tail boom on the P-38 or radiators on inline-engined aircraft. I would probably use a + / - system to rate them. Add for self-sealing fuel tanks, armor, and structural integrity. Minus for in-line engine or structural weakness such as the dive limitation for the Zero.

From what I've read, I don't think your mod is that far off from what I might have done. I just might have carried it a bit further if possible. We can quibble over things here and there but I do like the fact that you have taken into account wing-loading for maneuverability.

Chez

_____________________________

Ret Navy AWCS (1972-1998)
VP-5, Jacksonville, Fl 1973-78
ASW Ops Center, Rota, Spain 1978-81
VP-40, Mt View, Ca 1981-87
Patrol Wing 10, Mt View, CA 1987-90
ASW Ops Center, Adak, Ak 1990-92
NRD Seattle 1992-96
VP-46, Whidbey Isl, Wa 1996-98

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 161
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 5:57:58 PM   
Mike Scholl

 

Posts: 9349
Joined: 1/1/2003
From: Kansas City, MO
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nemo121

Well British and German wartime accounts do point to the geodesic construction as being particularly strong and giving the British bomber involved a greater ability to survive damage inflicted.



Tell that to the aircrews of the 94 British bombers shot down over Nuremburg..., greatest single Luftwaffe victory over bombers in the War. The geodesic design was inovative and successfull, but nothing in the records suggests that as implemented it had a significant effect on survivability in the manner of the Sturmovik's "steel bathtub" armor.

(in reply to Nemo121)
Post #: 162
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 7:15:44 PM   
Nemo121


Posts: 5807
Joined: 2/6/2004
Status: offline
Scholl,

The argument you make proves nothing.

Firstly, not all of those bombers shot down had a geodesic structure.

Secondly, it is possible to argue that bombers which returned to base in a damaged condition would have been destroyed if they had not had a geodesic design. Conversely one can make the statement that more would have been shot down if they were not of geodesic design. Unprovable? Yes, in the same way as your assetion plays hard and loose with the facts.

Thirdly, I've seen several RAF debriefings in which squadron commanders etc wax lyrical about the amount of damage the bombers with a geodesic design could take and still return to base when compared to their previous bombers. So that's evidence in the record.

Fourthly, structural design textbooks clearly state that geodesic designs are stronger than spheroidal or tubular ( constant diameter tube with rounded ends... typical for most WW2 airplanes) designs. When physics and structural analysis supports it being stronger I'll believe them.

Facts make something so. Saying it is so proves nothing.


So, we have historical reports from debriefs, we have backup from physics departments around the world and we have the reality that the 94 losses over Nuremberg don't actually prove anything one way or the other. Even if, for the sake of argument, those 94 bombers had all had a geodesic design all that might mean is that non-geodesic bombers might have lost 120 bombers over Nuremberg that night.  I think it is fairly obviou that geodesic designs DID convey a durability benefit. How much is something up for discussion.

< Message edited by Nemo121 -- 9/21/2006 7:24:36 PM >

(in reply to Mike Scholl)
Post #: 163
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 8:04:13 PM   
Mike Scholl

 

Posts: 9349
Joined: 1/1/2003
From: Kansas City, MO
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nemo121

Scholl,

The argument you make proves nothing.

Firstly, not all of those bombers shot down had a geodesic structure.

Secondly, it is possible to argue that bombers which returned to base in a damaged condition would have been destroyed if they had not had a geodesic design. Conversely one can make the statement that more would have been shot down if they were not of geodesic design. Unprovable? Yes, in the same way as your assetion plays hard and loose with the facts.

Thirdly, I've seen several RAF debriefings in which squadron commanders etc wax lyrical about the amount of damage the bombers with a geodesic design could take and still return to base when compared to their previous bombers. So that's evidence in the record.

Fourthly, structural design textbooks clearly state that geodesic designs are stronger than spheroidal or tubular ( constant diameter tube with rounded ends... typical for most WW2 airplanes) designs. When physics and structural analysis supports it being stronger I'll believe them.

Facts make something so. Saying it is so proves nothing.


So, we have historical reports from debriefs, we have backup from physics departments around the world and we have the reality that the 94 losses over Nuremberg don't actually prove anything one way or the other. Even if, for the sake of argument, those 94 bombers had all had a geodesic design all that might mean is that non-geodesic bombers might have lost 120 bombers over Nuremberg that night.  I think it is fairly obviou that geodesic designs DID convey a durability benefit. How much is something up for discussion.



