RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (Full Version)

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John 3rd -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 3:00:00 PM)

I grew up on John Denver while living in Missouri (pronounced correctly as Misouraa). I can remember belting out Country Roads (badly), Grandma's Feather Bed, and Thank Gawd I'm a Country Boy.

Loved the Kenny Rogers Ballads.

What about a women named "ELVIRA!?? Baa-Woom boppa woom boppa mow-mow....hiyo Silver and away!

Lordy---talk about a trip down amnesia lane...




John 3rd -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 3:14:26 PM)

Just honored Chez's Mom by listening to 'Sink the Bismarck!'

Thought I should also honor the Southern Paddle Man with 'Johnny Reb:' "I saw you a marching with Robert E Lee. Ya held your head a high trying to win the victory...




Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 3:15:25 PM)

The Oak Ridge Boys were always good. They started in gospel, as did alot of country stars, and then made it big.

I think ballads are my favorites, whether country or western or pop or rock. "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," "El Paso" (as Chez mentioned), "In the Ghetto," etc. Lots of memorable songs.

But there were ballads that I never figured out. Do songs like "Horse with No Name," "MacArthur Park," and "American Pie" actually have meanings?




John 3rd -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 3:16:45 PM)

American Pie doesn't need meaning. It calls to the heart and soul.




panzer cat -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 3:32:30 PM)

I started listening to Waylon and willie about a year ago, thats my dads music. Hated it growing up in the 70's, love it now. What about Cash's "a boy named Sue", the ultimate song about tough love.




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:40:49 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: John 3rd

What about a women named "ELVIRA!?? Baa-Woom boppa woom boppa mow-mow....hiyo Silver and away!

Lordy---talk about a trip down amnesia lane...



"Elvira" was playing on the juke box as I put my best, special, 1-A moves on the hottest USMC 2nd Lt. I ever laid eyes on. She was wearing a yellow flowered aloha shirt in the O-club at NavSup Corps School in Athens, GA in fall 1980. I remember the song like it was yesterday, as well as remembering her knowing absolutely that I was putting moves on her, her thinking I was a dork, but not being ugly about it. I wanted to marry her on the spot.




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:42:33 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

The Oak Ridge Boys were always good. They started in gospel, as did alot of country stars, and then made it big.

I think ballads are my favorites, whether country or western or pop or rock. "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," "El Paso" (as Chez mentioned), "In the Ghetto," etc. Lots of memorable songs.

But there were ballads that I never figured out. Do songs like "Horse with No Name," "MacArthur Park," and "American Pie" actually have meanings?


I have read that "Horse" is an allegorical tale of recovery from heroin addiciton. Take it for what it's worth.

"Stairway to Heaven" is supposed to be about heroin addiciton going the other way.

And dude, you need to start another game!!!!

Edit: "American Pie" is a history of American rock and roll. The lyrics have been examined line by line in many places, first I think at the time in Life magazine (?) The Day The Music Died was the plane crash that killed Buddy Holly. The Jester is Bob Dylan. Mick Jagger is in there, as well as John Lenin. Look it up on-line. I'm sure there are lots of places which deconstruct the lines. Although nobody can explain how the levee was dry. But it rhymed.

Just looked at the lyrics agian. Girl who sings the blues is Janis Joplin. The devil is Mick Jagger (Jack FLash, Sympathy for the Devil.) The king is John Lenin I think. Sergrants is Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Do you remember the Boo of Love, famous do-wop era song. A White SPort Coat and a Pink Carnaiton is alluded to. Helter Skelter is both the Stones and Manson. The Byrds sang "Eight Miles High." The "scared store" refers to a famous rock venue I think, but I don't know which one--maybe Filmore East?


From
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/908/what-is-don-mcleans-song-american-pie-all-about

"February made me shiver: Holly's plane crashed February 3, 1959.

Them good ole boys were ... singing "This'll be the day that I die": Holly's hit "That'll Be the Day" had a similar line.

The Jester sang for the King and Queen in a coat he borrowed from James Dean: ID of K and Q obscure. Elvis and Connie Francis (or Little Richard)? John and Jackie Kennedy? Or Queen Elizabeth and consort, for whom Dylan apparently did play once? Dean's coat is the famous red windbreaker he wore in Rebel Without a Cause; Dylan wore a similar one on "The Freewheeling Bob Dylan" album cover.

