Voting Day in the U.S.A. (Full Version)

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fodder -> Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 1:56:45 PM)

A reminder to all of the citizens of the good old U.S.A. Its election day. Vote early and often. I've just now returned from the polls and can report that there is only a fifty minute waiting line here. That's not to bad.




junk2drive -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 2:14:13 PM)

Like we need a reminder with all the robocalls and ads [:D]

I'm more concerned with my local issues than the national ones. All or nothing states like mine don't matter for the big one.

Everyone should take the time to vote.




Titanwarrior89 -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 2:19:23 PM)

Did early voting....hope it counts.




SuluSea -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 3:27:00 PM)

I can't wait to get to the polls--- I wish I could have some zeal for one of the candidates but like all elections in my voting life I'm left with who is going to hurt me less.

In Maryland we have some key issues on the ballot.

Especially our governor trying to get state funding for illegals to attend college if you can believe that one.

I would crawl to the polling station to cast my vote AGAINST that.

Edited for clarification: If you're in the country illegally you pay the rate the citizens of Maryland do, if you're a taxpaying citizen or child of one that's out of state the fee is full rate.. Who was it that said "only in America".




ilovestrategy -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 3:53:53 PM)

I mailed my vote 2 weeks ago. I want Oddball for president. Woof woof!




radic202 -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 6:14:11 PM)


Did I miss "vote early and vote often"?? LOL!




Chickenboy -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 6:43:28 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: radic202


Did I miss "vote early and vote often"?? LOL!


It's a 'Chicago machine' ism. An oldie but a goodie.




radic202 -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 6:52:00 PM)


Ok I have no idea what "Chicago machine'ism" means but think I can figure it out from there!

At least you Yanks have a voting system that permits you to directly choose your President/Leader unlike us Canadians who have the awful "first past the post" British Parliamentary system where unless you live in the riding of the Leader of the party that wins the most seats, you never ever get to vote for him/her or you can hate the Leader but like the local candidate but end up voting for the Leader's party thus electing him/her in the end anyways even though you did not want him/her to win in the first place.

One day, Canada will be free of it's lame political system, just hope it is in my life-time?




doomtrader -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 6:55:29 PM)

Isn't it funny that the cradle of modern democracy doesn't have a real democratic voting?




flanyboy -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 8:20:48 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: doomtrader

Isn't it funny that the cradle of modern democracy doesn't have a real democratic voting?



Very few democracies do. Most democracies are really Republics. Parliamentary style is by far the most common form of democracy and there as the above poster pointed out you merely vote for the party and the party leader becomes the head.

Heck in places like the UK a party that only wins 30% of the vote can in some cases become the dominating faction in the government!




doomtrader -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 8:34:04 PM)

I was reffering to the fact that despite people are voting, the electors don't have to listen to them and can choose completely different way.




Capt. Harlock -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 8:36:35 PM)

quote:

At least you Yanks have a voting system that permits you to directly choose your President/Leader


Surprisingly enough, that isn't strictly accurate. We vote for Electors, who in turn vote for the President. This means that it is possible -- and has happened -- for the man who gets the most popular votes to lose the election. Note also that only citizens of states and the District of Columbia get Electors. If you live in Puerto Rico or Guam or other territories, you're out of luck.




MrRoadrunner -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 8:56:42 PM)

I think it was Ben Franklin that said,
"A Democracy is like two wolves and a sheep voting for what is for dinner. A Republic is a well armed sheep that can contest the vote."

RR




Aurelian -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/6/2012 11:03:03 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: doomtrader

I was reffering to the fact that despite people are voting, the electors don't have to listen to them and can choose completely different way.


Although no elector is required by federal law to honor a pledge, in the overwhelming majority of cases each elector votes as pledged.

*But*, faithless electors.

A faithless elector is one who casts an electoral vote for someone other than the person pledged or does not vote for any person. 24 states have laws to punish faithless electors. In 1952, the constitutionality of state pledge laws was brought before the Supreme Court in Ray v. Blair, 343 U.S. 214 (1952). The Court ruled in favor of state laws requiring electors to pledge to vote for the winning candidate, as well as removing electors who refuse to pledge. As stated in the ruling, electors are acting as a functionary of the state, not the federal government. Therefore, states have the right to govern electors. The constitutionality of state laws punishing electors for actually casting a faithless vote, rather than refusing to pledge, has never been decided by the Supreme Court. While many only punish a faithless elector after-the-fact, states like Michigan also specify that the faithless elector's vote be voided.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Electoral_College




Hertston -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 2:32:59 AM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: flanyboy

Heck in places like the UK a party that only wins 30% of the vote can in some cases become the dominating faction in the government!