It's only "stronger" if the same weight of material is put into the airframe...... As I said, the Britich used the inherant strength of the design to make the airframes lighter and increase the carrying capacity or bombload......They weren't trying to build a "Flying Fortress", they wanted a "Flying Dumptruck" to place the most "bang" on target they could manage.

(in reply to Nemo121)
Post #: 164
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 8:37:36 PM   
Nemo121


Posts: 5807
Joined: 2/6/2004
Status: offline
quote:

It's only "stronger" if the same weight of material is put into the airframe


Well, another way of putting that is to say that per unit weight a geodesic airframe is stronger than a non-geodesic airframe, particularly a long non-geodesic one ( such as many bombers of the time had). Sounds like a perfect case for putting an adjustment in for a geodesic airframe.

After all it lookes like durability takes into account the weight of the plane. So, if that is so then it stands to reason it should take account of non-weight structural factors also... geodesic structure is one of these factors and, therefore, should be taken into account.

You've admitted that per unit weight a geodesic frame is stronger ( more durable) so under what grounds would you now exclude something from consideration which, by your own admission, acts to make an airframe more durable?

(in reply to Mike Scholl)
Post #: 165
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 9:59:02 PM   
Mike Scholl

 

Posts: 9349
Joined: 1/1/2003
From: Kansas City, MO
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nemo121

quote:

It's only "stronger" if the same weight of material is put into the airframe


Well, another way of putting that is to say that per unit weight a geodesic airframe is stronger than a non-geodesic airframe, particularly a long non-geodesic one ( such as many bombers of the time had). Sounds like a perfect case for putting an adjustment in for a geodesic airframe.

After all it lookes like durability takes into account the weight of the plane. So, if that is so then it stands to reason it should take account of non-weight structural factors also... geodesic structure is one of these factors and, therefore, should be taken into account.

You've admitted that per unit weight a geodesic frame is stronger ( more durable) so under what grounds would you now exclude something from consideration which, by your own admission, acts to make an airframe more durable?



I'll try to explain this one more time. If the airframe requirements using a more traditional design were five tons of aluminum, and you put the same five tons of aluminum into an inherently stronger Geodesic Design, you would have a stronger airframe. BUT, since aluminum was a "strategic material" in high demand and short supply, you ALSO have the choice to use just four tons of aluminum in the stronger design, and get an airframe that is just as strong, but ONLY just as strong, as the traditional design; but saves you a ton of aluminum and lets you carry 2,000 lbs. more bombload. In this case the A/C does not deserve any durability "bonus" for it's design---because it already got it's bonus in the bigger bombload. Get it?

(in reply to Nemo121)
Post #: 166
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 10:10:07 PM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14120
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online
So (in that case) you took advantage of the stronger design to
a) save material
b) carry more weight

You gave up the chance to build a stronger airplane, instead opting for a and b (above).

Right?

(in reply to Mike Scholl)
Post #: 167
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/21/2006 10:46:46 PM   
Nemo121


Posts: 5807
Joined: 2/6/2004
Status: offline
I understand what you are saying but I think you aren't open to seeing my contention. let me put explain it:

1. Durability in WiTP is, at least in part, a function of aircraft weight. Light Japanese fighters without armour are less durable than heavier Japanese fighters without armour. twin-engined planes are more durable than single-engined, four-engined are more durable than twin-engined. So far it all follows weight.

2. A 4 ton geodesic plane is MORE durable than a 4 ton non-geodesic design. For the sake of argument let us assume a 4 ton geodesic design should have the same durability as a 5 ton non-geodesic design.

Now if I design a plane with engines which can push 6 tons through the air at the required speed and to the required range I can build a 4 ton geodesic plane carrying 2 tons of bombs, a 5 ton geodesic plane carrying 1 ton of bombs or a normal plane carrying 1 ton of bombs...

The durabilities of the 4 ton geodesic and 5 ton normal will be the same, despite the differing bomb loads. The durability of the 5 ton geodesic will be higher than the 5 ton normal.

End result.... Talking about bombload is a design decision and an irrelevance when discussing the issue of durability ratings vis a vis ( non-bombed, non-fuelled) weight and structure.


The  weight of the plane without bombload and fuel is freely available and, logically, the correct weight to use in determining durability. So, since we're using a non-bombed, non-fueled weight ( since it is plainly ridiculous to assume that a 1 ton plane carrying 9 tons of bombs and fuel would have the same durability as a 9 ton plane carring a ton of bombs and fuel) to determine durability then there IS every reason to apply a modifier for structure.