With the Jester on the sidelines in a cast: On July 29, 1966 Dylan had a motorcycle accident that kept him laid up for nine months.

While sergeants played a marching tune: The Beatles' "Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band."

And as I watched him on the stage/ my hands were clenched in fists of rage/ No angel born in hell/ Could break that Satan's spell/ And as the flames climbed high into the night: Mick Jagger, Altamont.

I met a girl who sang the blues/ And I asked her for some happy news/ But she just smiled and turned away: Janis Joplin OD'd October 4, 1970.

The three men I admire most/ The Father, Son, and Holy Ghost/ They caught the last train for the coast: Major mystery. Holly, Bopper, Valens? Hank Williams, Elvis, Holly? JFK, RFK, ML King? The literal tripartite deity? As for the coast, could be the departure of the music biz for California. Or it simply rhymes, a big determinant of plot direction in pop music lyrics (which may also explain "drove my Chevy to the levee"). Best I can do for now. Just don't ask me to explain "Stairway to Heaven.""




Empire101 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:53:33 PM)

Does Glen Campbells 'Rhinestone Cowboy' count?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atHY8rDBhtI

One of my favourites, full of pathos.

I also loved Roger Millers 'King of the Road'. Is that C&W?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmOe27SJ3Yc





Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:56:33 PM)

Hey, Moose, I was at the University of Georgia in 1980. We might've bumped into each other at Allen's or B & L Warehouse or the 40-Watt Club. And Bradford Kay was probably there too.

I visited the Navy Supply Corps school in Athens several times during my '79 to '86 soujourn at UGA. During a wedding reception there around '85, I had a bit too much to drink and ended up leaving the place with a sailor's cap (one of the Gilligan's Island style caps, whatever they are called). I've always felt bad about doing that.




Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:57:38 PM)

Roger Miller's "City of New Orleans" is a tremendous ballad. Glen Campbell, originally of Beach Boys fame, became a great C&W singer. I think he was always very classy.




Empire101 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:59:32 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Roger Miller's "City of New Orleans" is a tremendous ballad. Glen Campbell, originally of Beach Boys fame, became a great C&W singer. I think he was always very classy.


I shall check it out & report back!!




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 4:59:32 PM)

This thread is making me think of those HD radio commercials. I can't recall all the misnamed songs in here, but these stand out:

Ventura Highway
Kiss An Angel Good Morning
Jolene

Chez, I am sure that it won't surprise you to learn that I am very partial to the Dead's version of El Paso...




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:02:48 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Hey, Moose, I was at the University of Georgia in 1980. We might've bumped into each other at Allen's or B & L Warehouse or the 40-Watt Club. And Bradford Kay was probably there too.

I visited the Navy Supply Corps school in Athens several times during my '79 to '86 soujourn at UGA. During a wedding reception there around '85, I had a bit too much to drink and ended up leaving the place with a sailor's cap (one of the Gilligan's Island style caps, whatever they are called). I've always felt bad about doing that.


I had a series of posts rapping with Bradford about Athens. I could describe places I went, usually not sober, and he knew all the names. I just knew the bouncers' names. [:)] B & L Warehouse sounds a little familiar.

Dixie cup hats. Wouldn't worry too much about it. The average sailor goes through a dozen a year, more if they wear them on deck. No chin straps.

The school is gone now, closed for budget reasons. I think it was moved to Orlando, along with half the other Navy schools which used to be in interesting places.




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:03:43 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Roger Miller's "City of New Orleans" is a tremendous ballad. Glen Campbell, originally of Beach Boys fame, became a great C&W singer. I think he was always very classy.


"The Dreams of the Everyday Housewife" always chokes me up. My mom loved that song.

Glen Campbell is in, or just finished, his last tour. He has Alzheiners. From reports it was very emotional. He forgot the lyrics in middle of many songs, but the band picked him up and the crowds did too. I think his daughter was in the band, touring. After the last show he planned to withdraw from pubic appearances.




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:04:57 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Bullwinkle58

quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

The Oak Ridge Boys were always good. They started in gospel, as did alot of country stars, and then made it big.

I think ballads are my favorites, whether country or western or pop or rock. "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," "El Paso" (as Chez mentioned), "In the Ghetto," etc. Lots of memorable songs.

