Artwork Request (Full Version)

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Don Bowen -> Artwork Request (9/24/2012 2:52:12 PM)


Would anyone like to tackle AE artwork for this little ship?

Interested in the Navy wartime version, not the later Coast Guard Bouy Tender conversion.



[image]local://upfiles/757/60CA66C7A27C4A1EAA59FC916D7682FF.jpg[/image]




SuluSea -> RE: Artwork Request (9/28/2012 3:37:37 PM)

Hi Don, if you can wait a week or two I think I'll have you something that you'd like. I already have a good start but don't have the time to put into it right now.




Don Bowen -> RE: Artwork Request (9/28/2012 3:41:51 PM)


Thanks. No sweat on a wait, I'll be out of town for a week or so anyway.

Don




oldman45 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/28/2012 10:08:41 PM)

Sulu if you would post it here, I enjoy these little tid bits to add to the game.




Buck Beach -> RE: Artwork Request (9/29/2012 2:44:23 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: oldman45

Sulu if you would post it here, I enjoy these little tid bits to add to the game.


Me too!!

Buck




Norm3 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/29/2012 5:35:06 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Buck Beach


quote:

ORIGINAL: oldman45

Sulu if you would post it here, I enjoy these little tid bits to add to the game.


Me too!!

Buck


Me 3, but that goes without saying!




kirk23 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 2:31:11 PM)

Hi Guys I will take a stab at doing art for the Navy Yard Lighter.




kirk23 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 3:27:18 PM)

USA Navy Yard Lighter Shil.

[image]local://upfiles/36378/240715CB84CD4335A5E4FFE0C1F0B74D.jpg[/image]




kirk23 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 3:28:06 PM)

Navy Yard Lighter Side.Is this the kind of thing you were after?

[image]local://upfiles/36378/6F2700E433344788A70D9C2752135101.jpg[/image]




SuluSea -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 3:30:48 PM)

Hi guys! [:)] Here's what's close to the complete art. I need to mull few ideas over before I upload the final which should be a few days. I'll have a boom up and boom down version if any of you all decide it's up your alley you'll have a choice.

[image]http://i47.tinypic.com/160ssk0.jpg[/image]

I got a little wrapped up in the art at the expense of my gaming and put more time into it than I thought I would have. I hope it shows. [:)]




Buck Beach -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 4:21:48 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: kirk23

Navy Yard Lighter Side.Is this the kind of thing you were after?

[image]local://upfiles/36378/6F2700E433344788A70D9C2752135101.jpg[/image]



Good job and thanks. Even though Sula is working on another version, my feelings are that you can't have too many ships in your ART folder. There are many, many configurations of various small ships so the more the merrier.

Buck




Buck Beach -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 4:22:27 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: SuluSea

Hi guys! [:)] Here's what's close to the complete art. I need to mull few ideas over before I upload the final which should be a few days. I'll have a boom up and boom down version if any of you all decide it's up your alley you'll have a choice.

[image]http://i47.tinypic.com/160ssk0.jpg[/image]

I got a little wrapped up in the art at the expense of my gaming and put more time into it than I thought I would have. I hope it shows. [:)]


Bring them on.

Buck




Shark7 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 4:29:23 PM)

Looking good SuluSea.

And I have a question: What exactly does the yard lighter do? I've never quite figured out their purpose. My search attempts to find information have been less than successful. [:(]




SuluSea -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 5:22:36 PM)

Thanks guys!

In the PDF on USCG.mil that I believe Don's picture is from states...

EVOLUTION OF THE 133-FOOT SELF-PROPELLED FREIGHT AND AMMUNITION LIGHTERS


The huge amounts of supplies shipped from United States ports
during the Second World War required the augmentation,
overhaul, and wholesale replacement of much of America’s
transportation infrastructure. Harbors and waterways were
recognized as potential bottlenecks in the transportation
system. Not only ships were needed, but also new piers,
warehouses, and harbor craft. Hundreds of barges and lighters
were built to speed the flow of cargoes being transhipped in
ports around the country. Like other critical parts of the
transportation network, barges for use in transhipping cargoes
were also upgraded and improved as time went on. One
important link in the supply chain was made up of special
covered barges for freight and ammunition, called lighters.
Experience taught that delays in delivering loaded lighters kept
the cargo from arriving where needed, and tied up a scarce
transportation vehicle, the lighter itself. To avoid these delays,
wartime speed and efficiency demanded that many lighters be
made self-propelling to avoid waiting for a tugboat to become
available.