I know you have issues with accepting other's views but seriously a plane weighing x tons using a structural design feature which physics says are superior to those used in most planes IS going to have a higher durability ( aka resistance to structural failure ) than a "normal" plane of weight x. That's just common sense and an application of fact and reason to this situation.


Are you really trying to say that a 2 four ton ( non-bombed, non-fueled) planes should have the SAME durability in this game even if one is made using a design which every structural engineering student will tell you gives greater structural strength ( aka resistance to damage aka durability) than the other? That's nonsensical no matter how you argue it and no matter how you represent it we ARE discussing whether or not a given structural design grants greater durability PER UNIT WEIGHT.

< Message edited by Nemo121 -- 9/21/2006 10:49:51 PM >

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 168
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 12:09:09 AM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14120
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nemo121

... I think you aren't open to seeing my contention.

...

I know you have issues with accepting other's views ...



Actually, this is the first time I've seen you explain clearly what you mean. I doubt it's a lack of openess.

I know you're speaking to Mike, but I thought a 3rd party viewpoint might be helpful.

What you are saying makes some sense. There is still one question - even though the geodesic shape is pound-for-pound stronger, does it actually resist damage in proportion to its additional strength? Explaining what I mean, a classic arch is very strong, but if the keystone goes the whole thing falls in a heap. Does the geodesic shape of the aircraft have the same vulnerability in that due to the continuous shape of the structure all of the pieces are, in effect, 'keystones'?

BTW, I am asking because I don't know, I am not arguing one way or the other.

(in reply to Nemo121)
Post #: 169
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 2:35:30 AM   
Nemo121


Posts: 5807
Joined: 2/6/2004
Status: offline
Well, I've had previous conversations with him where it was difficult to account for his failure to actually take on board any point I made. That is, however, a personal perception but one based on his failure to take on board a single point I made in a few separate but concomittant threads ( sufficient for it to be a definite pattern)... That's why I usually just avoid threads he is in. OTOH I am interested in RHS and thus I posted here.


As to your point re: geodesic design... No, as far as I am aware the fuselage having a geodesic shape does not cause it to weaken excessively per unit of surface area damage ( one of the most important easily calculable means of determining how close a metallic-airframed plane is to structural failure). In fact since the Wellington and others were structurally stronger than they would have been with the normal cigar tube shaped fuselage the point was repeatedly made that a cannon shell explosion which damaged a given surface area of the outer surface was far less likely to bring a geodesic-fuselaged plane down than a cigar tube-shaped plane.

Obviously we need to differentiate between early types of planes which gained their structural integrity due to their internal structure and mostly had fabric stretched over said fuselage ( which were often highly resistant to damage unless said damage occurred at a structural weak point... rare in the era of machineguns but increasingly common when explosive cannon shells entered the mix) and those planes which gained much of their strength from their actual fuselage structure ( becoming more common as planes moved to metallic fuselages). This does point to the need to rate differing designs differently with respect to the exact same weapons system but such modelling falls outside of the scope of this game as there is no code or work-around way to effect such modelling.


(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 170
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 5:59:14 AM   
Mike Scholl

 

Posts: 9349
Joined: 1/1/2003
From: Kansas City, MO
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

So (in that case) you took advantage of the stronger design to
a) save material
b) carry more weight

You gave up the chance to build a stronger airplane, instead opting for a and b (above).

Right?



RIGHT! The initial discussion concerned giving two specific designs a "bonus" in durability because of specific, unusual design factors. I suggestted that while the Il-2 deserved this because of the heavily armored "bathtub' surrounding it's engine and pilot, the British "geodesic" bombers did not. Because the British had chosen to use the inate strength of the geodesic design to lighten the airframe and increase the bombload. Take the armor off the Sturmovik and it could carry more bombs and cannon to attack with---but it would be just as vulnerable as any other low-flying aircraft to enemy fire (and not deserving of any "bonus"). Leave it on, and you deserve a "special bonus" to the A/C's durability/defense---but you can't hit as hard.

The British opted to use the geodesic design to lighten the airframe and increase the payload. So while the geodesic design allows the POSSIBILITY of stronger and more survivable A/C, it was not the design choice the Brits made. They opted to carry more "offensive payload" instead, settling for a design that had no more "intrensic strength" than a more conventially designed bomber of greater weight and less payload. Which would not qualify for any "special bonus" to the A/C's durability/defense. Nemo wants to give them both, I'm saying you get one or the other. That's what the discussion is about.

