Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (Full Version)

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Dili -> Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/24/2009 6:20:30 PM)

New article at Hyperwar:http://funsite.unc.edu/hyperwar/USN/Wallin/index.html

by
Vice Admiral Homer N. Wallin
USN (Retired)

with a Foreword by
Rear Admiral Ernest McNeill Eller, USN (Retired)
Director of Naval History

Naval History Division
Washington: 1968

Foreword v
Preface vii
Index 365
Chapter I INTRODUCTION 1-8
Chapter II THE TRENDS TOWARD WAR 9-24
1. Basic Causes of War 9
2. Germany's Insatiable Appetite for Aggression 9
3. The Aggressions of Italy 12
4. The Brutal Aggressiveness of Japan 14
Chapter III PROBLEMS AND DILEMMAS OF THE UNITED STATES AND EVENTUAL PREPAREDNESS FOR WAR 25-40
1. American Attitudes and Policies 25
2. Retrenchment in Military Preparedness 26
3. Diplomacy at Work to Prevent War and to Improve Preparedness for War 28
4. Hardening of Public Opinion 31
5. Assistance to Friendly Nations 33
6. Military Preparedness Measures 35
Chapter IV THE FLEET AT PEARL HARBOR 41-58
1. Why Was the Fleet There? 41
2. Army-Navy Defense of Pearl Harbor 43
3. Reconnaissance 44
4. Radar 48
5. Operation of the Fleet 50
6. How Powerful Was the Fleet? 51
7. Where Were the Fleet Ships on 7 December? 54
Chapter V IMMINENCE OF WAR 59-82
1. Breakdown of Diplomacy 59
2. Japan's Knowledge of Pearl Harbor 60
3. America's Knowledge of Japan's Intentions 65
4. Warning to the Fleet 74
5. What Information Did Hawaii Not Receive? 79
Chapter VI JAPANESE ATTACK, STRATEGY, AND TACTICS 83-98
1. Preparedness, War Games, and Drills 83
2. Assembling of Attack Force 85
3. Route of the Pearl Harbor Attack Force 85
4. The Attack Force 88
5. The Attack 88
6. Direction of Attack 94
7. Submarines 94
8. Japanese Losses 94
9. Japanese Estimates of Damage to the Americans 96
Chapter VII RESULTS OF JAPANESE SURPRISE AIR RAID 99-112
1. Sunday Was a Day of Rest in Hawaii in Peacetime 99
2. Submarines 100
3. We Are at War 100
4. All Air Bases Immobilized 101
5. Ships Attacked by Torpedo Planes 102
6. Inboard Ships Hit by High-level Bombers 104
7. Losses in Honolulu 105
8. Officers and Men Aboard Ship and Fit for Duty 105
9. Anti-aircraft Batteries Which Opposed the Japanese Planes 106 106
10. Deeds of Heroism 108
11. Total Dead and Wounded in the Services 108
12. Sabotage 108
13. State of Mind of Military Personnel 109
Chapter VIII WASHINGTON'S RESPONSE TO THE JAPANESE ATTACK 113-124
1. Military and Civilians Taken by Surprise 113
2. Declaration of War 114
3. Secretary of the Navy Visits Pearl Harbor 114
4. The Roberts Commission 115
5. President Roosevelt's Fireside Chat 116
6. Admiral Kimmel and General Short Relieved 117
7. Admiral C. W. Nimitz Takes Command 118
8. Admiral Ernest J. King Becomes Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Fleet 118
9. Admiral Nimitz's Policy of a "Limited Offensive" 120
10. Halsey's Early Raids 121
Chapter IX OBSERVATIONS AND STATEMENTS MADE BY SURVIVORS 125-160
1. Condition of Ships at 0755 125
2. Impressions and Actions on USS West Virginia 126
3. Impressions and Actions on USS Oklahoma 132
4. Impressions and Actions on USS Arizona 136
5. Impressions and Actions on USS California 140
6. Impressions and Actions on USS Utah 146
7. The Performance of USS Nevada 150
8. Impressions and Actions on USS Maryland 152
9. Impressions and Actions on USS Tennessee 156
Chapter X OTHER SHIPS' OFFICIAL REPORTS 161-174
1. Destroyers 161
2. Battleships 165
3. Cruisers 165
4. Miscellaneous Auxiliary Ships 168
5. Submarines 169
6. Oglala 170
Chapter XI "ALL HANDS" ENGAGED IN SALVAGE WORK 175-188
1. Priority of Work 175
2. Helping Each Other and Repelling Enemy Attacks 176
3. Freeing the Trapped Men 176
4. Salvage Operations from Argonne 178