Yeah, it's great. Particularly when many of the beneficiaries keep on trying to pass laws prohibiting us Union types from holding any industrial action where less than 50% overall (not of just those who voted) vote in favour because it's apparently 'undemocratic'! [:@]

Anyway, back on topic; I see Florida seems to have made a right pig's ear of it again?




Neilster -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 4:13:28 AM)

I'm perplexed at how difficult it is to actually vote in the U.S. I may be wrong but it appears you have to register as Republican, Democrat or independent. Then the election is on a Tuesday (I know there are historical reasons for this but we now no longer live in an age where farmers couldn't travel on a Sunday because it is the day of rest and for going to church) and you often have to wait in line for hours to cast your vote, with wildly differing systems in every state. Then you have hurdle packs of lawyers, monitors, monitors of monitors etc...

In Australia you just enrol to vote. You can vote for the compulsory marijuana party if you want, as long as you're enrolled. Voting is on a Saturday and there is a single national system. Generally you wait for a few minutes and we have a very high tech voting system...

Someone checks your name off and you are given the ballot papers for the upper and lower houses. In the booth there is a pencil attached to a string. You either put a "1" next to your choice or number the candidates in order. If you can't do that properly you didn't deserve a vote anyway, but if necessary someone is there to explain it. Then you put each paper in a box. The result is generally known within a couple of hours of the polls closing with no controversy. We may be a bit behind the times down here [;)]

Additionally, in response to radic202 above, the political analysts I've heard suggest there is much to be said for the parliamentary system, but I can't remember all the arguments. There are certainly some disadvantages to the Electoral College system, such as the over-importance of large swing states, discouragement of voter turnout in others and the favouring of smaller states. Democracy has a way of working stuff out anyway, whatever the system.

Cheers, Neilster






Neilster -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 4:17:15 AM)

BTW, Australian TV has an awesome election analyst who can be much bolder than the U.S. ones because they don't won't to affect voting that is still occurring and he's got it 250-206 Democrats at the moment.

Cheers, Neilster




Neilster -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 4:18:53 AM)

257-206

Cheers, Neilster




Neilster -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 4:26:53 AM)

275-206

Cheers, Neilster




radic202 -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 4:32:43 AM)


From a left wing political thinker Canadian here: Gratz Obama on such a great win...........Hope the Tea Party quickly boils away.................Now to return Canada to it's center to left glory days of old! LOL!




Neilster -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 4:39:09 AM)

Let's be very careful not to make this thread political.

Cheers, Neilster




OldSarge -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 5:06:04 AM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Neilster

I'm perplexed at how difficult it is to actually vote in the U.S. I may be wrong but it appears you have to register as Republican, Democrat or independent. Then the election is on a Tuesday (I know there are historical reasons for this but we now no longer live in an age where farmers couldn't travel on a Sunday because it is the day of rest and for going to church) and you often have to wait in line for hours to cast your vote, with wildly differing systems in every state. Then you have hurdle packs of lawyers, monitors, monitors of monitors etc...


Each state determines its own voting requirements. That is why there are some voting problems that occur in a few states that are as equally perplexing to us Americans as they seem to you and the rest of the world.

My own state allows early voting and the local County Clerk was able to set up early voting that allowed any registered voter to vote at any available station. I early voted and there was absolutely no issues with either lines or the process. Smooth as silk.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Neilster

Additionally, in response to radic202 above, the political analysts I've heard suggest there is much to be said for the parliamentary system, but I can't remember all the arguments. There are certainly some disadvantages to the Electoral College system, such as the over-importance of large swing states, discouragement of voter turnout in others and the favouring of smaller states. Democracy has a way of working stuff out anyway, whatever the system.

Cheers, Neilster


The Electoral College is a compromise that was put into the Constitution because the other choices weren't all that great either. Like all compromises it is imperfect, but it has the singular virtue of having served the U.S. so well for so long...even if it is sometimes frustrating.




Erik Rutins -> RE: Voting Day in the U.S.A. (11/7/2012 6:03:13 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Neilster
Let's be very careful not to make this thread political.


Too late, thread locked. Thank Radic202.

Regards,

- Erik




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