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 171
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 6:25:10 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mike Scholl


quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again

Nope - no bonus in maneuverability for any plane. But there is a special bonus for a Russian bomber and a British bomber in durability. The Russian one has a cast armor forebody. The British one has geodesic construction.



The Sturmovik certainly deserves a "special" consideration..., even the Germans called it a flying tank. But I don't thing the Brits should get an "edge" for the Wellington/Lancaster/whatever. The geodesic construction was stronger, but the Brits used it to lighten the overall aircraft and increase bombload (show me another bomber that can carry an 11-ton "Grand Slam" bomb)......When the Germans could find them in the dark, British bombers went down at a depressing rate.



I think the plane is the Wellington. It is a twin engine bomber whose exploits and return with battle damage are legon.
It was clear in review of the history of the aircraft it was not in the same leage as other planes of similar size. Being a two engine plane, it does not get the four engine bonus however. So it isn't actually as "durable" as a lancaster. But it is more durable than any other 2 engine aircraft rated. By about two points (under the regime that we are using a K of 2 each point ends up being two in the final value).

(in reply to Mike Scholl)
Post #: 172
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 6:27:00 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: ChezDaJez

quote:

If it was your mod - how would you do it?


I would take into account where ever possible any particularly vulnerable part of an aircraft such as the tail boom on the P-38 or radiators on inline-engined aircraft. I would probably use a + / - system to rate them. Add for self-sealing fuel tanks, armor, and structural integrity. Minus for in-line engine or structural weakness such as the dive limitation for the Zero.

From what I've read, I don't think your mod is that far off from what I might have done. I just might have carried it a bit further if possible. We can quibble over things here and there but I do like the fact that you have taken into account wing-loading for maneuverability.

Chez



As we are learning once again redoing maneuverability - 249 types is a LOT of calculation and data entry. But in principle we always are willing to use better values - if someone figures them out.

(in reply to ChezDaJez)
Post #: 173
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 6:33:00 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline
Having worked in SILs (Software Integration Laboratories) which simulate aircraft and missile flights in conditions not possible in real life - and long before they are ever built - I must side with Nemo: in principle the geodesic structure is probably a better investment, pound for pound, than a armored structure like the Sturmovic had. Clearly both were in a different league for durability than normal structural methods - and that is all the RHS rating says. It is a crude indicator - worth 1 point in the calculation - and 2 points at the end (after the constant 2 - derived from calibration tests - is applied).

(in reply to Nemo121)
Post #: 174
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/22/2006 6:37:13 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nemo121

... I think you aren't open to seeing my contention.

...

I know you have issues with accepting other's views ...



Actually, this is the first time I've seen you explain clearly what you mean. I doubt it's a lack of openess.

I know you're speaking to Mike, but I thought a 3rd party viewpoint might be helpful.

What you are saying makes some sense. There is still one question - even though the geodesic shape is pound-for-pound stronger, does it actually resist damage in proportion to its additional strength? Explaining what I mean, a classic arch is very strong, but if the keystone goes the whole thing falls in a heap. Does the geodesic shape of the aircraft have the same vulnerability in that due to the continuous shape of the structure all of the pieces are, in effect, 'keystones'?

BTW, I am asking because I don't know, I am not arguing one way or the other.



The great advantage of a geodesic structure is it does not matter where the damage occurs - the structure retains integrity until a very large number of structural points are defeated. The only thing that matters is if you hit something or someone vital (a pilot, an engine) - if you don't - even hitting and destroying a structural point matters almost not at all. Most aircraft have very vital structural members - geodesic airplanes have very few of these. The whole skin is laced with structural cables - an loss of a few is not particularly meaningful.

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 175
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/23/2006 4:03:59 AM   
Herrbear


Posts: 851
Joined: 7/26/2004
From: Glendora, CA
Status: offline
Something I just thought of concerning the dividing by the number of engines. Now that Wing Loading and Power Loading is taken into account do you penalize multi engine planes for speed and ROC. Wouldn't all planes, in theory, be consistent for those two factors. For example, shouldn't a 2-engine plane with 1000 hp engines with a ROC of 3000 and weight of 10,000 lbs work the same as a 1-engine plane with a 2000 hp engine also with a ROC of 3000 and a weight of 10,000 lbs.

Why would the 2-engine plane be penalized in those factors?