5. Start of Salvage Organization 179
6. Recovery of Ordnance Material 186
7. Medical Help for Wounded or Burned 186
Chapter XII GETTING THE LESS DAMAGED SHIPS READY FOR ACTION 189-202
1. USS Pennsylvania, Battleship (Launched in 1915) 189
2. USS Honolulu, Cruiser (Launched in 1936) 191
3. USS Helena, Cruiser (Launched in 1939) 192
4. USS Maryland, Battleship (Launched in 1920) 192
5. USS Tennessee, Battleship (Launched in 1919) 193
6. USS Vestal, Repair Ship (Launched in 1908) 194
7. USS Raleigh, Cruiser (Launched in 1922) 195
8. USS Curtiss, Seaplane Tender (Launched in 1940) 197
9. USS Helm, Destroyer (Launched in 1937) 198
Chapter XIII SHIPS SUNK AT PEARL HARBOR 203-272
1. USS Shaw, Destroyer (Launched in 1935) 203
2. Floating Drydock Number Two 205
3. The Tug Sotoyomo 206
4. USS Cassin (Launched in 1935) and Downes (Launched In 1936) 206
5. USS Nevada Battleship (Launched in 1914) 211
6. USS California, Battleship (Launched in 1919) 222
7. USS West Virginia Battleship (Launched in 1921) 233
8. USS Oglala (Launched in 1907) 243
9. USS Plunger (Launched in 1936) 252
10. USS Oklahoma, Battleship (Launched in 1914) 253
11. USS Utah, Former Battleship (Launched in 1909) 262
12. USS Arizona, Battleship (Launched in 1913) 267
Chapter XIV CONDITIONS WHICH PREVAILED OR WERE ENCOUNTERED IN SALVAGE WORK 273-286
1. Lack of Material 273
2. Fire Hazards on the Ships Themselves 273
3. Salvage of Ordnance Material 274
4. Electrical Equipment 275
5. Japanese Torpedoes and Bombs 276
6. Diving Experience 277
7. Deadly Gas Encountered on Most Ships 277
8. Gasoline Explosions 279
9. Electric-Drive Battleships 280
10. Classified Correspondence and Personal Property 280
11. Removal of Human Bodies 280
12. Cleaning of Compartments 281
13. Work Performed by the Navy Yard 281
14. Use of Sunken or Damaged Ships in the War Effort 282
15. Spirit of the Salvage Crew 283
Chapter XV FINAL APPRAISAL OF PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 287-296
1. Japan's Mistake in Attacking Pearl Harbor 287
2. Other Mistakes Made by the Japanese 291
3. United States' Aversion to War 292
Appendices 297-363
A. Survivors' Statements and Actions 297
B. Restoration of Unwatered Compartments and Machinery of Sunken Ships 328
C. Gas Hazard and Protection Against Gas 337
D. Electric-Drive Machinery of Battleships 339
E. The Salvage of USS West Virginia 342
F. The Plan for the Salvage of USS Oklahoma 356
G. Ships Present at Pearl Harbor and Vicinity, 7 December 1941




Local Yokel -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/24/2009 7:51:41 PM)

Thanks, Dili, glad to see that this has been put online.




foliveti -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/24/2009 8:15:41 PM)

There was a series of articles that ran in the New York Times a few years ago on the Pearl Harbor salvage.  They were originally written during the war, but the newspaper was unable to publish them at the time, because of operational censorship.  I was going to post a link, but it looks like they charge for the articles from the archives.




JeffK -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/24/2009 9:22:48 PM)

Been posted on the Senarios/Research sites for a fortnight [8D]




Dili -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/24/2009 10:36:58 PM)

[&o]. Lets call it a way to promote your link [:)].




JeffK -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/25/2009 10:38:00 AM)

So how much money do I get?????




Dili -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/25/2009 4:10:24 PM)

Well i am promoting you, should i not be the one getting the money? [:'(]




JeffK -> RE: Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal (3/26/2009 1:31:55 AM)

Ok, How about we split the profit 60/40?




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