One of the most numerous type of self-propelled lighters were
“133-foot” vessels built by manufacturing concerns around the
country. The U.S. Navy Bureau of Ships drew up specifications
for building freight and ammunition lighters (self-propelled).
1. The requirements called for a vessel similar to the very best of
small self-propelled commercial lighters in use at the time.
Some changes were made to outfit the lighters for military
service. Each ship had to be capable of worldwide service, so
full sets of navigational instruments were delivered with each
vessel. Naval duty also called for a full set of fire-fighting and
damage control gear. Reserve buoyancy was increased by
adding an enclosed forecastle and enlarging the deckhouse.
2. Shallow draft allowed access to inner harbors and to load and
transport supplies to large vessels at anchor.


Because of the full employment of most experienced shipyards,
contracts to build these vessels were awarded to inexperienced
contractors. Erie Concrete and Steel Supply of Erie, Pennsylvania,
had never built a ship when they won a contract to build
several lighters. Basalt Rock Company of Napa, California,
had built only unpowered steel barges when they won a contract
for two Navy lighters. They seriously underestimated the cost
of their first contract, but went on to build YF self-powered
lighters, other smaller types, and became the lead yard for
salvage ships (ARS).3


The specifications called for twin-screw, Diesel-driven, steel,
self-propelled freight lighters similar to YF-257, with some
modifications. YF-257 had been built at Norfolk Navy Shipyard
in early 1940 and launched June 29, 1940. The Boston Navy
Yard built a sister ship YF-258, launched August 22, 1940.
Norfolk Navy Yard also built another of the same type the next
year. The main hoist consisted of a single mast and boom
powered by an electric winch mounted on the working deck.
The deckhouse did not extend to the sides, and the forecastle
was much smaller than that on the later 133-foot self-propelled
ammunition lighters. The principal dimensions for the 133-foot
self-propelled lighters were:


Length, overall,132 feet, 6 inches long
Length, between perpendiculars,132 feet
Breadth, extreme, molded, 30 feet
Depth, molded at side to main deck, amidships, 12 feet,
3 11/16 inches


Diesel oil, full capacity (estimated), 33.5 tons
Potable water, full capacity (estimated), 10.0 tons
They drew about 8 feet, 9 inches of water at maximum loading.
The class was propelled by twin screws each powered by a
600 BHP Diesel engine. The maximum sustained speed was
10.5 knots giving a 2,450 mile radius of action, or 7.5 knots
giving a 2,830 radius. The ships were built of steel except within
a five foot radius of the steering compass, where they were
built of brass. The hull was broad, nearly flat-bottomed, with a
raised enclosed forecastle deck and a raised deckhouse
extending from side to side nearly to the stern. The wide flat
bottoms, combined with bilge keels, provided a stable platform
during lifting operations.




Don Bowen -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 6:14:27 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Shark7

Looking good SuluSea.

And I have a question: What exactly does the yard lighter do? I've never quite figured out their purpose. My search attempts to find information have been less than successful. [:(]


A yard lighter is used to move supplies and ammunition to/from ships in harbor. Ships that can not come alongside a pier can load from/unload into lighters, which then transfer the load to/from loading areas. They are also used to load specialized cargo when ships are not able (or allowed) to dock at the source. Ammo from ammo depots where safety issues preclude direct loading, for instance.

This later requirement called for extensions to the size and capability of lighters. Weapons depots were frequently located away from other harbor facilities (sometimes 20 miles or more away) in case of "events". Large, capable lighters were used to move ammo from the depot to ships in the main anchorage. Most lighters were unpowered (classed as YFN) and had to be moved by tug boats. As Sulu Sea noted, a class of self propelled lighters (YF) were developed pre-war to remove the dependency on tug boats. These were good sized - about the same size as the Army FS type inter-island transports - and had a decent radius.

I had quickly passed over YF for Da Babes as even the self-propelled ones were primarily harbor craft. They are accounted for in the loading/unloading capability of ports and of naval support. However, a reading of a bit of history indicated that one self propelled YF was used for regular supply runs from San Diego to San Clemente (circa 80 miles). Some more research turned up other YFs that made long ocean voyages and were used as inter-island cargo ships in the Central and South Pacific. One report indicated a convoy including a YF (and some other Y-types) made a trip of over 7000 miles without refueling at a port enroute. Average speed of around 5 knots. May have been some underway refueling, the log does not say (it was actually the port records for the New Hebrides port where the convoy arrived).