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 176
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/23/2006 4:56:28 AM   
witpqs

 

Posts: 14120
Joined: 10/4/2004
From: Argleton
Status: online
Except for the case of multiple engines along the center axis (very rare), multi-engine planes in WWII have their engines on/in the wings. Because the engines are heavy, this means that they have a lot more inertia to overcome when they try to roll. It's basically the physics concept of angular momentum.

This is one big difference between single and multi-engine planes in WWII.

(in reply to Herrbear)
Post #: 177
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/23/2006 6:54:27 AM   
el cid again

 

Posts: 14898
Joined: 10/10/2005
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: Herrbear

Something I just thought of concerning the dividing by the number of engines. Now that Wing Loading and Power Loading is taken into account do you penalize multi engine planes for speed and ROC. Wouldn't all planes, in theory, be consistent for those two factors. For example, shouldn't a 2-engine plane with 1000 hp engines with a ROC of 3000 and weight of 10,000 lbs work the same as a 1-engine plane with a 2000 hp engine also with a ROC of 3000 and a weight of 10,000 lbs.

Why would the 2-engine plane be penalized in those factors?



The multi engine penalty - it is not just for twin engine planes - but all of them - is meant to address the problem of conservation of angular momentum. It is meant to say that it is a severe restriction on maneuverability. It is a nice part of the function - whatever the number of engines - it goes there. There is, however, this caviet: multiple engines on one axis count as one engine. This can occur in 3 ways (and does NOT occur in WITP so far).

1) Two engines coupled to act as one.
2) Two engines with a common shaft - driving counter rotating screws on the same hub.
3) Two engines on a single axis - one driving a tractor and one a pusher.

Anyway - the number of engines is in the deonominator because that is the right place for it to be. It divides what otherwise would be the maneuverability value - a composite function - by N. It is not meant to say any particular element of that function is so divided.

(in reply to Herrbear)
Post #: 178
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/23/2006 10:46:59 PM   
Herrbear


Posts: 851
Joined: 7/26/2004
From: Glendora, CA
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: witpqs

Except for the case of multiple engines along the center axis (very rare), multi-engine planes in WWII have their engines on/in the wings. Because the engines are heavy, this means that they have a lot more inertia to overcome when they try to roll. It's basically the physics concept of angular momentum.

This is one big difference between single and multi-engine planes in WWII.


I understand about the concept of angular momentum. But I am only discussing max speed and rate of climb. I don't think that angular momentum plays a part in this.

(in reply to witpqs)
Post #: 179
RE: How he got the new ratings - 9/23/2006 10:49:23 PM   
Herrbear


Posts: 851
Joined: 7/26/2004
From: Glendora, CA
Status: offline

quote:

ORIGINAL: el cid again


quote:

ORIGINAL: Herrbear

Something I just thought of concerning the dividing by the number of engines. Now that Wing Loading and Power Loading is taken into account do you penalize multi engine planes for speed and ROC. Wouldn't all planes, in theory, be consistent for those two factors. For example, shouldn't a 2-engine plane with 1000 hp engines with a ROC of 3000 and weight of 10,000 lbs work the same as a 1-engine plane with a 2000 hp engine also with a ROC of 3000 and a weight of 10,000 lbs.

Why would the 2-engine plane be penalized in those factors?



The multi engine penalty - it is not just for twin engine planes - but all of them - is meant to address the problem of conservation of angular momentum. It is meant to say that it is a severe restriction on maneuverability. It is a nice part of the function - whatever the number of engines - it goes there. There is, however, this caviet: multiple engines on one axis count as one engine. This can occur in 3 ways (and does NOT occur in WITP so far).

1) Two engines coupled to act as one.
2) Two engines with a common shaft - driving counter rotating screws on the same hub.
3) Two engines on a single axis - one driving a tractor and one a pusher.

Anyway - the number of engines is in the deonominator because that is the right place for it to be. It divides what otherwise would be the maneuverability value - a composite function - by N. It is not meant to say any particular element of that function is so divided.


Sid -- I understand why the penalty is used as it impacts wing loading and power loading. But does the "problem of conservation of angular momentum" have any impact on max speed or ROC. If it doesn't, why penalize those factors?

(in reply to el cid again)
Post #: 180
Page:   <<   < prev  4 5 [6] 7 8   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Current Games From Matrix.] >> [World War II] >> War In The Pacific - Struggle Against Japan 1941 - 1945 >> Scenario Design >> RE: How he got the new ratings Page: <<   < prev  4 5 [6] 7 8   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.135