But there were ballads that I never figured out. Do songs like "Horse with No Name," "MacArthur Park," and "American Pie" actually have meanings?


I have read that "Horse" is an allegorical tale of recovery from heroin addiciton. Take it for what it's worth.

"Stairway to Heaven" is supposed to be about heroin addiciton going the other way.

And dude, you need to start another game!!!!

Edit: "American Pie" is a history of American rock and roll. The lyrics have been examined line by line in many places, first I think at the time in Life magazine (?) The Day The Music Died was the plane crash that killed Buddy Holly. The Jester is Bob Dylan. Mick Jagger is in there, as well as John Lenin. Look it up on-line. I'm sure there are lots of places which deconstruct the lines. Although nobody can explain how the levee was dry. But it rhymed.

Just looked at the lyrics agian. Girl who sings the blues is Janis Joplin. The devil is Mick Jagger (Jack FLash, Sympathy for the Devil.) The king is John Lenin I think. Sergrants is Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Do you remember the Boo of Love, famous do-wop era song. A White SPort Coat and a Pink Carnaiton is alluded to. Helter Skelter is both the Stones and Manson. The Byrds sang "Eight Miles High." The "scared store" refers to a famous rock venue I think, but I don't know which one--maybe Filmore East?


From
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/908/what-is-don-mcleans-song-american-pie-all-about

"February made me shiver: Holly's plane crashed February 3, 1959.

Them good ole boys were ... singing "This'll be the day that I die": Holly's hit "That'll Be the Day" had a similar line.

The Jester sang for the King and Queen in a coat he borrowed from James Dean: ID of K and Q obscure. Elvis and Connie Francis (or Little Richard)? John and Jackie Kennedy? Or Queen Elizabeth and consort, for whom Dylan apparently did play once? Dean's coat is the famous red windbreaker he wore in Rebel Without a Cause; Dylan wore a similar one on "The Freewheeling Bob Dylan" album cover.

With the Jester on the sidelines in a cast: On July 29, 1966 Dylan had a motorcycle accident that kept him laid up for nine months.

While sergeants played a marching tune: The Beatles' "Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band."

And as I watched him on the stage/ my hands were clenched in fists of rage/ No angel born in hell/ Could break that Satan's spell/ And as the flames climbed high into the night: Mick Jagger, Altamont.

I met a girl who sang the blues/ And I asked her for some happy news/ But she just smiled and turned away: Janis Joplin OD'd October 4, 1970.

The three men I admire most/ The Father, Son, and Holy Ghost/ They caught the last train for the coast: Major mystery. Holly, Bopper, Valens? Hank Williams, Elvis, Holly? JFK, RFK, ML King? The literal tripartite deity? As for the coast, could be the departure of the music biz for California. Or it simply rhymes, a big determinant of plot direction in pop music lyrics (which may also explain "drove my Chevy to the levee"). Best I can do for now. Just don't ask me to explain "Stairway to Heaven.""




Wow, Moose... you were in Athens during the best fall ever!!! That was my senior year at Georgia - a very fun time.Friends with military IDs were able to get kegs at the Navy Supply Corps School for the cheapest price in town.




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:06:43 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Bullwinkle58

quote:

ORIGINAL: Canoerebel

Hey, Moose, I was at the University of Georgia in 1980. We might've bumped into each other at Allen's or B & L Warehouse or the 40-Watt Club. And Bradford Kay was probably there too.

I visited the Navy Supply Corps school in Athens several times during my '79 to '86 soujourn at UGA. During a wedding reception there around '85, I had a bit too much to drink and ended up leaving the place with a sailor's cap (one of the Gilligan's Island style caps, whatever they are called). I've always felt bad about doing that.


I had a series of posts rapping with Bradford about Athens. I could describe places I went, usually not sober, and he knew all the names. I just knew the bouncers' names. [:)] B & L Warehouse sounds a little familiar.

Dixie cup hats. Wouldn't worry too much about it. The average sailor goes through a dozen a year, more if they wear them on deck. No chin straps.

The school is gone now, closed for budget reasons. I think it was moved to Orlando, along with half the other Navy schools which used to be in interesting places.



It's funny... I have a great memory for places and times, but apparently not for something I talked about yesterday or a few years ago!!!




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:08:13 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: bradfordkay

Wow, Moose... you were in Athens during the best fall ever!!! That was my senior year at Georgia - a very fun time.Friends with military IDs were able to get kegs at the Navy Supply Corps School for the cheapest price in town.