So I've decided to add the YF to my own scenario. Not sure how many were built - little data on them and some contradiction in what is available. The majority of the yard lighters were unpowered. 110 foot rectangular barges, some covered, some not. Some had refrigeration for food. These are too small even for me. At least a dozen (probably more) were the 133 foot self propelled units, capable of small scale supply runs to the Channel Islands, smaller Hawaiian islands, and the Noumea/New Hebrides area up to the Solomons. Here their small size is a virtue, requiring minimal port facilites and quick to load/unload.




kirk23 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 6:31:43 PM)

Very interesting little craft,I have to admit I knew nothing about them,just proves you learn something new everyday cheers.[:)]




kirk23 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 6:34:37 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Buck Beach


quote:

ORIGINAL: kirk23

Navy Yard Lighter Side.Is this the kind of thing you were after?

[image]local://upfiles/36378/6F2700E433344788A70D9C2752135101.jpg[/image]



Good job and thanks. Even though Sula is working on another version, my feelings are that you can't have too many ships in your ART folder. There are many, many configurations of various small ships so the more the merrier.

Buck


Thanks Buck![;)]




Shark7 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 7:20:18 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: kirk23

Very interesting little craft,I have to admit I knew nothing about them,just proves you learn something new everyday cheers.[:)]


You should be glad I asked then. [;)]

Big thanks to SuluSea and Don Bowen for explaining their use. In game terms it seems they would essentially be the same as the Pool Barges the IJN gets, only they sound more dedicated to transferring cargo to ships inside the port while occasionally being used for short supply runs.

The 110' covered barges mentioned would similar to those currently used to move cargo on the Mississippi River, etc. Wouldn't be surprised at all if some of those weren't built during WWII to be honest.

edit: Some day I *might* learn to spell. [:)]




Don Bowen -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 7:41:40 PM)


Here is typical unpowered YF (later redesignated YFN for non-self propelled). These are pure harbor craft, moved by tugs alongside a ship for loading/unloading.

Photo from Nav Source.



[image]local://upfiles/757/EDC1288839F54A8E807DB9EE64FFD75D.jpg[/image]




Shark7 -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 8:24:07 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Don Bowen


Here is typical unpowered YF (later redesignated YFN for non-self propelled). These are pure harbor craft, moved by tugs alongside a ship for loading/unloading.

Photo from Nav Source.



[image]local://upfiles/757/EDC1288839F54A8E807DB9EE64FFD75D.jpg[/image]


It honestly looks like a floating warehouse.




Don Bowen -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 9:51:46 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Shark7

It honestly looks like a floating warehouse.


Yeah, but this is the unpowered ones. Basically barges.

Here's the powered ones...



[image]local://upfiles/757/CC38984F842E432BA7011498DB85588D.jpg[/image]




SuluSea -> RE: Artwork Request (9/30/2012 11:24:11 PM)

That was one of the main pictures I was working off of Don. Very nice shot.

I made a few changes since this morning and have what I believe is a completed version which I'll attach to this post.

Thanks and enjoy guys!! [:)] [:)]

[image]http://i47.tinypic.com/mm3n03.jpg[/image]




Don Bowen -> RE: Artwork Request (10/1/2012 12:13:55 AM)


Thanks once again. Airport beckons in the AM, will add this to my scenario when I get back.




Buck Beach -> RE: Artwork Request (10/1/2012 10:53:14 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: SuluSea

That was one of the main pictures I was working off of Don. Very nice shot.

I made a few changes since this morning and have what I believe is a completed version which I'll attach to this post.

Thanks and enjoy guys!! [:)] [:)]

[image]http://i47.tinypic.com/mm3n03.jpg[/image]


Very good as always Sulu.

Buck




oldman45 -> RE: Artwork Request (10/1/2012 11:43:34 AM)

Thanks for the artwork Kirk and Sulu.

Short of a code change, I wonder if these ships can get the same kind of bonus that landing craft get when they are used to unload TF's at small ports?




MateDow -> RE: Artwork Request (10/12/2012 1:28:07 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: oldman45

Thanks for the artwork Kirk and Sulu.

Short of a code change, I wonder if these ships can get the same kind of bonus that landing craft get when they are used to unload TF's at small ports?


It would be interesting that if you got a code change whether you could have them give a naval support bonus, since that seems to be their biggest effect.




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