Amazing how cheap booze is when all state and federal taxes are removed. [:)]




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:10:16 PM)

You do remember why I called that "the best fall ever" (hint: it wasn't because it was my senior year)?




Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:18:42 PM)

Oops, "City of New Orleans" is by Arlo Guthrie. Not Roger Miller. Great ballad though: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfxoM6trtZE




Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:23:52 PM)

This got me thinking to some of the great ballads in American (and Canadian!) music. How about these:

1. City of New Orleans
2. The Night they Drove Ol' Dixie Down
3. The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald
4. One Tin Soldier (okay, it's kind of a ballad/allegory)
5. El Paso
6. In the Ghetto
7. Sunday Morning Coming Down

What else? There must be a ton of them. (I don't know the purely "technical" definition of a "ballad," but I'm thinking it's a song that tells a story.)




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:25:10 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: bradfordkay

You do remember why I called that "the best fall ever" (hint: it wasn't because it was my senior year)?


Because of Mr. Walker?




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:31:13 PM)

Yep, Mr Walker had everything to do with it.

"My God, a Freshman!!" (Dan is probably the only other person on here who recognizes that quote.)




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:37:36 PM)

Dan, Chez already mentioned a couple:

The Battle of New Orleans
and
Sink the Bismark

Johnny Horton was almost the originator of the pop ballad.




Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:39:42 PM)

"My God, he ran right over people! Herschel Walker, a freshman out of Johnson County!"

Larry Munson's call of Belue to Scott skill gives me chills:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOhWVvsrq5k




bradfordkay -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 5:42:33 PM)

Yep, I think that I'm going to have to go play my "Larry Munson's Greatest Hits" DVD... check back with y'all later.

Hmmm.... maybe I should run my turn first, so it will be waiting for Steve when he gets home.




Empire101 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 8:57:28 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: bradfordkay

It's funny... I have a great memory for places and times, but apparently not for something I talked about yesterday or a few years ago!!!



Join the club......I can remember obscure facts, dates, events and specifications ( especially when it comes to Military History ), but what happened last week, or what my wife just said[8|], just seem to evade me.

Dangnabbit Musky!! I must be gettin' old!!

[image]local://upfiles/29250/44294EACAC4C40599BBF5743F9486063.jpg[/image]




CaptDave -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 10:01:56 PM)

Back in my early days (60s and 70s) I didn't spend a lot of time listening to the radio, mostly just when we were in the car. Didn't listen to the words in any case, so I can easily say I see everything in a new light now!

BTW, don't for a minute think the Big Band lyrics were all that innocent! Not strictly Big Band, but toward the end of that era, the Andrews Sisters' "Hold Tight" drips with innuendo, the best example I can think of off the top of my head. Just heard some Count Basie songs the other day that had me doing double takes, as well.




Canoerebel -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 10:04:54 PM)

Are you suggesting "In the Mood" wasn't referring to "for a quick game of cribbage"?




CaptDave -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/2/2012 10:13:01 PM)

Probably not! [;)]

Most people don't know "In the Mood" even has lyrics!

FWIW, almost any Cole Porter tune falls into the same category. Check out "Too Darn Hot," the opening number to the second act of Kiss Me, Kate! -- the real version (the stage musical, not the abomination of a movie).




Bullwinkle58 -> RE: OT - The Truth About '70s Country Music (11/3/2012 1:33:06 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: CaptDave

Back in my early days (60s and 70s) I didn't spend a lot of time listening to the radio, mostly just when we were in the car. Didn't listen to the words in any case, so I can easily say I see everything in a new light now!

BTW, don't for a minute think the Big Band lyrics were all that innocent! Not strictly Big Band, but toward the end of that era, the Andrews Sisters' "Hold Tight" drips with innuendo, the best example I can think of off the top of my head. Just heard some Count Basie songs the other day that had me doing double takes, as well.


Absolutely. People who think our grandparents were all virgins when they got married need to stop believing grandma's lies. The 1920s in particular, when jazz exploded, rival the 1960s for the degree of fornication going on across the land.

A lot of music of the time has innuendo. "Rock and Roll" itself is an old blues phrase meaning intercourse. When Bessie Smith sings, "Roll me like your back ain't got no bone" she isn't talking about pilates.




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